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1930s

Lela Kirkbride Murphy '34, of Bridgewater, Mass.; June 6. She was a retired high school teacher.

Wilbur H. Frazel '35, of East Providence; May 9, after a short illness. He was an engineer with Builders Iron Foundry for several years. In retirement he ran his own consulting firm. A member of the Providence Engineering Society, he held several patents. He enjoyed computers, working with cars, and watching sports on television. He is survived by three sons, three grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

Catherine O'Meara Moriarty '35, of Osterville, Mass.; May 21. She is survived by her husband, William.

Edward N. White '35, of Highland Park, N.J.; Mar. 22. He worked for 35 years at the Home Insurance Co. in New York City, rising to the position of manager of the Marine Insurance Dept. He was a founding member and president of the Crestwood Village 6 Bocce Club. He enjoyed playing pool and the piano. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and three grandchildren.

Samuel Bojar '36, of Dedham, Mass.; Apr. 21. He was a psychiatrist and teacher. He cofounded the Harvard Medical Area Health Service, where he was a psychiatrist to students, faculty, and employees of the Harvard medical, dental, public health, and medical science graduate schools for 26 years. He was an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard Divinity School, for which he designed and taught a field education course. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps as a captain and chief neuropsychiatrist at Fort McPherson in Atlanta. He was a member of the board of directors and vice president of the New England Home for Little Wanderers for 15 years. He was a past president of the Massachusetts Society for Research in Psychiatry, a 50-year member of the Massachusetts Medical Society and Norfolk District Medical Society, a distinguished life fellow of the American Psychiatric Assoc. and the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society, and a life member of the American Psychoanalytic Assoc., the Boston Psychoanalytic Society, and the International Psychoanalytic Assoc. He was an active member of Congregation Mishkan Tefila for more than 50 years. Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. He is survived by his wife, Leah; a daughter; a son, Robert '73, '76 MD; and five grandchildren.

Edwin O. Florence '38, of Charleston, Ohio; Jan. 8, of heart failure. He is survived by a son, Edwin Jr. '61.

Joseph J. Lambiase '39, of East Greenwich, R.I.; June 15. He was a retired chief of radiology at Rhode Island Hospital and founder of Ray Medical Services, now known as Rhode Island Medical Imaging. He was also a clinical instructor of radiology student residents at Brown. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army and received the Purple Heart, a Combat Infantryman's Medal, and a Silver Star. He was a member of the American College of Radiology and the Metacomet Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Augusta; a daughter, Lisa Lambiase '71, 3540 Sleepy Hollow Dr., Santa Rosa, Calif. 95404; two sons, Joseph Jr. '69 and Robert '73; and six grandchildren, including Jill Lambiase '10.

 

1940s

Grace Lillien Blumberg '40, of Pikesville, Md.; Apr. 20. She is survived by a daughter, a son, four grandchildren, a great-granddaughter, and a brother.

Arthur W. Byam '40, of South Chelmsford, Mass.; June 3. He worked for Aetna Life & Casualty in Hartford, Conn., for 35 years, retiring as a tax administrator. During World War II he trained as a naval aviator and later served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, where he earned a commission as a first lieutenant. He received the Air Medal and numerous campaign ribbons for service. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, and baseball. He is survived by a daughter, a son, two granddaughters, a niece, and a sister.

Kenneth A. Heinold '40, of Hickory, N.C.; May 17, from a stroke. He was a retired sales manager for Federal Products Corp. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by two daughters, two grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

Robert X. Betancourt '41, of Hemet, Calif.; Feb. 3. He worked as an organic and polymeric chemical engineer for more than 50 years. He retired in 1990. He was a member of the American Chemical Society, Kiwanis, and the Knights of Columbus. He enjoyed classical music and opera. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; two sons; a granddaughter; and a sister.

Roberta Kegan Brown '41, of Dearborn, Mich., formerly of Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; June 11, of a stroke. She was a homemaker. She enjoyed traveling, playing bridge and golf, and spending time with her children and grandchildren. She is survived by a daughter, a son, and three grandchildren.

Aurea Cancel Schoonmaker '41, of Hamden, Conn.; May 12. She was an emeritus professor at Quinnipiac Univ., where she taught modern languages from 1946 to 1989. She was a member of the New Haven chapter of the American Assoc. of Univ. Women, the Yale Univ. Women's Organization, Yale Hospital Auxiliary, and the board of trustees of Cheshire Academy. She is survived by a brother and several nieces and nephews.

Helena Smith Dunn '42, of Gladstone, N.J., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Mar. 2. She is survived by three children, four grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a sister, Virginia Smith O'Donnell '45.

Marion Lippitt Murdock Kelley '42, of Tucson, Ariz.; Dec. 3, 2010. She was a retired research analyst for the State Department Office of Strategic Services. She was actively involved in community affairs and served six years as president of the League of Women Voters; she was also a member of the Tucson community council, the Tucson Regional Plan Inc., the Charter Revision committee, and the executive committee of Arizona Academy. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by four sisters and several nieces and nephews, including Steven Read '79.

