Obituaries

Nov, 2023
51
Black Hawk Down
A pioneer in military aviation
Read More
portrait of Ray D. Leoni
Nov, 2023
68
The Shooter
Remembering a gifted basketball player and master storyteller
Read More
photo of Bill Reynolds in the ProJo office
Nov, 2023
MD 82

Jay S. Loeffler ’82 MD, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Waban, Mass.; June 22, after a brief illness. He was a renowned leader in the field of cancer treatment. For 20 years, he served as chair of radiation oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and was the Herman and Joan Suit professor emeritus and professor of neurosurgery at Harvard Medical School (HMS). He attended Williams College and Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School and completed his training at the Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy, where he served as chief resident. His interest in neuro-oncology led him to become an attending physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, where he became the founding director of the Brain Tumor Center. In 1996, he was recruited to MGH to be the director of the Francis Burr Proton Therapy Center, which at the time was only the second proton center in the country. His leadership led to his becoming chair of the department of radiation oncology at MGH, where he expanded the department by hiring and mentoring a diverse faculty. He just recently retired from MGH after holding leadership roles for 25 years. After retirement he continued his clinical work at Inspire Oncology in Naples, Fla. Through his pioneering work, he catalyzed the development of specialized radiation delivery technologies that have been widely adopted and that have resulted in cancer therapies that have led to meaningful improvements in quality of life and increased survival for those with cancer. He authored more than 400 scientific publications and was coeditor of nine cancer textbooks. He was a member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the American College of Radiology. He was the recipient of numerous awards and honors. He and his wife, whom he met while both were residents, shared a passion for medicine and science. They were devoted to curing adults and children with cancer. He enjoyed traveling, history, and reading. An athlete, he played many sports and was an avid sports fan but especially enjoyed golf and baseball. He is survived by his wife, Dr. Nancy Tarbell; three children; a grandson; his mother; a sister; and a brother. 

Nov, 2023
FAC

Samir G. Moubayed, of Providence; July 1. He was an ob-gyn at OB-GYN Associates, Inc. After practicing medicine in Egypt for 10 years, he spent one year working for the United Nations in the Congo and immigrated to the U.S. in 1963. He was on the staffs of Women & Infants Hospital, Rhode Island Hospital, and Miriam Hospital. He was a clinical associate professor emeritus at Brown, a member of the Rhode Island Medical Society, and a Life Fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three sons, including John ’84; a stepdaughter; nine grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2023
FAC

George P. Landow, of Providence; May 31, after a two-year battle with metastatic sarcomatoid prostate cancer. He taught at Columbia, the University of Chicago, Brasenose College, and Oxford before coming to Brown to teach in the English and Art History departments. He served Brown for three years as chair of the faculty. From 2000 through 2002 he was the founding dean of the University Scholars Program at the National University of Singapore, after having been brought there as a distinguished visiting professor. He authored multiple books and articles on Victorian literature and art and saw several works translated into Italian, Spanish, Japanese, Korean, and Arabic. His academic honors included a graduate student Fulbright, two Guggenheims, two senior Fulbrights, and a fellowship at Cornell’s Society for the Humanities. He retired in 2012 and traveled the world lecturing until the pandemic. As editor-in-chief, Landow expanded the world-renowned Victorian Web, establishing a foundation and editorial board to ensure it would continue. He was also recognized as Master Model Railroader #737 by Little Rhody, his local National Model Railroad Association division. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; daughter Shoshana Landow ’98 MD, ’16 MPH; a son and daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandsons; and a sister. 

Nov, 2023
STU

Noah A. Mack ’25, of Providence; May 2. He was a National African American Recognition Program Scholar and a champion debater, as well as a track and field athlete before coming to Brown. He enjoyed writing and his work included novels, feature-length screenplays, and teleplays. He was also a mentor and leader who enjoyed the thrill of debate and coaching younger students. He created and led an affinity group at his secondary school, BMORE (Black/Brown Men at Oakwood Representing Excellence), to create a place of inclusion and understanding and a platform for advocacy and positive change. At Brown, he was a literary arts concentrator. He was active in theater and was a member of the Brown Madrigal Singers. At Providence’s Stages of Freedom Museum he served as a grant writer, speech writer, and museum curator. Recently, he began acting as a curator for the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts. He is survived by his parents, a brother, his grandparents, and aunts, uncles, and cousins. 

Nov, 2023
MD 82

Thomas McCauley ’82 MD, of Narragansett, R.I.; May 31. He completed his ophthalmology residency at Yale. In addition to his ophthalmology private practice, he was a clinical assistant professor of surgery at Brown. He is survived by his partner, Michele Palazzolo, and several cousins.

Nov, 2023
GS 99

Marisa Huerta ’99 AM, ’05 PhD, of Austin, Tex.; Apr. 24. She had several academic positions, including student advising, before changing careers and enrolling in law school. She earned a JD degree from Rutgers University School of Law in 2020. She served as a law clerk for Judge Thomas W. Sumners of the New Jersey Appeals Court, then accepted a position as an attorney with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in Washington, D.C., where she was employed at the time of her death. She is survived by her father, two brothers and sisters-in-law, three nieces, and extended family. 

Nov, 2023
GS 80

Charles C. Ouimet ’80 PhD, of Belleview, Fla.; May 2, of cancer. He taught at Rockefeller University before joining the faculty at Florida State University, where he was instrumental in founding the College of Medicine. His area of expertise focused on neurodegeneration and received numerous awards. He enjoyed sailing, playing his guitar, and listening to Beethoven. He is survived by his wife, Janice; three children; nine grandchildren; two sisters; a brother; and nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
GS 73

Henry J. Martin ’73 ScM, of Centennial, Colo.; May 22. He worked for many years in the oil and gas industry exploring the earth for petroleum reserves. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three daughters; two sons-in-law; six grandchildren; a sister; three brothers, including Philip ’76 and Raymond ’78; and many nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
GS 72

Aslan Baghdadi ’72 PhD, of Rockville, Md.; June 12. He was a physicist for a time and briefly worked at Motorola in Arizona before joining the National Bureau of Standards, where he worked for 11 years. He later attended law school at night at George Washington University and began a second career as a patent attorney. As a lawyer, he was recognized for both his legal skills and his scientific expertise. He enjoyed reading, especially American history and biographies of the presidents. He is survived by his wife, Mania Kleinburd Baghdadi ’72 AM, ’75 PhD; three children, including son David ’99; and two brothers and their families. 

