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1930s

Jerome M. Rosenfeld '32, of Chestnut Hill, Mass.; July 11. He owned and operated Jerome Press Publications in Boston, producing several local theater magazines, including Panorama, On Stage, and Good Listening. He was the founder of the Show of the Month Club and the Boston Arts Festival, as well as a trustee of the Institute of Contemporary Art, past treasurer of the Boston Arts Center, and member of the Corporation of the Boston Opera Assoc. At Brown he played saxophone in the band and was a managing editor at the Brown Daily Herald. He enjoyed fly-fishing, boating, and playing tennis. He is survived by two sons, three grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Dorothy Sylvia Neville '35, of Providence, formerly of Virginia; Aug. 20. She worked for the dean of admission at Brown and later had a career as a placement officer at the Univ. of Virginia. She retired in 1982. She is survived by four sisters and two brothers.

George E. Caswell '36, of Milford, Conn.; May 7. He was employed with Burroughs Adding Machine Co. for 41 years in sales and managerial positions. During World War II he served in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve. He was a 50-year member of the First United Church of Christ (Congregational) of Milford, where he served on the board of trustees and the diaconate. He was also a member of the Plymouth Men's Club. He is survived by a daughter, a son, daughter-in-law, a granddaughter, and a nephew.

1940s

Arthur H. Cooper '40, of Norwell, formerly of Newton, Mass.; Mar. 19. He is survived by his wife, Delta.

Marian Samar Blount '41, of Newport News, Va.; Aug. 4. She participated in numerous community activities, including the League of Women Voters, the Girl and Boy Scouts of America, and the Army Wives Club. She was a communicant at St. John's Episcopal Church and a member of St. Anne's Guild, the Pembroke Garden Club, and the Hampton Yacht Club, and served on the board of the Peninsula Council of Garden Clubs. She enjoyed playing bridge and dining with friends. She is survived by a daughter, four sons, 11 grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren.

Nancy Herr Bare '41, of Lancaster, Pa.; July 1. She pursued a life of business and public office, with extensive civic and volunteer activities. She was elected to the office of prothonotary, where she served from 1964 to 1967. She was co-owner of Metzger's Publicity Service, president of the Junior League of Lancaster from 1949 to 1951, and served as president of the board of directors of the YWCA from 1968 to 1970. She was a supporter of the arts, including the Fulton Theater, the Pennsylvania Academy of Music Center, the Philadelphia Symphony, and various local artists. She is survived by two nephews and a grand-nephew.

Muriel Allen Hoffacker '41, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; June 26. She was the founder of C.O. Hoffacker Co., a major international industrial equipment manufacturing and rebuilding company. She was a member of the St. John's Island Club, the Kittansett Club, the Quail Valley Club, and the Vero Beach Yacht Club. She enjoyed water and snow skiing, sailing, and playing bridge and golf. She is survived by four children.

Walter J. Mullen Jr. '41, of Atlanta, formerly of Baltimore and Columbia, Md.; June 20, of complications of congestive heart failure. He served 20 years in the U.S. Army, rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel. Following his military career, he worked for 20 years as a systems analyst for the U.S. Social Security Administration in Maryland. In retirement he was involved in computerized charting of stock market performance. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, six grandchildren, one great-grandchild, two sisters, and a brother.

Philip W. Porter Jr. '41, of Higganum, Conn.; Aug. 13. A career naval officer from 1942 to 1973, he was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat "V" for meritorious service during World War II. From 1959 to 1961 he was captain of the USS Glacier, then the largest icebreaker in the world. He made several voyages to Antarctica on scientific missions which became the first ship to penetrate the Bellingshausen Sea to the coast (see "The Spectacular Exploits of Philip Porter's 'Glacier'" BAM April 1960). After retiring from the military, he taught oceanography and navigation for 25 years at the Chinese Cultural Univ. in Taipei, Taiwan, and worked for the U.S. government. He returned to the United States in 1988. He is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

Leonard Bellin '42, of Warwick, R.I.; July 4. He was a pediatrician in Providence for 50 years and an assistant clinical professor in the Brown Medical School from 1973 until his retirement in 1999. He was on the staff of Rhode Island and Women & Infants hospitals. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II and the Korean War. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc., the R.I. Medical Assoc., the American Academy of Pediatrics, and Temple Emanu-El, Providence. He enjoyed gardening. He is survived by a daughter; two sons, including David Bellin '76; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Matthew J. Mitchell '42, of Osterville, Mass. and Key Largo, Fla.; Aug. 11. He was a self-employed businessman. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Honolulu. He served as president of Psi Upsilon at Brown and president of Oyster Harbors Club, Osterville, and was a member of the Ocean Reef Club and the Anglers Club in Key Largo. He enjoyed painting and playing squash and golf. He is survived by his wife, Jessie; a daughter; two sons; and two grandchildren.