Rae Derber Webber '42, of Woodbridge, Conn.; Apr. 18. She was an elementary school teacher for a short time before establishing a long career as an equal opportunity specialist in the U.S. Labor Department's Office of Contract Compliance. She volunteered for and served on numerous civic committees, including the League of Women Voters, the Anti-Defamation League, Friends of the New Haven Public Library, Community Action Agency, Planned Parenthood, the New Haven Commission for People with Disabilities, Congregation Mishkan Israel, the Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation, and the Interfaith Religious Coalition. For several years she coauthored a regular op-ed column for the New Haven Register. Phi Beta Kappa. She was the recipient of the YWCA Women in Leadership award. She is survived by her husband, Malcolm; a daughter; two sons, including Henry '79; daughter-in-law, Christine Jacobs '85; five grandchildren, including Robert Webber '12; and a sister.

Jean Coplen Crawford '43, of Dallas, formerly of Hutchinson, Kans.; May 12. She was a homemaker. She was an avid reader and enjoyed painting, needlework, gardening, and traveling. She was a member of Grace Episcopal Church. She is survived by two daughters, five grandchildren, a sister, and five nieces and nephews.

Doris Loebenberg Brown '44, of Atlanta, formerly of White Plains and Utica, N.Y.; May 31, of cancer. She was a public school psychologist in White Plains for more than 30 years. In retirement she volunteered in the gift shop of White Plains Hospital. She was a founding member, sisterhood president, and teacher at Temple Emanuel in Utica. She enjoyed traveling, doing the New York Times crossword puzzle, and playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters and four grandchildren.

Sara Hahn Holcomb '44, of Avon, Conn.; Nov. 26. She was a homemaker and a volunteer with the United Way and the League of Women Voters. She is survived by a daughter, Janet Solomon '69.

Gottfried O. Lang '44, of Abiquiu, N. Mex.; June 9. He was a professor emeritus of anthropology at the Univ. of Colorado, Boulder. Previously he taught anthropology at the Univ. of Chicago and Catholic Univ. in Washington, D.C. He spent time on Native American reservations in the United States, and with the Sukuma of central Tanzania and the Asmat people of coastal New Guinea. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He was an active participant of the Monastery of Christ in the Desert, where he spent the last few years as an oblate monk. He was a member of the American Anthropological Assoc. and the American Ethnological Assoc. He is survived by seven children, several grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.

Donald F. Blair '45, of Valdosta, Ga.; June 13. He was a retired physician. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Navy, after which he opened a private practice in Auburn, N.Y., before returning to active duty in 1959. He retired in 1983 as a captain in the U.S. Naval Medical Corps. During his career, he was chief of the outpatient department at Jacksonville Naval Hospital and served as a medical advisor on behalf of the U.S. Naval Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea's navy. At the time of his retirement, he was chief of the office for physical evaluations for the Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, in Arlington, Va.. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc., the Cayuga County Medical Society, and Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; five children; nine grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

John F. Casademont '45, of Beverly, Mass.; Jan. 3. He is survived by daughter Joan Casademont '79.

Edward W. Holmes '45, of Washington, D.C.; Dec. 18. He was a retired foreign service officer. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; two sons; and four grandchildren.

William S. Mullen '45, of Novi, Mich.; May 8, of a stroke. He owned and operated Mullen Pump & Supply until he sold the company and retired in 1986. He was a member of the National Early American Glass Club, the Horton Bay Club, Birmingham Tennis Club, and the Detroit Institute of Arts. He enjoyed collecting antique American glass, fishing, traveling, and playing tennis and the piano. He is survived by his wife, Bobbie; two daughters, including Pam McEnroe '74; three grandchildren; and a nephew.

Jean Campbell '46, of New Bedford, Mass.; Apr. 12. She was a retired executive director of the New Bedford YWCA. She was active in several civic organizations, including serving as the first female president of the executive committee of the Interchurch Council of Greater New Bedford. She was a member of Delta Kappa Gamma Society for Women Educators, the New Bedford Council Region VII Health Planning Society, the New Bedford Legal Aid Society, and the Assoc. of Girl Scout Professional Workers, and a trustee of St. Luke's Hospital and Millicent Library of Fairhaven.

Judith Korey Charles '46, of New York City; Apr. 29. She was a copy editor with Sears Roebuck's national retail fashion advertising office in New York City and an executive director of the Roundtable for Women in Food Service, before founding Charles and Associates, a New York City-based public relations firm. In 1991 she was the recipient of a Brown Bear Award. She was a past president of the North West Central Park Multiblock Assoc. and a member of the board of directors of the Veritas Therapeutic Community Foundation. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Nathaniel Davis '46, of Claremont, Calif.; May 16. He joined the Foreign Service in 1947, was a Soviet desk officer for the State Department in 1957, and was a special assistant to the director of the Peace Corps before serving as the American ambassador to Chile, Bulgaria, Guatemala, and Switzerland. He taught political science at Harvey Mudd College, in Claremont, Calif., retiring in 2002. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He wrote A Long Walk to Church: A Contemporary History of Russian Orthodoxy. He was an accomplished skier and mountain climber and enjoyed white water canoeing. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters, including Margaret Mainardi '80; two sons, Thomas '91 and James '85,'04 PhD; son-in-law, Edward Mainardi '80; eight grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and two sisters.

