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1930s

Rosabelle Winer Edelstein ’32, of New York City and Sarasota, Fla.; Dec. 9. She was a retired interior designer who wrote “You and Your Home,” a column for the Westport (Conn.) Town Crier. She was a member of the Brown Club of New York. She is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and two grandchildren.
 
Abraham Horvitz ’32, of Providence; Jan. 27. He worked at Harlem Hospital in New York City until the attack on Pearl Harbor. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II and  working for three years at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, he and his family returned to Providence, where he opened a surgical practice in 1948. He was affiliated with Miriam Hospital for forty-one years and named medical staff president in 1966. After retiring from medical practice, he became a clinical associate professor of surgery at Brown for many years, earning emeritus status. He was a member of Temple Beth-El, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his son, Leslie ’70.
 
Dorothy Markoff Nelson ’35, of Providence; Dec. 13. She was an editor and executive vice president for Paramount Greeting Cards. She was past president of Jewish Family Service and active with many organizations, including Temple Beth-El and the National Council of Jewish Women. She was a supporter of the arts and enjoyed traveling and playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; seven grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; two sisters, Bernice Gourse ’41 and Gloria Winston ’48; brother-in-law Samuel Gourse ’40; and several nieces and nephews, including Jonathan Nelson ’77.
 
Alma Stone Sich ’35, of Cumberland, R.I.; Jan. 30, of Alzheimer’s. She was a retired nurse. She was an instructor at Rhode Island Hospital from 1936 to 1942, served in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps from 1942 to 1945, was assistant executive secretary for the American Nurses Assoc. in New York City from 1948 to 1949, and was an instructor at Bronx Community College from 1972 until her retirement in 1974. She was a communicant of St. John Vianney Church and a member of the Rhode Island Hospital Nurses Alumnae Assoc., Hamilton House in Providence, and Bridgeworks in Cranston, R.I. She is survived by daughter Paula Sich Martinez ’71; a son; a son-in-law; three grandchildren, including Leah Martinez Dursch ’98; four great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
 
William O’Donnell ’38, of Binghamton, N.Y.; Nov. 7, 2012. He was a sales division manager for Liberty Mutual for 39 years, followed by a brief time in real estate. He was one of the founders of the Chenango Forks Civic Assoc. and one of its youth basketball coaches. He served as president of the Board of Education for Chenango Forks Central School for ten years. He enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by four daughters, two sons, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.
 
Cad W. Arrendell ’39, of Black Mountain, N.C.; Jan. 21. He served aboard the USS St. Croix for one year and then as a medical officer at the U.S. Navy disciplinary barracks in Long Beach, Calif. From 1949 to 1951 he practiced general medicine with his father and brother at the Arrendell Clinic in Ponca City, Okla. From 1951 to 1954 he trained as a general surgery resident at the Alston Ochsner Medical Foundation Clinic and Hospital in New Orleans, and then practiced general surgery in Charlotte, N.C., from 1955 until his retirement in 1982. He was a member of the American Board of Surgery, the Black Mountain Croquet Club, St. James Episcopal Church, and the Barbershop Chorus (in Charlotte). He enjoyed reading, painting, and playing bridge. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; four grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; a niece and three nephews.
 

1940s

Russell W. Field ’40, of Barrington, R.I.; Dec. 23. He was employed by American Steel and Wire before joining Brownell & Field, now known as Autocrat. He retired in 1979 as president of Autocrat. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was a member of the American Meteorological Society and Phi Kappa Psi. He is survived by his companion, Anne B. Jencks; three daughters; six grandchildren, including Andrew Bennett ’92; and five great-grandchildren.
 
Muriel Port Stevens ’40, of Providence; Dec. 7. She was manager of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra from 1964 to 1987 and was instrumental in the foundation of the R.I. Philharmonic Orchestra’s Children’s Concerts Committee. She was an executive member of the Providence Community Concert Assoc. and the Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. She was an accomplished pianist and in retirement an active volunteer. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, and a great-grandson.
 
Channing K. Dupouy ’41, of West Yarmouth, Mass., formerly of Waynesboro, Va.; Dec. 6. He worked at General Electric Co. for more than 39 years, mostly in Lynn, Mass., and Waynesboro. After retiring, he volunteered to do transportation, maintenance, and repair work for the elderly and disabled in Waynesboro. He also taught Sunday school and was a Little League umpire. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed playing piano, bridge, and golf; woodworking; and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Helen; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; a great-grandson; and two sisters.
 
Burton N. Sears ’41, of Covington, La., formerly of Austin, Tex., Weston, Mass., and Tunkhannock, Pa.; Dec. 16. He was a former hospital administrator in Texas, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania at Midland (Tex.) Memorial Hospital, Newton-Wellesley (Mass.) Memorial Hospital and Elk County (Pa.) General Hospital. He later worked for 15 years as a director of professional relations at Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania, retiring in 1982. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the Mayflower Society and was involved with the American Heart Assoc. and the Kiwanis Club. He enjoyed gardening, reading, attending cultural events, and traveling. He is survived by two daughters, a son, seven grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, three step-great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.
 
Charlotte Gallup Cox ’42, of Norris, Tenn.; Jan. 8. She taught in the department of romance languages at the Univ. of Tennessee until retiring in 1986. She volunteered with many organizations, including the Red Cross and the Methodist Medical Center.  She served on the board of the Methodist Hospital Foundation and was president of the Norris Women’s Club, secretary of the Norris Women’s Fellowship, and an executive committee member of the Norris Religious Fellowship. She was an avid tennis player and at one point was ranked second in the state in the Senior Division of the U.S.T.A. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.
 
Audrey Mitscher Ferguson ’42, of Clarksburg, Md.;  Jan. 1. She served as a sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps Women’s Reserves until 1945. After marrying she worked as a secretary/treasurer for her husband’s company and was a homemaker and an artist. After she earned an MFA from American Univ., her paintings were displayed in several art shows in Montgomery County, and some appeared on the cover of Consulting Pharmacist magazine. She was a member of local book clubs and enjoyed reading, swimming, hiking, and playing tennis. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by four children, nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
 
Samuel Friedman ’42, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Jan. 19. He was co-owner and treasurer of S. Adelson Co. in Newport. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was a lifelong member of Touro Synagogue and served as its president in the 1960s. He was a member of the Lions Club of Newport and the Masons. He sat on the board of directors of Newport National Bank, Citizens Bank of Rhode Island, and the Bank of New England of Rhode Island. In retirement he volunteered at Newport Hospital and delivered Meals on Wheels in Portsmouth, R.I. He enjoyed traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Phyllis-Ann; two sons; and a sister, Jeanette Dillabough ’37.

