Obituaries
— Class of 1954

Send your news to class secretary Margery Sharp, to class secretary Marshall Cohen, or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@brown.edu.

Jan, 2022

Oliver H.P. Rodman Jr. ’54, of Hingham, Mass.; July 23. He worked in sales at the Boston Globe before retiring in 1994 as vice president of advertising. He was inquisitive and curious and willing to engage with everyone he encountered. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and he enjoyed gardening, birding, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia; three children; two granddaughters; a brother; and nieces and nephews. 

 

Jan, 2022

P. Gerald DeSimone ’54, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Suffield, Conn., and Old Westbury, N.Y.; July 27. He was a life insurance agent and succeeded in becoming a member of the Million Dollar Round Table. He transitioned into real estate development and was involved in designing, building, and managing indoor recreational facilities, condominiums, and apartment buildings. He was also successful at trading stocks. He was an avid tennis player, golfer, and skier and served as past president of the Quail Creek Country Club in Naples. He is survived by his wife Rose; four daughters; son Gerald ’85; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; 10 grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren. 

Oct, 2021

Elaine Annotti Scanlan ’54, ’59 MAT, of Riverside, R.I.; Apr. 26. She was a school teacher at Primrose Hill School in Barrington, Hope High School in Providence, and Mount Pleasant High School in Providence before retiring in 1995. She was a communicant of St. Brendan Church, a member of the parish’s Forever Young Club, and a member of the Daughters of Isabella, Riverside Circle. She enjoyed traveling, reading, and cooking. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two sons, a daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Oct, 2021

John W. Melone ’54, of Stow, Mass.; May 4. He worked in the oil fields of Texas before returning to Massachusetts to build J. (Joseph) Melone and Sons construction company. While at Brown he was a member of the football and crew teams. He enjoyed being around people and family and especially enjoyed listening to their stories. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; 11 children and their spouses; 30 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Oct, 2021

Elenore Jean Macphail Weber ’54, of Brunswick, Me.; Jan. 28. She began her career in the museum field in Kentucky as the director of the Louisville Junior Art Gallery. She went on to have a long career as a museum director at the helm of diverse museums and historic sites, including Parrish Art Museum, Rochester Museum and Science Center, Wisconsin Historical Society, Maine Maritime Museum, University of Maine Museum of Art, the Nantucket Historical Association, and various museums in New Mexico. During the 1970s, she was an associate professor at Southampton College (now Stony Brook Univ.) teaching art history and museum studies. In 1972, she was the only woman delegate for the first Sino-American Arts Exchange to China. In addition, she was president of the New England Museum Assoc., codirector of the Museum Management Institute at UC Berkeley, trustee of the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, a member of the Museum Studies Committee at Tufts Univ., and on the advisory board of the Maine Crafts Assoc. In later years she continued her involvement with museums serving as a board member and volunteer at the Cultural Alliance of Maine, Hudson Museum, Abbe Museum, and the Sir Andrew Macphail Foundation. She earned numerous awards over the length of her career, including a 2012 Merit Award from the Community Museums Association of Prince Edward Island. She was proud to be a trustee emerita at Brown and is survived by three daughters and their spouses and children.

Oct, 2021

Jon W. Fay ’54, of Newtown Square, Pa.; Feb. 3. While at Brown, he was a member of the football, lacrosse, and wrestling teams. Upon graduation he joined the U.S. Marine Corps, and once his military service was completed, he earned a degree in metallurgy from the University of Pittsburgh. His career took him to many places across the country before settling in Pennsylvania, where he started his own business that he ran for five years before merging with BenTech. He remained with BenTech for 35 years before retiring. He was always an athlete and competitor, playing golf, tennis, squash, bocce, and cards. He also enjoyed reading and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Inger; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and two brothers.

Oct, 2021

Susan Sperry Burns ’54, of Manchester, N.H.; May 7, after years battling Alzheimer’s disease. She was the owner and operator of New England Antiquities, specializing in early American pressed glass. She was also an avid knitter who learned to spin and dye all kinds of fiber to make her own yarn. She was an active member of the New Hampshire Knitters and Dyers Guild for many years and she enjoyed refurbishing old spinning wheels and selling them at sheep and wool festivals. She is survived by her husband, William; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; and nine nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2021

David Sloan ’54, of East Haddam, Conn.; Mar. 30. After discharge from the Army, he began a career in business development working for several multinational corporations assisting them in building their sales efforts, including international trade. He later became a real estate agent and appraiser serving Connecticut markets until his retirement. He had a mischievous sense of humor and enjoyed the opera, reading, and the N.Y. Giants. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; son David ’88 and his wife; and two granddaughters.

Aug, 2021

Charles M. Moran Jr. ’54, of Tiverton, R.I.; Feb. 18. He served in the ROTC at Brown and was drafted into the Army during the Korean War. After military service, he worked at Honeywell before transitioning to print journalism. He was a stringer for the Providence Journal and Fall River Herald News, and eventually the editor and publisher of the Tiverton Bulletin in the 1960s. Later he worked in the office at the family business, National Roofing Company, until its closing in 1984. During the time working in the family business, he returned to school and earned a law degree from the New England School of Law. He was passionate about local government and politics and served on the Tiverton Planning Board from 1963 until 1975 and again from 1978 to 1988. He also served on the Town’s Personnel Board in 1977 and 1978. He went on to serve as chairman of Tiverton’s Democratic Town Committee from 1995 until 2011. He was an alternate on the Board of Canvassers from 2011 until 2014 and was part of Congressman David Cicilline’s Senior Advisory Council during Cicilline’s first term. He strongly believed in citizens exercising their right to vote, offering rides to the polls for voters without transportation, and often organized meal delivery to poll workers of both parties on Election Day in Tiverton. He was a communicant of St. Christopher’s Church for more than 80 years. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021

Patricia J. Collins ’54, of Branford, Conn.; Mar. 21, of pancreatic cancer. She was a Tony Award–winning lighting designer. After graduating from Brown, she spent a year at Yale Drama School. She worked as a stage manager at the Joffrey Ballet, then as an assistant to Jean Rosenthal, who was a top Broadway lighting designer at the American Shakespeare Festival Theater in Stratford, Conn. She worked as a stage manager, among other jobs, in the 1960s when Joseph Papp, the founder and director of the New York Shakespeare Festival, hired her to design the lighting for productions of The Threepenny Opera (Lincoln Center Revival) in 1976. She won her Tony for Herb Gardner’s I’m Not Rappaport in 1986, and was the lighting designer for more than 30 other Broadway productions, among them Ain’t Misbehavin’ and Doubt, which earned her a Tony nomination. In a 2002 revival of Lanford Wilson’s Burn This at the Union Square Theater, she transformed figures onstage into what Ben Brantley of The New York Times called “ambiguous silhouettes.” She also worked at regional theaters throughout the United States and with opera companies in New York, San Francisco, Santa Fe, London, Paris, and Munich. She is survived by her partner, Dr. Virginia Stuermer.