Nov, 2023
GS 70

James J. Scanlon ’70 PhD, of Pine Knoll Shores, N.C.; Mar. 13, from pancreatic cancer. He was president emeritus of Missouri Western State University and previously was on the faculty of University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Southeast Missouri State University, Clarion University, and Youngstown State University. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, a grandson, a sister, a brother, and his mother. 

 

Nov, 2023
GS 68

Raymond Wilson ’68 PhD, of Glastonbury, Conn.; June 10, of complications of surgery. He had a 55-year career at Pratt & Whitney in East Hartford. He played the cello with the Manchester Symphony Orchestra and the Connecticut Valley Symphony Orchestra, serving as first cellist for both orchestras for a number of years. He attended the Kent Music summer workshops for many years. He was an active member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Hartford, where he served as treasurer and warden. He enjoyed reading, cooking, and traveling, and he was a Red Sox fan. He is survived by his wife, Katie Sandford Wilson ’67; two daughters and sons-in-law; a grandson; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece and nephew. 

 

Nov, 2023
GS 66

Frank Sewell ’66 PhD, of Redding, Conn.; Apr. 1, of lymphoma. He was director of the semiconductor laboratory at Sperry Rand Corp. between 1966 and 1984 and retired from his position as director of the semiconductor pilot line lab at IBM Watson Research Center in 2006. He was a lifelong musician, playing oboe in a number of local orchestras and woodwind quintets. A passionate sailor, he cruised and raced on Cape Cod and in Maine. He was active in the Episcopal Church, serving on the vestry. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter and son-in-law; and a grandson. 

Nov, 2023
GS 68

Lawrence C. Shears ’68 MAT, of Toledo, Ohio; May 29. He was a mathematician and taught at Napoleon High School, Ottawa Hills High School, McCord Junior High School, Southview High School, and the University of Toledo, from which he retired in 2011. He was active in his local Emmanuel Baptist community. He is survived by his wife, Margo; three daughters; a son; a son-in-law; two granddaughters; two sisters; and a brother. 

Nov, 2023
GS 68

Philip J. Pondiscio ’68 ScM, of Livingston, N.J.; June 29, of Parkinson’s and dementia. He was a chemist at Lever Brothers before becoming a quality assurance engineer at Becton Dickinson and Nexcore Technologies. He retired in 2013. He was awarded for 30 years of service to the Boy Scouts and was an active member of Grace Lutheran Church, where he served as deacon, council president, and youth group leader. He enjoyed woodworking, gardening, photography, and skiing at Jay Peak, Vt. He is survived by his wife, Dianne; a daughter; a son; two grandsons; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews. 

 

Nov, 2023
GS 64

W. J. McCoy ’64 AM, of Chapel Hill, N.C.; May 22. He taught for two years at Georgetown University before joining the faculty of UNC Chapel Hill, where he would remain until his retirement. He enjoyed fishing and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and six grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
GS 61

Patrick F. Delaney ’61 MAT, ’64 PhD, of Leominster, Mass.; May 3, after a brief illness. He was an adjunct professor at College of the Holy Cross (Mass.) and an academic dean of students at Lindenwood College (Mo.) and served as vice president of academic affairs at Fitchburg State University (Mass.). He was a member of Rotary International and listed in Who’s Who Among American Teachers. He enjoyed golf and the casino slot machines. He is survived by four daughters, three sons-in-law, four grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2023
GS 58

Harley Cohen ’58 ScM, of Winnipeg, Manitoba; Apr. 24, 2022, following a brief illness. After obtaining his master’s, he worked as a research engineer for the Boeing Aircraft Company and as a development engineer and senior scientist for Honeywell. While at Honeywell he obtained a patent for a gyroscope that was used in the first lunar landing in 1969. He completed his PhD at the University of Minnesota in 1964. His academic career began in 1965 at the University of Minnesota when he was appointed assistant professor in the department of aeronautics and engineering mechanics. He returned to Winnipeg in 1966 to take a professorship in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Manitoba. He enhanced the mathematics curriculum there and was appointed distinguished professor in 1983, a title conferred for distinction in research, scholarship, creative endeavors, professional service, and teaching. He was head of the civil engineering department from 1984 to 1989 and dean of the science faculty from 1989 to 1994, retiring in 1998. He authored more than 100 papers on topics from electromagnetics to couple-stress elasticity. In 1988, he coauthored The Theory of Pseudo-Rigid Bodies, a concept he introduced in 1981. He was the James L. Record Professor at the University of Minnesota in 1979, the first holder of the chair. In 1982, he was awarded the Killam Visiting Professorship at the University of Calgary. He was a visiting professor at the University of Warsaw in 1983, the University of Strathclyde (SERC Fellow) in 1985, and the University of Pisa (CNR Fellow) in 1987. He was a registered professional engineer in the Province of Manitoba (APEM) and a fellow of the American Academy of Mechanics (Founder Member), the International Society of Engineering Science, the Society for Natural Philosophy, and the Canadian Applied Mathematics Society. His board memberships included the American Academy of Mechanics, the Manitoba Research Council, and the Premier’s Economic Innovation and Technology Council of Manitoba. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, a daughter-in-law, a sister, and nieces and nephews. 

 

Nov, 2023
GS 57

Joseph E. Earley ’57 PhD, of Falls Church, Va.; June 10, after a long battle with cancer. After serving as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, he taught chemistry at Georgetown University. He was an author or contributor for several books and publications in science and philosophy. He was an emeritus member of the American Chemical Society and a Life Member in both the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Philosophical Society. From 2000 to 2015 he was president of the Everan Foundation. He was active in his church and community. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; three sons and daughters-in-law; and seven grandchildren. 

 

Nov, 2023
GS 56

Gerald L. Roy ’56 ScM, of Lancaster, Pa.; Apr. 28. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; two step-grandchildren; seven step-great-grandchildren; and a brother. 

