Obituaries
— Class of 1956

Apr, 2022

Stuart Terrill ’56, of Brookfield, Conn.; Sept. 9. He was an accountant and retired from Nuclear Services of Danbury (Conn.) in 1996. He was past president and a 62-year member of the Brookfield Volunteer Fire Department and was honored for his service to the community in 2021. He was an active member of the Brookfield Historical Society and a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed gardening, golfing, and watching football. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022

Jayne Partridge Oliver ’56, of Baton Rouge, formerly of Amarillo, Tex.; Oct. 12, after 15 years battling cancer. She worked for United Airlines in New York and later in San Francisco. She and her family moved to Baton Rouge in 1976 and she worked as a substitute teacher in both public and private schools, then spent many years working in the travel industry at Pearson’s Travel World. She enjoyed volunteering in the women’s ministries at Broadmoor Methodist Church. She is survived by her husband, Tom; a daughter and son-in-law; two grandsons; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2022

David W. Merson ’56, of Boynton Beach, Fla., formerly of Lewiston, Me.; Sept. 28. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Army in Italy. Upon discharge, he earned a master’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and worked for a short time in New York as a buyer for Bloomingdale’s. He then worked at the family business, Ward Brothers, an upscale women’s retail store. Under his tenure, the business grew to three locations in Maine. Business and travel were a constant in his life to buy merchandise for the next season or to meet with his buying group. He retired to Florida in 1987. He enjoyed reading multiple newspapers daily, traveling, and playing bridge, achieving the title of life master. He is survived by three children and their spouses. 

Apr, 2022

Christa Y. Buhler Fagerberg ’56, of Binghamton, N.Y.; Sept. 21. She was a lifelong learner, a teacher, and an artist. She was involved in village theater productions and enjoyed raising her family. She is survived by four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece. 

 

Jan, 2022

Richard E. Williams ’56, of Shavertown, Pa.; Sept. 3. He came to Brown through the NROTC training program and in his junior year was initiated into Phi Delta Theta. Prior to his death he was granted Phi Delta Theta True Blue status and received a brick in his name at Phi Delta Theta’s founding campus. He graduated with a civil engineering degree and, after military service, worked at the former Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company for 36 years in various engineering and operating positions. He enjoyed fishing trips to Quebec, a tradition started by his father, and singing in the Shavertown United Methodist Church choir and Orpheus Choral Society. He was the recipient of military commendations and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with two bronze stars. He fired in sanctioned .22 caliber prone rifle matches until age 81 with competitive proficiency and held a lifetime master classification in four position indoor rifle shooting. He was a member of the Wilkes-Barre Rifle and Pistol Club and the Harveys Lake Rod & Gun Club. He is survived by his wife, Joanie; three sons and daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022

David W. Reynolds ’56, of Estero, Fla.; Feb. 16, of declining health related to Parkinson’s disease. After Brown he was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy and served until 1962. He earned an MBA from Boston University and thereafter began a 26-year career with IBM Corp. He maintained a dual career with the U.S. Navy Reserve and, among other commissions, served as commander of the Naval Reserve Iceland Defense Force, for which he received a Defense Meritorious Service Medal. He retired with the rank of captain to Florida but spent summers at the family home in Chatham, Mass. He enjoyed sailing and is survived by his wife, Catherine; a son, two daughters, including Andrea Reynolds ’94 AM; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and his former wife, Cecily Reynolds Mermann. 

 

Jan, 2022

Harold Resnic ’56, of Longmeadow, Mass.; Aug. 25. He graduated with an MBA from Cornell University and a law degree from Western New England Law School. He practiced law in Springfield for more than 40 years. He enjoyed playing the saxophone, tennis, golf, and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephew. 

Jan, 2022

Linda Kessler Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn., and Charlestown, R.I.; July 23, of pancreatic cancer. She rejoins her husband of 64 years, David Fishman ’56, who passed in January, and whom she deeply missed. They met in the Brown bookstore on the first day of their senior year. Their fate was sealed in an English class they shared when David sat down next to her on the day the professor declared that these were now assigned seats for the semester. They were married shortly after graduation. After a brief time in Buffalo, N.Y., they moved to Bloomfield and (mostly) lived there and in West Hartford, except for summers, which they spent at their beach house in Green Hill, R.I. She and David loved that house and that beach and gathered family and friends there for most of the rest of their lives. She was an excellent cook, baker, and gourmand. She was always game for lobster rolls, oysters, and dessert, especially cookies. Linda and David were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera. She was generous, kind, and slyly funny. During her last illness she was lovingly cared for by her son Douglas, his wife Dena, and grandchildren Zoe and Lili Fishman, who loved their grandma very much (it was a mutual love-fest). She is survived by her son, Douglas Fishman ’81 and his wife; daughter Sarah Boyle ’89, ’96 MD and her partner; four grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; siblings and in-laws; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Oct, 2021

Robert A. Watts ’56, of Yardley, Pa.; May 13. He owned and operated three businesses during his career: manufacturing company Sherwatt Wire Cloth Co., Allen Products importing company, and Murray Street Associates real estate. A member of Brown’s ROTC, he served two years as a lieutenant JG in the U.S. Navy with active deployments. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters, including Sandra Watts-Courtney ’90; son John ’84; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Oct, 2021

Henri E. LeBlond ’56, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Oct. 22, 2020. He was a retired teacher from the East Providence School Department. He was a life member and past president of the LeFoyer Club in Pawtucket and past president of the American-French Genealogical Society in Woonsocket, R.I. He enjoyed reading, writing, and studying genealogy. He is survived by two sons and three grandchildren.