Aug, 2021

Ruth Finkelstein Drill Ignatoff ’54, of Roseland, N.J.; Nov. 20. She was a homemaker who wanted more and returned to school, graduating from Rutgers University School of Social Work in 1968. She accepted a position with the Jewish Family Service, where she worked as a social worker, and was an active member of the Community and Social Agency Employees union. She was a role model for community involvement and an advocate for social justice. In 1970, she led a sit-down strike which ended with her spending an afternoon in jail. She was a lifelong member of the Democratic party and had strong opinions about politics. She is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Jonathan Drill ’80; daughters Rebecca Drill ’82 and Esther Drill ’90; four stepchildren and their spouses; 17 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021

Olinda Andrade Calista ’54, of Worcester, Mass., formerly of Rumford, R.I.; Feb. 10, of Parkinson’s disease. She continued working towards a master’s degree at Rhode Island College while working as an elementary school teacher in East Providence. She believed in educational equity and was a volunteer for many years with Literacy Volunteers of America, assisting English Language Learners to read and write. Throughout her life she experienced medical challenges, yet did so with dignity and a quiet elegance, always wanting to be productive and contribute to the well-being of her family and others. She was active in the R.I. Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association. It was her wish to make an anatomical donation (her brain) for the advancement of Parkinson’s Disease research. In 2016, she moved to Worcester to be closer to her daughter and was welcomed by the Briarwood Community, where she actively participated in life and ongoing learning. She is survived by a daughter, two sisters, two sisters-in-law, an aunt, and a cousin.

Aug, 2021

William Brigden ’54, of Fairfield, Conn.; June 13, 2020, from COVID-19. He was a marketing director for various agencies, including Benton & Bowles of New York City. He retired in 2001. He was an avid golfer, swimmer, and hiker and enjoyed traveling and photography. He is survived by three children, including Adriane Brigden McDermott ’91, and six grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Wilhelm F. Zantow ’54, of Orleans, Mass.; Jan. 9, of pancreatic cancer. He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and taught electronics at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. He was recruited by IBM in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., then worked at Raytheon Corp. in Sudbury, Mass., finishing his career in Kaiserslautern, Germany, and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His proudest achievement was his design of the core rope memory for the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. He retired to Cape Cod in 1992 and began a new career building small boats and cabinets. He was a mentor and sponsor in the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous for more than 20 years and a founder of Club Drydock in Harwich, Mass. He was a member of the Nau-Sets Square Dance Club in Dennis and traveled the world attending square dance conventions. He was an active supporter of human rights and social justice activities. He is survived by his partner Elizabeth Kelley; nine children; six grandchildren; a sister; nieces; a nephew; and his former wife, Mary Guinn Zantow.

Jun, 2021

Robert Wals ’54, of Rye Brook, N.Y.; Jan. 15, from complications of Alzheimer’s. He was a product manager at General Foods prior to founding his own company, Scarsdale Marketing. He was also an adjunct instructor at Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y., where he taught Introduction to Marketing for 28 years. He retired in 2011. For many years he interviewed prospective students for Brown. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed attending the Brown v. Columbia and Brown v. Penn football games, swimming, and participating in sculpture classes. He is survived by his wife, Avis; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021

Ludwig “Lou” W. Murgo ’54, of San Bruno, Calif.; Jan. 4. After graduation, he enlisted in the Army. He played baseball for the Baltimore Orioles in their farm system and later became a high school baseball, basketball, and football coach both in Rhode Island and in California, where he was honored by Aragon High School for coaching 50 consecutive years. He enjoyed volunteering for local community theatres and orchestras and was active in his church. He also enjoyed reading and writing poetry. He is survived by his wife, Jeanie; two daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021

Glenn C. Morrison ’54, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Feb. 8. He spent most of his professional life in pharmaceutical research with Warner-
Lambert Co. in Morris Plains, N.J., transferring to Ann Arbor when the company merged with Parke-Davis. In retirement, he enjoy-
ed following the stock market, playing bridge, golf, and bowling. He is survived by his wife, Anne; three children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021

Alfred J. Petteruti ’54, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Jan. 19, from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating with a degree in electrical engineering, he attended graduate school at Yale and obtained a master’s degree from Northeastern University. In 1956, Al enlisted in the U.S. Army and was stationed as a security officer in Japan. Upon discharge, he worked at Raytheon for 11 years before founding Ocean Data Equipment Corp. Subsequently, he acquired Digitronics, which became Comtec Information Systems, where he served as CEO until he retired in 2000. Along with the company, he was granted numerous patents for a wide range of innovative products. Above all, he enjoyed nothing more than sharing a meal while surrounded by his children and grandchildren. He maintained a lifelong commitment to Brown through philanthropy and other roles, but hosting entertainers who performed at the annual Brown Pops Concert was one of his favorite things to do. Among his contributions, he funded the Petteruti Lounge in Brown’s Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center and the Petteruti Laboratory for Design and Entrepreneurship (part of the Brown Design Workshop in Prince Lab). He was a BASC interviewer and served as a class marshal. He was a member of Tau Beta Pi and Our Lady of Mercy Church. He is survived by his wife, Mary; daughters Anne Marie Petteruti Barone ’84 and Lenore Petteruti Kopko ’86; sons Robert ’81 and Steven ’83; nine grandchildren, including Alina Petteruti ’13, Marissa Petteruti ’14, Robert Jr. ’17, Anessa Petteruti ’21, Patrick Petteruti ’21, and Michael Barone ’24. 