Nov, 2023
GS 53

Daphne Davis Allan ’53 ScM, of Orlando, Fla., formerly of Woodbury, Conn.; Nov. 2, 2022. She was an elementary school teacher for 18 years. She retired in 1984 and enjoyed traveling the world with her husband. She also enjoyed birdwatching. She is survived by three daughters and sons-in-laws, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
GS 46

Judith Ullman Chernoff ’46 ScM, of Roslindale, Mass., formerly of Chicago; June 9, after a month-long struggle with cholecystitis. She worked at the Museum of Science in Chicago doing computations for Army projects while her husband completed his post-doc work. She and her family first moved to Palo Alto, Calif., then in 1974 to Massachusetts. She worked at the survey research center at the University of Massachusetts, as a bookkeeper for an Asian publishing company in Boston, and as an English as a Second Language teacher to MIT faculty and student wives. She was an active member of the League of Women Voters and Hadassah. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by her husband, Herman Chernoff ’45 ScM, ’48 PhD, and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
08

Meghan C. Andrews ’08, of Williamsport, Pa.; June 20, of colon cancer. She received her master’s and doctorate degrees in English at The University of Texas at Austin. While there, she was the recipient of several grants and awards including the Excellence in Graduate Research Award. Her dissertation, “Shakespeare’s Networks,” received the Outstanding Dissertation Award from the Office of Graduate Studies in 2015. After leaving UT, she joined the English Department at Lycoming College and was promoted to associate professor. She was honored with the Junior Faculty Award in 2019, which was designed to recognize excellence in teaching. She was a member of the Shakespeare Association of America and the Renaissance Society of America. Her research was supported by a Mellon/ACLS Fellowship and her work has been published in Shakespeare Quarterly, Renaissance Drama, SEL, Shakespeare Bulletin, and Marlowe Studies. With the assistance of friends and colleagues, several of her forthcoming essays and works will be published posthumously, along with her book Shakespeare, the Inns of Court, and the Jacobean Court: Authorial Networks in Early Modern Drama. She enjoyed traveling, having visited Germany and England to advance her research, and she was proud to have completed the last 100 kilometers of the Camino de Santiago in Spain. She also enjoyed spending time on Cape Cod with her family and all things fantasy and science fiction: movies, comics, and games. She is survived by her mother, sister, and many aunts, uncles, and cousins. 

Nov, 2023
85

Paul S. Eckstein ’85, of Marina Del Rey, Calif.; June 6. At the time of his death, he was teaching a screenwriting workshop in Jamaica. Following graduation from Brown, he began working in New York City theater, where he became a founding member of the Naked Angels Theater Company and was featured on Broadway, Shakespeare in the Park, and Minnesota’s Guthrie Theater. He went on to act in television and film, appearing multiple times on Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Law & Order, The Steve Harvey Show and 413 Hope St. As a film producer, he coproduced MGM’s Hoodlum. He was the cocreator and executive producer of Godfather of Harlem and previously led the writer’s room on the first year of the Netflix drama Narcos. His other writing credits include Street Time, Law & Order Criminal Intent, and The Dead Zone. He also wrote and produced the Disney/ABC biblical series Of Kings and Prophets on location in South Africa. He was a member of the MGM+ and ABC Signature families and when not creating, he could be found mentoring the next generation of storytellers. He is survived by his wife, Hala, and two sons. 

Nov, 2023
72

William M. Perkins ’72, of New York City; May 15. He was a city councilman and state senator who fought for justice, equality, and reform. After graduating he returned to New York, working as a social worker and tenant advocate before his initial election to the City Council in 1997. He served for seven years, then worked as a state senator in Albany for a decade, and finally returned to the City Council for four more years. He was an outspoken advocate of the Central Park 5, who were eventually cleared after being wrongfully convicted. He sponsored the Childhood Lead Paint Poisoning Prevention Act of 2004, forcing landlords to fix paint hazards, and as an Albany senator, he fought for reductions in sulfur in heating oil to reduce the risks of acid rain. In addition, he was christened “The Rat Man” by the Washington Post due to his persistence in trying to shrink the city’s rat population, which included leading legislation banning eating on the subways. He retired in 2021 after losing his seat. “He was a very dear friend,” said New York City Mayor  Eric Adams. “We lost a very strong, committed fighter for justice in the city.” He is survived by his wife, Pamela, and daughter Margaret Perkins ’08. 

Nov, 2023
98

Eric M. Andersen ’98, of Natick Mass.; June 1. After graduating, he joined IBM, where he had a long career and held titles that included chief architect and client technical lead. During his tenure in tech, he helped to drive innovation and excellence. He was instrumental in identifying opportunities for both tactical and strategic partnerships for financial services clients, developer and operations training, technology workshops, and conferences. He has been recognized for his innovative customer solutions and was the recipient of numerous accolades. As chief architect for State Street’s Iris Trading Platform, his group won a 2017 AFTA Award for Best Cross-Asset Trading Initiative and he was twice the recipient of IBM’s Outstanding Technical Achievement Award. He was a volunteer soccer coach with Natick Soccer Club for many years and served as a mentor offering workshops on interview skills to high school students at Boston Latin Academy. He was a talented pianist and flutist. He enjoyed singing as a member of the Trinitarian Congregational Church choir, walking in Natick’s Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary, and supporting environmental and charitable causes. While at Brown, he was a founding member of Technology House and a member of the Higher Keys and served for two decades as an interviewer for the College of Admissions Office. He is survived by a son, a brother, a half-sister, and his former wife, Jennifer DeLuise Andersen ’00.

Nov, 2023
91

Samantha Shea Almy ’91, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Southborough, Mass.; June 25, unexpectedly in her sleep. After Brown, she received an MBA from Boston University. Until her retirement in 2021, she was a certified public accountant and worked as a senior VP at Fidelity Investments. After working hard for many years, she was able to dedicate more time to the things she loved—spending time with family and friends, playing tennis and pickleball, taking art classes, going to the beach, and designing her dream home in Naples. While at Brown, she was a member of the varsity tennis team. She was a role model and instilled in both her daughters the mindset that hard work pays off. She passed on her passion for, and talent at, tennis to her girls. She enjoyed cheering for her daughters, spoiling her dog, spending time with her father, and being a wife to her husband of 27 years. She is survived by her husband, Sean; two daughters; and her father. 

 

Nov, 2023
82

Matthew B. Heller ’82, of Bellport, N.Y.; June 16. He had a career in advertising at J. Walter Thompson, Ammirati & Puris, Deutsch, McCann and FCB in Chicago. He volunteered with the Bishop Walker School in Washington, D.C., for six years and with the Boys and Girls Club of Bellport. He is survived by his wife, Susan Holmes ’82; a son; and friends.