Oct, 2021

James B. Greer ’56, of Wellington and Vero Beach, Fla.; June 2. He had a long successful career in banking beginning with a position at Harvard Trust in the early 1960s, eventually holding the position of president of Chase Bank of Florida and later founder of Cypress Trust Company. He was a pitcher in college, an avid tennis player, and remained involved with both sports over the years by coaching his three sons in Little League, playing softball, and becoming a certified tennis umpire. He was involved in charitable work that included the Rehabilitation Center for Children and Adults in Palm Beach, Indian River Community Hospital, the Community Foundation of Palm Beach, the 19th Hole Club, and the Boys and Girls Clubs. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and he is survived by three sons, including Jeffrey ’86; two daughters-in-law; and a granddaughter.

Oct, 2021

Richard A. Gallotta ’56, of Southport, N.C.; June 17, of heart disease. He earned a master’s degree in national security strategy from the Naval War College. From 1956 to 1984 he served in the U.S. Navy as a cryptologist and Russian linguist. Highlights of his naval career included commanding an intelligence unit in Karamursel, Turkey; submarine deployments to the Barents Sea intercepting Soviet communications; service in Saigon during the Vietnam War; and military assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Affairs. He retired in 1984 with the rank of captain. Following his career in the Navy, he began a second career involving deep sea research and marine science. As part of this work, he had the opportunity to ride a submersible to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. He retired for a second time in 1998. In 2019 he published an autobiography entitled What Manner of Man Is This. He is survived by his wife, Kay; two sons; three stepchildren; 16 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Oct, 2021

Thomas E. Favero ’56, of Brentwood, Calif.; May 1. He spent a year at Brown before being drafted into the U.S. Army. Following his military service, he transferred to Arizona State University and was a physical education teacher and coach. After college he married and began a 36-year career as an educator and coach. He retired in 1994 and was proud to be the recipient of the 1993 Coach of the Year award. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Oct, 2021

Edwin L. Bevins ’56, of Wells, Me.; Mar. 12. He taught at Leland & Gray Union High School in Townshend, Vt., for 22 years before moving to Wells. He enjoyed reading, baking, and traveling with his wife, visiting 49 states. He is survived by his wife, Janet; a daughter and son-in-law; three sons; two daughters-in-law; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2021

David S. Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn. and Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 31, of Parkinson’s disease. He married a few months after graduating and settled in the Hartford, Conn. area. Engineer by day and law student by night, upon graduation (first in his class), he established what would be the first of several patent law firms. Not only a patent attorney, he was also a named inventor on at least five patents, a fact of which he was quietly proud. David and Linda were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera, and he was honored to share the Met stage with Luciano Pavarotti one evening. His bouillabaisse was celebrated around the world, as was his warmth and generosity. He enjoyed his family and the R.I. shore, where he had a beach home for 35 years, and where he looked forward to spending most of the summer with visits from his children, and grandchildren. He was a father figure to his younger siblings, mentor to younger attorneys, including his son, and dear friend and trusted advisor to many. He gave great toasts, was unabashed in his enjoyment of life, and set a spectacular example for those following him.He is survived by his wife, Linda Kessler ’56; son  Douglas ’81; daughter Sarah ’89; and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Ann J. Nelson ’59 MAT (see ’56).

Jun, 2021

W. Bradford Schultz ’56, of Kingstown, N.H., formerly of Allentown and Lafayette Hills, Pa.; Jan. 8. After service in the U.S. Army, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked in a series of technology companies. From that experience he and four of his best friends created their own computer consulting company, Macro Corporation, near Philadelphia. The company grew to be a leading international corporation in the energy industry. He was an avid reader, historian, social justice advocate, and athlete and enjoyed creating green peaceful spaces and gardens. He is survived by six children, including son Neil ’76, and many grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Gerald G. Norigian ’56, of Warwick, R.I.; Oct. 17. He was a retired attorney. He is survived by his wife, Lillian.

Jun, 2021

Ann J. Nelson ’56, ’59 MAT, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Dec. 12, of Alzheimer’s. She taught high school English in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York before moving to Colorado Springs in the late 1960s and working at Mitchell High School as a high school counselor for many years. Following her call to ordained ministry, she studied at Bishop’s School of Theology in Denver, then attended the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She was ordained a priest in the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado on June 27, 1985, and finished her counseling career at Coronado High School in Colorado Springs while assisting as part-time priest at Grace and St. Stephen Church. She accepted a call to serve St. Andrew Episcopal Church (Colo.) and was a rector there for several years. Upon retirement she joined the Episcopal Chapel of Our Saviour, Colorado Springs, where she also sang in the choir. She is survived by cousins. 