Luther B. Francis '46, of Gorham, Me.; June 15, of congestive heart failure. He held a variety of positions in local insurance firms before becoming partner of the Bradish-Young Insurance Agency in Portland. He retired in 1982. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He was active in several charities and served as president of Kiwanis and Portland's United Way. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a son, Bruce '83; and two grandchildren.

Eugene M. Grummer '47, of New Smyrna Beach, Fla., formerly of Washington Township, N.J.; May 9, from renal failure. He was a retired partner and senior vice president and partner of Merrill Lynch in New York City. He was also cofounder of INTEX, a pioneer in electronic trading platforms. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He was a member of the Angler Yacht Club, the Smyrna Yacht Club, and St. Peter the Fisherman Episcopal Church. He is survived by his wife, Priscilla; two daughters; a son; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Robert C. Hayes '47, of Griffin, Ga.; Nov. 26. He was a past president of HN Power Services Inc. in Atlanta. He was a member of the Brown baseball team. He is survived by his wife, Rosemarie.

John S. Frey '48, of Stanfordville, N.Y.; Apr. 11, from complications of Parkinson's disease. He began his legal career at Swan & Frawley in Elmira, N.Y., before becoming legal counsel at IBM in Armonk, N.Y. He retired in 1989 as assistant general counsel. He enjoyed classical music, sailing, and football. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two daughters; three sons; eight grandchildren; two sisters; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews.

Howard Greis '48, of Holden, Mass.; Apr. 21, from heart failure. He was a businessman, entrepreneur, and inventor. He started several companies, including HAG & Assoc. in 1953, Control Molding Corp in 1955, and in 1962 Kinefac Corp., a Worcester-based metal-forming company that received an Exporter of the Year award from the New England Small Business Assoc. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, stationed at the Naval Ordnance Lab in Washington, D.C., developing rocket fuses. An authority on roll forming metals, he held several patents and wrote numerous technical articles on mechanical engineering. At Brown he was a three-sport athlete and a member of Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Xi. As an advocate for the machine tool industry, he was founder and chairman of the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences in Ann Arbor, Mich., and chairman of the Industry Advisory Committee to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Machine Tool Builders Partnership program. He served on the government relations committee of the Assoc. for Manufacturing Technology. Locally he served as director and vice chairman of the Associated Industries of Mass. and on the advisory board of the mechanical engineering department of Worcester's Polytechnic Institute. He received many industry awards and honors, including the Brown Engineering Alumni Medal. He was instrumental in building Mountview Junior High School in Holden, Mass. From 1976 to 1981 he served on the Mass. State Board of Education. He also wrote a regular column called "The Business of Education" for Industry Magazine and promoted partnerships between schools and companies as a director of the Central Mass. Employer Association. He was a member of Epworth United Methodist Church in Worcester. He is survived by four children, including Noel '72 and Frederick '76, and seven grandchildren.

Roy W. Hoffmann '48, of Gloversville, N.Y.; May 12. He worked with AT&T Long Lines Division in New York City from which he retired as a district engineer in 1982. He was a member of the Concordia Singing Society, the Edelweiss Club, the Fulton County Republican Club, the Telephone Pioneers of America, and the Church of the Holy Spirit, Gloversville. He is survived by a son and by his companion, Karen Smith.

Jean Amadon Stearns Hall '49, of Westborough and Sudbury, Mass.; Mar. 20. She was a retired head preschool teacher at Sunny Hill Preschool in Sudbury. She is survived by her husband, Walter; two daughters; a son; three stepchildren; 11 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Caroline Molineux Bartholomew '49, of Newtown Square, Pa.; Oct. 5, 2010. She is survived by three children and six grandchildren.

Raymond W. Houghton '49, '57 AM, of Lincoln, R.I., formerly of Dublin, Ireland; Apr. 30. Professor emeritus of R.I. College and Trinity College, Dublin. During the 1950s, he taught in the Pawtucket and Warwick, R.I., school systems, and in 1961 he joined the RIC faculty, where he taught until 1984 and was awarded a Doctor of Humanities in 2006. He developed RIC's MAT program and founded its Urban Educational Center of R.I. From 1985 to 1999 he was a lecturer at Trinity College, which awarded him an honorary degree in 2001. He founded and directed the Free University of Ireland. From 1963 to 1977 he produced the weekly R.I. television program Your Child In School. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He wrote several books on education and philosophy, including many on Bishop George Berkeley, and founded the International Berkeley Society, serving as president for 10 years. In 1966 he ran for R.I. representative to the U.S. Congress, and in the 1970s he founded the local environmental group RILED (Righteous Indignation over Lincoln's Environmental Decline). In the early 1980s he donated much of his land to the Nature Conservancy to form the Lime Rock Preserve. He was a member of AFSCME Council 94, the Blackstone Valley Historical Society, the American Assoc. of University Professors, the R.I. Education Assoc., the Commission on Higher Education, Phi Delta Kappa, and Lime Rock Baptist Church, where he was a deacon and taught adult Sunday school. He played drums with the New Jazz Three and other local bands. He was a catcher for the Fairlawn Mules and a fan of the Boston Red Sox. He enjoyed playing golf, especially in Ireland and Scotland. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two daughters; two sons; seven grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