Nov, 2023
81

Mark A. Shallcross ’81, of Ewing, N.J.; Apr. 22. He worked for many years at Information Builders, a software company in New York City. Recently, he worked as a freelance photographer. He enjoyed reading science fiction and attending the New York Science Fiction Society’s annual Lunacon. He is survived by a son and a brother. 

 

Nov, 2023
80

Diana Puglisi George ’80, of Palmyra, Va.; June 16. She was a publications editor at the Virginia Law Foundation, LexisNexis, and Saint Martin’s Press. As an active parishioner at Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, she was a greeter, lecturer, and a member of the choir. She enjoyed reading and gardening as well as photography, sketching, painting, and various other kinds of arts and crafts. She is survived by her husband, Daniel; two sisters-in-law; and a niece and nephew. 

Nov, 2023
79

T. Stevens Spruth ’79, of Minneapolis; Mar. 9, of lung cancer. For 20 years he worked in start-up and development of health care ventures that led into a second career of 20 years teaching at the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. His focus was on entrepreneurship, strategic management, and nonprofit management. He enjoyed biking, cross country skiing, yoga, running, cooking, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Frances X. Durkin ’79; two sons; a sister; and a brother. 

Nov, 2023
79

Neil M. Goodman ’79, of Chevy Chase, Md., and West Boothbay Harbor, Me.; May 8. After Brown, where he was a member of the crew team, he went on to law school at Columbia University, graduating in 1983. After a clerkship for Judge Frank Battisti on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Ohio, he became an associate at the law firm Arnold & Porter in Washington, D.C., eventually becoming a partner in 1991. He retired in 2021. He was an avid runner, competing in seven marathons. He also enjoyed exploring the country’s national parks, skiing, boating, and tracking birds. He served on the board for Nature Bridge. He is survived by his wife, Emily; three children; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2023
78

Howard A. Peyton ’78, of Atlanta; June 15. He worked in sales and marketing for many years before receiving a Master of Divinity degree from Interdenominational Theological Center in 2015. He enjoyed preaching, singing, and playing cards with family and friends. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sisters, and many cousins, nieces, and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
76

Russell Kirkland ’76, ’76 AM, of Augusta, Ga.; May 31. He taught at the University of Rochester, University of Missouri, Stanford University, Oberlin College, and Macalester College. In 1994, he began a career as a professor at the University of Georgia in the religious studies department. In 2012, he had a stroke that ended his teaching career, and he accepted his disability retirement in 2014. He enjoyed walking through the neighborhood and by the river a few blocks away. He also had a passion for sports, especially the Atlanta Braves and the Georgia Bulldogs. He is survived by a brother, an aunt, and a niece. 

Related classes:
Class of 1976, GS Class of 1976
Nov, 2023
75

Steven M. Gilbard ’75, of Phoenix; June 26, of Alzheimer’s. He was an opthalmology plastic reconstructive and orbital surgeon. His numerous publications included critical research on orbital blowout fractures and interventions to support patients with eyelid paralysis, which fueled his prominence among his peers in the 1980s and 1990s. After helping countless patients over several years in private practice, he retired following a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s, allowing him time with his family and for his hobbies. He is survived by his wife, Lauren; and three daughters, including Kamren Gilbard ’20.

 

Nov, 2023
72

Gary W. Androphy ’72, of Sarasota, Fla.; Apr. 28. After Brown, he went on to complete his MD degree from UConn and his JD from Northwestern School of Law. For several years he practiced orthopedic surgery in Connecticut and patented a triplanar knee system device. He enjoyed photography and collected vintage posters and historical memorabilia. He is survived by his wife, Karen; two brothers; and nieces and nephews. 

 

Nov, 2023
71

Jeanne Darrigant Gibson ’71, of Pueblo, Colo.; Apr. 23. After Brown, she served in the Peace Corps from 1971 to 1973, where she met her future husband and began her teaching career in Malaysia. She went on to attend UC San Diego for graduate school and then worked as a linguistics professor at various universities, including UC San Diego, University of Hawaii, UCLA, National University, and CSU-Pueblo, where she was the director of the English Language Institute from 2006. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a son; a granddaughter; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Nov, 2023
69

Thomas E. Jacobs ’69, of West Lebanon, N.H.; May 20, of metastatic colon cancer. He graduated from Columbia University School of Library Service, got married, and spent the next seven years in Baltimore working for the Baltimore County Public Library system. After earning a degree from the University of Maryland School of Computer Science, he and his family moved to West Lebanon and he worked briefly for a small computer company and then in the finance department of Dartmouth Hitchcock, before becoming self-employed and then a stay-at-home dad. He enjoyed hiking, biking, kayaking, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; three sons; two daughters-in-law; a sister; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
67

Alan B. Scarritt ’67, of Albany, N.Y.; July 1. An artist, he had a decades-long career in San Francisco and New York City. He was known for his mixed-media works on paper, sound, video, photography, sculpture, performance, and installation work. Throughout his career, he had 27 solo shows, 59 group shows, and numerous performances. His work can be found in the New York Museum of Modern Art; the New York University Library; the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive; and the Denver Art Museum. He taught at the School of Visual Arts, Mercersburg Academy, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, San Francisco State University, and San Francisco Art Institute. In 1979 and 1980, he was honored with a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship award. Other honors include the Curatorial Fellowship Award at Richmond Art Center, California Arts Council Grant, Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant, and New York State Council for the Arts Grant. He was passionate about many things in life including writing, philosophy, music, cinema, books, playing tennis, and global travel. He is survived by four siblings, including brother John ’73; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and nieces and nephews, including Gabriela Scarritt ’09.

Nov, 2023
67

Robert N. Nead ’67, of Bethlehem, Pa.; June 7. He served his country as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy in Vietnam and was a Naval instructor at Oregon State University. Upon discharge from the military, he settled in New York City and worked at American Express International Bank. He had a passion for the theater and the arts. He was an avid bridge player, trivia participant, reader, and history buff. Later, he completed a creative writing program at New York University. As a volunteer for the Rainbow Youth Organization, he mentored and counseled numerous LGBTQ teenagers. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his husband, Tom Augusta; a brother and sister-in-law; a niece; and two nephews. 

Nov, 2023
65

Leonard J. Santopadre ’65, of Highland Village, Tex.; May 1. While at Brown he was the coxswain for the crew team and later served in the Army National Guard, rising to the rank of captain. He had a long career working with Texas Instruments. He enjoyed reading, fixing things, documenting family events through pictures and videos, and collecting things that were yellow. He is survived by his partner, Michele; his mother; a daughter and son-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and three nieces and nephews. 