Jun, 2021

Alphonse U. Marcotte ’54, of Hyde Park, N.Y.; Feb. 4, after a short illness. He was an electrical engineer at IBM for 32 years. He volunteered with Dutchess County Tourism, was involved with the Regina Coeli Church and School, and was a charter member of the Swim and Tennis Club in Hyde Park and a member of the Center for Lifetime Study at Marist College. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ellin; five children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021

Girard E. Haverty ’54, of Farmington, Conn.; Feb. 19, of complications of Parkinson’s. He and his brother ran E.J. Haverty, Inc., a construction company founded by their father that specialized in paving and site work in the greater Hartford area. When he was not working, he and his family enjoyed spending time in Florida and Vermont. He enjoyed skiing, fishing, scuba diving, and spending time with his buddies at the West Hartford Exchange Club. He was a former Brown football captain and class marshal. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; two children and their spouses; a granddaughter; a sister; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2021

Nicholas C. Siotka ’54, of Towson, Md., formerly of Longs, S.C.; Sept. 27. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Loretta; two daughters; two stepchildren; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021

Keith G. Milligan ’54, of Seekonk, Mass.; Oct. 1. He was an underwriter executive assistant for Amica Insurance, earning his CPCU designation in 1966. He retired in 1996 after 40 years of service. In 1968, he was one of eight people that founded the Special Signal Fire Association. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the Masons, several antique car clubs, and Mensa.

Apr, 2021

Barbara Reuben Levin ’54, of Hartford, Conn.; Nov. 19. An accomplished artist, her paintings won juried prizes and awards throughout her career, and her work lives in individual museum and corporate collections. She was active in the Connecticut Watercolor Society and in an artists’ critique group in Greater Hartford. She joined the New Yorker readers group at the West Hartford Public Library and enjoyed discussions with her husband about matters of the day, with her sons-in-law to learn more about their work and interests, and with her grandchildren to hear about their triumphs and struggles. She is survived by her husband, Ira; three daughters; two sons-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021

Haven P. Cammett ’54, of Lake City, Fla.; Nov. 22, following a long illness. He retired from the U.S. Navy after 36 years as a Naval navigator. He then spent the next 20 years working as a data processor with the Jacksonville Electric Authority. He was a Vietnam War and Korean War veteran and enjoyed flying his private plane. He is survived by his wife, Pearline; four children; four grandchildren; and four sisters.

Apr, 2021

Richard G. Brodrick ’54, of Barnard, Vt., formerly of New Canaan, Conn.; Oct. 5. After graduating from Harvard Law School, he spent 10 years at a small New York firm specializing in trusts and estates before he founded his own firm, Cross, Brodrick, & Chipman, with an emphasis on corporate law. The firm merged in 1980 with the large international firm of Kelley, Drye & Warren. Dick served on its executive committee until his retirement in 2000. The last 10 years of his career focused on representing many broker-dealers and investment advisors. He provided legal and compliance services for brokerage firms, investment banking and advisory firms, discount brokers, and many of the largest specialist firms on the New York Stock Exchange. He managed and participated in major arbitration and enforcement actions. For three years after his retirement, he served as an arbitrator for the National Association of Securities Dealers in Phoenix. While living in New Canaan, he headed the Child Guidance Clinic. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two daughters; a son; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Gail Erickson Woods ’54, of Fort Collins, Colo.; Aug. 8. She worked as a program coordinator with the YWCA in Salem and Portland, Ore., and returned to the East Coast as the assistant director of the New Haven (Conn.) YWCA. In 1970, she was involved with the International Friends Program, welcoming international students to the U.S. In 1978, in Fort Collins, she was involved in volunteer work that led the city to hire her as the volunteer program coordinator. She successfully wrote a grant to establish Senior Alternatives in Transportation (SAINT), in which volunteer drivers help older adults get around. She and her husband moved to Taiwan in 1984 for a year-long Fulbright Fellowship and Gail continued her volunteer work with the Taipei YWCA. In addition to her work welcoming students from around the world, she also supported the homeless at New Bridges and the Homelessness Prevention Initiative (now Neighbor to Neighbor), and older adults through the Foundation on Aging for Larimer County. She is survived by three children and their spouses, six grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Jan, 2021

Paul E. Wittreich ’54, of Franklin, Pa.; Aug. 12. As a member of Brown’s NROTC, he was commissioned an ensign upon graduation. After military service, he worked for 14 years as a research bench chemist for Merck & Co. in Rahway, N.J. In 1969, he left the labs to become a medical associate in the MSD International Division of Merck & Co.; two of his six years there were spent in Europe. In 1975, he was promoted to associate director of Merck’s International Animal Health Products Division. He retired in 1986. Paul was a marathon runner during his 50s, completing 13 marathons. In addition, he hiked the Long Trail in Vermont, completing it in 1973, and completed the Appalachian Trail in 1989 after 47 hikes over 19 years. In the early 1990s he biked across the U.S. and continued to bike every summer in various organized bike tours. He took numerous art classes, allowing him the opportunity to show his work in one-man shows. He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a stepson, seven grand-children, a great-grandson, and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021

Lynn Campbell Morris ’54, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; June 20, of heart failure. She taught intermediate and high school in Hicksville, N.Y., and later at Stony Brook University, where she served as foreign student advisor and dean for foreign students before retiring in 1998. Lynn worked with students and scholars from 90 countries. She expanded her PhD dissertation to publish Chaucer Source and Analogue Criticism, a computerized index of 200 years of Chaucerian scholarship. A master gardener, she also enjoyed the Kalamazoo Symphony, Viking culture, traveling, and playing bridge and Scrabble. She is survived by her husband, Greg; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Peter H. Mohrfeld ’54, of Black Mountain, N.C.; Aug. 25. He spent most of his career with the Gillette Company working in Boston, New Orleans, Italy, Spain, and Mexico. He served in the U.S. Army and was happiest on the water enjoying sailing and fishing. He is survived by two daughters.

Jan, 2021

Elizabeth Kelly Dudley ’54, of Chaska, Minn., formerly of Minneapolis and Fripp Island, S.C.; Nov. 18, 2019, of a stroke. She was active in the Welcome Wagon organization and was a hospital volunteer. After moving to Fripp Island, she stayed active playing golf and bridge. She also enjoyed traveling. She is survived by her husband, Dana ’54; a daughter and son-in-law; and three grandsons.