Jun, 2021

David S. Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn. and Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 31, of Parkinson’s disease. He married a few months after graduating and settled in the Hartford, Conn. area. Engineer by day and law student by night, upon graduation (first in his class), he established what would be the first of several patent law firms. Not only a patent attorney, he was also a named inventor on at least five patents, a fact of which he was quietly proud. David and Linda were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera, and he was honored to share the Met stage with Luciano Pavarotti one evening. His Bouillabaisse was celebrated around the world, as was his warmth and generosity. He enjoyed his family and the R.I. shore, where he had a beach home for 35 years, and where he looked forward to spending most of the summer with visits from his children, and grandchildren. He was a father figure to his younger siblings, mentor to younger attorneys, including his son, and dear friend and trusted advisor to many. He gave great toasts, was unabashed in his enjoyment of life, and set a spectacular example for those following him.He is survived by his wife, Linda Kessler ’56; son  Douglas ’81; daughter Sarah ’89; and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Jerome S. Cline ’56, of New Bedford, Mass.; Jan. 18. He spent his career in corporate sales. In retirement, he volunteered as a docent for the Washington National Cathedral and more recently as a docent at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran and is survived by a daughter, four sons, five grandchildren, two sisters, and six nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021

George Boulukos ’56, of Freeport, N.Y.; Jan. 23, from a blood infection. Following graduation from Brown, he owned and operated Nick’s Marina in Merrick, N.Y., a business he and his brother built from a fishing station to a fully operational marina. He was involved with the Boy Scouts of America for 80 years and was the recipient of their Silver Buffalo Award for distinguished service. He worked on several programs for the Scouts on a local, district, and national level, as well as with the Greek scouting program (Eastern Orthodox Committee on Scouting), which he chaired for many years. He was an avid sailor, raced in the Long Island Regatta many times, and held the title of Commodore of the Port Washington Yacht Club. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; two children; and two grandchildren. 

Apr, 2021

Wesley M. Vandervliet ’56, of Canton, Conn.; Dec. 6. He had a long career in public education beginning at Bloomfield High School, where he taught from 1963 to 1968. In 1968 he assumed asocial studies teaching position at Bulkeley High School in Hartford and became Social Studies Chairman for the city in 1971. Later in his career he became a school administrator and retired in 1994 as vice principal at Quirk Middle School. He enjoyed being on the water, either canoeing or sailing. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a son and daughter-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021

George A. Midwood III ’56, of Sandy Springs, Ga.; Oct. 15, from stroke complications. After Brown, he entered the U.S. Army, where he served for two years as a counterintelligence analyst, then returned to civilian life for his doctorate studies at Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He left Fletcher and began an executive position at Exxon, living in Hong Kong, Malaysia, India, and Pakistan, and rose to the position of comptroller. During those years he became a competent speaker in German, Japanese, French, and Russian. In 1979, at age 45, he joined American Cyanamid as treasurer. In 1987 he was signed as treasurer and executive vice president by RJ Reynolds Nabisco and presided over one of the largest leveraged buyouts in U.S. corporate history. He moved his family to Georgia and in addition to golf, he enjoyed fishing, skiing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepdaughter and her husband; five grandsons; and four nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021

Joseph B. Donahue ’56, of Noblesville, Ind.; Dec. 23. He was a sales representative for Anaconda American Brass in 1956, rising to regional sales manager before retiring in 2001. His career took him to Cincinnati for 22 years and eventually to Indianapolis. He volunteered at Handicamp (a Lutheran disabilities ministry) and was active for some time with the Miracle Place in Indianapolis. He worked with inner city youth tutoring after school and with the Boy Scouts of America. He was an avid runner who accomplished three marathons and enjoyed backpacking throughout the U.S. He is survived by his wife, Linda; five children; four grandchildren; two stepdaughters; and four step-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Walter M. Westcote ’56, of Lexington, Ky.; June 15. After serving in the U.S. Army, he worked as a pension actuary. He was a Civil War expert and book collector, as well as the author of the book American Civil War Era: A Critical Bibliography. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; four daughters; nine grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

Jan, 2021

Robert P. Knauff ’56, of Old Lyme, Conn.; July 2, after a short illness. He had a 20-year career as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Coast Guard, serving as a marine inspector in many areas of the country. Subsequently, he spent 23 years as the financial manager and corporate secretary for the Fishers Island Ferry District. Occasionally, he would captain a tour boat on the Connecticut River or at Mystic Seaport. He was an active community volunteer and a lifetime member of the Old Lyme Volunteer Ambulance Association, serving as president, secretary and treasurer, as well as an EMT. He also served on the Board of Finance for the Town of Old Lyme, and during many holiday seasons, Phil could be seen as Santa at the Silver Skate Christmas Shop in Niantic. He is survived by his wife, Constance; three children and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