George D. Senter '42, of Topsham, Me.; July 21. He was a retired teacher. He began a long career in private boarding schools as a faculty member and dormitory supervisor at the New Hampton School in New Hampton, N.H. Later, he taught and was faculty advisor to the yearbook at the Peekskill Military Academy, in Peekskill, N.Y., and taught and served as financial advisor to the school newspaper at The Hill School, in Pottstown, Pa., from which he retired in 1983. During summers he taught at a tutoring camp in Dexter, Me. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and served in the U.S. Army Reserve until 1953. In 2005, The Hill School dedicated a new dormitory in his honor. In retirement, he was involved with activities at Bowdoin College and served on the Steering Committee of the Assoc. of Bowdoin Friends. He is survived by a sister and 13 nieces and nephews.

Elizabeth Macks Webber '42, of Upper Arlington, Ohio; July 18. She was an archivist and registrar for St. Mark's Episcopal Church for several years. She had an interest in historic preservation and New England lighthouses and churches.

William F. O'Connell '43, of Chula Vista, Calif.; Sept. 29, 2010. He was a retired pediatrician and former chief of staff at Children's Hospital of Orange County. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps. He is survived by six daughters; seven grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; a brother, Charles O'Connell '51; a niece, Mary O'Connell Cummings '69; and a nephew, Luke O'Connell '91.

William A. Carroll '45, of Fall River, Mass.; Aug. 1. He was a professor of political science at Oglethorpe Univ., in Atlanta, Ga., Frostburg State Univ. in western Maryland, and Guilford College, in Greensboro, N.C. He was also a Barrister at Law of the Middle Temple in London from 1985 to 2000. He published several political papers. He is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

James B. Gabriel '45, of Riverdale, N.Y.; Mar. 9. He was a physician at Roosevelt Hospital and an associate professor of medicine at Columbia Univ. Medical School until his retirement in 1997. He served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American College of Physicians. He enjoyed photography and playing the violin. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two children, including James Jr. '81; and three grandsons.

Joan Singsen Davenport '46, of Westborough, Mass.; July 11, of a stroke. She was a social worker before becoming a kindergarten teacher; she operated the Sunny Day Kindergarten out of her home. She was an active member of the Evangelical Congregational Church. She enjoyed traveling, playing bridge, and cheering for the Boston Red Sox. She is survived by two daughters, including Susan L'Heureux of 77 Locust St., Douglas, Mass. 01516; six grandchildren; three nieces; and three nephews.

Gilbert C. Hoover Jr. '46, of New York City; Aug. 4. He was a self-employed advertising and publishing consultant. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was involved in Democratic politics and environmental causes. He enjoyed fishing, painting, drawing, and music. He is survived by two daughters, Mallory DeCillis '66 and Katharine Lee Truer '75; a son; two grandchildren; and two sisters.

Robert T. Jenkins '46, of Hixson, Tenn.; June 14, of pneumonia and kidney failure. He is survived by his wife, Marina.

Ross J. Sullivan '47, of Charleston, S.C.; July 7. He worked as an engineer with the Bureau of Reclamation in Denver before working as a chief engineer at Shakespeare Fiberglass, in Columbia, S.C. He retired in 1985 from Hastings Fiberglass, in Hastings, Mich. He held several U.S. patents. He was a member of Christ our King Catholic Church in Mount Pleasant, S.C., and the Knights of Columbus. He enjoyed gardening, hiking, swimming in the ocean, and spending time with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by 17 children, 32 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, two sisters, and a brother.

Albert C. Foster '48, of St. Petersburg, Fla.; July 15, after a long illness. He worked as a plant manager for Brite Industries, in Providence, before becoming an engineer technician at Silor Optical, in Florida. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a lifelong member of the American Civil Liberties Union. He is survived by his wife, Winifred; a daughter; two sons; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters, including Mary Cadbury '45; and several nieces and nephews.

Olivia Heminway Ruth '48, of Bradbury, Calif.; June 30. She was a librarian at Berkeley Prep School, in Tampa, Fla., and at Fuller Theological Seminary, in Pasadena, Calif. She retired in 1990. She enjoyed painting and camping. She is survived by her husband, Stuart '48; three daughters; three grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and a sister.