Nov, 2020

Diane Demirjian Markarian ’58, of Bethesda, Md.; July 2. She taught elementary school in Warwick, R.I., and in Anne Arundel County, Md., and later held various professional roles with Old Colony Bank, Mass. She served as chair of the Hopedale School Committee, Mass., and was a longstanding member and officer of the Portsmouth Garden Club, R.I. She enjoyed antiques, playing bridge, tennis, dancing, skiing, gardening, crocheting, knitting, sewing, solving crossword puzzles, and cooking. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Shant Markarian ’54; a daughter, Kris Markarian ’84; two sons; two grandchildren; three sisters, including Virginia Demirjian Dadourian ’59; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020

Louis H. Pastore Jr. ’54, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. He had a long career as an insurance broker in Providence and Hartford, Conn. He also served as state senator and held a commissioner appointment in the business regulation department. He enjoyed playing golf and was a longtime member of Metacomet Country Club in East Providence. He also enjoyed spending summers with family at Bonnet Shores in Narragansett. He is survived by his wife, Elaine Richard Pastore ’58 AM; four children, including daughter Chaela Pastore ’89; seven grandchildren, including Michael Pastore ’13; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020

Vincent M. Love ’54, of New York City; Apr. 16. He was vice president of the Mayflower Hotel in New York City. In retirement he volunteered as a research docent at the South Street Seaport Museum. He enjoyed sailing, opera, and attending productions at the Met. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his brother Arthur ’56; a sister-in-law; a niece; and four nephews, including Andrew M. Love Jr. ’87.

Nov, 2020

Charles I. Judkins Jr. ’54, of Albuquerque, formerly of Maryland, Massachusetts, and Connecticut; June 26. He was known as “Red” to his family and friends because of his fiery red hair. He was a choir singer all of his life, most recently at Sandia Presbyterian Church. He entered Brown on a Navy ROTC scholarship and played varsity football and basketball, then proudly served during the Korean War. He earned an MBA from Columbia Business School in 1958, was hired by IBM and sold large-frame computers in the New York City area. In 1961, he was recruited to work at Travelers Research Center in Hartford, Conn. In 1967, he and two partners started Geomet, a technical service company in Washington, D.C., and the family lived in Potomac, Md., until 1985, when Geomet was purchased and he partially retired. He then traveled the world with his wife, Nancy, played golf, and enjoyed his summer cottage in Bethany Beach, Del., with family and friends. They moved permanently to Albuquerque in 2003 to take part in the lives of their two grandsons. In 2019, he and Nancy attended their 65th reunion, where they were both honored to serve as Marshals at the 2019 Brown Commencement. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Kaufman Judkins ’54; three children, including son Peter ’84; a daughter-in-law; two grandsons; a brother, Richard Judkins ’59; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020

Armando E. Batastini Jr. ’54, of Providence; Apr. 11. He worked as a student support specialist for the Providence School Department for 36 years. He also worked as a supervisor and director for the Kennedy Recreation Center at the Providence Recreation Department for 25 years. He was named to the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Children and Youth for his work in education. Additionally, he served as State Representative from the Elmhurst/Mount Pleasant and North Providence areas from 1976 until 1992. He was awarded the Hubert Humphrey Public Service Award for his work on the Senior Citizen Bill of Rights legislation. Throughout his life he was involved in all aspects of his community, particularly through sports, having founded the Elmhurst Little League and coached the St. Pius Catholic youth sports basketball team for 61 years. He was inducted into both the New England Basketball Hall of Fame and the Sons of Italy Hall of Fame, and in 2019 the Armand Batastini Recreation Center in Providence was named in his honor. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Mary; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2020

Caleb R. Woodhouse ’54, of Little Compton, R.I.; Jan. 28. He had a distinguished career teaching history at both the college and high school level for more than 30 years. He enjoyed singing and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Alesandra; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law.

Aug, 2020

Nancy Schmidt Sherman ’54, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Feb. 20. She worked at Manufacturer’s Bank until she began her family. She was cofounder of the Angle Tree Garden Club and served as its president. She was an accomplished artist and enjoyed knitting, needlepoint, and playing tennis. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020

Edward Rowland ’54, of South Hamilton, Mass.; Mar. 11. After serving in the U.S. Army, he moved to Carbondale, Colo., where he taught at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He moved to Boston a year later to join Estabrook and Company, where he began a career in the investment business that spanned six decades. In 1971, he joined the board of trustees at The Pingree School in Hamilton, later becoming its chair. An avid sailor, he spent many summers on Cape Cod and was a member of the Cruising Club of America, where he served as commodore from 2005 to 2007. He is survived by his wife, Susie; a daughter; a son; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

Aug, 2020

Frank J. Lord ’54, of West Yarmouth, Mass.; Feb. 1. After three years of active duty in the Pacific with the U.S. Navy and 18 years in the Naval Reserve, he retired with the rank of captain. He taught high school world geography in Lexington, attended Boston University to become a guidance counselor, and worked for 38 years as a guidance counselor in both Wellesley and in Duxbury, retiring in 1994. He spent 12 years building houses with Habitat for Humanity and later led his Duxbury church high school youth group to build and repair homes with Rural Missions in South Carolina. During summers he volunteered as a historical tour guide in Duxbury. He joined Mashpee Historical Commission and for decades served as schoolmaster of the One Room Schoolhouse, for which he received a Historical Preservation Award in June 2019. He was appointed to the Mashpee Community Preservation Committee and served as president of the Southport Woodworkers Club and assistant moderator of the Mashpee Men’s Club. He enjoyed historical research and wrote a monthly article about Mashpees’s unique history as a Wampanoag town for the Southport Village Voices. He enjoyed woodworking, swimming, sailing, reading biographies and historical novels, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren, and two sisters.