Warren N. Martin '49, of Waterford, Conn., formerly of Hollywood, Fla.; Apr. 24. He was a retired claims officer with Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. In retirement he worked as a bankruptcy trustee and a guardian ad litem. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed golf tournaments and watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by two sons, seven grandchildren, three sisters, and two brothers.

Harold Steingold '49, of Santa Monica, Calif.; Jan. 1. He was a retired electrical engineer. He was employed at Hughes Aircraft from 1959 to 1963, and then at RAND Corp. until his retirement. He was instrumental in the development of the Visualtek closed-TV monitor for the partially sighted. He was a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed hiking and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Clara; a daughter; two sons; eight grandchildren; and a sister.

Royal C. Taft Jr. '49, of Jamestown, R.I.; May 28. He was a textile engineer at Andrews and Goodrich of Boston before becoming vice president of engineering at Barnstead Corp. and later chief engineer at Goodrich Engineering, from which he retired. During World War II he served in the U.S Army Air Corps. He enjoyed sailing, playing golf, and woodworking. He was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four children; and 12 grandchildren.

Elwin G. Wilder '49, of Longwood, Fla., formerly of Westfield, N.J.; May 5. He was employed with New York Life Insurance Co. for 32 years. He retired in 1986. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was past president of Sons of the American Revolution and a member of the Mayflower Society and St. Peter's Episcopal Church. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; and two grandchildren.

 

1950s

Wallace I. Dietz '50, of Afton, Tenn., and Titusville, Fla.; Dec. 11. He was a State Farm Insurance agent, a salesman with Liberty National Life Insurance in Knoxville, and a 22-year tour guide at the Kennedy Space Center. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He was a Shriner and a 50-year Mason. He enjoyed reading history and traveling to historic battlefields. He is survived by his wife, June; two daughters; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Henry J. Hager Jr. '50, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Apr. 23, after a brief illness. For nearly 50 years he helped run his family's custom home and commercial building business. He and the company retired in 1997. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He was town councilman and Aurora supervisor from 1984 to 1991. He spearheaded the building of the Aurora Community Pool and the East Aurora Library. He was also on the board of the East Aurora Boys & Girls Club and a member of the Glenwood Acres Ski Club and the East Aurora Country Club. A former Kiwanis Club president, he received the 2009 George F. Hixson Award. He enjoyed skiing and playing racquetball and golf. He is survived by two sons and a brother.

Charles H. Saxon '50, of Warwick, R.I.; Aug. 15, 2010. He was a retired senior underwriter for Amica Insurance. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy.

Robert A. Smith '50, of Carson City, Nev.; Jan. 8.

Dallas B. Trammell '50, of Cazenovia, N.Y.; Apr. 30. He was employed with the New York Telephone Co. He retired in 1987 as district commercial manager of the Buffalo office. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He enjoyed reading, gardening, sailing, tennis, and genealogy. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a daughter; two sons; eight grandchildren; and two nephews.

Janice Synes Weissman '50, of New York City; Apr. 25. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by two daughters, including Nancy Weissman '80. A gift fund has been established in her memory to acquire library collections (in any format) that support excellence in undergraduate education. When possible, acquired materials will have an emphasis on psychology, Jewish life, or the sport of fencing. Contributions may be made to the Janice Synes Weissman Memorial Gift Fund online at www.gifts.brown.edu or mailed to Brown University, Gift Cashier, Box 1877, Providence, R.I. 02912.

Ormston Aldred '51, of Utica, N.Y., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; May 13. He was a retired executive of the former Gladdings Department Store in Providence. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was a member of the Barrington Yacht Club. He is survived by two daughters, including Bailey A. Rooke '79; four grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

John M. Allard '51, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Jan. 7.

Leon Frank '51, of Chestnut Hill, Mass.; Feb. 8. He is survived by his wife, Florence.

Paul Greenberg '51, of Jamestown, R.I.; May 8. He was a partner of the former Adams Radio in Providence. He served in the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of Temple Shalom and the Johnston Lions Club. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; a daughter; two sons; five grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; four step-great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Marjorie Schneider Litchfield '51, of Richmond, Va., formerly of Danbury, Conn.; May 29. She taught English at Danbury High School for 23 years. She was a member of the United Methodist Church of Danbury for 54 years. She enjoyed bowling, playing golf, cross-country skiing, and traveling. She is survived by two daughters and three grandsons.