Marie Aierstock Brubaker
’43, of Lancaster, Pa.; Jan. 10. She directed the art department at Conestoga Valley High School and was instrumental in starting the county’s Scholastic Art Awards program and Mount Gretna Art Show. She exhibited her own work at the Marion Art Center, Lancaster Galleries, the Lancaster Library, and the Mount Gretna Art Gallery. She was active in Lancaster community affairs. She is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, eight grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.
 
John R. Hess ’43, of Barrington, R.I.; Jan. 13.  He was vice president of sales at George Mann Co. until 1969, when he formed his own industrial chemical distribution company, John R. Hess & Co. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He was a founding leader and past president of the National Assoc. of Chemical Distributors and the Chemical Education Foundation and was honored in 2014 for his 40 years contributing to these groups. While in his 70s he joined the Peace Corps and served three years in the Czech Republic. He was active in the Barrington YMCA, served as chairman of the Barrington zoning board for more than 20 years, and was the first chairman of the Bristol County Water Authority. He was a member of the Rhode Island Country Club and the Royal Dornoch Golf Club. He is survived by a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; 10 grandchildren, including Peter Hess ’99; a great-grandson; and sister Nancy Spencer ’43.
 
David L. Joseph ’43, of Delray Beach, Fla.; Dec. 23. He was the retired owner of J. Joseph Co., a manufacturing and merchandising company of embroideries in New York City. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He enjoyed traveling, taking adult education classes, and doing volunteer work. He is survived by his companion, Rose Whinston; a daughter; two sons; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.
 
Robert H. Dunbar ’44, of Hingham, Mass.; Oct. 22. He was a history teacher at Reading Memorial High School for 31 years. He retired in 1988. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He is survived by four sons, including Philip ’73; nine grandsons; and two granddaughters.
 
George M. Hindmarsh ’44, of Punta Gorda, Fla., formerly of Pittsburgh; Aug. 9. He was a supervisor at Schnabel Inc. in Pittsburgh. He retired in 1984. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the Society of American Foresters, the Freemasons, the National Audubon Society, and the Charlotte Harbor Environmental Center. He enjoyed fishing and golfing. He is survived by five daughters, including Susan H. Penny ’68; 11 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and a brother, Alexander Hindmarsh ’50.
 
Frederic J. Hunt Jr.
’45, of Coatesville, Pa.; Dec. 3. He worked at Providence Washington Insurance in Providence prior to joining the Insurance Company of North America. He retired in 1988 as title secretary and casualty actuary. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy.  He was a fellow of the Casualty Actuarial Society and Phi Beta Kappa. He enjoyed furniture restoration.  He is survived by his wife, Marjorie; two sons; two grandsons; and two sisters, Elizabeth H. Schumann ’40 and Constance H. Del Gizzi ’51.
 
Lewis W. Lees Jr. ’45, of Hendersonville, N.C.; Jan. 3. He held a variety of auditing and accounting positions with Caterpillar Tractor Co. in Peoria, Ill., and Sao Paulo, Brazil. At the time of his retirement he was manager of the department of pricing and scheduling. Moving to Hendersonville, he became a real estate broker of commercial properties with Oates Realty Associates. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was on the board of directors and was president of Henderson County Hospice. He was director of services of the Rotary Club of Hendersonville, president of the board of directors of the Blue Ridge Community College Education Foundation, and a member of the Hendersonville University Club. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen Anderson Lees ’46; a daughter; four sons, including Carlton ’72; and eight grandchildren.
 
Roberta Wheeler Mullin ’45, of Great Barrington, Mass., formerly of Daytona Beach, Fla.; Jan. 4. She worked for the Daytona Beach News Journal until moving back to Great Barrington in 1980 and working as a realtor with Wheeler & Taylor Inc. She was a volunteer with the Great Barrington Historic District Commission and the Great Barrington Historical Society. She is survived by a daughter, a son, three granddaughters, and a sister.
 
A. Peter Quinn ’45, of Redding, Conn.; Jan. 29. He was an attorney with Letts, Quinn & Leach until 1959, when he accepted a position with the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. in Springfield, Mass., where he was general counsel and executive vice president. After his 1988 retirement, he became of counsel at Day, Berry & Howard in Hartford, Conn. In 2004 he moved to Meadow Ridge in Redding, Conn., where he helped establish a croquet court for his retirement community. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He was an experienced sailor and completed numerous Newport-to-Bermuda races. He was a member of the New York Yacht Club; the Longmeadow Country Club; the Colony Club in Springfield; the Dunes Club in Narragansett, R.I.; and the Hillsboro Club in Florida. He is survived by a brother, John Quinn ’57, and a nephew, Michael Quinn ’89.
 
Stratis P. Kostas
’46, of  Fort Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of Swansea, Mass.; Jan. 12. He worked as a technical illustrator for General Dynamics and GTech before retiring. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was an active member of St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church in Fall River, Mass., where he was past president and a member of the choir. He enjoyed painting and was a member of the Fall River Art Association and the Massachusetts Audubon Society. He also enjoyed traveling with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Mary; three grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
 
John A. Hess ’47, of Atlantic Beach, Fla.; Dec. 16. In 1952 he became a naval aviator, in 1954 a patrol plane commander, and in 1956 he earned a degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate Engineering School. He was stationed in various cities around the United States and retired in 1964 with the rank of commander. After a few years with other companies, he started his own firm in underwater research, consulting for the military and helping to develop sonar and underwater acoustic technology. He sold his company in the late 1970s and sailed with his wife. In 1998 after moving to Atlantic Beach, he became president of the Resident Council of Fleet Landing retirement community and was active in the sailing club, computer club, and travel club. He is survived by his wife, Dotty.
 
Paul J. Hess ’47, of Cincinnati; Dec. 13. He was an engineer at General Electric for 37 years and helped to develop and oversee an Engine Aircraft Systems Integration course for 20 years. He was then an adjunct professor at the Univ. of Cincinnati Aerospace Engineering graduate school. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He was the author of a published technical paper on TF39 Engine Development and held one patent. He was inducted into the General Electric Propulsion Hall of Fame and was a recipient of the Brown Engineering Alumni Medal. He is survived by his wife, Betty Anne; eight children; and 20 grandchildren.
 
Robert C. Barnes ’48, of Clearwater, Fla., formerly of Manchester, Conn.; Dec. 18. He was a retired managing executive at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. He was a member of the executive committee of the Manchester (Conn.) Community College Foundation. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces and was the recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was a member of Phi Gamma Delta. He is survived by his wife, Nancy.
 
Stephen E. Janas ’48, of  Roswell, Ga., formerly of Atlanta; Dec. 22.  After serving in the U.S. Navy aboard a ship that escorted President Roosevelt, he worked in the FBI for six years in Seattle and Chicago. He also worked in sales for Thomas A. Edison Inc. in Minneapolis and later with Investors Diversified Services. In 1970, after relocating to Georgia, he worked as an executive director of the Georgia Dental Association until he retired in 1986. He volunteered for many years maintaining the Colorado trail. He was chairman of the Atlanta Chapter of the Society of Former FBI Agents from 1980 to 1981. He enjoyed hiking, canoeing, bird-watching, playing tennis, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Louise; eight children; and several grandchildren.    
 