Aug, 2020

Laurie Crispin Elliot ’54, of State College, Pa.; Feb. 3. She was an instructional aide for 33 years at the State College Elementary School library. She retired in 2006. She was a member of State College Presbyterian Church and the State College Choral Society. She enjoyed reading and traveling. She is survived by five children and their spouses, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2020

Robert A. Seligson ’54, of Oakland, Calif.; Nov. 24. After graduation from the Boalt Hall School of Law at UC Berkeley, he embarked on a law career that spanned more than three decades. He worked for the San Francisco law firm Bledsoe, Smith, Cathcart, Johnson & Rogers for 15 years, becoming a partner in 1963. In 1973, he opened his own law practice in San Francisco and specialized in insurance law and appellate work, and he taught both of those subjects at UC Hastings College of the Law. He served on a variety of committees and boards with the San Francisco and California State Bar associations and retired early to travel with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; three children; six grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

 

Apr, 2020

George Monteiro ’54, ’64 PhD, of Windham, Conn.; Nov. 5. He taught American literature at Brown for 42 years, retiring in 1998. He authored more than 30 books and hundreds of articles on American and Portuguese literature and culture and was an accomplished poet. He was knighted by the Portuguese Government with the Order of Prince Henry the Navigator for distinguished contributions to the study and dissemination of Portuguese culture. He was an avid supporter of the UConn women’s basketball team and a fan of both the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. He is survived by his wife, Brenda Murphy ’75 PhD; two daughters; son Stephen ’90;
three grandsons; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020

Elton P. Katz ’54, of West Hartford, Conn.; Nov. 19. He earned a PhD at MIT focusing on physical chemistry and received an appointment at Harvard University as research associate in biological chemistry in the department of orthopedic surgery. This was followed by a two-year sabbatical in Israel at the Weizmann Institute of Science. He ended his career as a professor in UConn’s department of biostructure and function. He was an expert in the use of x-ray crystallography as a means to understand the molecular structure of connective tissue with a special interest in collagen. He was an avid sailor, having spent many summers sailing from Rhode Island to Maine and Canada. He played basketball for Brown and enjoyed hiking, swimming, tennis, and biking. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Rosalind; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; two stepsons and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and a sister-in-law.

 

Apr, 2020

Bruce H. Hunt ’54, of Marshfield, Mass., formerly of Skiathos, Greece; Oct. 9. After graduating, he served two years in the U.S. Navy, then took a position as a social studies teacher at Northport High School on Long Island, N.Y., beginning a 38-year career as an educator. During his tenure he helped design and implement unique classes and novel teaching methods. During the 1960s he was an active civil rights leader, head of the Fair Housing Association of Huntington, N.Y., and chair of the Huntington Human Relations Committee. He went to Alabama to march with Dr. Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery. In 1970 he took his family to Greece, where he taught at the American Community Schools for six years. After retiring from Northport High School, he took positions at the American Embassy School in Damascus, Syria, and lived there for five years. In 1998 he permanently retired and moved to Skiathos, living there for 16 years. In 2014 he moved back to the U.S. and enjoyed time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Marcia Pickering Hunt ’55; a daughter and her husband; two sons and their spouses, including Peter ’84; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; brother Albert ’50; and many nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2020

Stephen F. Honan ’54, of Concord, Mass.; Oct. 30. His career centered around publishing and book manufacturing as a senior account manager for the Banta Corp., now known as RR Donnelley. He was a member of Book Builders of Boston and a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed reading, birdwatching, astronomy, and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Frances; four children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a sister, Ann Rodrigues ’66; and a brother.

Apr, 2020

Arthur Hacking Jr. ’54, of Milton, Mass.; Sept. 29. He was a retired architect. Much of his work was in the biomedical community helping to build functional patient care, administrative, and research spaces at such places as Lahey Clinic and Brigham & Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School. He was also a trusted adviser in Boston for more than 30 years. He is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020

Elizabeth Kelly Dudley ’54, of Chaska, Minn.; Nov. 18. She resided in several states before retiring to Minnesota. Over the course of her career, she was employed as secretary to the vice president and legal counsel of Bridgeport Brass of Bridgeport, Conn. and as the secretary to the vice president and treasurer of American Water Works in Philadelphia, and later was active with Welcome Wagon in Minnesota. She enjoyed playing duplicate bridge, golf, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Dana Dudley ’54; a daughter and son-in-law; three grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020

John L. Dodge ’54, of Charlottesville, Va.; Oct. 28. He joined Habitat for Humanity and started the HFH store. He later became a director and then served as chair of the board of directors for many years. He is survived by his wife, Anne Peasley Dodge ’65; three children; and a stepdaughter.

Jan, 2020

John E. Orton III ’54, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 20. He was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar Association in 1962 and practiced law in Warwick and Providence. In 1969 he was appointed an Associate Justice of the R.I. District Court and then appointed an Associate Justice of the R.I. Superior Court in 1974 before retiring as acting presiding judge in 1991. He was a member of the Brown football team and also played on the U.S. Marine Corps football team. He is survived by his wife, Denise; three sons; two stepdaughters; eight grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020

John D. Greene ’54, of Pine Plains, N.Y.; Sept. 20. After discharge from the U.S. Army, he joined his father in starting the firm Greene & Greene on the floor of the American Stock Exchange. In 1973 he merged his firm into Spear, Leeds & Kellogg, where he remained a partner until his retirement in 1987. He had a second 30-year career as a painter and sculptor.  He studied at both the American Academy of Art and the New York Sculpture Center. Over the years he became recognized for his use of encaustic (beeswax), painting primarily abstract landscapes noted for their richness of color and surface and exhibiting throughout the country. His work can be seen at Windham Fine Arts in Windham, N.Y. and Main Street Arts in Clifton Springs, N.Y. He was a member of the board of the University of Rochester and is survived by his wife, Gwen; two daughters; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and two nieces.

 

Jan, 2020

Charles D. Drummond Jr. ’54, of Germantown, Tenn., formerly of Tampa, Fla.; Oct. 2, after a long illness. After receiving his medical degree from Boston Univ., he moved to Tampa and practiced urology for 10 years. He then completed a residency in pathology at Tampa General Hospital and the University of South Florida and served as a clinical professor of pathology at USF and a lecturer at Tampa General Hospital’s School of Medical Technology. He was employed as a staff pathologist at Pathologist’s Reference Laboratory and was medical director of the laboratory at Hillsborough County Hospital. In 2000, he moved to Germantown to be closer to his children and grandchildren. He was a member of several medical committees, the Germantown United Methodist Church, and the Rutherford Prayer Group. He also enjoyed watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; a daughter; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020