Nov, 2020

Joanne Dean Keane ’56, of Stamford, Conn.; May 15. She had a 35-year career working for the Department of Education for the Town of Stratford, Lord Chamberlain Elderly Care, and the Westinghouse Corporation. An accomplished artist and art historian, she enjoyed painting, sketching, and visiting museums and galleries around the world. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Nov, 2020

Ronald E. Foster ’56, of Princeton, N.H.; Apr. 13. After serving in the U.S. Army, he began a 30-year banking career with Bankers Trust Company (now Deutsche Bank) in New York City. He retired in 1989. At Brown he was a member of the baseball and basketball teams and Lambda Chi Alpha. He enjoyed reading, playing golf, traveling and was a fan of the New York Yankees and Giants. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandsons; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Nov, 2020

Joseph Focarino ’56, of New York City; Apr. 21, of lung cancer. Before retiring, he was the editor of books and catalogs for the Frick Collection in New York City. He had a lifelong interest in the arts and frequently visited the theater, art museums, the opera, and ballet. He is survived by a sister, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece and nephew.

Nov, 2020

Nevann Winslow Smith ’56, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Feb. 13. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, eight grandchildren, and a sister.

Nov, 2020

Charles W. Merritt Jr. ’56, of Boonton, N.J.; June 1, after a brief illness. While at Brown he was captain of the men’s basketball team and a member of the football and golf teams and was named to Brown’s 100th Basketball All-Decade Team. After serving in the U.S. Army, he took over the operations of the family business, Merritt Mounting & Finishing in New York. He was a member of Rockaway River Country Club, where he was a multiple time club golf champion. He also enjoyed playing cards and spending many hours watching his children and grandchildren participate in activities. He is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Wesley A. Merritt ’85 and daughter Elizabeth H. Merritt ’89; 18 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020

Ruth Fried Schetman ’56, of Glen Mills, Pa., formerly of Wilmington, Del.; Jan. 29. She assisted in the operations of her husband’s dermatology practice, volunteered at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, and taught reading skills to inner-city children. She enjoyed reading and playing tennis, bridge, and mahjong, but especially spending time at her second home at Rehoboth Beach. She is survived by three sons and their spouses, including Richard ’79 and Bill ’81; and five grandchildren.

Sep, 2020

Quentin G. Kraft ’56, of Granville, Ohio; Mar. 24. He had a 36-year teaching career at Denison University in Granville. He retired from Denison in 1997. At age 70 he began writing poetry and titled his collection On Getting Too Damn’d Old: Free Speech Poems for Free Readers. He competed in road races in Ohio including the Columbus Marathon and twice qualified for the Boston Marathon. He enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a son and daughter-in-law; a sister; five sisters and brothers-in-law; nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020

Robert Ise ’56, of Calabasas, Calif.; Mar. 17, of congestive heart failure. He had a long career working at the Atlantic Richfield Company and later at Lyondell Petrochemical, where he was vice president of marketing. He retired in 1998. He enjoyed gardening and is survived by his wife, Armelle; two daughters; a granddaughter; and brother Richard Ise ’54

Sep, 2020

Harry F. DiZoglio ’56, of Johnston, R.I.; Feb. 16. He was a civil engineer for many years and served in the Rhode Island Army National Guard. He is survived by his companion Lucille Waidalowski; a daughter; a son; a grandson; a sister; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

Sep, 2020

William A. Cooper ’56, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Wolfeboro, N.H.; Mar. 19, of cancer. He was a member of Brown’s hockey team all four years and went on to be a math teacher and coach hockey, football, and baseball at Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, N.Y. In 1959 he moved to Connecticut to work as an engineer for Southern New England Telephone, but in 1962 he returned to Trinity-Pawling to serve as chair of their math department, head of the Disciplinary Committee, and coach of the varsity hockey, junior varsity baseball, junior varsity football, and intramural tennis teams until his retirement in 1981. Trinity-Pawling inducted him into its Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003. An appointment as an educational consultant based in Avon, Conn., followed. Concurrently, he began working at the Wolfeboro Camp School as a teacher in 1967 and became head of school in 1977. He retired in 2005 and became a trustee. He enjoyed swimming, biking, sailing, tennis, golf, traveling, and cheering on the Boston Red Sox, Boston Bruins, and New England Patriots. He is survived by a daughter and her spouse, two sons and their spouses, six grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, a sister, four nieces and nephews, and his former wife, Joan Cooper.

Jun, 2020

Arthur Weddell ’56, of Stanton, Calif.; Feb. 25. He was an aircraft design engineer of military aircraft and worked for Northrop Aircraft for 30 years. He owned and operated Sandbar Sporting Dogs kennel, which consisted of breeding, training, and showing Brittany spaniels and Labrador retrievers. He enjoyed hunting upland game and waterfowl and was also a licensed falconer. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020

Richard L. Thompson ’56, of Brewster, Mass., formerly of Providence, and Westfield, Mass.; Nov. 19, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating from Yale Law School, he began working as an associate for the Providence law firm of Tillinghast, Collins, and Tanner. In 1963 he moved to Westfield and became a corporate lawyer for the then Stanley Home Products company, specializing in labor and real estate law. He became an assistant secretary of the Corporation. Following his retirement, he moved to Brewster on Cape Cod and joined his wife in her antique business, Bayberry Antiques. He was a member of the Cape Cod Antiques Dealers Association for many years and a longtime member of the First Congregational Church of Harwich, where he had served as a trustee. He enjoyed skiing in Vermont and traveling to Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and Williamsburg, Va. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2020