Patricia Fuqua Nagle ’48, of Atlanta; Dec. 4.  She was involved in Atlanta area politics and was a Georgia delegate for the Democratic national convention for several presidential elections. She was an active volunteer in several community organizations, including the Kiwanis Club of Druid Hills and the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was a member of the Druid Hills Golf Club and the Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church. She is survived by a son, two daughters-in-law, and four grandchildren.
 
Lester Rand ’48, of New York City; Dec. 17, of myasthenia gravis. He worked at Gilbert Public Relations in New York City before founding the Youth Research Institute. He retired in 2003. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed cooking, swimming, attending the theater, writing poetry, and watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, and a sister.
 
Robert E. Sprott ’48, of Napa, Calif.; Jan. 4. He was commissioned in the U.S. Naval Dental Corps and served at Camp Pendleton, Calif. He was in the U.S. Naval Reserve until 1968, retiring as a Lt. Commander with 23 years of service. After his discharge, he opened an orthodontist practice in Napa, retiring in 2010. He was a member of the Napa-Solano Dental Society, serving as president for one term and editing The Oracle, its newsletter, for 41 years. He was president-elect of the California State Society of Orthodontists, a charter member of the North Napa Rotary Club, and a life member of the Elks Lodge. He was active in Republican politics. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; a daughter; three sons; a son-in-law; three daughters-in-law; two stepsons; eight grandchildren; three step-grandchildren; and two great-granddaughters.
 
Florica Cicma Van Epp ’48, of Wilmington, Del.; Nov. 24. She was a homemaker for most of her life and later worked part-time at Lady’s Image in Wilmington and for Avon. She was involved with several Baptist and Presbyterian churches and was a former deacon at the Concord Presbyterian Church in Wilmington. She was the former president of the DuPont Country Club Associate Women’s Golf group and won the Associate Women’s championship twice at the club. She enjoyed golfing, bowling, gardening, cooking, and playing bridge. She is survived by a daughter; two sons, including James Van Epp ’70; three grandchildren; and a brother.
 
Adele Miller Fiderer ’49, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Jan. 12, after a long illness. She taught in Scarsdale elementary schools until her retirement in 1992. She is survived by her husband, Martin; a son; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.
 
Frederick R. Govain ’49, of Somerset, Mass.; Jan. 9. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, he became an executive for the Boy Scouts of America, serving for more than 42 years. He worked at posts in Connecticut and Massachusetts before becoming chief executive of the Annawon Council in southeastern Massachusetts. He was instrumental in the development and expansion of Camp Norse in Plymouth, Mass. In 1969 he was chosen Outstanding Man of the Year by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. After retiring in 1991, he continued volunteering and was awarded the Boy Scouts of America’s prestigious Silver Beaver Award. In 2003 the Annawon Council’s headquarters was named the Chief Govain Scout Service Center in his honor. He served on boards for the United Way, the American Red Cross, the Battleship USS Massachusetts, and the Morton Hospital in Taunton, Mass. He was a member of Rotary International. He enjoyed visiting Bermuda and traveled there 40 times. He is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson.
 
H. Irving Long Jr. ’49, of Lexington, Ky.; June 22, 2014. He worked for IBM for 34 years. He was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church, the National Association of Accountants, the Alden Kindred of America, and Kappa Sigma. He is survived by two daughters, a son, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a brother.    
 
Jeanne M. Maroney ’49, of Sleepy Hollow, N.Y.; Jan. 27. She was a retired associate manager for General Foods. She enjoyed painting and exhibited her work in the Westchester area for many years.
 
Howard J. Miller ’49, of Warsaw, N.Y.; Feb. 5. He served in the U.S. Army and later the U.S. Army Reserves, retiring with the rank of full colonel. He was employed for 26 years as a sales representative for the Puritan Chemical Co. He retired in 1990. He served as the Warsaw Town Justice, the Warsaw Village Justice, and the Supervisor for the Town of Warsaw and was involved in the United Church of Warsaw. He is survived by his wife, Katie; a daughter; two sons; eight grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.
 
Marilyn Lodge Reeve ’49, of Chatham, N.J.; Dec. 7. She taught for many years in the Chatham school district. She was an active volunteer in a number of organizations and at the Independent Thrift Shop in Madison, N.J. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and eight grandchildren.
 

1950s

Blandy Boocock ’50, of Paradise Valley, Ariz.; Jan. 29.  He worked as a journalist in New York City and later owned a GM dealership in Charlottesville, Va.  He then worked at Bankers Insurance in Maryland and later in Arizona for 20 years. He became semi-retired and owned his own insurance agency. He enjoyed the opera and served on the board of directors of the Arizona Opera. He is survived by his wife, Joanne.

William S. Brady ’50, of  South Dartmouth, Mass.; Feb. 5. He was employed by Coater’s Inc. in New Bedford, Mass., for 40 years and retired as president. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a past president of the New Bedford Kiwanis Club and a member of the New Bedford Yacht Club and the Wamsutta Club. He enjoyed boating and flying as a private pilot. He is survived by his wife, Claire; four sons; four daughters-in-law; seven grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.
 
Edward F. Burns ’50, of Newington, Conn.; Oct. 24, 2013. He was a mechanical engineer at Raymond Engineering in Middletown until his retirement in 1989. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He enjoyed reading, taking train trips with his wife, and traveling abroad. He is survived by four daughters, a son, three sons-in-law, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a sister, and two brothers.
 
Frank V. Carollo ’50, of Warwick, R.I., formerly of Seal Beach, Calif.; Jan. 18.  He was employed as a social worker with the U.S. Veterans Administration in Seal Beach for his entire career. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces. He is survived by a sister, a brother, and nieces and nephews.
 
Joan Baer Drury ’50, of Ormond Beach, Fla., formerly of Shelton, Conn.; Jan. 1. She taught English and math at the Northampton School for Girls and was later employed in the metallurgy laboratory at Sikorsky Aircraft in Connecticut. After raising a family, she returned to teaching and taught seventh-grade biology for 20 years. She became a certified genealogist for DAR and eventually its Connecticut state treasurer. After moving to Ormond Beach, she became the regent for the Captain James Ormond Chapter of DAR. She was also a member of the Mayflower Society, the Halifax Genealogical Society of Ormond Beach, the Halifax Yacht Club, and St. Mary’s Episcopal Church. She enjoyed traveling the world, playing family card games, and music. She is survived by her husband, Warren; two daughters; a son; nine grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

Edmund F. Leland ’50, of North Andover, Mass.; Dec. 23. He owned and operated several businesses, including Howe Heating Oil Co., Purity Cleaners, and the All-Season Resort in North Conway, N.H.  During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces. He was an avid collector of antique cars, motorcycles, and clocks. He was past president of the North Shore Old Car Club and hosted car shows at his farm in North Andover. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two stepdaughters; and a grandson.
 