Maynard L. Raffety '51, of Grinnell, Iowa; Oct. 24, 2010; of kidney cancer. He was a self-employed farmer until his retirement in 1997. He served in the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of the Lions Club, the National Farmers Organization, the Grinnell-Newburg Education Assoc., and First Baptist Church. He enjoyed traveling and flying his own plane. He is survived by his wife, Eloise; four daughters; and 10 grandchildren.

Richard M. Scott '51, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Ridgewood, N.J.; July 31, 2010. He was a retired executive vice president of Medical Publishing Enterprises. He is survived by his wife, Martine, and son, William '83.

William H. Woodwell '51, of Ligonier, Pa.; June 1. He was a retired vice president of Union National Bank in Pittsburgh. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He volunteered with several organizations and was recognized for his efforts on behalf of the Visiting Nurses Assoc., Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, and Canterbury Place, Pittsburgh. He was a member of the Church of the Redeemer, where he sang in the choir. He enjoyed reading and oil painting. He is survived by his wife, Margot; three sons, Davitt '83, James '88, and William Jr. '85; daughter-in-law, Melinda Pierce '88; and six grandchildren.

Francis H. Beckett Jr. '52, of Brush Prairie, Wash.; Apr. 28. He worked with the Hughes Aircraft Co., retiring in 1991 as top executive in the missile systems group. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; three sons; and a sister.

Jack L. Ringer '52, of Evanston, Ill.; Dec. 12. He was the owner and operator of Victorian Independent Properties Inc. for more than 50 years. He served in the U.S. Army. He was an avid world traveler and collector of maps. He is survived by a son.

Philip R. Detwiler '53, of San Miguel de Allende, Mexico; Mar. 19. He practiced law for more than 40 years as an assistant district attorney and later in private practice. He served in the U.S. Army. In 1987 he acted as president of the Montgomery Bar Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Babette; three children; three grandchildren, and two brothers.

Alfred Geller '53, of Miami, formerly of New York City; Mar. 3. He was the CEO of Geller Media Management Inc. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; and three sons.

Charles F. Moody '53, of Stamford, Conn.; May 24. He began a career with Phelps Dodge in New York City before founding his own company, Risk Management Programs. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Lori; three children; two granddaughters; a brother, Jim Moody '58, '65 ScM; and several nieces and nephews, including James Moody '97.

Edmund D. Mooney '53, of Cincinnati; Mar. 22.

Kung-Yeh Wang '53, of Randallstown, Md., formerly of Beijing, China; Mar. 9, from congestive heart failure. He was a professor of mechanical engineering at Beijing Petroleum Institute until 1982. He returned to the U.S. and became an instructor at the Univ. of Maryland until 1990. He then worked as an engineer with Transviron Inc. until his retirement in 2006. He is survived by his wife, Yi-Fen Zhou Wang; two daughters; and five grandchildren.

Leland D. Breckenridge Jr. '54, of New York City; Apr. 11, after a long illness. He worked in advertising and marketing in New York City. He served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a granddaughter and two sisters.

Joan Anderson Friend '54, of New Orleans; May 24. She was a homemaker. She was a founder of St. George's Episcopal School, a member of the Quarante Club, and a former member of the Brown Alumni Assoc. She enjoyed stitchery. She is survived by her husband, Joseph; two daughters; two sons; and nine grandchildren.

Robert I. Glass '54, of Northampton, Mass.; May 29. He was an entrepreneur and owned and operated several businesses, including Cogen Energy Technology L.P. and Hydro Development Group. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the St. Matthews Lodge A.F. & A.M. in Andover. He enjoyed playing baseball and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; a daughter, Dale St. Lawrence '83; three sons; and four grandchildren, including Samantha St. Lawrence '14.

Richard S. Kaufman '54, of Rhinebeck, N.Y., and San Miguel de Allende, Mexico; Apr. 4. He worked in the family business, Deka Plastics, in Elizabeth, N.J., and pursued other business endeavors until his retirement. He served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by two daughters; two grandchildren; life partner Gail Lowenstein and her two sons; a sister; and former wife Carol Kaufman.

Philip G. Cannon '55, of Westerly, R.I., formerly of Fairfield, Conn.; June 2. He was the founder and publisher of Manufacturers' Mart Publication in Fairfield. He served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed reading, boating, and spending time with his family and dogs. He is survived by his wife, Ilse; two daughters; a son; and eight grandchildren.

Adrian M. Russo '55, of Somerset, Mass., formerly of Chicago; Mar. 14. He worked as a human resources manager at Duchossois Industries Inc. (Ill.) and Chamberland Manufacturing (Mass.) before retiring. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard. He was a member of the Society for Human Resource Management and the Industrial Relations Research Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Deborah.

Ian A. Sinclair '56, of Blue Mounds, Wisc.; Apr. 13. In the course of his life, he worked as a commercial and mortgage loan officer and as a self-taught chef. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He enjoyed fishing, playing tennis, listening to music, baking cakes for his grandchildren, and watching sports. He is survived by three daughters, two sons, ten grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Edwin A. Carter '57, of Bonita Springs, Fla., formerly of Hyannis, Mass.; June 5. He began a career in the insurance business with Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. and later worked as a licensed yacht captain. He served in the U.S. Navy. During the 1970s to the early 1990s he lived on his boat traveling and, for many years, participating in the Figawi Race. He was a member of various race committees in Hyannis, Miami, and Key West. On land, he enjoyed gardening. He is survived by his wife, Dana; four daughters; 11 grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and two sisters.