Donald S. Cohen ’56, of Pasadena, Calif.; Jan. 9. He was one of the first faculty members recruited for Caltech’s newly formed applied mathematics program in 1965, earning tenure in 1971. His research covered a variety of topics, including early work in the theory of reaction-diffusion equations and later on nonlinear differential equations, pattern formation, stability, and bifurcations that had a significant impact on mathematical biology and chemical engineering. At Caltech he was a popular teacher who received awards for undergraduate teaching excellence in 1979, 1987, and 1998. In 2000, he was awarded the Richard P. Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching. He served as the executive officer of applied mathematics from 1988 to 1993 and was chair for the Division of Engineering and Applied Science in 1990. He also served as chairman of the faculty from 1983 to 1985 and from 1986 to 1987 he chaired the faculty advisory committee of the Caltech Board of Trustees. In 1998 he was named Charles Lee Powell Professor of Applied Mathematics. He retired in 2003. He was a member of numerous organizations, including the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the American Mathematical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. From 1993 to 1995, he was the director of the Center for Nonlinear Studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is survived by his wife Natalie and daughter Susan Cohen ’89, ’91 AM.

 

Apr, 2020

Allen W. Whittmore ’56, of Boynton Beach, Fla.; Oct. 20. He is survived by his wife, Terry.

 

Apr, 2020

James H. Rogers III ’56, of Wareham, Mass., formerly of Castine, Me.; Oct. 5. He taught English at the Collegiate School in New York City for five years before attending Harvard to earn his master’s in education. Upon graduation, he accepted a position in Brown’s Admission Office, where he was later promoted to the director of admissions, a post he kept until 1988. During his tenure he was proud that Brown’s applicant pool was the highest amongst the Ivy League as reported by the New York Times in 1983. After leaving Brown, he and his wife moved to Italy, where he opened an educational consulting business called The Rogers Group International. He worked with families outside the U.S. as a private secondary school and college consultant. In 1993, he and his wife moved back to the U.S. and settled in Maine. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by three daughters, including Whitney Scholfield ’88 and Jessica Mellon ’93; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2020

Lewis W. Petterson Jr. ’56, of New York City; Oct. 30. He had a career in advertising. A longtime member and former president of the Amateur Comedy Club, he acted in and directed numerous productions. He enjoyed sailing, football, oil painting, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. He is survived by his companion, Hillary Ghertler; three daughters, including Lisa Petterson ’84; and seven grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Deborah Shupert Nimick ’56, of Sarasota, Fla.; Nov. 18. After receiving her master’s degree in educational psychology from Duquesne University, she entered the professional world as an advocate for children, focusing her attention on testing and counseling. She was also a curriculum writer in the emerging field of game theory, the use of games to help youngsters understand how to overcome specific learning deficits. She is survived by her husband, George; three children; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

 

Apr, 2020

Alexandra “Sandy” McCain Morgan ’56, of Annapolis, formerly of Houston, Tex.; Nov. 6., of advanced mesothelioma. She ran the microbiology lab at the Fourth Ward Clinic in Houston. She was a longtime dedicated cancer research volunteer at MD Anderson Hospital and continued her volunteer research work at Johns Hopkins Oncology Center after moving to Maryland in 1990. She participated in sailing on the Galveston and Chesapeake bays and was an avid bridge player and member of The Book Club of Annapolis. She is survived by her mother, two daughters, a son, four grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020

Janet Price Falsgraf ’56, of Tucson, Ariz.; July 5. She taught elementary school prior to starting a family. Once her children were born, she became deeply engaged in the social and civic life of her community. She served as president of the League of Women Voters of Cuyahoga County and executive director of the Criminal Justice Information Center. She traveled the world with her husband, visiting six continents. She is survived by her husband, Bill; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Apr, 2020

Thomas F. Dacey ’56, of Agawam, Mass.; Nov. 18. He worked at the Agawam Junior High School as a geography teacher for several years and then took a position as a guidance counselor at the middle school. He retired in 2005 after 42 years of service. He was a 44-year member of the Agawam Lion’s Club and served as its secretary for more than 20 years. He was also a member of the Brown Faculty Club and a veteran of the U.S. Army.