Francis C. Craig '49, of Akron, Ohio; July 14. He had a career in sales with the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. and worked for one of its subsidiaries until his retirement. He served in the U.S. Army. He performed volunteer work in numerous organizations and was a member of the Boy Scouts of America, SCORE, and Citizens Democracy Corps. He enjoyed sailing. He is survived by eight children, 13 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

Donald B. Fouser '49, of Ipswich, Mass.; July 3, of melanoma. He was an Emmy Award-winning producer and former newspaper reporter. He was best known for the public affairs programs he produced for WGBH in Boston, including Dollar Diplomacy, The Dissenters, and V.D. Blues. He later turned to building and refurbishing homes. He also built harpsichords. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and the Korean War. He enjoyed reading, listening to music, cooking, and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter; two sons; a brother and sister-in-law; and six nephews and nieces.

Patricia Deignan Montalbano '49, of Coronado, Calif.; Sept. 2, 2010, after a brief illness. She was a physician. She was an active member of several organizations in San Diego, most recently a member of the board at Sharp Hospital. She enjoyed traveling and spending time with her children and grandchildren. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, and five grandchildren.

Rudolph Recher '49, of Wakefield, R.I.; Aug. 23. He worked for the Amica Insurance Co., retiring as branch manager. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He enjoyed reading, wood carving, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Janis; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

1950s

David Baillie '50, of Cheshire, Conn.; July 1. He worked for ARCO for 27 years before founding NGL Inc., a natural-gas brokerage business. He retired in 1992. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed making and refinishing furniture, cheering for the Boston Red Sox, spending time with family, traveling, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by a daughter; a son, Donald Baillie '70, of 290 Highland Ave., Cheshire 06410; three grandchildren; and a sister.

William E. Garne '50, of Chesterfield, Va.; July 12. He was a retired electrical engineer. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was a passionate World War II historian and enjoyed sports, card games, and spending time at the beach with his family. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; a daughter; two sons; four grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Albert B. Jeffers '50, of Califon, N.J.; July 30, after a long illness. He practiced law in Morristown, N.J., for more than 50 years until he retired in 2006, at which time he was of counsel at Celli & Schlossburg. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1950 to 1953 and in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves until 1959. He was involved with Lawyers Concerned for Lawyers and was a member of the Morristown Club, the Washington Assoc. of New Jersey, and Phi Alpha Delta. He enjoyed history and had extensive knowledge of the American Revolution and the American Civil War. He is survived by his wife, Victoria; two daughters; four sons; and 11 grandchildren.

John V. McCulloch '50, of Fleming Island, Fla.; July 3. He was a retired vice president of Amica Insurance. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was active in school, church, and civic affairs. He was a member of the Certified Property Casualty Underwriters Society, Sacred Heart Catholic Church, and Theta Delta Chi. He is survived by his wife, Marcella; and five children, including Megan Pickel, of 429 Bay Point Way N., St. Johns, Fla. 32259.

Donald J. Owler '50, of North Stonington, Conn.; July 19. He was the president of Almardon Mills Inc., in Lonsdale, R.I., and later in Pompano Beach, Fla. He served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He enjoyed sailing, fishing, and watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Muriel; three daughters; a son; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; three stepdaughters; and four step-grandchildren.

Frederick S. Richardson '50, of Jaffrey, N.H.; Aug. 8, of Alzheimer's disease. He owned and operated the Village Shop in Jaffrey for several years and later worked at Berger Lahr, retiring in 1990. After retiring, he worked at Monadnock State Park and was active in Jaffrey community affairs. He served as a trustee of the Jaffrey Public Library and was a committee member of the Monadnock Advisory Commission. He enjoyed hiking and photography. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; two daughters; a grandson; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Edward B. Sperduty '50, of Fall River, Mass.; July 16. He taught English in Mexico for several years. He was a U.S. Navy Seabee. He enjoyed reading. He is survived by his wife, Beda; two sisters; and nieces and nephews.

Barbara Bruce Stoddard '50, of Pittsboro, N.C., formerly of Westerville, Ohio; June 30, after a long illness. She worked as an actuarial analyst for the J.C. Penney Casualty Insurance Co. in Westerville until her retirement in 1989. She was a member of St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church and a board member of the CORA Food Pantry, both in Pittsboro. Sigma Xi and Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a daughter, a son, four grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

Raymond J. Surdut '50, of East Providence; Oct. 25, 2010. He is survived by his wife, Sandra.

Leah Greifer Abrams '51, of Riverside, R.I.; June 9. She is survived by a daughter, a son, two grandchildren, and two brothers.