Frances Tower Maroni ’50, of Falls Church, Va., formerly of Cohasset, Mass.; Dec. 5. She worked as an electrician’s aide at the Hingham Shipyard in Hingham, Mass., before joining the U.S. Navy as a WAVE. As a member of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Arlington, Va., she taught in its religious school, was president of its women’s evening alliance, and served for three years as a trustee. She was a volunteer with Meals on Wheels. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, five grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.
 
Vartan Papazian ’50, of Smithfield, R.I.; Jan. 20. He was the chief of otolaryngology at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island from 1963 to 1992 and remained on the active staff until his retirement. He was also on the staff of Rhode Island Hospital in Providence from 1958 to 1980 and remained on its consulting staff from 1980 to 1998. He retired in 1998. He became a member of the American Board of Otolaryngology in 1960 and a fellow of the American Academy of Otolaryngology in 1961. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc., the Rhode Island Otolaryngological Society, the New England Otolaryngological Society, the Rhode Island Medical Society, the Providence Medical Society, and the Pawtucket Medical Society. Additionally he was a member of the Barrington Yacht Club, the University Club, the Rhode Island Country Club, and the Riverbend (Fla.) Golf Club.  He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and also a member of Sigma Xi. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two daughters; a son; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.
 
Edgar W. Swanson Jr. ’50, of Vernon Hills, Ill.; Jan. 10.  He was personnel manager and corporate secretary at L.A. Dreyfus Co. in Edison, N.J., before relocating to Chicago and joining the William Wrigley Jr. Co. as vice president of personnel and assistant to the president. He retired in 1991. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He served on the board of directors of the Santa Catalina Island Co. and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and two grandchildren.
 
Ann Defuria Twombly ’50, of Media, Pa.; Dec. 24. She worked as a legal secretary at Harvard Law School. After moving to Pennsylvania, she joined the Rolling Green Golf Club, the Rose Valley Swim Club, the Rose Tree Garden Club, and many book clubs. She enjoyed attending Philadelphia Orchestra concerts and was an avid skier and golfer. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and a step-grandson.
 
Paul A. Bisnette ’51, of Fort Worth, formerly of Tucson, Ariz.; Jan. 7, of Alzheimer’s. He worked as a sales manager for Norton Abrasives in Tucson until his retirement in 1991. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed playing golf and taking long walks in the foothills of Oro Valley and the Tucson mountains. He is survived by his wife, Betty Ann, and two sons.
 
Harley R. Derleth ’51, of Sanibel, Fla., formerly of Upper Saddle River, N.J.; Dec. 7. He was CEO of Henry Balfour & Co., a Ritter Pfaudler subsidiary in Scotland, and Permutit Co. (N.J.), traveling throughout the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union, the Middle East, and South America. After ending his corporate career, he and a partner created and managed a consulting company, Business Development Services, until his retirement. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. As part of the Sanibel community, he served as a past director of the Island Water Assoc. and was a member of the Sanibel Kiwanis, serving as its treasurer. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, four stepchildren, and seven step-grandchildren.
 
Bradford K. Pease ’51, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 2.  He was an engineer and was certified as an energy manager by the Association of Energy Engineers. He worked  in the management training program at Bethlehem Steel Co. and later in its research department, where he spent most of his 47-year career. He wrote several papers and held numerous patents. He was the recipient of Bethlehem Steel’s Research Recognition Award. He also served as Bethlehem Steel’s representative to the American Flame Research Committee supporting research activities internationally. He was a manager of the Bethlehem Area National Society of Professional Engineers. He served in the U.S. Naval Reserve and was a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. He was a founding moderator and later treasurer of Center City Ministries of Bethlehem. He was a member of Christ Church and served as consistory president, elder, deacon, financial secretary, Sunday school teacher, and chair of the Outreach Committee. He was also president of the Allentown Council of PTAs, an assistant scoutmaster, and a member of the leadership training committee of the Minsi Trails Council of the Boy Scouts. He was president of the Mental Health Society of Lehigh Valley, where he was instrumental in establishing Compeer of the Lehigh Valley. He is survived by his wife, Gwendolyn; two daughters; a son-in-law; a stepson; two grandchildren; and a sister.
 
Beth Becker Pollock
’51, of Boston, formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Dec. 25. She had been a docent at the RISD Museum, executive director of Looking Glass Theatre, a board member of the American Crafts Council and the American Repertory Theatre, and a Brown University trustee. She was honored in 1981 for her deep commitment to Brown Annual Fund activities. She is survived by sons Russell ’76 and Steve ’73; daughter-in-law Laurie Campbell ’76; four grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.
 
Roland J. Tierney ’51, of Somerset, Mass.; Jan. 12.  He worked as an engineer for the U.S. Naval Base in Newport, R.I., for 34 years. He retired in 1981. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was a communicant of Saint Patrick Church in Somerset and enjoyed woodworking, reading, and painting. He is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and three sisters.
 
Jack Nadler ’51, of Montclair, N.J.; Dec. 16. He started his career in research at Bell Labs and later worked for 25 years as a business analyst at AT&T. He then became a stockbroker. He is survived by his wife, Rita; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Vincent R. Keating ’52, of Southport, Conn.; Feb. 1. He worked on Wall Street and spent his professional career with several brokerage firms, including Oppenheimer, where he was head of the institutional sales division. He volunteered transporting patients to and from medical appointments for the American Cancer Society. At Brown he was a member of the varsity golf team. He was a member of the Shinnecock Hills Golf Club on Long Island, the Greenwich Country Club, and the Country Club of Fairfield. He enjoyed skiing, skeet shooting, bowling, and golf. He is survived by his wife, Adele; three sons, including John ’84; three granddaughters; two stepdaughters; and two sisters.
 
Joan Hastings Crosby ’52, of Richmond, Va.; Dec. 9. She was a docent and tour guide for the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. She served twice as president of the museum’s council and created the VMFA Fine Arts and Flowers fund-raising event. She also served as president of the Richmond Symphony Orchestra League and on the advisory board of the Visual Arts Center of Richmond. She is survived by her husband, Ralph; five sons and their spouses; and seven grandchildren.
 
John H. Norberg Jr. ’52, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.; Sept. 7. He worked for the Atlantic Richfield Co. from 1955 to 1986. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his son, John H. Norberg III, of 515 Cameo Highlands, Corona Del Mar 92626.
 