 

Jan, 2020

Alden R. Walls Jr. ’56, of Jamestown, R.I., formerly of Wilton, Conn.; Sept. 5. He was a marketing manager for Monsanto Company in New York City for 20 years. He later worked for Unifi Company as vice president. He retired in 1985. After retiring, he worked in real estate for 15 years in Jamestown. He was a senior warden at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Jamestown and a volunteer with the Jamestown Ambulance Assoc. He is survived by three sons, including Jeffrey ’83; two daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2020

Gordon L. Parker ’56, of Little Compton and Providence, R.I.; Sept. 21, after a long illness. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he joined Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank’s investment department and retired after 30 years as head of the Investment Management and Trust Division. Upon leaving the bank, he took courses at RISD and became an artist member at The Providence Art Club. He was involved in numerous organizations and served as past president of The Boys and Girls Clubs of Providence and on several boards, including the Providence Preservation Society and the Rhode Island Philharmonic. He enjoyed reading, classical music, gardening, sailing, tennis, fishing, and duck hunting. He is survived by his wife, Jane; son Gordon L. Parker III ’15; a daughter-in-law; two nieces, including Tuppett M. Yates ’97; and a nephew.

 

Nov, 2019

John A. Worsley ’56, ’63 MAT, of Lincoln, R.I.; Aug. 4, after a long illness. He taught at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and at the Community College of Rhode Island for 49 years. Early in his career he worked as a reporter for the Pawtucket Times and for the last twenty years he wrote a column about jazz and jazz musicians for the Times. Additionally, he was the primary grant proposal writer for the City of Central Falls School Department. He served on the executive board of the Providence Federation of Musicians from 1998 until his death and was a life member of the Musicians Union. He produced several jazz concerts at the Providence Marriott hotel and the University Club, and he was a strong supporter of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. He also was on the board of directors of the Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame. He is survived by his wife, Rhoda; and a cousin.
 

 

Nov, 2019

Nancy Willenbecher Dickinson ’56, of Leeds, Mass.; Aug. 12. After graduating from Brown, she earned a master’s in fine arts from RISD and began welding, carving, and casting bronze life sized sculptures. She had a series of shows across western Massachusetts. In addition to her art, she also had a small business named Tiddly Products Inc., which manufactured doll-house-sized goods for toy stores and retail outfits. But she was known to most as The Acorn Lady because of her project, The Acorn People. She built an entire community based on acorns and nature, which included dioramas and photography of her creations. In 1985 she received the Hitchcock Center for the Environment photography award and in 2005 The Acorn People were showcased on the WGBY TV show Making it Here. Over the years she donated several of her displays and dioramas to schools, libraries, and museums. Her work can be viewed at www.nancydickinson.net. She is survived by two daughters, including Nina Lesher ’81; three sons; two daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 12 grandchildren; a brother; and brother-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019

Maurice C. Davitt ’56, of Barrington, R.I.; June 20. He served with the Southport, Conn., fire department in the 1950s. Later he worked at IBM and eventually became president and CEO of Academic Management Services. Subsequently he founded Student Resources, providing guidance for students and families navigating the college search process. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and was an avid golfer. He was inducted into the Rhode Island Golf Association Hall of Fame in 2018. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, including Kristin Davitt ’88; and six grandchildren, including Kellan Barr ’19.

 

Sep, 2019

Gretchen Reiche Terhune ’56, of Falmouth, Maine, formerly of Darien, Conn.; Apr. 24, of a stroke. From 1983 to 1994, she was the executive director of the Darien United Way and Community Council. Always active in volunteer activities over the years, she had been a district chair of the Darien Representative Town Meeting, the director of volunteers at Darien High School, and a director of the Fairfield County Pembroke College Club. She is survived by her husband, Richard; three sons; three daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019

Bruce W. Lovell ’56, of Agawam, Mass., formerly of Enfield, Conn.; Apr. 13. He was employed with Aetna Life Insurance for 28 years before retiring and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed Austin-Healy racing, boating, model railroading, and watching his children’s and grandchildren’s participation in sports. He is survived by three children, four grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019

May N. Stone ’56, of Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., formerly of New York City; Dec. 21. She was employed in the membership department of the Museum of Modern Art prior to obtaining a master’s degree in library science and a master’s in historical preservation, both from Columbia University. She went on to be a reference librarian at Avery Architectural Library of Columbia University.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Gilbert Pemberton II ’56, of Rumford, R.I.; Feb. 21. He worked for more than 45 years for Bell Atlantic, New England Telephone, and then Verizon. He was also an amateur softball umpire with the Blackstone Valley Umpires Assoc. for more than 40 years, serving as the treasurer for many of those years and umpiring in a World Softball tournament. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Marines. He served two terms as governor and treasurer of the Rhode Island Society of Mayflower Descendants and was a member of Emmanuel Church in Cumberland and St. Stephen’s in Providence. He enjoyed cooking, sporting events, and telling long stories. He is survived by his wife, Margaret E. Thomas ’79; three sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

Kenneth C. Morley ’56, of Lebanon, N.H., formerly of Alpine, N.J.; Feb. 23, of cancer. He was a retired physician. He served in the U.S. Navy as a naval medical officer from 1961 to 1964. From 1964 to 1972 he was employed as a surgeon at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center. In 1972 he moved to Vermont and joined Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center and additionally joined an existing surgical practice at Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont, N.H. He was known to make house calls to many who appreciated his services. After retiring from medicine in 1999, he moved to Lebanon and began a second career as a volunteer member on the Lebanon City Planning Board. He enjoyed summers on Goose Pond in Canaan, N.H., building model wooden boats, and creating Lionel train layouts. He is survived by seven children; nine grandchildren; a sister; two stepbrothers; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019

John H. Jeffers ’56, ’63 MAT, of Melbourne, Fla.; Feb. 18. He was a science teacher, department head, and coach at Berkeley Preparatory School in Tampa for more than 20 years. Later in his career he was head of Holy Trinity Episcopal School and also worked at Brevard Learning Clinic in Melbourne. He was active in his community and enjoyed camping, sailing, lapidary work, and silversmithing. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; son, David ’82 and his wife; and granddaughter Rachael Jeffers ’12 AM.