Walter Helgeland '57, of Charlton, Mass.; Mar. 25, from glioblastoma. He worked as an engineer for Sprague Electric Co., of Nashua, N.H., and the Norton Co., of Newton, Mass. He was general manager of Varian Associates, in Lexington, Mass.; vice president of Ferrofluidics Corp., in Nashua; and vice president of Rigaku USA Inc., in Danvers, Mass. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the American Chemical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Sigma Psi, and Holy Trinity Episcopal Church in Southbridge, Mass. He enjoyed flying electric model airplanes, making golf clubs, and singing in various vocal ensembles, including the Freelance Family Singers and the Salisbury Singers. He is survived by his wife, Joan; three daughters; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Cyrille Bloom Pokras '57, of Lyons, Ill., formerly of Dallas; Dec. 23. She was a retired elementary school teacher. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, and a sister.

Susan Low Sauer '57, of Wyckoff, N.J.; May 5. She pursued a career in early childhood education and was a homemaker before becoming principal operator of her late husband's real estate brokerage, management, and development company in 2007 (see "Without Missing A Beat," Classes, May/June 2010). She volunteered at Barnert Temple in Franklin Lakes, N.J., where she served as temple president, Sisterhood president, and cofounder of the Barnert Temple Preschool. She was also involved in the American Red Cross, Wyckoff Public Schools, Wyckoff Partners in Pride, and the Northern New Jersey chapter of Brown's National Alumni Schools Program (now BASC). She was class president at Brown and later received a Brown Bear Award. She was the recipient of the Rabbi Martin Freedman Humanitarian Award from Barnert Temple. She is survived by a son, Richard H. Sauer '79; three daughters, including Stephanie Sauer Pasternak '87; son-in-law Jonathan Pasternak '85; five grandchildren; a brother, Theodore F. Low '49; a sister; brother-in-law Robert M. Mann '52; 12 nieces and nephews, including Sara B. Low '83 and Emily Low Boenning '85; and a cousin, Arlene Rome '43.

Andrew E. Dzelzitis '58, of Warren, Vt.; Mar. 5, 2010. An artist, he taught painting and drawing at the Horace Mann School in Riverdale, N.Y., and at Hudson (N.Y.) High School. He retired in 1990. His work was featured in several exhibitions and publications. He served in the U.S. Army as a teacher in the language program in Puerto Rico. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a stepdaughter; a stepson; four grandchildren; a brother; and a niece.

Paul T. Wilson Jr. '58, of Shawnee Mission, Kans.; May 16. He was a retired regional sales manager for CNA Insurance. He served in the U.S. Air Force. He enjoyed telling stories, attending sporting events, and gardening. He is survived by six children, seven grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

John V. Russo '59, of Annapolis, Md.; May 12, from Alzheimer's disease. He was a cardiologist in private practice in Washington, D.C, for 24 years, retiring in 1996. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. Before entering private practice, he taught at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins. He also directed the catheterization lab at Washington (D.C.) Hospital Center and the cardiac catherization units at several Baltimore city hospitals. He was a member of the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American College of Cardiology, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians, Phi Beta Kappa, and Alpha Omega Alpha. He enjoyed sailing, skiing, and landscaping. He is survived by his wife, Jean, of 318 Kingsberry Dr., Annapolis 21409; a daughter, Jean E. Russo '88; and a son.

Peter R. Vale '59, of New York City; Apr. 14. He was the owner and CEO of Valmont Inc. He retired in 2010. He was a member of the New York Athletic Club, the Yale Club, and the Westchester Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; two sons; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

1960s

John F. Huntsman '61, of Falmouth, Mass.; May 27, from pneumonia. He taught at the Moses Brown School in Providence, and was a wrestling coach at Brown before becoming an attorney in Newburyport, Mass. He retired in 2000. He served in the U.S. Army. He volunteered at Falmouth Hospital and the Penikese Island School. He enjoyed fishing and sailing. He is survived by his partner, Marianne White, and daughter Elizabeth Huntsman '92.

Edward A. Jones Jr. '61, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Apr. 17.

Maureen McFadden Mainen '63, of Castine, Me.; Apr. 26. She was a school psychologist in Todd County, Minn., before moving to Maine in 1978. She then worked in Winterport and Newburgh schools. She retired in 1995. She enjoyed sculpting. She is survived by her husband, Mike '63; two sons, including Andrew '93; two sisters; a niece; and a nephew.

Paul J. Buchbinder '64, of Washington, D.C.; Nov. 14, from pancreatic cancer. He was a sales representative for Wall Goldfinger, a furniture manufacturer. During the Vietnam War he served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two sons, including Christopher '94; and two grandchildren.