Robert F. Copp ’54, of Locust Valley, N.Y.; Sept. 30. He served in the U.S. Navy before beginning his 39-year career at Union Carbide Corp. He was a member of Seawanhaka Corinthian Yacht Club and is survived by his wife, Jacqueline; daughter Catherine Copp Colley ’82; a son; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Arthur W. Vietze Jr. ’54, of Stratford, Conn.; Aug. 12. At Brown he was co-captain of the men’s hockey team. He served in the U.S. Army Signal Corp from 1954 to 1957. Upon leaving the army, he was employed by Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia. He left Liberty Mutual and was hired by Rite Box in Hamden, Conn. In 1969 he cofounded Valley Container, Inc., in Bridgeport, Conn., and in 1973 cofounded Fluted Partition Inc., also in Bridgeport. In 1996 he cofounded Honey Cell Inc. in Shelton, Conn. He enjoyed camping and hiking in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and skiing in Vermont and Colorado. He also enjoyed playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Carmella; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Roderick Schutt ’54, of Ridgewood, N.J.; June 21. He practiced corporate law in New York City, was a counselor with the Fresh Air Fund Summer Camp, volunteered with Planned Parenthood of Northern N.J., and, after retirement, cooked meals for children in a group home. He is survived by his wife, Rose Marie; two daughters; two grandsons; and sister Katherine Chadwick ’58.

 

Nov, 2019

Harold H. Robinson Jr. ’54, of Manchester, Conn.; June 1. He taught English and for 38 years was head of the English department at Windsor Locks High School, where he was also chosen as Teacher of the Year. He served as adjunct faculty at the University of Hartford and at UConn. He later taught English at Manchester Community College and volunteered as an English tutor at Notre Dame Learning Center in Hartford. He enjoyed reading, camping, and traveling with family. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Madeleine; four children; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019

John J. Farrell ’54, of Indio, Calif.; Feb. 7.

Nov, 2019

Alton C. Emery ’54, of Cranston, R.I.; June 25. He managed the family businesses, Relton Realty and the Hope Theatre Company, for many years. He enjoyed fishing and gardening and is survived by three children, a granddaughter, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019

James M. McSherry ’54, of West Falmouth, Mass., formerly of Charleston, S.C.; Apr. 9. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began working at E.R. Carpenter Company in Richmond, Va., and later at West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company, which eventually became Westvaco. He retired in 1994 as vice president of the Kraft Division in Charleston. He was a member and former commodore of the Chapoquoit Yacht Club in West Falmouth and the Lions Club of Charleston. He enjoyed family summers on Chapoquoit Island and is survived by his wife, Joanne Webster McSherry ’53; four sons, including Peter ’78; 11 grandchildren; a sister; a brother; sister-in-law Joan Edgley Webster ’58; brother-in-law Gordon Webster ’54; and niece Alison Webster ’83.

 

Sep, 2019

S. Thomas Gagliano ’54, of Red Bank, N.J.; Apr. 13. He joined the law practice of Potter and Fisher, Long Branch, in 1960 and became senior partner of the firm, which later became Gagliano, Tucci, Iadanza & Reisner, representing municipal governments, land use boards, and authorities. In 1991 he became of counsel at Giordano, Halleran & Ciesla, then senior vice president for corporate and legal affairs at EPS Corporation. Active in county politics, he was elected to the Borough of Oceanport Council in 1967, became County Surrogate for a five-year term, and served in the New Jersey Senate for three terms beginning in 1977. He rose in leadership ranks to hold the post of minority leader of the Senate, as well as ranking member of the transportation and communication committees. He was instrumental in forming what is now New Jersey Transit, to which he would later be appointed executive director. In 1991 he formed the Jersey Shore Partnership. He was a member of the Amerigo Vespucci Society of Long Branch; served on the board of East Jersey Savings and Loan; was a founding member of the Ironbound Bank; a founder and board member of Future Vision Cable, which became part of Comcast; and a member of the legislative committee of Meridian Health Care. He is survived by his wife, Maria; four children, including son John ’85; and 11 grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019

Loring W. Chadwick ’54, of Leesburg, Fla.; Apr. 26. He was a music teacher for 28 years in the Cumberland, R.I., school system. He cofounded the Cumberland-Lincoln Community Chorus and served as codirector for 12 years. He was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1958 and served at various locations throughout Rhode Island. After moving to Ocala, he joined the Church of the Advent, assisting as the director of music.

 

Jul, 2019

Joan Schlosser Taber ’54, of Barrington, R.I.; Mar. 18. While raising a family, she was involved with civic organizations, taught preschool at St. John’s Day School, volunteered at Encore clothing boutique, was a summer camp director at Bayside Family YMCA, and served as an officer for Barrington Junior Women’s Club. She enjoyed playing tennis and needlework. She is survived by four children.
 

 

Jul, 2019

George S. Morfogen ’54, of New York City; Mar. 8. An actor whose career spanned Broadway, film, and television, he was most recognizable as Bob Rebadow in the HBO series Oz. He appeared in more than 12 television series, including St. Elsewhere, Sherlock Holmes, Kojak, Blood Feud, and Deadly Matrimony. He also appeared in numerous films, including What’s Up, Doc?, Daisy Miller, They All Laughed and She’s Funny That Way. His Off-Broadway credits were numerous and his latest stage production was Traveling Lady at Off Broadway’s Cherry Lane Theatre in 2017. For 17 seasons he was resident actor at The Williamstown Theatre Festival and was an instructor in acting at HB Studio. He is survived by his husband, Gene Laughorne, and two nieces.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Helen Deuell Carter ’54, of Goshen, N.Y., formerly of Fort Myers, Fla.; Nov. 20. She worked as an advertising copywriter at Bonwit Teller  in New York City, and after marrying, raised a family. She is survived by three sons.

 

May, 2019

David F. West ’54, of Bremen, Me., formerly of Harrington Park, N.J.; Nov. 24. He began working in life insurance sales prior to owning his own agency. He was active in the Bremen community and was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by two sons and their spouses and six grandchildren.

May, 2019

Douglas L. Turner ’54, of Springfield, Va., formerly of Buffalo, N.Y.; Nov. 4, after a long illness. He was a rower in the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games. In 1957 he joined Buffalo’s Courier Express, advancing as Albany bureau chief, financial editor, city editor, executive editor, and Washington bureau chief. After the Courier closed in 1982, he joined the Buffalo News and was bureau chief from 1982 to 2007. At Brown he participated in varsity crew, sang with the Jabberwocks, and was a member of Beta Theta Pi. For most of his life he was a deacon, elder and trustee of First Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, but converted to Catholicism in 1988 and immersed himself in Catholic literature. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Associated Press Managing Editors Assoc. He was also a governor of the National Press Club and a member of the Gridiron Club, an elite journalism society. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, and 10 grandchildren.