 

May, 2019

Charles R. Flather ’56, of Coronado, Calif.; Dec. 25. He retired from the U.S. Navy in 1982 after 26 years of service. He went on to work for several years at Computer Sciences Corporation as a systems analyst and then he and his wife opened and ran two retail stores in Seaport Village. He was an avid tennis player and past president of the Coronado Tennis Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; three children; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and sister  Beverley Edwards ’69.

Mar, 2019

Arnold H. Kritz ’56, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Apr. 16. After receiving his PhD in physics from Yale, he spent several years in the research industry before joining the faculty of Hunter College in 1969, where he later served as chair of the department of physics. He was recruited to the department of physics at Lehigh Univ. and served as its chair from 1991 to 1998. At the same time, he led his own research program at Lehigh on nuclear fusion. He also led large multi-institutional collaborations that included research centers across the world. For many years he was a visiting research fellow at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and held several visiting appointments at major laboratories in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Denmark, and Germany. He served on the International Advisory Committee for the Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory in China and for four years he worked at the U.S. Department of Energy in charge of the modeling and simulation branch of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. He was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society and published numerous articles and wrote two books, including Introduction to Problem Solving. In 2005 a two-day Symposium on The Future of Integrated Modeling was held in celebration of his 70th birthday. He was an active member of the Jewish communities in which he lived and was a board member of the Jewish Federation. He volunteered with the Boy Scouts of America and enjoyed hiking, camping, skiing, traveling, gardening, and playing duplicate bridge. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons, including Barry ’84 ScM; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Mar, 2019

Thomas E. Hazlehurst ’56, of Wakefield, R.I.; Nov. 17. He was president and CEO of Potter Hazlehurst, an advertising public relations firm in East Greenwich, R.I. He was an avid sailor, having served in the U.S. Navy, was president of the Narragansett Bay Yachting Assoc., founding secretary of Save the Bay, commodore of the East Greenwich Yacht Club, a trustee and fleet captain of the New York Yacht Club, fleet captain of Cruising Club of America, chairman of the Newport to Bermuda Race, and a member of the Rhode Island State Yachting Committee. He was a finalist for selection in sailing in the 1956 Olympics. He was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame and the Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Hall of Fame. He is survived by three daughters, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019

Walter J. Weber Jr. ’56, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Oct. 18, after a brief illness. He joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 1963 as a professor in the departments of civil and chemical engineering. He was internationally known for his contributions to the field of environmental science and engineering, in particular the development of new and advanced technologies for treatment of water and wastewater and for water pollution control. He was the recipient of numerous awards and honors during his tenure at the Univ. of Michigan. He was named a Diplomat in the American Academy of Environmental Engineers in 1975, elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 1985, and named the Gordon M. Fair and Earnest Boyce Distinguished University Professor of Environmental and Ecological Sciences and Engineering in 1994. The International Science Index recognized him as the fifteenth most highly cited and quoted scientist in the world, seventh in the United States. He authored or coauthored more than 200 technical publications and mentored many engineering students and PhD students. He was a member of many professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Water Works Assoc., Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control, and the Water Pollution Control Federation. He was a devoted Michigan football fan who served on the University of Michigan Athletic Advisory Board. He enjoyed traveling, yard work, and the Jersey Shore. He is survived by Iva Corbett; four daughters; six grandchildren; and a brother.

Jan, 2019

Raymond R. Cooke ’56, of Raynham, Mass.; Sept. 15. After serving in the U.S. Navy for two years, he was employed as a marine service engineer at Babcock & Wilcox of New York City and as a works engineer at ICI America prior to joining Hart Engineering in East Providence, R.I. After 15 years with Hart as project manager and later vice president of the mechanical division, he moved to Herzog-Hart Corp. in Boston as vice president of construction management, retiring in 1997. He settled in Raynham and was appointed a sewer commissioner, where he helped to establish the Raynham sewer system. He was a member of the town’s Industrial Development Commission. He enjoyed playing golf at his vacation home in Myrtle Beach, S.C. He is survived by three daughters, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018

Ned P. Baugh ’56, of Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., formerly of Indianapolis; May 28. He worked for Dow Chemical Co. for many years and had a second vocation as a career counselor. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and Naval Reserves and member of Alpha Delta Phi. He enjoyed gardening, boating, traveling, and singing in church choirs. He is survived by his companion, Polly Leibe; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2018

Donald I. Trott ’56, of Wayne, N.J.; May 4, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired financial analyst and founder of the Consumer Analyst Group of New York. He had a 50-year career on Wall Street. He was active in his community and enjoyed mentoring future analysts. He is survived by his wife, Frances; two daughters; and two granddaughters.