 

Nov, 2023
64

William S. Sorgen ’64, of Berkeley, Calif.; June 1, from Alzheimer’s. After Brown he earned a law degree from Harvard Law School and moved to San Francisco. He eventually taught political science at Virginia Union University and American literature at Tuskegee University in Alabama. Returning to San Francisco, he joined the San Francisco Neighborhood Legal Assistance Foundation, where he fought the use of racially biased IQ tests in public schools, among other precedent-setting cases. He worked to improve public education as legal counsel for the San Francisco and Oakland Unified School Districts and he taught law at UC Hastings, Golden Gate University Law School, Whittier College, and UC Berkeley Law. He taught law in French as a Fulbright Professor in Nice, France, and in Spanish while on a second Fulbright Professorship in Bogotá, Colombia. He returned to his own private law practice in San Francisco and for 30 years litigated civil rights, access to education, employment discrimination, and prison and labor reform cases. He defended the rights of U.S. soldiers during the Vietnam and first Iraq wars. His international human rights work included seeking restitution for Vietnamese citizens affected by Agent Orange, challenging Chevron’s suppression of labor organizing in Nigeria, and releasing child immigrants detained at the U.S.-Mexican border. He enjoyed music, dancing, tennis, the outdoors, and good conversation. He is survived by Mary Malone Roberts; four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother; and three former wives. 

Nov, 2023
64

Charles J. “Chase” Pugliese ’64, of East Greenbush, N.Y.; July 18, from Parkinson’s. He received his Juris Doctor degree from Albany Law School and was admitted to the bar in 1969. For more than 30 years he was an attorney and assistant counsel for the New York State  Departments of Agriculture and Markets, Social Services, and the Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance. During his career, he represented his agencies in numerous administrative hearings and argued and wrote briefs for cases in the State Supreme Court, the Appellate Division and the Court of Appeals. He was the recipient of the 1978 Commissioner’s Award for writing the New York State Dog Law and the 1993 Commissioner’s Special Commendation for efforts in implementing the Centralized Child Support Collections from the New York State Department of Social Services.  In addition, he operated his own law practice for more than four decades. He was active in the Knights of Columbus, East Greenbush Council 6027, and chaired many events for the council, subsequently receiving the council’s highest award, Knight of the Year in 1987 for distinguished service. He was a cofounder of the New York State Organization of Management/Confidential Employees (OMCE). He served as a lector for Holy Spirit Church for many years and was a communicant of St. John the Baptist Church in Valatie, N.Y. He also served as the publicity director for the East Greenbush Community Library Book Sales and for the Kinderhook Lake Corporation’s events for many years and received the Greenbush Award for outstanding service to the community in 1986. He was a lifelong New York Yankees and Giants fan. He played softball for the Knights of Columbus and the Bozos for more than three decades. He and his wife enjoyed traveling and visited more than 37 countries. He proudly attended his class reunions every five years and walked through the gates with Slater Hall roommate and lifelong friend Ronald T. Wilson, who survives him. He is survived by his wife, Paula; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; and several cousins, nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2023
64

Laurence J. Hoffman ’64, of Washington, D.C.; May 13. After Brown he graduated from Boston University School of Law and began his legal career at the National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C., but was there less than a year when he was recruited to join Steptoe & Johnson in their labor practice department. Three years later, he was invited to become the third associate at a new start-up satellite office of the Texas-based firm Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, where he remained until his full retirement in 2007. He was active for several years with the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs and played basketball most workdays at lunch at the D.C. YMCA. For more than 30 years he actively supported the Benedictine School and Adult Services Programs, an organization that provides services to the special needs community. He served on its board for most of that time, acting as chair for 10 years. While at Brown, he played baseball and often told the story of competing against Roger Staubach when the Navy team came to play in Providence. He was an accomplished self-taught woodworker, and he enjoyed the outdoors, playing golf, and fishing while at his homes in St. Michaels, Maryland, and Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He is survived by his wife, Michele Levine Hoffman ’64; two sons, including Matthew ’91; a daughter-in-law; and two granddaughters. 

Nov, 2023
64

Michael C. Dwyer ’64, of Rochester, N.Y.; May 16. He was an attorney, first at Underberg & Kessler and later with Harter, Secrest & Emery. He was involved with the Monroe County Bar Association, where he served on numerous committees and was president from 2001 to 2002. He enjoyed reading and was a lifelong learner, taking classes at the Osher Institute in his retirement years. His favorite times were spent on his sailboat racing at the Rochester Yacht Club or skiing and hiking at his cottage in Muskoka, Canada. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two sons and daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; and brother Peter ’66.

 

Nov, 2023
63

Thomas W. Walker ’63, of Millfield, Ohio; May 2. After Brown, he joined the Peace Corps and served in Colombia. For six months he worked in Alaska, writing proposals for Native Housing initiatives in rural communities, and then enrolled at the University of New Mexico to earn his master’s degree and met and married his wife. In 1972, he began teaching at Ohio University. He wrote and published many works on Nicaragua and Central America. During the 1980s and ’90s he traveled extensively, lecturing at universities and colleges from coast to coast about the Sandinista Revolution and United States foreign policy towards the region. He served as director of the Latin American Studies program at Ohio University for many years. In 1995, he became involved in the Athens Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and was an advocate for people living with mental illness. He hosted a series of interviews on the local public radio station that was eventually changed to a podcast, speaking with advocates and experts about living with severe mental illness. He had worked alongside NAMI volunteers to restore cemeteries and build a trail and nature walk connecting three cemeteries.He was also involved in crisis intervention training for mental health in the community. In 1978, he and his wife bought a small farm and he was able to fulfill his dream of having and raising animals. He is survived by his wife, Anne; four children; three grandchildren; and a sister.