Charles G. Edwards '51, of Providence; Aug. 20. He practiced law at Edwards & Angell in Providence from 1959 to 1989, with a brief interval as assistant attorney general of Rhode Island in charge of the civil division. He later ran a private practice in Little Compton until retiring in 2000. He was a U.S. Navy veteran. He served on several boards, including Hospice Care of Rhode Island, the Little Compton Historical Society, the Sakonnet Preservation Assoc., the Providence Players, and the Providence Charitable Fuel Society. He enjoyed acting in amateur theater, amateur sports car racing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Beverley Flather Edwards '69; two daughters; a son; six grandchildren; and a brother.

Paul J. Michael '51, of Woodland Hills, Calif.; July 8, of heart failure. He worked as an advertising copywriter for BIF Industries, Providence, before becoming a successful Broadway musical performer and Hollywood television actor. His career spanned more than 60 years. Among his numerous performances were Broadway productions of Bells Are Ringing and Man of La Mancha. He starred alongside his companion of 23 years, Marion Ross, in the Hallmark Channel TV movie Where There's a Will and in theatrical appearances at San Diego's Globe and Kansas City's New Theater in Barefoot in the Park, Love Letters, and Over the River and Through the Woods. In 2010 they appeared together in The Last Romance, which was written for them by Joe DePietro. Paul appeared in episodes of Frasier and Seinfeld, and was most recognized on the TV soap opera Dark Shadows. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He is survived by Marion Ross and two sons.

Richard W. Stockton '51, of Delanco and Beach Haven, N.J.; June 19, of cancer. He was an optometrist for 10 years in Delanco and a science teacher at Riverside High School for more than 45 years. He served in the U.S. Army. He was active in the American Legion Post 146 of Riverside; the Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 17; and the Beverly-Riverside Lodge. He is survived by his wife, Dorothea; a daughter; two sons; six grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

Charles B. Godfrey '52, of Midland, Tex.; Apr. 25. He was a retired employee of Pan American Petroleum in Midland. He served in the U.S. Army. He served on the boards of the Petroleum Museum, the Salvation Army, and the Hospice of Midland. He was a member of the American Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, the Society of Petroleum Engineers, and the First Presbyterian Church. He is survived by his wife, Tanya; a son; two granddaughters; four great-grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Joyce Phillips Young McCann '52, of Plainfield, Conn.; June 20. She was employed by Kaman Aerospace and later McCann Manufacturing Co. until her retirement in 1986. She was a lifelong member of the First Congregational Church of Plainfield, where she held several positions. She enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and making and collecting dolls. She is survived by her husband, John; a son; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Porter S. Woods '52, of Fort Collins, Colo., formerly of New Haven, Conn., Middlebury, Vt., Grinnell, Iowa, and Portland, Ore.; July 22. He was a teacher, playwright, director, and musician. He taught English at Grant High School, in Portland, and directed the school's musicals while writing his first play, The Dowery Contest. He is also the author of an original masque, Fire in Middle Earth. While at Yale, he was the baritone in the professional quartet at the New Haven Chapel on the Green. He later taught English and directed plays at Middlebury College in Vermont and Grinnell College in Iowa, where he headed the theater department. In 1970 he joined the theater department at Colorado State Univ., where he directed several plays and operas, retiring in 1998. He wrote two books and was awarded a Fulbright grant to teach English and theater at Taiwan National Univ. for a year. At Brown he was a member of the Glee Club and the Jabberwocks. He was active with the Fort Collins International Center and enjoyed sailing and travel. He is survived by his wife, Gail Erickson Woods '54; two daughters, including Katherine Woods '81; a son; and six grandchildren.

R. Alan Young '52, of New Providence, N.J.; Aug. 18. He worked for Prudential Insurance Co. for more than 40 years, retiring as the manager of its data center support services. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the BAA, a trustee of the Irish-American Society of the Oranges, president of the Chadwick Beach and Yacht Club, and a member of the New Providence Republican Club, the Summit Old Guard, and the Newark Museum. He enjoyed fishing, golfing, traveling, and listening to jazz music. He is survived by his wife, Irene; a son; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Earl W. Fahlquist '53, of Barrington, R.I.; May 3. He was a banker with Old Colony Bank and later Citizens Bank until retiring in 1999. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He is survived by a brother and several nieces and nephews.