May, 2019

William F. Peace ’54, of Rockport, Me.; Dec. 21, after a short illness due to ALS complications. While at Brown, he played football, was president of Delta Upsilon, co-chairman of the Brown Community Fund, and was an active member of the Class Council and Brown Keys. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Army’s Counter Intelligence Corps. He began a career at Procter & Gamble and later moved to real estate, where he worked for the majority of his career. He received many honors over the course of his professional life, including Realtor of the Year (Hartford, Conn.) in 1983. Residing in Simsbury, Conn., for 35 years, he dedicated countless hours to his community and was honored as Town Citizen of the Year in 1973 by both the Jaycees and the Simsbury Chamber of Commerce. Following his retirement, Bill and his wife settled in Rockport, where he continued his volunteer efforts and was recognized as Volunteer of the Year by the Chamber of Commerce (Camden/Rockport) in 2005. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Patti; two children and their spouses; and three granddaughters.

May, 2019

Edith Veit Johnstone ’54, of Rutland, Vt.; Dec. 6. She taught art in elementary schools and china painting to two groups of adults in Killington, Vt., for 14 years and then became self-employed painting china and eggs for retail shops. She is survived by three children, including Anne Johnstone ’79; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

May, 2019

Doris Eisenberg Epstein ’54, of Bradenton, Fla.; Dec. 25. After marrying and moving to San Diego, she worked as a social worker for two and a half years. She eventually moved to Ames, Iowa, where she earned a master’s in library science and worked for 20 years as a media specialist for the Ames Community Schools. She was an active member of the Ames Jewish Congregation and its Interfaith Council. In 2005 she retired to Bradenton and became a member of the Sarasota-Manatee Chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; two grandsons; brother Benjamin Eisenberg ’51; a sister-in-law; and niece.

Mar, 2019

Vieri Guy Volterra ’54, of Boston; Nov. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and graduating from Boston Univ. School of Law, he started an independent law practice in New Bedford, Mass., where he went from criminal defense attorney to public defender, assistant district attorney, and finally counsel to the mayor. For the next 27 years he was a Massachusetts judge in the Taunton District Court first, and then for 20 years with the Massachusetts Superior Court. After retiring from the court, he joined his brother’s law partnership and set up an independent neutral mediation practice. In 2009 he left the practice and joined Senior Partners for Justice/Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Massachusetts Bar Assoc. to represent indigent civil litigants in family law disputes. He was vitally engaged in issues of oppression and conflict in the U.S. and internationally. In 2002 he received the Law and Justice Award from the Commission for Social Justice, Sons of Italy in America, and in 2012 he received the Victor J. Garo Public Service Award from the B.U. School of Law. He enjoyed reading and is survived by his wife, Melanie; two children; a grandson; a brother, Max ’57; a sister-in-law; a niece and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019

Barbara Hobart Mitten ’54, of Paradise Valley, Ariz.; Oct. 6. She was a homemaker and in charge of local junior tennis tournaments. She volunteered at the Maricopa County Courthouse and served on several boards, including the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation. She enjoyed being active and did aerobics as well as playing tennis and golf. She is survived by three children, two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019

John A. Wallace ’54, of Warwick, R.I.; Sept. 16. He attended Brown through ROTC and upon graduation became a naval officer and went to flight school in Pensacola, Fla. Following his naval career, he started Copters Unlimited, Inc., at T.F. Green Airport. He later began a second career as an engineer with General Dynamics. He served as president of the Warwick Boys & Girls Club and was a former member of the Jaycees and past vice president of the Rhode Island Pilots Assoc. He was also a member of the American Helicopter Society and enjoyed reading and playing cribbage. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter and son and their spouses; two grandsons; two great-grandchildren; and a sister-in-law.

 

Jan, 2019

Norman E. Langdon ’54, of Newcastle, Me.; July 29, of pancreatic cancer. He worked as a real estate developer in New Hampshire and Maine before being employed at Damariscotta Hardware in Damariscotta, Me. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and many nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2018

Delfina Fiorini Shockley ’54, of Lake Havasu City, Ariz.; Dec. 19. She was a retired teacher and enjoyed family and traveling. She is survived by three daughters.

 

Nov, 2018

Albert D. Kelly Jr. ’54, of Waterbury, Vt.; July 2, after a brief illness. He taught math and driver’s education at Harwood Union High School in Moretown, Vt. He was also an inaugural instructor and facilitator for the State of Vermont Project CRASH Program in 1973. He was an early member of the Vermont Teacher Credit Union and served on the slate of officers. He enjoyed teaching and in retirement tutored neighbors and volunteered with the North Central Vermont Recovery Center. An accomplished musician, he served in the U.S. Army Band and performed in choirs and bands throughout his life, including the choir at St. Andrew’s Church and faculty theater performances at Harwood. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; eight daughters; a son; 21 grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018

Virginia Fellows Maloney ’54, of Charlotte, N.C.; May 19. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She enjoyed playing bridge and traveling. She is survived by her husband, William ’51; a daughter; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Robert I. Kramer ’54, of Dallas; Mar. 5. He was a founding partner of Pediatric Associates of Dallas, president of the medical staff at Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, and chairman of the department of pediatrics at Baylor Univ. Medical Center, where he founded the Baylor Pediatric Center for Restorative Care. He was also a faculty member and clinical professor of pediatrics and pulmonology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He was well-known for his work treating cystic fibrosis patients, primarily through Children’s Medical Center. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics, and a member of the American College of Physician Executives. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four daughters, including Lisa Morgan ’86 and Megan Kramer ’93; a brother, Frederick ’52; and nephews James Kramer ’85 and Andrew Kramer ’88.