Nov, 2023
63

Robert W. Ross ’63, of Fernandina Beach, Fla., formerly of the Netherlands; June 25. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War and subsequently in the Naval Reserves. He earned his JD from Boston University and, having specialized in telecommunication law in Washington, D.C., worked at the Federal Communications Commission, and during the Nixon and Ford administration he worked for the White House Office of Telecommunication. He eventually became a partner in the Pepper Hamilton & Sheetz firm and later worked for Turner Broadcasting Systems as general counsel and later managing director of CNN International in London, followed by president of Turner International. In 1998, he was appointed the founding chief executive officer of New Skies Satellites, a global satellite telecommunication company based in the  Netherlands. He retired in 2002 to Fernandina Beach. He enjoyed playing golf, cooking, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Dina; four children; four grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Nov, 2023
63

John C. Pennoyer ’63, of Hopewell Junction, N.Y.; May 28. He was a high school history teacher in Colorado and went on to become an educational administrator as first a high school principal, then an assistant superintendent in Illinois, then a school superintendent in New Jersey and Colorado until his retirement after 15 years as superintendent of Dutchess County, N.Y. He enjoyed gardening and playing the clarinet. He is survived by his partner, Roberta Weiner; two children; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren. 

 

Nov, 2023
63

B. Russell Formidoni ’63, of Yardley, Pa.; Apr. 28. He worked at IBM before joining Merrill Lynch as a financial advisor. Later he managed UBS’s offices in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. An avid golfer, he was a member and director of Trenton Country Club. He also volunteered with the Boys Club of Trenton. He is survived by his wife, Susan; two children and their spouses; two stepsons; four grandchildren; brothers Roland ’65 and Roger ’72; two sisters-in-law; and many nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
63

Carol Spindler Duncan ’63, of Lowell, Mass.; June 23, from ovarian cancer. After earning her master’s from Boston University in 1969, she worked as a junior high school English teacher in Dracut, Mass., before being recruited by Girls, Inc. to be their executive director in 1991, a position she remained in for 22 years. She was involved with several community organizations and also served as a board member with such organizations as Ironstone Farm, Whistler House Museum of Art, and the Pollard Library Foundation. She was the recipient of many awards and received the 2018 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network. She enjoyed traveling and visiting more than 60 countries and all 50 states. She was also involved with the Merrimack Repertory Theater in Lowell for more than 35 years, holding several positions including president and overseer. She enjoyed the theater, opera, playing duplicate bridge, and solving puzzles. She is survived by her husband, George; daughter Alison Duncan ’93; and a son.

Nov, 2023
62

Raymond P. Rhinehart ’62, of Washington, D.C.; May 7. He taught English at the University of Virginia, George Washington University, and Virginia Commonwealth University. He was the arts correspondent for the Richmond NPR station for two years and drove the Arts Mobile for the Virginia Museum for a year. In 1980, he began a 35-year tenure at the American Institute of Architects and for three years was vice president of the American Architectural Foundation. He was a member of the Cathedral Choral Society of Washington for 35 years and also served on its board. He authored four books during the course of his career. He is survived by his husband, Walter R. Smalling. 

 

Nov, 2023
62

Gary Bowen ’62, of Malibu, Calif.; May 10. He was a television director and longtime member of the Directors Guild of America. He is survived by his wife, Ruth, and a daughter. 

Nov, 2023
61

John A. Whitney ’61, of Moneta, Va.; May 21. He served in the National Guard and had a career in the computer business, retiring as vice president of satellite communications for Nautica. He retired to Smith Mountain Lake, volunteered as the treasurer for Smith Mountain Lake Charity Home Tour for four years, and baked his own cookies for the coffee cart at Bedford Memorial Hospital. He was an active member of the Methodist Church and enjoyed leading tours at the Bedford D-Day Memorial for 15 years. He is survived by his wife, Susan; four children; and four grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023

Peter D. Esser ’61, of Smithtown, N.Y.; Jan. 31. He was a medical physicist at New York Presbyterian Hospital, then became chief physicist in the division of nuclear medicine, followed by the position of chief physicist at the Kreitchman PET Center. He was involved in research and developing improvements in nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography (PET) technology. He obtained several patents, coauthored research papers, and edited books related to the fields. He collaborated with Data Spectrum in the development of a “phantom” for the testing of PET equipment, which is in use today. He also taught at Columbia University as professor emeritus of Clinical Radiology (Physics) in Environmental Health Sciences and special lecturer in the Department of Radiology and the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics. He was the recipient of the NSF Presidential Internship in nuclear medicine at the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory (N.Y.). He was a past president of the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine, a member of the Nuclear Accreditation Committee of the American College of Radiology, and a fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the American College of Nuclear Medicine. He enjoyed photography. He is survived by his wife, Jean; two sons, including Jeffrey ’92; two daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2023
60

Margaret Steinhaus Sheppe ’60, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; May 26. After Brown, she worked at Time Inc., where she met her late husband. They married and moved to Scarsdale and raised a family. She worked at Sybil Wild Travel from 1967 to 1985 and then founded her own travel agency, CMR Travel. She was a huge Yankees fan and also enjoyed watching baseball and tennis on television with her sons and grandsons. She is survived by three children and their spouses, including daughter Laura Miller ’87; nine grandchildren, including Emma Miller ’16; two sisters, including Nancy Zisson ’65; brother-in-law William Zisson ’63; and several nieces and nephews, including Alex Zisson ’91.

Nov, 2023
60

Louise Patton Pearson ’60, of Springfield, Va.; Apr. 20. After receiving her master’s degree in remedial reading from Southern Connecticut State University, she taught English and reading at the high school level and at the Italian Air Force Academy. She lived in several states and countries and enjoyed snorkeling, camping, and entertaining in her home. She was a member of the Colonial Dames Society of America and Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband Pete Pearson ’61; four children and their spouses; and 12 grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
60

Judith H. Linn ’60, of Wayland, Mass.; May 8. She earned a master’s degree from Boston University, where she later taught for many years and was appointed an adjunct assistant professor. She joined the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) in 1976 and became the New England chapter secretary followed by her 1985 appointment to president of AMWA’s national association. Her dedication to AMWA was recognized in 2002 at the New England chapter’s 25th anniversary celebration by the governor of Massachusetts, who declared it Judy Linn Day. A membership award was also created in her honor. She is survived by her husband, Harold; a sister; and a sister-in-law.