Clarence R. Perry ’52, of Spring Hill, Fla., formerly of Needham and Dover, Mass.; Jan. 7. He was in the design and building business, earning several awards for his designs and new building techniques. He received a teacher certificate and taught business law and advanced bookkeeping. He then joined BayBank in Massachusetts, heading a trust department and acting as the bank’s investment officer. He served as chairman of the Needham Finance Committee and was active in several community organizations. He was a member of the Shriners and was a Master Mason. He enjoyed collecting and working on the restoration of antique automobiles, boating on Lake Winnipesaukee, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild.
 
William M. Reynolds ’52, of Lake Bluff, Ill.; Dec. 31. He worked for more than 25 years in industrial real estate in Chicago. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. An avid fan of jazz, he played banjo for decades with several Chicago-area jazz groups, including the Samuel Dent Memorial Jazz Band of Lake Forest. He also recorded with such bands as the Chicago Hot Six, the Riverboat Rascals of Milwaukee, the Bald Eagles Jazz Band, and the Red Rose Ragtime Band. An amateur radio operator, he was part of several ham radio operator teams. He enjoyed the restoration of vintage MG cars and received many awards at antique car shows for his work. He was a member of the Vintage MG Car Club of Chicago and the Vintage Sports Car Club of Chicago. He is survived by his wife, Joan; five children; 11 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.
 
Edward H. Rodman Jr. ’52, of Centerville, Mass.; Jan. 23, after a long illness. He was a musician and instructor. He played at the Sheraton Biltmore Hotel in Providence and was an instructor at the Huntington School of Music in Boston for a short time before moving to Cape Cod. He was a Cape Cod Conservatory faculty member and a self-employed musician teaching piano, accordion, and organ. He was part of the musical groups known as the Trey Townsmen and the Ted Rodman Trio. For 10 years the groups played nightly at Laurino’s Restaurant in Brewster, Mass. Song in the Key of Time was the title of a locally produced CD on which Ted played. He performed at numerous weddings, restaurants, and clubs, including at the Kennedy compound in Hyannis Port. He is survived by his wife, Karen; a son; a daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; and three nephews.
 
R. Edward Searles ’52, of Worcester, Mass., formerly of Holliston, Mass.; Dec. 19. He was a retired manager for the Travelers Insurance Co. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a sister, and nieces and nephews.

Roy Stern ’52, of Bala Cynwyd, Pa.; Dec. 26. He was a psychiatrist at Temple Univ. Hospital for more than 40 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Lenore; a daughter; a son-in-law; a grandson; and a brother.
 
Davis R. Bates Jr. ’53, of Berlin, Mass., formerly of Sudbury, Mass.; Jan. 2. He worked at Sperry Rand before serving in the U.S. Army. He later joined General Electric as a guidance engineering program manager. In 1963 he joined Raytheon as the federal ballistic missile marketing director. He was well published and held several patents. He was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Phi Delta Theta. He later served as lead partner and consultant of D.R. Bates & Associates, serving clients such as Lockheed, Boeing, and NASA, as well as serving on the board of directors for NAVSYS Corp. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 
Jim Peed ’53, of Hickory, N.C.; Jan. 16. He worked as a furniture designer with Hickory Manufacturing and Drexel Furniture prior to establishing his own furniture design company, Jim Peed Associates, in 1969. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by a daughter, three sons, nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
 
Henry Stern ’53, of Melville, N.Y., formerly of East Rockaway, N.Y.; Aug. 30, 2014. He worked in private and public accounting from 1955 until his death. He joined Stern & Stern Inc. as its comptroller for 25 years and then moved on as a non-equity partner in a variety of public accounting firms on Long Island. He was a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, and Pi Lambda Phi. He was a veteran of the U.S Army. He is survived by his wife, Shari; a daughter, a son; and four grandchildren.

Stuart P. Erwin Jr. ’55, of Solana Beach, Calif.; Nov. 22, after a brief illness. He had a long, successful career in the entertainment industry, where he began as an assistant director on The Ed Sullivan Show in New York City. He ran the advertising division at Ralston Purina in St. Louis and later was a development executive at Universal Studios, MTM Enterprises, and GTG Entertainment. He was instrumental in bringing shows such as Hill Street Blues, Remington Steele, Newhart, and St. Elsewhere to television. He served on many boards, including that of the Brown Alumni Magazine, and was a trustee emeritus of Brown and a trustee and governor of the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. He was also involved with the Brown Sports Foundation, the Boys and Girls Clubs of San Diego, and the YMCA. He was a Brown 25th Reunion Class Marshal, editor-in-chief of Liber Brunensis, and a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He was the recipient of numerous entertainment business awards and a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed the arts, traveling, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Diane; a daughter; two sons, including Tom ’87 and Terry, of 11 Berkley Ln., St. Louis 63124; two stepsons; and six grandchildren.
 
John A. Leva ’55, of  Downington, Pa., formerly of Titusville, Fla.; Jan. 15. He had a successful career in the building materials industry at U.S. Gypsum, Flintkote, and Genstar. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of Phi Delta Theta. He enjoyed traveling the world with his wife. He is survived by two children, two grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.
 
Marilyn Ida Beemus Buzzard ’56, of Richmond, Va., formerly of Minneapolis; Jan. 13. She was one of only a few women to receive a degree in physics at the time of her graduation. She went on to play a critical role in the field of nutrition epidemiology, working with researchers worldwide to develop standardized methodology for dietary collection and assessment. She was director of the Nutrition Coordinating Center at the Univ. of Minnesota for 14 years and contributed to the creation of the Nutrition Data System for Research, used at Cornell, Harvard, NASA, Stanford, Yale, and Johns Hopkins. She was a faculty member of the Virginia Commonwealth Univ. Medical Center from 1996 until her retirement in 2005. She was an active member of Tikvat Israel Congregation and a member of Sigma Xi. She is survived by her husband, Jon; four children; seven grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.
 
Katherine Cashman Hower ’56, of Teaneck, N.J.; Dec. 17. She worked for the Social Security Administration before owning a restaurant in Paramus, N.J. She was a former president of the Whittier School PTA, past president of the Teaneck League of Women Voters, secretary of the Ho-Ho-Kus Women’s Club, and a leader in both the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts of America. She enjoyed traveling as well as sitting on the beaches in Bonnet Shore, R.I. She is survived by a daughter; two sons, including Thomas ’91; and six grandchildren.
 
Frederick T. Seving Jr. ’57, of Blue Bell, Pa.; Jan. 10, of pancreatic cancer. A retired investment adviser, he advised trusts and estates at Wachovia Bank, and previously at First Pennsylvania and Core-States banks, Wachovia’s predecessors. He retired in 2004. He served as accounting and rector’s warden for the Church of St. Martin-in the-Fields and on the boards of Episcopal Community Services, the Wyck Historic House, and the Germantown Relief Society. During the 1970s he was president of the Wissahickon Skating Club. He enjoyed reading, deep-sea fishing, and sports. He is survived by his wife, Carol; two daughters; a son; five grandchildren; and a sister.
 