Arch D. Hart '53, of Vista, Calif.; June 30. A research biologist, he studied marine invertebrates at both the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, in Woods Hole, Mass. He developed Hart Farm Nursery and Garden Center in Dennisport, Mass. His interests were horticulture and agrarianism, which he practiced in Dennisport, the Bahama Islands, Arkansas, and Southern California. Some of his writings on agroecology are in the Dennis (Mass.) Historical Society. His extensive botanical and zoological research library will be donated to Alta Vista Gardens, Calif. He is survived by his wife, Clavel; a daughter; two sons; a stepdaughter; two grandsons; two step-grandsons; and three great-grandsons.

Barbara Bolotow Levy '53, of Providence; Feb. 21. She worked in public relations before becoming a homemaker. She was a member of Temple Habonim. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

Gerald H. Markowitz '53, of Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.; Aug. 9, from complications during surgery. He practiced law for 53 years. In the 1990s he began developing homes using his expertise in real estate law and partnering with an independent builder. He also created the firm Markowitz & Piro, currently operating in Harrison, N.Y. He served in the U.S. Army. He was an active member of the Westchester Bar Assoc., and was recently honored for 50 years of service as an attorney. He was a former board member of Bet Am Shalom Synagogue in White Plains, a strong supporter of Israel through the United Jewish Appeal and Jewish National Fund, an active member of the Westchester Bar Assoc. and the Brown Club of Westchester. He enjoyed swimming, scuba diving, reading, traveling, and art history. He is survived by his wife, Neala; two daughters; a son; two stepchildren; seven grandchildren; a sister; and three brothers.

Richard A. Ornsteen '53, of Wellesley, Mass.; Aug. 11, from complications of T-Cell lymphoma. He worked at Kesslen Shoe Company in Maine before becoming a real estate broker, most recently at Realty Consultants. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; two sons; and eight grandchildren.

James F. Pendergast '55, of Dayton, Ohio; Aug. 31, of colon cancer. He was an officer in the U.S. Air Force from 1956 until his retirement in 1986. In addition to his stateside assignments, he served in Okinawa, Vietnam, and Iran. He received the Legion of Merit and numerous other medals. At Brown, he played varsity basketball. He enjoyed golfing, traveling, and cheering for the Boston Red Sox and Celtics. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; three daughters; three sons; 12 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Julia Chrystie Webster '55, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Oct. 19, 2010.

Joan Gale Wuterich '55, of Virginia Beach, Va.; July 19. She was a computer science professor at Salem State College for 23 years. She retired in 1993. She was a member of the National Education Assoc., the Massachusetts State Teachers Assoc., the National Council of Teachers of English, and the Pilot Club of Boston, and served as president-elect of Pilot International from 1995 to 1996. She volunteered with the Massachusetts Assoc. for the Blind, the Eastern Massachusetts chapter of the Alzheimer's Assoc., and the Healing Abuse Working for Change program. She enjoyed cross-stitch needlework, quilting, crocheting, reading, solving word puzzles, and traveling. She is survived by her life partner, John Ottesen.

John J. Whipple '56, of Sarasota, Fla.; July 24, 2010. He was the Buick dealer in Fort Worth since 1963, running Tyson Buick until its sale in 1999. He is survived by three sons, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Beverly Ann Decker '57, of Barrington, R.I.; Apr. 3. She was a retired employee of the IBM Corp., Providence. She is survived by two nephews.

Virginia Kinney Dunnan '57, of Reading, Pa.; May 10. She worked as an employment counselor with Executive Search Inc., then as an executive vice president of their Morristown, N.J., office before moving to Pennsylvania. She was involved in numerous community organizations and activities, including serving as a choir mother and Sunday school teacher, chairwoman of the Westfield Service League's Consignment Shop, and a volunteer helping to establish the first College Resource Center at Westfield High School. At Brown she was a director of the Chattertocks and performed in several musical productions. She enjoyed cooking, fishing, bowling, knitting, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Bruce '57; a daughter; three sons, including Cameron '85; five grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Susan Hubbard Vojta '57, of Bronxville, N.Y.; Aug. 6. She was an art historian, teacher, and community leader. She taught Asian art history at Columbia Univ. and Manhattan College. She served as chair of the history departments at various high schools in New Haven, Conn.; Manila; and Singapore, and was chairman of the committee for the Tokyo Annual Print Show. She later served as a docent for major Asian art exhibitions at the Asia Society in New York City. She was a member of the Art Advisory Committee for Brown, chairman and member of the board for the Maxwell Institute, chairman of the Friends of the Sarah Lawrence Library, and a member of the board for the Bronxville Family and Community Services, the Bronxville Adult School, and the Bronxville Adoption Service. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by two sons, including Timothy Vojta '91; and three grandchildren.