Nov, 2023
59

Frederick M. Williamson ’59, of McLean, Va.; Apr. 6, after a brief illness. Following graduation, he was commissioned in the U.S. Navy and retired as captain in 1989. He spent much of his Navy career on ships at sea. He served as commanding officer, Naval Station Guam, and deputy commander, Military Sealift Command. Subsequently, he held positions as an executive in the security industry. He was an avid New York Giants football fan his entire life and was known as “Big Blue” in his fantasy football leagues. He is survived by his wife, Mildred; three children, grandchildren; and great-grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
59

Ariel Follett O’Hara ’59, of Deerfield, Ill.; Apr. 11. For years she worked as a travel agent and enjoyed the perks of traveling to various countries, most notably meeting President Nelson Mandela in South Africa. She was passionate about politics and supported up-and-coming political candidates from her earliest days to her retirement years. She was a voracious reader of all things political and historical, especially the Civil War and World War II. She is survived by three children; 17 grandchildren, including Alison Laurence ’11 and Rhone O’Hara ’21 AM; seven great-grandchildren; a sister; brother Robert J.R. Follett ’50; and many nieces and nephews, including Jean A. Follett ’77. 

Nov, 2023
59

John M. Cohen ’59, of Boston; May 10. He was a retired pediatrician. After graduating from Albany Medical College, he served two years overseas in the U.S. Air Force before settling in the Boston area and growing a pediatric practice.  He also ran Newton-Wellesley Hospital’s pediatric department and became an anchor on Channel 5’s noonday call-in segment “Ask the Pediatrician” for many years. He took an active role in causes he was passionate about. He was an avid fan and supporter of the Huntington Theater Company, where he also served as a board member. He was also a board member of Planned Parenthood of Massachusetts and the New England Aquarium. He is survived by his wife, Bette; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and a brother. 

Nov, 2023
59

Anson W. “Sandy” Clough ’59, of East Orleans, Mass., formerly of Wilton, Conn.; June 3. After serving two years in the U.S. Army, he began a 35-year career in the insurance industry working at The Travelers and Gen Re. He enjoyed traveling, playing tennis, golf, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; two grandsons; and three nephews. 

 

Nov, 2023
58

Edward J. Williamson Jr. ’58, of Roanoke, Va.; May 8. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Navy for four years, then worked for the Department of the Navy. After retiring from the military, he founded a private consulting group. He was president of his neighborhood watch and vice president and secretary of his local chapter of National Contract Management Association. He enjoyed drawing and spending time at Smith Mountain Lake. He is survived by his wife, Teresa; two daughters; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter.

 

Nov, 2023
58

Richard L. Lang ’58, of Northport, Mich.; June 24. After graduating and working as a claims adjuster for one year in Providence while his wife, Susan Haydock Lang ’59, finished her studies, they relocated to Lexington, Va., where Dick attended Washington and Lee University Law School. He graduated in 1962 and passed the Michigan Bar Exam that December. He was admitted to the Michigan Bar Association and began his legal career as a trust attorney for Michigan National Bank in Kalamazoo. In 1966, he joined the Kalamazoo-based law firm Bauckham, Reed, Lang, Schaefer, Travis & Sparks focused on municipal law and general practice. In 1987 he was named general counsel for Wolverine Power Cooperative and relocated to Northport. After a year, he practiced law from his home office until fully retiring in 2011. He was an active member of Planned Parenthood, the Kalamazoo Jaycees, the YMCA, First Congregational Church, and Phi Delta Phi and he served on numerous boards. He enjoyed all things history related, genealogy, and watching Antiques Road Show. He is survived by three children and their spouses, six grandchildren, and his sister Margaret Lang ’63.

Nov, 2023
58

Arlene MacKey Cummings ’58 of Cranford, N.J., formerly of Hudson, N.Y.; July 7. She was a former elementary English school teacher in Claverack (N.Y.) and taught evening classes to recent immigrants as an English as a Second Language teacher. Later in her career she taught incarcerated individuals at the Hudson Correctional Facility. She enjoyed genealogy and spent time tracing her American ancestors back to the 17th century in New York state. She was a member of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution and is survived by three daughters, three granddaughters, and three great-granddaughters. 

Nov, 2023
58

Albert F. Clark ’58, of Silverdale, Wash.; May 18. He had a 21-year career in the U.S. Air Force, flying 102 combat missions—some during the Vietnam War or on alert during the Cuban Missile Crisis—and was twice awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for an act of heroism or extraordinary acheivement during aerial flight. He retired from the Air Force in 1978 with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He then became a stockbroker, followed by a securities principal at Seafirst Bank, retiring in 1996. He was past president of the Rotary Club of Bainbridge Island and an active member of first Central Kitsap Presbyterian Church and then Silverdale Lutheran Church. He enjoyed playing games and cards, reading, collecting first edition books, and building model airplanes. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; two daughters; a son; three granddaughters; and two great-grandsons. 

Nov, 2023
58

Betsy Becker Adams ’58, of Madison, Conn., formerly of Annapolis, Md., York, Pa., and New York City; June 8. From 1959 to 1981 she lived in New York City and worked for Lord & Taylor, the Bank of New York, and Henry Street Settlement. In 1981, she moved to Annapolis and cofounded Sharp-Adams Inc., a Maryland registry of bed and breakfast accommodations. Before retiring she volunteered at the Mental Health Association, where she was executive director for eight years, and served as corporate director in the Maryland office of the American Heart Association. In 2005, after traveling quite a distance, she moved to York, Pa., and volunteered at the reference desk at the Martin Library. She finally moved to Madison in 2013 to be closer to family and was active with the Madison Senior Center. She is survived by a daughter, a son, and four grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
56

Richard G. McKenney ’56, of Rye, N.H., formerly of East Longmeadow, Mass.; May 12, from end stage effects of Alzheimer’s. Upon graduation, he served two years in the U.S. Navy and then had a 32-year career with Northwestern Mutual. At the time, he was the youngest general agent and built the Springfield (Mass.) office into an award-winning office. He retired in 1988 to Deer Isle, Me., then moved to Rye in 2002. He and his wife enjoyed adventures together including biking 4,000 miles to raise funds for the Deer Isle food pantry and teaching English in Vietnam and China. He loved sailing, the Boston teams, and doing yard work. He is survived by his wife, Amelia; three children and their spouses; and four grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
56

Geraldine Weicker McCann ’56, of Hopkinton, Mass.; May 26. She was a teacher for a period of time and then worked in the banking industry. She valued her time as a homemaker as well. She was an active member of St. Mark’s Parish in North Attleboro and served as a Eucharistic minister and lector. She enjoyed traveling with her husband, reading, solving crossword puzzles, and spending time with her children and grandchildren. She is survived by three sons and daughters-in-law and nine grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
56