Alan H. Young '64, '68 AM, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Mar. 28. He was a former law partner at Lindenbaum & Young. At Brown he was a three-sport athlete. He was named to the All-Ivy and All-New England first teams for soccer, was selected to the Eastern Intercollegiate League second team for baseball, and was a leading scorer in basketball. In 1963 he was named R.I. Athlete of the Year and R.I. Jewish Athlete of the Year. After graduating, he helped coach Brown's freshman basketball team and baseball squad. He is survived by his wife, Caroline; two daughters; a son; and two grandchildren.

Nancy Robbins DeLorenzo '65, of Richland, Wash.; June 2. She taught high school English at the Norwich (Conn.) Free Academy, and was the continuing education coordinator at the Richland (Wash.) Joint Center for Graduate Study. Having earned her master's in management in real estate and regional planning, she became a real estate broker for Rainier Realty before joining her husband, Bob'64, in founding RANDEL Investment Associates, a rental property business. She was a director and president of both the Columbia Basin Apartment Assoc. and the Washington Apartment Assoc., and was a member of the Benton County planning commission, the Richland Housing and Community Development Advisory Committee, and its Community Development Block Grant subcommittee. She was recognized by the Richland City Council in 2005 for her contributions and received the 1987 WAA Member of the Year award. She enjoyed traveling. She is survived by her husband; two sons; six grandchildren; two sisters, Sally Robbins Bilder '62 and Katherine Robbins Frost '64; and several nieces and nephews, including Mary Bilder '87.

Peter E. Lynch '67, of Old Saybrook, Conn.; June 14. He worked in management positions with the New Haven Railroad, Penn Central Railroad, Conrail, and the Housatonic Railroad. He retired in 2010. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He wrote and published three books pertaining to the New Haven and Penn Central railroads. He was a member of the New York-New Haven Railroad Historical and Technical Assoc. He enjoyed the opera, classical music, history, and politics. He is survived by his wife, Kathi; a daughter; a sister; and a brother.

Marjorie Ainscough Parker '67, of Carbondale, Ill; June 15, from cancer. She was the coordinator of the Good Samaritan Food Pantry in Carbondale. She is survived by her husband, George '67; a daughter; a son; and three grandchildren.

Steven G. Ludemann '68, of Mancos, Colo.; May 16.

 

1970s

John A. Saury '71, of Covesville, Va.; Jan. 24.

Richard H. Sippel '71, of Coraopolis, formerly of McKees Rocks, Pa.; Mar. 4. He was a former layout specialist at McCrory Corp., York, Pa. He is survived by two sons, two sisters, a niece, and two nephews.

Richard D. Jones '73, of Pawtucket, R.I.; June 26, 2010. He is survived by his sister, Ellen Jones Bean '77.

Andrea Ernst Birger '76, of Lexington, Mass.; July 18, 2010, from breast cancer. She is survived by her husband, Chet; four children; her mother; a sister; sister-in-law, Laura Grossfield Birger '90; and brothers-in-law, Jon Birger '90 and Robert Brown '74.

William P. Barbeosch '76, of New York City; May 13, from a heart attack. He practiced law, specializing in trust and estate matters, with Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy before joining GenSpring as managing director and chief fiduciary officer. He was also chairman of Teton Trust Co. He was a member of the Bankers and Lawyers Advisory Committee of the New York Philharmonic, the executive committee of the Trust Management Assoc. of the American Bankers Assoc., and the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners. He is survived by his wife, Marta.

 

1980s

Wendy Schnipper Clayton '85, of Lexington, Mass.; Nov. 29, from ovarian cancer. After serving as a clerk in the New Hampshire Supreme Court and having successful careers at Fidelity Investments and Goodwin Procter LLP, she was general counsel at DDJ Capital Management in Wellesley, Mass., for 14 years. She is survived by her husband, Aaron B. Clayton '85; two daughters; her parents; two brothers; and several in-laws, including sister-in-law Ronna Clayton Benjamin '81.

Lawrence M. Hettleman '87, of Pikesville, Md.; May 12, from Hodgkins lymphoma. He was president of the Southern Galvanizing Co., his family's business. He is survived by his wife, Julie; two children; his parents; and two brothers.

1990s

Gabrielle DiMartino '94, of Alexandria, Va.; June 13. She performed various cultural resource management archaeology digs throughout the United States. She enjoyed history and listening to music. She is survived by her parents, two sisters, and numerous friends.

 

2000s

Anthony L. Halperin '06, of New Rochelle, N.Y.; Apr. 7. He is survived by his parents, a sister, a brother, and numerous friends and family.

Matthew E. Strickland '09, of Huntsville, Ala.; Apr. 5, from complications of asthma. He is survived by his parents and two sisters.

 

G.S.

Earl A. Wilson Jr. '47 PhD, of Morristown, N.J.; Apr. 21, from pneumonia. He was a retired chemistry professor and researcher. While at Brown, he participated in the Manhattan Project. He taught at Lincoln Memorial Univ., Brandeis Univ., Texas College, and Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., where he was chairman of math and physical sciences. He enjoyed reading. He is survived by a daughter, Ann Wilson Boscardin '69; two grandsons, including W. John Boscardin '91; and two great-grandchildren.