Nathan Nathanson '58, of Pawtucket, R.I.; May 20. He is survived by a sister and a brother.

Abbott E. Wilson Jr. '58, of Green Bay, Wisc.; Aug. 10, of leukemia. He worked at the Larson Co. (formerly the Dean Foods Vegetable Co.) for 30 years, retiring as vice president of sales and marketing in 1995. He served in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the Ski Patrol Assoc. of America. He enjoyed skiing, hiking, fishing, baseball, traveling, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Lou; two daughters; four sons, including Dan Wilson of 94-409 Lanikuhana Pl., # 1080, Mililani, HI 96789; 10 grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Eleanor Marks Zexter '58, '62 MAT, of Los Angeles, formerly of Providence; June 29, of cancer. She taught French and English for more than 35 years at Hope High School and Nathan Bishop Middle School, both in Providence. She was named in Who's Who in America and Who's Who Worldwide. In retirement, she volunteered weekly at her grandchildren's school. She was a member of the American Assoc. of Teachers of French. She enjoyed playing tennis and bridge. She is survived by her husband, Ronald; two daughters; and two grandchildren.

Louis E. Hathaway III '59, of Hilton Head, S.C., formerly of Darien, Conn.; July 21. He had a career in the mortgage banking and commercial real estate markets, based in New York City. He was president of the Mortgage Bankers Assoc. of New York City, an active member of the Union League Club, and a member of Wee Burn Country Club in Darien. After moving, he served as treasurer of the board of Hospice Care of the Lowcountry. He is survived by his wife, Judith; two daughters; a son; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Robert D. Redfern '59, of Methuen, Mass.; Aug. 3. He was a self-employed real estate appraiser with Burnham & Redfern Appraisals Inc. He was a member of the Arlington Neighborhood Group, the Lawrencian Ski Club, and the Methuen Planning Board, and served as past president of the Methuen Exchange Club. He served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by numerous family members.

Louis E. Tarsa '59, of Lake Wales, Fla., formerly of Rockland, Mass.; July 4, after a long illness. He was a justice of the peace and a former computer engineer, and ran a real estate business in Mansfield for several years. He was elected to the first school board of the Southeastern Regional Vocational High School and was instrumental in establishing the first vocational school computer curriculum; the school named the computer center after him. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife, Constance; two sons; three stepdaughters; 12 grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

1960s

Joseph H. Cooper '61, of Boerne, Tex.; June 4. He was a self-employed computer programmer. He taught and hosted regular Bible study classes. He is survived by his wife, Juanita; a daughter; two sons; eight grandchildren; a stepson; and a brother.

William H. Huttenlock '61, of Katy, Tex., formerly of Essex Center, Vt.; June 26. He was employed with Engelberth Construction as a project manager and estimator for 25 years. He was active in the Essex Jaycees and later became a member of the Vermont JCI Senate. He enjoyed reading, building ship models, bicycling, playing tennis, and the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; and two grandsons.

Pamela Kendrick O'Connor '61, of Arlington, Va.; July 11, of lung cancer. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She was actively involved with the American Heart Assoc., the Arlington Hospital Foundation, and the Northern Virginia Service League. She was a member of the Washington Golf and Country Club. She enjoyed playing golf, tennis, bridge, and the piano. She is survived by her husband, Kevney; three children; and eight grandchildren.

Raymond A. LeBlanc '62, of Kalispell, Mont., formerly of Fort Worth, Tex.; July 14, of brain cancer. He was a practicing neurosurgeon in Fort Worth until his retirement in 2010. He joined the Tarrant County Medical Society in 1976; he served as secretary from 1996 to 1997 and president from 1998 to 1999, and was a delegate to the Texas Medical Assoc. As president of the society, he began the annual Physician Humanitarian Award. He served in several capacities from 1982 to 1993, including chief of neurosurgery at John Peter Smith Hospital, chief of the department of surgery at St. Joseph's Hospital, chief of the neurosurgery division at Harris Methodist Hospital and vice chief of medical staff at Plaza Medical Center. He was past president of the Fort Worth Neuroscience Assoc., and a member of both the American Medical Assoc. and the Texas Assoc. of Neurological Surgeons. He volunteered with the United Way, Sister Cities, Easter Seals, and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. He was a member of Colonial Country Club, Jewel Charity, and Ridotto Club. He enjoyed fishing hiking, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Sunnie; three daughters; a grandson; three brothers; and several nieces and nephews.