Pasquale F. Altieri ’58, of Derby, Conn.; Feb. 6. He excelled in both football and track-and-field and, after a tryout with the Boston Patriots, played semipro football with the Ansonia Black Knights. He eventually took over the family business and operated Altieri Press in Bridgeport, Conn., until 1996. He enjoyed coaching Pop Warner Football, playing golf, and cheering for the Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
 
John M. Cummings ’58, of Woods Hole, Mass.; Jan. 7. He served with the U.S. Public Health Service as a physician on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana before moving to Woods Hole in 1972 to begin a career as a pathologist at Cape Cod Hospital. He volunteered with People for Cats in Falmouth and enjoyed fly-fishing, hiking, camping, and gardening. While at Brown, he was captain of the wrestling team. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, and three grandsons.
 
Elizabeth Mushinsky Mitchell ’58, of Wallingford, Conn.; Jan. 30. She was a reporter for Wallingford’s Meriden Record. She later wrote for the Record-Journal, where she profiled conductor Philip T. Ventre, which turned her into a supporter of building a local symphony. She served on the Wallingford Symphony Orchestra’s board of directors from its inception, serving multiple times as president. She helped to establish the children’s concert series, the big band dinners, and a Choate student program of free music instruction. She supported Choate’s chamber orchestra by joining student musicians during summer performance tours in France, Italy, Greece, and Spain. In 1991 she joined the admissions office at Choate, where she worked for 22 years. She also volunteered with the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. She is survived by her husband, Alphonsus; daughter Elizabeth Mitchell ’88; three sons, including Edward ’83 and Christopher ’86; three daughters-in-law; 10 grandchildren, including Adeline Mitchell ’15; and several nieces and nephews.
 
Allan A. Ayre ’59, of Englewood, Fla., formerly of Agawam, Mass.; Dec. 10. After college he played semipro football for the Springfield Acorns. He was then a teacher and football coach at Agawam Junior High School and Bishop Bradley High School in Manchester, New Hampshire. He next became vice president of investments at A.G. Edwards in Springfield, Mass., working there for more than 25 years before starting his own company, Ayre Investments, with his daughter and son. He enjoyed traveling and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Mary; four daughters; a son; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.
 
Frank Finney ’59, of Danville, Calif.; Jan. 5, of pneumonia. He practiced law in northern California for more than 35 years. At Brown he was a member of the football and baseball teams. He coached in the Danville Little League and enjoyed playing golf. He was a member of Crow Canyon Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Pam, and three sons.
 
Robert F. Pyper ’59, of Rumford, R.I.; Dec. 19, of COPD and heart complications. He worked for 37 years in the advertising department of the Providence Journal, retiring as retail advertising administration manager. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves. He was a member of the Rhode Island Advertising Club and the Brown Club of Rhode Island. He enjoyed sports, gardening, and spending time with family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; two sons; four grandchildren; a sister; and brother Gordon Pyper ’48.
 
Gaylord H. Rockwell ’59, of Killingworth, Conn.; Feb. 2, of a heart attack. He was an anesthesiologist at Lawrence and Memorial Hospital in New London, Conn. He retired in 2010. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He served on the board of the Coastal Connecticut Wetlands Commission and was a member of the American Board of Anesthesiology and Sigma Xi. He enjoyed reading, crosswords, genealogy, and fishing. He is survived by three daughters, a son, two granddaughters, and a sister, Rev. Nancy Rockwell ’65, of 16 Coach Rd., Exeter, N.H. 03833.
 

1960s

Martin B. Sloate ’60, of Delray Beach, Fla., formerly of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Dec. 15. He was a stockbroker with Steiner, Rouse & Co. before becoming president of Sloate Weisman & Murray in New York City. He is survived by his wife, Roxene; a daughter, Pamela Sloate ’86; a son; and niece Penny Bauerfeld ’85.
 
Daniel C. Soriano Jr.
’60, of Raritan, N.J.; Dec. 23. He was the editor of the Pennsylvania Law Review from 1962 to 1963. He practiced law briefly on Wall Street with Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft, then moved to Somerville in 1968 to establish the law practice of Mott & Soriano. Throughout his five-decade career he also served as the Raritan Borough municipal court prosecutor from 1968 to 1973 and as attorney for the Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District from 1975 to 2005. He was also lender’s review counsel for many local banks. He was a member of  the Somerset County, New Jersey State, and American Bar Associations. He was also a member of the Raritan Valley Country Club, where he served on the board of governors, was club president, and chaired the legal committee; in 2013 he was named an honorary life member. He was a loyal alumnus and a fan of the Brown football team. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, and gin rummy. He is survived by his companion, Judith Quick; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.
 
John D. Master ’61, of Leesburg, Fla.; Sept. 28. He worked for insurance companies in New England, Georgia, California, New Jersey, and Missouri, focusing on commercial real estate lending. He volunteered in children’s sports, at the local hospital, and as a guardian ad litem. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. At Brown he played on the tennis team, was a goalie for the soccer team, and was president of Phi Delta Theta. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; four children; and five grandchildren.
 
Walter J. McNamara Jr. ’61, of Trent Woods, N.C., formerly of Ridgefield, Conn.; Jan. 28, of cancer. He was a pilot with United Airlines from 1965 to 1998. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He joined the Ridgefield Environmental Action Program (REAP) and was instrumental in the foundation of the Ridgefield recycling center. He retired from REAP after 16 years. He was active in the Airline Pilots Assoc. and helped develop the Family Assistance Fund. He was also involved in the Mamanasco Lake Improvement Fund. He enjoyed flying his 1943 Seabee seaplane, traveling, and building furniture. He is survived by his companion, Lorraine Furia; two daughters; two sons-in-law; four grandsons; two stepdaughters; five step-grandsons; two sisters; and his former wife, Jean DesBarres.
 
Mary Winter LoLordo ’62, of Halifax, Canada; Oct. 3, of liver cancer. She spent 35 years as a docent at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. She enjoyed painting watercolors and participated in several painting groups. She is survived by her husband, Vincent LoLordo ’62; two children; and a brother.
 
Richard H. Hosp ’64, of Westerly, R.I.; Dec. 11. He was an executive vice president in the advertising and retail industries in New York City; Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; and Chicago. He also taught as an adjunct professor at Pace Univ. while earning his MBA. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. After retiring in 1999 to Rhode Island, he was on the Charlestown Town Council, the Charlestown Budget Committee, the Chariho Finance Committee, and the Chariho Charter Revision Committee. He was on the board of directors of South County Habitat for Humanity and the Nope’s Island Conservation Association, and on the board of trustees of Dunn’s Corners Community Presbyterian Church. He is survived by his wife, Martha; two sons; two daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.
 