Paul M. Gross Jr. '48 PhD, of Tenafly, N.J. Mar. 17. He was a professor emeritus of chemistry at Wake Forest Univ., where he coordinated the interdisciplinary honors program. He previously taught at the Univ. of Virginia and was a teaching fellow at Cambridge Univ.

Cornelia Pratt Van Bommel '53 AM, of Hingham, Mass.; Mar. 1.

Victor R. Formisano '54 ScM, of Cranston, R.I.; Feb. 9. He was a retired dermatologist. He is survived by five children, 12 grandchildren, and a brother.

Raymond W. Houghton '57 AM (see '49).

M. Patricia Di Sarro Boitano '59 MAT, of Narragansett and North Providence, R.I.; Apr. 19. She was a Providence elementary school teacher and later worked as an administrator and writing teacher at Davies Vocational High School in Lincoln, R.I. She published Methodology in Developing Creativity in Children. She was a member of the Sundial Garden Club and held the title of Master Judge Emeritus in the R.I. Federation of Garden Clubs. She is survived by her husband, George; a daughter; three sons; and four grandchildren.

Richard J. McQuillin '59 ScM, of Somerville, Mass.; June 28, 2010.

Judith Meyer Barnet '66 AM, of Westborough, Mass., formerly of Barnstable, Mass.; Apr. 28. She taught for 16 years at Cape Cod Community College before becoming a housing consultant on Cape Cod. She served on the Barnstable Housing Authority. She enjoyed painting. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, four grandchildren, two sisters, and her companion, Gershen Rosenblum.

Robert S. Fell '67 PhD, of Atlanta, formerly of N.Y. and R.I.; Nov. 26. He was the chairman of the accounting department at Clark Atlanta Univ. School of Business. He previously held positions as senior vice president at International Bakerage Inc., Atlanta, and vice president of finance at Hasbro Industries Inc., R.I. He taught accounting at URI. He was a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the N.Y. Society of Public Accountants, the R.I. Society of Certified Public Accountants, and the finance committee of Miriam Hospital, Providence. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Alan H. Young '68 AM (see '64).

John A. Fox '72 AM, '75 PhD, of Klamath Falls, Ore., formerly of Boardman, Ohio; Feb. 21, from complications of diabetes. He was an assistant professor of economics at Youngstown State Univ., Elmira College, Purdue Univ., Clarion Univ., and the Univ. of South Carolina before becoming a self-employed economic consultant. He published several economic articles in academic journals. He enjoyed hiking, camping, skiing, and metal-working. He is survived by two aunts and several cousins.

Judith E. Grossman '75 AM, of New York City; May 21, from cancer. She was a retired teacher. She is survived by a sister.

Douglas Wong '82 PhD, of Northborough, Mass.; Mar. 25. He worked as a software engineer at Oracle Corp. He enjoyed listening to music. He is survived by his wife, Betty Lee; two daughters; his mother; and two siblings.

Thomas R. Harshman '87 AM, '95 PhD, of Providence; Mar. 8. He was an adjunct professor at Rhode Island College. He taught piano and performed occasionally. He is survived by his parents, a sister, and a brother.

Alfred J. Rossi '07 ScM, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 14, after a brief illness. He was an IT manager at CVS Caremark in Woonsocket, R.I. He is survived by his wife, Dawn, and a daughter.

 

Faculty

Robert Accola, of Providence; May 15, from Parkinson's disease. He was an instructor at Harvard before joining the Brown faculty in 1960 as an assistant professor of mathematics. He was named a full professor in 1969 and was vice chairman of the department from 1978 to 1980 and 1989 to 1992. From 1992 to 1994 he chaired the department, retiring in 1996. His research centered on the theory of Riemann surfaces and associated subjects. He published 31 papers in journals and two monographs, Topics in the Theory of Riemann Surfaces and Riemann Surfaces, Theta Functions, and Ablelian Automorphism Groups. Active in political causes, he was an avid reader, especially books on history and politics, and 18th- and 19th-century novels. He enjoyed the outdoors and hiking. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn '67 MAT; two daughters, Kristen Crawford '77 and Katharine Accola '82; a son, Robert '81; and four grandchildren.

Arthur M. Phillips, of Warwick, R.I., formerly of Weirton, W. Va., and Palm City, Fla.; Apr. 24. He was in private practice for 30 years in Weirton, where he established the first coronary care unit at Weirton General Hospital and chaired the department of medicine for 20 years. In addition, he was assistant clinical professor of medicine at the Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, assistant chief of medicine at the Veterans Hospital in Providence, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians. Upon retiring from private practice, he became a clinical professor of medicine at Brown and was awarded the Irving A. Beck Memorial Award in 1998 for dedication to patient care and scholarship in medicine. Many of his articles were published in the West Virginia Medical Journal, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Archives of Internal Medicine, and the Journal of Occupational Medicine. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and was a member of the Church of the Advent, Palm City. He is survived by his wife, Doris; a daughter; two sons; five grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.





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