 

Sep, 2018

Seymour G. Karnes ’56, of Palm Coast, Fla., formerly of Warwick, R.I.; May 11. He was a retired textile chemist for the former Sequoia Chemical Co. of Providence. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, a 1996 heart transplant recipient, and a member and former two-term commander of the Jewish War Veterans of Palm Coast. An avid New York Yankees fan, he enjoyed all sports, playing bridge, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Charles H. Eden Jr. ’56, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Apr. 14. He was an area sales manager for Nicholson File Co. in Providence. He retired in 1996 as vice president of sales for the former Russell Harrington Cutlery Co. in Southbridge, Mass. During the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Army. An avid golfer, he was a founding member of Clinton Country Club (Connecticut) and a longtime member of Wannamoisett Country Club (Rhode Island). He enjoyed building and flying remote controlled aircraft and was a member of the Academy of Model Aeronautics. He is survived by his wife, Paula; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Daniel H. Morrissey Jr. ’56, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Jan. 31, after a long illness. He was retired from the U.S. Office of Education and was a U.S. Coast Guard veteran of the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons; and eight grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Edward P. Kelly ’56, of Aberdeen, Miss., formerly of Chicago; Dec. 22. After working briefly as an assistant district attorney for New York, he moved to Chicago and worked for Apollo Savings and Loan. He was promoted to president in 1962. At that time, he was the youngest member of the U.S. Savings and Loan League Legislative Committee and the Illinois Savings and Loan League Advisory Board and he was subsequently elected to membership in the Young Presidents’ Organization. He was an accomplished public speaker involved in several political campaigns and instrumental in developing the Plaza of the Americas flags on Michigan Ave. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Susie; three daughters; a son; and seven grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Joseph M. Daley Jr. ’56, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Feb. 18. He was president of J.M. Daley & Associates, an equity investment firm. He had been director of investor relations at Kalan Gold Corp. He earned a master’s degree in economic development and Japanese labor relations from Sophia Univ. in Tokyo while working there for the Japanese subsidiary of an American specialty chemical company. His career included achievements in international enterprise management, investments, adult education, technology, and public service. He lectured at more than 125 technology conferences and authored numerous economic development studies. He served in the U.S. Navy and retired as a commander, U.S. Naval Reserve. He also was a director of the Japan America Society. He is survived by his wife, Grace Wessels Daley ’59; four children and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Bruce N. Abbott ’56, of Oxford, Me., formerly of West Springfield, Mass.; Dec. 23. In West Springfield, he began his career working at IBM, transitioned into insurance, and retired after 31 years with Travelers Insurance in Hartford, Conn., as a data analyst. He was a longtime member, Sunday school teacher, and choir member at Mittineague Congregational Church in West Springfield. After moving to Oxford, he joined Oxford Congregational Church and served as treasurer. He enjoyed playing cribbage and was an avid Boston sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; 16 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers, including Douglas ’61; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018

Nancy W. Maker ’56, of Manchester Center, Vt., formerly of Wrentham, Mass.; Feb. 11. She taught kindergarten and worked as a unit coordinator in the ICU of Massachusetts General Hospital. She was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta and enjoyed creative writing and reading. She is survived by a sister, a nephew, and many cousins.

May, 2018

James D. Kalloger ’56, of Lynn, Mass.; Dec. 11. A U.S Army veteran of the Korean War, he joined the Lynn Police Department as patrolman for several years. He joined the Massachusetts State Police and retired as a member of its Harbor Patrol. In addition to his police work, he was a cement finisher and bricklayer for many years. He was a lifetime member of the Danvers Fish & Game Club, where he won many awards for both skeet and trap shooting, and was a member of VFW Post 1240. He played football at Brown. He is survived by his wife, Lillian; children; and grandchildren.

 

May, 2018

Bruce N. Abbott ’56, of Oxford, Me., formerly of West Springfield, Mass.; Dec. 23. In West Springfield, he began his career working at IBM, transitioned into insurance, and retired after 31 years with Travelers Insurance in Hartford, Conn., as a data analyst. He was a longtime member, Sunday school teacher, and choir member at Mittineague Congregational Church in West Springfield. After moving to Oxford, he joined Oxford Congregational Church and served as treasurer. He enjoyed playing cribbage and was an avid Boston sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; three sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; 16 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; two brothers, including Douglas ’61; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Apr, 2018

Frances Evans Justin ’56, of Clarks Summit, Pa.; Nov. 1, from Alzheimer’s. She was an organist and choir director at churches in New Brunswick, N.J., and Scranton and Ransom, Pa. She also taught piano and was an office manager for Weichert Realtors in East Brunswick, N.J. She is survived by her husband, James; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and three granddaughters.

Feb, 2018

Frederick F. Trost ’56, of Victor, N.Y.; June 18. He was a retired senior sales representative for Sandoz Pharmaceutical Corp. in East Hanover, N.J. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four children, and nine grandchildren.

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