Randall G. Drain ’65, of New York City; Dec. 27, of Parkinson’s. He was international counsel for more than 30 years at the American International Group in New York City. He was a member of the New York Bar Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Lynda.
 
Albert A. Milanesi ’66, of Boca Raton, Fla., and Mantoloking, N.J.; Dec. 13. He began a solo sports medicine orthopedic practice in Madison, N.J., in the early 1980s. At Brown he was a member of the basketball team. He also served as a deacon at Silver Lake Baptist Church in Belleville, N.J. He was a member of the American Physiological Society, the Massachusetts Medical Society, Sigma XI, and Delta Tau Delta. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.
 
David A. Robinson III ’67, of Meredith, N.H.; Dec. 29. He was the retired president of H.T. Bailey Insurance Group. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. At Brown he was a member of the hockey team and Kappa Sigma. He enjoyed boating, skiing, golfing, and snowmobiling. He is survived by his wife, Claire; a son; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.
 

1970s

Jean Braucher ’72, of Tucson, Ariz.; Nov. 25. She was the Roger C. Henderson Professor of Law at the Univ. of Arizona. She was the coauthor of the two-volume casebook Contracts: Law in Action and wrote several articles and studies. She was a fellow of the American College of Bankruptcy, a member of the American Law Institute, and a scholar in residence at the American Bankruptcy Institute. She was a former editor of the Brown Daily Herald and enjoyed returning to campus. She is survived by her husband, David Wohl; daughter Emma Wohl ’14; a son; and three siblings.
 
Kathryn R. Mullins ’72, of Chicago; Dec. 27, after a long illness. She had a career in advertising, producing commercials for television and crafting witty one-liners for a range of products. She won several Clio awards for her commercials. Recently she was a Chicago-area yoga instructor. She is survived by two sisters, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.
 
Catherine A. Barber ’75, of Biddeford, Me.; Jan. 3, of cancer. She had a longstanding career in the petroleum business working for Atlantic Richfield, Herkimer Petroleum, Shell Oil Co., and Petro Plus Inc. Her most recent employers were L.E. Belcher Inc. and Drake Petroleum. She was also a volunteer with the New England Convenience Store Assoc. from 2003 to 2012, where she served as a board member, vice president, and president. She enjoyed dogs and nature. She adopted and cared for dogs from the Protectors of Animals shelter in Connecticut. She is survived by her husband, Michael; her father; a stepdaughter; a stepson; two sisters; two brothers-in-law; a stepgrandson; and a niece and nephew.
 
Richard B. Fishbane ’75, of Princeton Junction, N.J.; Dec. 19, of cancer. He was a vice president of research at Strategic Data Marketing. He served on the board of the United Way of Greater Mercer County and was president of the Jewish Center in Princeton. He enjoyed traveling, attending the theater in New York City and in London, and cheering for the New York Mets and Jets. He is survived by his wife, Joanne; a daughter; two sons; his father; his stepmother; a sister; and a brother.

1980s

Barbara Jean Pendleton Madden ’81, of Charleston, S.C.; Jan. 12, of sarcoma. She worked and volunteered for nonprofit organizations for more than 30 years. She enjoyed singing, animals, and the Boston Red Sox. She is survived by her husband, Mark; a stepdaughter; her mother; a sister, Jan Pendleton ’76; a brother-in-law, Steve Kahn ’76; two nephews, including Matthew Kahn ’10; and a great-nephew.

Beth M. Deutch ’82, of Rumson, N.J.; Dec. 11, of complications from multiple myeloma, after recovering from breast cancer years earlier. She was a nationally renowned breast imager and the first radiologist in New Jersey certified to read digital mammography and credentialed in stereotactic and ultrasound-guided needle breast biopsy. She was also the first physician in Monmouth County to implement a comprehensive screening ultrasound program for women with dense breasts, as well as the first in Monmouth and Ocean Counties to provide Breast Specific Gamma Imaging. She had been a mammography reviewer for the American College of Radiology and in 2008 was selected as the Top Women’s Imaging Specialist by Medical Imaging Magazine and received the Best Practice of the Year Award from Physicians Practice Magazine. She was director of breast imaging and medical director of the Wilentz Breast Cancer Center at Monmouth Medical Center prior to starting HerSpace Breast Imaging Center. As an assistant attending radiologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, she was instrumental in starting the hospital’s breast MRI program and helped pioneer stereotactic breast biopsy. She was an active member of  the Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, the American Association of Women Radiologists, the Society of Breast Imaging, and Phi Beta Kappa.She is survived by her husband, Larry Rubin; three children, including son Simon Rubin ’16; her father; two sisters; a brother-in-law; and six nieces and nephews.
 
Margaret Randazza ’86, ’90 ScM, of Andover, Mass.; Jan. 22, of cancer. She was a veterinarian who owned and operated Andover Mobile Vet. She enjoyed gardening and photography. She is survived by her partner, Polly; a daughter, Juliette Randazza ’17; her mother; a brother; and a sister-in-law.
 

1990s

Eric Arons ’90, of Titusville, N.J.; Jun. 13, 2013.
 

2000s

Samantha E. Dweck ’14, of San Francisco, formerly of Carlisle, Mass.; Jan. 25, drowned while kayaking. She was a sustainable food education specialist and developed a farm-to-table program for the International Culinary Center in Campbell, Calif., before working with Credibles, a community funding platform for local food businesses in San Francisco. At Brown she was a member of the women’s track-and-field team focused on pole vaulting. She is survived by her parents and a brother.
 

Students

Sara J. Overstreet ’16, of San Jose, Calif.; Oct. 29. She was an international relations and English double concentrator. She was focused on digital technology as a means of social innovation and problem-solving and planned to attend graduate school or work for an independent think tank or nonprofit after graduating. She is survived by her parents and her two sisters.
 

G.S.

Ralph V. Hedberg ’47 ScM, of Kingston, R.I.; Jan. 7. He was a clinical microbiologist at the Albany VA Hospital for 28 years before retiring in 1978. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the American Society of Microbiologists and the Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd. He is survived by a daughter; a son, Hilding Hedberg ’72; and a daughter-in-law.
 
Donald B. Potter ’49 ScM, of Clinton, N.Y.; Jan. 20. He worked for the U.S. Geological Survey in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado before joining the faculty at Hamilton College in 1954. He retired as Stone Professor of Geology in 1988. His interest in planetary geology was marked by the first geologic map of a Mars quadrangle published in the U.S. Geological Survey. He was active in his community and cofounded the Clinton ABC (A Better Chance) program. He was a member of the Clinton School Board and led the Clinton Community Chest. He was a competitive cross-country skier and enjoyed hiking, hunting, reading, writing, and singing in the St. James Church choir. He is survived by three daughters, three sons, three daughters-in-law, nine grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.
 