Jeffrey L. Ballon '64, of Owens Cross Roads, Ala.; Jan. 19. He is survived by his wife, Ann; and brother, C.D. Ballon '69.

Barbara Rigelhaupt Fetner '65, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Truro, Mass.; July 23. She worked at Lehman Brothers in New York City and for the Boston Traveler. She was also the director of the Eleanor Rigelhaupt Art Gallery, in Boston. She enjoyed gardening and reading and was a lifelong Red Sox fan. She is survived by her husband, Carlton; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Norwell F. Therien Jr. '66, of Nyack, N.Y.; Aug. 17. He was an art and humanities publisher for Prentice Hall for more than 40 years. During the Vietnam War he served in the U.S. Army. He was an active member of the Upper Nyack Planning Board Committee, the Riverfront Committee, and the Boy Scouts of America. He is survived by four children and three grandchildren.

John N. Anglim '68, of Scotch Plains, N.J.; July 27. He was a managing partner of the accounting firm of Ross, Anglim, Angelini & Co. LLP, in Watchung, N.J., where he worked for 37 years. He served in the U.S. Army. He was active in the Scotch Plains community, including coaching Little League and serving as recreation commissioner. He enjoyed hosting family parties and attending New York Yankees and Giants games. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; three sons; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

Kenneth C. Hertz '68, of Miami; July 3, of leukemia. He was chief of dermatology at West Kendall Baptist Hospital. He served as president of the Miami Dermatological Society and board member of the Florida Society of Dermatologic Surgeons. In 1993 South Florida Magazine named him "best dermatologist." He is survived by his wife, Adele; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; and a brother.

Roger A. Leo '68, of Princeton, Mass.; July 25. After graduating from Brown, he joined the Peace Corps before becoming a columnist and editor at the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. He also taught journalism and environmental studies in Clark Univ.'s continuing and professional education program. He retired in 2005. He then founded the ski news website Leopard Report and contributed to other publications, including On the Snow, where he served as executive editor. He also served as president of the Princeton Land Trust. He traveled to Iraq several times and began the blog Men at War. He is survived by two sons, two grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Michael L. Ras '69, of Westport, Mass.; June 29, of cancer. He taught in the New Bedford (Mass.) school system for 35 years, retiring in 2004. He taught mathematics in the Normandin Junior High School and then the New Bedford High School, and capped his career as the assistant principal of Roosevelt Middle School, where upon his retirement the "Cafetorium" was named in his honor. After retirement, he continued as a lead math teacher at the Feinstein High School and then William B. Cooley Health and Science Technology High School, both in Providence. He was a member and past president of the New Bedford Educators Assoc. and on the board of directors and the executive board of the Massachusetts Teachers Assoc. He enjoyed reading, music, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; a sister; a niece; and two nephews.

1970s

Steven J. Gabbert '73, of Galena, Ill.; July 19. He was a business owner specializing in interior design office sales. He was the recipient of the American Legion Award. He enjoyed playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Rita.

Jennifer M. Prescott '73, of Malden, Mass.; July 2, after a short illness. She was a physician and assistant pastor of Abundant Life Church in Cambridge. She was part of the medical team for the Boston Celtics and worked as a consultant at Roxbury Comprehensive Community Health Center and as medical director for the former Mattapan Chronic Disease Hospital. Since 1992 she performed physical examinations required for disability and life insurance at American Para Professional Systems in Wellesley. In 2001 she began her apprenticeship at Abundant Life Church and was ordained two years later. She also worked for the Aswalos House for unwed mothers and with Superior Mobile Medics. In 2004 she traveled to Uganda as part of the church's mission providing medical care and educational materials. She ran the church's Women's Ministry, counseled homeless women in Cambridge and Boston, and helped to run support groups for pregnant teenagers. She is survived by her mother, five sisters, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Arthur D. Warga '75, of Houston; Aug. 7, of brain cancer. He was the dean of the Univ. of Houston C.T. Bauer College of Business. Previously he served on the faculties of Claremont Graduate School, UCLA, the Graduate School of Business at Columbia Univ., and the Univ. of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He was the founder and director of the Fixed Income Research Program, which provides research databases on bond pricing to the board of governors of the Federal Reserve System, regional banks, and major universities around the world. He conducted studies for the U.S. Treasury Dept., the Congressional Budget Office, the Office of Housing and Urban Development, and the General Accounting Office. He consulted with major corporations and developed a fixed-income training program with the World Bank's Economic Development Institute. He served as a member of an NASD Bond Market Transparency Initiative research team and testified before the U.S. Senate Banking Committee on the structure and regulation of the U.S. corporate and municipal bond markets. He published numerous research articles. He was honored as the recipient of the Mid-Con Teaching Excellence Award. He volunteered with various community agencies. He is survived by his wife, Penny; three sons; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

G.S.