 

Sep, 2018

Nathaniel W. Horton ’54, of Yorba Linda, Calif., formerly of Northbrook, Ill.; Mar. 23. After passing the Illinois State Bar, he entered into a legal career and advanced through a series of positions at Continental Illinois National Bank, Illinois Central Railroad, United Airlines, and the First National Bank of Evanston (Illinois), where he became vice president and head of the Trust Department. In 1972 he moved to California and was chief legal officer of Capital Guardian Trust in Los Angeles. After further positions with United California Bank and First Interstate Bank, he began a private practice with his wife, Horton & Horton, specializing in estate and family matters. He enjoyed singing in performing groups such as the Over the Hill Gang and Jabberwocks. He also enjoyed traveling and playing golf. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War and is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter, a son; a stepdaughter; two granddaughters; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Mary Sisk Caulfield ’54, of San Rafael, Calif.; May 8, after a long illness. She was a physician at Spencer and King Orthopedic Group in Philadelphia. She moved to Bethesda, Md., where she worked for the Department of Education and later, after moving to San Rafael, she worked in the emergency department of Letterman Hospital and then the Permanente Medical Group in San Rafael. She retired from practice in 1996. She enjoyed painting and woodworking and was a ham radio operator and an avid gardener. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Harry; a daughter; three sons, including Walter H. Caulfield III ’84 and James ’86; 13 grandchildren, including Walter H. Caulfield IV ’15; a sister, Jane Sisk ’63; and nephews John Willems ’85 and James Willems ’89.

 

Jul, 2018

Charles D. Lake ’54, of Marion, Mass.; Feb. 16. A retired clergyman. After Brown, he went on to earn a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Yale and a master’s in Christian Theology and PhD in philosophical theology from the Univ. of Chicago before being ordained to the Christian ministry by the First Baptist Church of Melrose, Mass., in 1957. He served as an assistant in the First Baptist Church in America in Providence, then on the faculty of Stevens College in Columbia, Mo., followed by the position of chaplain and dean of Stevens College for 11 years. In 1976 he moved to Marion to become the executive director of the Massachusetts Commission for United Ministries in Higher Education and he later went into semiretirement as interim pastor of the South Baptist Church of New Bedford, Mass., and, finally, preaching at First Congregational Church of Marion. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Richard S. Weinstein ’54, of Los Angeles, formerly of New York City; Feb. 24, from complications of Parkinson’s. He worked for architects I.M. Pei and Edward Larrabee Barnes and spent a year at the American Academy in Rome as a winner of the Rome Prize before joining the mayoral administration in 1966 as an advisor of the new Urban Design Group within the Department of City Planning in New York City. He helped plan and oversee the expansion of the Museum of Modern Art in the mid-1970s, a project that hinged on the transfer of air rights, and he spent six years working on redevelopment along 42nd Street in Manhattan and saving the South Street Seaport. In 1985 he moved to Los Angeles to become dean of the architecture and urban planning school at UCLA. From 1995 to 2008 he was a professor of architecture and urban design. He founded the Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA, served on the jury for the Walt Disney Concert Hall, and was coadministrator of the architectural selection process for the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles. He immersed himself in political debates over architecture and planning in Los Angeles. He is survived by his wife, Edina; two sons; and two granddaughters.

May, 2018

Gordon F. Udall Jr. ’54, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Jan. 6. He worked in manufacturing for many years as vice president and general manager of Graham Mfg. in East Greenwich, R.I. He was a pilot in the U.S. Navy and later volunteered at the Quonset Air Museum, the South County Museum, and the New England Wireless and Steam Museum. He is survived by his wife, Polly; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; three step-grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; and two sisters.

 

May, 2018

Alan M. Corney ’54, of Saratoga, Calif., formerly of Morristown, N.J.; Jan. 12.  He worked in the furniture industry. After retiring, he pursued his interest in boating and building and restoring wooden boats. He was a member of the New Jersey Furniture Assoc. and is survived by his wife, Judith Robinson Corney ’55; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

 

Apr, 2018

Edward Beadle ’54, of Bel Air, Md.; Oct. 28. After graduating from the Univ. of Pennsylvania Dental School, he cofounded Media Dental Associates, where he practiced until his retirement in 1999. He advocated to bring fluoride to the Media Water Company in 1965. He was a member of the Media Rotary Club since 1986, served as its high school foreign exchange program director, and hosted many foreign exchange students. He coached baseball and basketball with the Nether Providence Athletic Assoc. in Wallingford, Pa., and was an amateur ham radio operator. He was a member of St. John Chrysostom Catholic Church for more than 50 years. He is survived by his wife, Mary Jane; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

Susan Wing Klumpp ’54, of Weston, Mass., to which she moved after living in various cities in Virginia and California; Oct. 27, of melanoma. She was a guidance counselor at Littleton Middle School in Littleton, Mass., from 1970 to 1976 and later was a school psychologist at Paradise Canyon Elementary School in La Canada, Calif., from 1978 until her retirement in 1998. She was a member of several committees and served on many boards. She enjoyed hiking, skiing, swimming, tennis, snowshoeing, canoeing, contemporary art, poetry, reading, classical music, cooking, gardening, traveling, and genealogy. She is survived by her husband, Allan; a daughter; three sons; nine grandchildren; a great-grandchild; three brothers; and 11 nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018

Andrew M. Rasmussen ’54, of Corning, N.Y.; Oct. 3. He began working at Corning Glass Co. in 1962, servicing their melting plants at home and abroad until his retirement in 1995 as a senior project engineer. He was involved in various community programs and supported several animal shelters. He was a U.S. Army Korean War veteran and is survived by four daughters, a son, seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.

Feb, 2018

Letty Lebeck Edes ’54, of Miramar Beach, Fla., formerly of Dallas; Oct. 14, 2016. She was a stockbroker with Reynolds & Co. in Los Angeles and later worked as an executive secretary at Verado Energy in Dallas before retiring to Florida.

Feb, 2018

Milton G. Franklin ’54, of Plainville, Mass.; June 8. He was retired from Texas Instruments in Attleboro, Mass.

Feb, 2018

Robert R. Johnson ’54, of Louisville, Ky.; Aug. 18. He was a research chemist at Brown & Williamson Tobacco in Louisville until his retirement in 1991. He held several patents and was a member of the American Chemical Society. He enjoyed traveling with friends and family. He is survived by his companion, Shirley Howard; a daughter; and five granddaughters.

Feb, 2018

Catharine Bancroft Sloan ’54, of East Haddam, Conn., formerly of Old Greenwich, Conn.; Aug. 16. She worked as a dental assistant for many years and was an active member of the Junior League of Greenwich and the Old Greenwich Garden Club. She enjoyed music, traveling, and spending time with her family. She is survived by her husband, David; a daughter and her husband; son David ’88 and his wife; and two granddaughters.

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