Harrison M. Dickson ’51 ScM, ’54 PhD, of Lancaster, Pa.; Feb. 1. He practiced surgery for seven years in Chambersburg and left to serve as a deputy chief surgeon for Project Hope in Maceio, Brazil. The USS Hope was a peacetime hospital ship serving developing nations with training and teaching while healing. Project Hope ended in 1974. He also served as a medical officer in the U.S. Coast Guard in Connecticut, Alaska, and New Jersey, retiring as captain. He is survived by four nieces and two nephews.
 
Paul D. Porter ’61 MAT, of  New Limerick, Me.; Jan. 15. He had a 38-year career teaching at Lawrenceville School in New Jersey. He was chairman of the math department for 13 years, dean of studies, and assistant dean of students. He was the recipient of the Master Award for outstanding teaching, and the athletic field was named Porter’s Field to honor his longtime dedication to children and the school. He participated in three sabbaticals, spending time in Europe and Hawaii, and sailing from Alabama to England. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He retired to Maine in 1998 and became involved with the Star Bright Children’s Theatre, Nickerson Lake Preservation, the United Methodist Church, the Aroostook Historical Society, the Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum, the Houlton Rotary Club, and the Houlton Lodge of Elks. He enjoyed woodturning and organized the Northern Maine Woodturners in 2010. He is survived by his wife, Glynn; two sons; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister; and two nieces.
 
Jane J. Anderson ’62 PhD, of Potomac, Md.; Jan. 27. She taught for more than 45 years in the Washington, D.C., community. She was a member of the American Assoc. of University Women. She is survived by her husband, William; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.
 
Charles W. Swain ’66 PhD, of Tallahassee, Fla.; Dec. 25. He taught at Oberlin College before joining the faculty of Florida State Univ. He retired in 1998. He volunteered with the Funeral Consumer Assoc. both locally and nationally for many years. He was a member and an elder at First Presbyterian Church and was instrumental in establishing a chess program at Wakulla Correctional Institution. He is survived by his wife, Elaine; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a great-granddaughter; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.
 
Robert H. Chambers III ’69 PhD, of Indio, Calif.; Jan. 15, of complications caused by an intestinal ulcer. He was the seventh president of Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College, for 16 years. In 1969 he became dean of Davenport College and assistant professor of English and American Studies at Yale. In 1972 he was a visiting fellow at Clare College, Univ. of Cambridge, in England. In 1975 he was dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and professor of English at Bucknell College before becoming president of Western Maryland College in 1984. While president, he founded WMC-Budapest, a branch campus in Budapest, Hungary, and became founding director of Common Ground on the Hill. In 2000, Common Ground named the Robert H. Chambers Award for Excellence in the Traditional Arts after him, and the award has been presented to notable musicians, including Pete Seeger. He was a teaching associate in American Civilization at Brown for three years and taught American students in Kyoto, Japan. He received numerous academic awards and was the author of articles on the works of Robert Penn Warren and John Berryman. After retiring from Western Maryland College, he worked as a senior consultant for Marts & Lundy Inc., assisting schools with fund-raising. From 2004 to 2005 he served as provost and dean of Trinity College, Univ. of Melbourne, Australia. He served on several boards and committees and was a member of the Modern Language Assoc., the American Studies Assoc., the Council of Independent Colleges, and Brown’s Council of Graduate Education. Occasionally he wrote book reviews for The Critical Flame and The Beachwood Reporter. He enjoyed traveling the world, running, hiking, playing golf, scuba diving, and collecting eclectic items. He is survived by his companion, Jennie Mingolelli; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a brother; and his former wife, Alice Grant Chambers.
 
Juris P. Kalejs ’69 PhD, of Wellesley, Mass.; Jan. 6. His work focused on solar energy. He was the founder of two solar companies, author of more than 100 scientific articles, and holder of several patents. He enjoyed mountain hiking and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; a son; and seven grandchildren.
 
Patricia Lahan Parker ’81 AM, of Cotuit, Mass.; Jan. 18, from complications of Parkinson’s and Lewy body dementia. She taught for many years in the sociology department at Central Connecticut State Univ. She is survived by her husband, Fred ’63; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; two sisters; three brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.
 
Claudia Robitaille Grace ’86 AM, of New Bedford, Mass.; Dec. 23, of cancer. She was the founder of A.C.C.E.S.S. Art Corp. International. She taught Write for Life training workshops at various venues, including UMass Dartmouth, where she was an adjunct instructor in creative writing. She has been listed in Who’s Who of American Women. She is survived by her husband, Thomas, and a sister.
 
Lee A. Goodglick ’88 PhD, of Los Angeles; July 8, of pancreatic cancer. He was professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at UCLA and a translational cancer biologist. He authored more than 75 peer-reviewed publications and held numerous patents. He was responsible for launching the CTSI/IMED lecture series, an innovation in science seminars. He enjoyed playing basketball and was a fan of the LA Lakers. He also enjoyed spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Rietta; a son; his parents; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and six nieces and nephews.
 
Margaret Randazza ’90 ScM (see ’86).
 

Faculty

Aishah Rahman, of San Miguel de Allende, Mex.; Dec. 29. An accomplished playwright and author, she was a professor of literary arts and taught at Brown from 1992 to 2001. She also served as director of playwriting at the New Federal Theater in New York City. Among her numerous fellowships, grants, and awards is a special citation from the Rockefeller Foundation of the Arts for dedication to playwriting in the American Theater. Her book Chewed Water: A Memoir was published in 2001, and her plays, including The Mojo and the Sayso, Only in America, Chiaroscuro, A Tale of Madame Zora, and Has Anybody Seen Marie Laveau?, have been produced at theaters and universities across the country. She is survived by daughter Yoruba Richen ’94; a son; two grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.
 
Donald G. Rohr, of Providence; Jan. 26. He taught modern European history and served as chairman of the history department and associate dean of the faculty. He was a former president of the Committee on Foreign Relations. He was a member of the book club at St. Sebastian’s Church in Providence. He is survived by two daughters, two sons-in-law, and two grandchildren.
 
Peter J. Westervelt, of Providence;  Jan. 24. He worked at the MIT Radiation Lab and the Harvard Underwater Sound Lab before joining the Brown physics department in 1951. He left Brown shortly after to serve as assistant attaché for research with the U.S. Navy at the American Embassy in London and later to conduct research at the Univ. of Texas, Austin. During his career he held assignments with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council and was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the Acoustical Society of America, and the American Astronomical Society. He was awarded the Lord Rayleigh Medal from the British Institute for Acoustics and the Silver Medal in Physical Acoustics from the Acoustical Society of America. He is survived by his wife, Alice.     






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