Helen Brush Hiscoe '40 ScM, of Lansing, Mich.; July 28, following complications after a fall. She taught at Vassar and then joinedMichigan State's College of Natural Science, where she taught for 24 years, winning the Distinguished Faculty Award and retiring in 1986 as professor emerita. She wrote several scholarly papers and published the book Appalachian Passage in 1992. She enjoyed traveling. She is survived by her husband, Bonta; four daughters; two grandsons; two sisters; and a sister-in-law.

Malcolm Freiberg '47 AM, '51 PhD, of Cambridge, Mass., formerly of Belmont, Mass., and Jaffrey, N.H.; June 27. He was the emeritus editor of publications at the Massachusetts Historical Society. He wrote numerous articles, including "Prelude to Purgatory: Thomas Hutchinson in Provincial Massachusetts Politics 1760-1770" for the William and Mary Quarterly and "A Summary View" for the Catholic Historical Review, as well as many sketches for Sibley's Harvard Graduates. He was named in The Dictionary of American Scholars, 3rd edition. He was a member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, the American Historical Assoc., and the Massachusetts Historical Society. He is survived by his daughter, Sarah Ellison '80; a son-in-law; and two grandchildren.

George R. Cowan '49 PhD, of Huntington, Pa., formerly of Woodbury, N.J.; July 14, after a long illness. He was a research scientist at DuPont. He published many scientific papers, obtained several patents, and received numerous scientific awards. He enjoyed reading, camping, canoeing, skiing, and playing golf and bridge. He is survived by his wife, Fran; a daughter; two sons; four grandchildren; four stepchildren; and five step-grandchildren.

Preston S. Abbott '53 PhD, of Alexandria, Va.; June 9, of congestive heart failure. He was employed as a research psychologist and held several managerial positions for more than 50 years at the Human Resources Research Organization. He also served as director of the American Univ.'s Center for Research in Social Systems from 1970 to 1975. In 1975 he founded the consulting firm Abbott Associates. He was a member of Sigma Xi and a fellow of the American Psychological Assoc., and was listed in the Who's Who American Men of Science. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons; and four grandchildren.

Paul T. Somm '57 ScM, of Seattle; July 19. He was a retired engineer for Boeing in Seattle. He was involved with the YMCA and the Boy Scouts of America. He enjoyed spending time outdoors with his family and sailing on Lake Washington in the sailboat he built. He is survived by two children, four grandchildren, three brothers, and several nieces and nephews.

Eleanor Marks Zexter '62 MAT (see '58).

John Broza '66 MAT, of Glen Cove, N.Y.; July 26. He was an English teacher and later department chair for 18 years at Paul D. Schreiber High School, in Port Washington, N.Y. He gave talks about Shakespeare's plays in several public libraries, took groups of students to England, and created an annual Shakespeare Day. He retired in 2000. He also taught English as a Second Language, prepared students for SAT exams, and tutored at a Korean school. He is survived by his wife, Michaline; three sons; two grandchildren; and a sister.

George F. Sawdy '72 AM, '83 PhD, of Westport, Mass.; Aug. 16. He taught economics at Providence College for 35 years. He served in the Peace Corps from 1964 to 1966 and in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He enjoyed hiking, skiing, running, and white-water rafting. He is survived by his wife, Mary Anne Sedney, and two daughters.

MD

Douglas A. Wegner '89 MD, of Tucson, Ariz.; Aug. 5. A hand surgeon, he began his career as an engineer working for Fisher Scientific and Westinghouse. Wanting to switch to orthopedics, he attended medical school at Brown and did his internship and residency in orthopedics at Yale. He took a faculty surgeon position at the Univ. of Kentucky at Lexington, where he won the Teacher of the Year Award. Subsequently, he joined the Tucson Orthopedic Institute, where he practiced for the last 12 years. He enjoyed skiing, running, biking, camping, and playing golf. He is survived by his father, three sons, and two brothers.

Faculty

John W. Shroeder, of Providence; July 29. Emeritus professor of English at Brown and former associate dean of the graduate school. During World War II he served as an artillery medic in the U.S. Army. He received his PhD from Yale. He appeared in productions of Gilbert & Sullivan operas at the Cabot Street Playhouse. He enjoyed painting and music. He is survived by a daughter.





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