Leo Marcoux ’56, ’64 ScM, of Lincoln, R.I.; May 23, of Alzheimer’s. He was a mechanical engineer at Texas Instruments (then Metals & Controls), in Attleboro, Mass. Throughout his career, he specialized in automotive temperature controls and some of his many patents for the firm are used in applications today. His work frequently took him to other locales such as Detroit, Sydney, Beijing, and Johnson City, Tenn. Early retirement afforded him and his partner the opportunity to boat, hike, camp, and attend music festivals. Throughout his travels, he was known for his ability to repair almost any broken appliance or device. As a true Rhode Islander, he enjoyed sailing in Narragansett Bay, rooting for the PawSox, and slurping up littlenecks on the half shell. He is survived by three daughters including Paula Marcoux ’82 and two grandchildren. 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1956, GS Class of 1964
Nov, 2023
56

Sanford Kluger ’56, of Englewood Cliffs, N.J.; July 1. He graduated from New York Law School and practiced law in Paterson for 22 years and in Englewood for 23 years. He served as municipal prosecutor in Englewood Cliffs for 16 years. He was a member of CommonCause. A Brooklyn Dodgers fan, he enjoyed baseball, and later became an avid Mets fan. He also enjoyed stamp collecting, solving crossword puzzles, reading about history, and playing chess. He is survived by his wife, Mildred; two sons and daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
56

William S. Bivens ’56, of Taos, N.Mex.; May 18. He had a varied career after Brown beginning with the U.S. Navy, where he had assignments in cryptography and secure communications, after which he worked for Traveler’s Insurance Company in New York. Next he taught Classics at the Roxbury Latin School in Boston and  was the assistant headmaster of the Wheeler School in Providence and the vice president of Hood College in Frederick, Md. At Hood, he headed a project to computerize the campus, which led to a career in the computer business when the company on the project, Digital Systems, recruited him. He eventually founded his own company, Image Data Systems, which was responsible for projects in the Washington, D.C., area and for government agencies. After moving to Taos in 2000, he started the Mountain Home Repair business and worked to support Taos community organizations. He was the vice president and on the Board of Directors of the Taos Chamber Music Group and coproduced the Art of the Book project for the Millicent Rogers Museum. He was also an amateur photographer and enjoyed hiking. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; daughter Frances Bivens ’84; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2023
56

Richard C. Fredette ’56, of Castle Rock, Colo., formerly of Reston, Va.; June 16. He attended Brown through the ROTC program and served for four years in the U.S. Navy upon graduating. After he was discharged, he worked for the Department of Defense. He enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake Bay, dabbling in the stock market, and cheering for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Terry; a daughter and son-in-law; a daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren. 

 

Nov, 2023
55

William T. Prifty ’55, of East Greenwich, R.I.; May 4. After Brown he received his MBA from the University of Bridgeport and worked as a broker at Janney Montgomery Scott in Providence. He was a member of Brown’s football team and attended as many football games at Brown as he could after moving back to Rhode Island. He is survived by his wife, Janice, and brother Robert ’56.

Nov, 2023
55

John J. Monaghan Jr. ’55, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 4. He had a 47-year career in journalism beginning as a reporter for the Pawtucket Times in 1951 followed by nearly two decades as managing editor of the Providence Journal before retiring in 1998. He transitioned from reporter to editor with his appointment as assistant city editor of the Evening Bulletin, later becoming city editor before his elevation to managing editor in the early 1980s. During his tenure as managing editor, the newspaper won the New England Newspaper Association Newspaper of the Year award. He was a lifelong supporter of Brown and served 25 years as a member of the BAM Board, earning him an alumni service award. He also served on the Cumberland Conservation Commission for 10 years and the Cumberland Boys Club Board for four years and was the founding member and first chairperson of the Cumberland High School Parents’ Advisory Group. An avid outdoorsman, he spent much of his free time at his West Ossipee, N.H., second home canoeing, skiing, snowshoeing, and hiking in the White Mountains. In his retirement he traveled with his wife throughout the United States and Europe and subsequently published pieces on travel, canoeing, and skiing in the Sunday Providence Journal. He is survived by a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; two sisters, including Sheila Monaghan Harvey ’56; and nephew Peter Harvey ’80. 

Nov, 2023
55

J. Richard Lownds ’55, of Garnet Valley, Pa., formerly of East Granby, Conn., and Los Angeles; July 2. He served in the U.S. Air Force and later worked for Connecticut General, Hay Associates, and Kaiser Permanente Medical Groups, from which he retired in 1998. He enjoyed traveling and singing and was involved with the Barbershop Quartet Society and Songmakers. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a son and daughter-in-law; five stepchildren; 10 step grandchildren; two brothers; and his former wife, Barbara Schiller. 

 

Nov, 2023
54

Mary O’Neil Ward ’54, of Georgetown, Me.; Apr. 27. She was a homemaker. She enjoyed painting and often her scenes were from her travels to Block Island and Maine. She also enjoyed reading and sewing. She is survived by five children, 15 grandchildren, and 21 great-grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
54

Elizabeth Turner Taylor ’54, of State College, Pa.; June 5. She was a volunteer her entire life and held leadership roles in numerous community organizations. For almost two decades she was the pro shop manager at Orchard Lake Country Club. She also served as a docent at the Centre Furnace Mansion. While at Brown, she was a member of several singing and theater groups and served as vice president of her class. She was an avid reader, gardener, and knitter. She is survived by her husband, Alfred; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2023
54

Tovia Mancoll Siegel ’54, of East Providence, R.I.; June 10, after a brief illness. She was a librarian at Temple Emanu-El, Wheeler School, and Gordon School. She was active in many community organizations, including the Miriam Hospital Women’s Association, where she served as president and editor of Simply Delicious. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, a sister, two sisters-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
54

Joan Chiappinelli Sammartino ’54, of Warwick, R.I.; July 4. She taught in Barrington (R.I.), Cranston (R.I.), Melrose (Mass.), Broomall (Pa.), and Winston-Salem (N.C.). She was a president of the Rhode Island Medical Society Auxiliary and a member of the Aurora Club, the Elmhurst Alumnae Association, and the Brown Club of Kent County. She enjoyed hosting holiday dinner parties. She is survived by son Wayne ’80; a daughter-in-law; and grandchildren Laura Sammartino ’10 and Ryan Sammartino ’13. 

Nov, 2023
54

Ronald H. Coleman ’54, of Bloomfield, Conn.; June 10. He was employed as an engineer for Avco, GCA, Textron, and Mitre. Eventually, he opened his own manufacturing business in Stoughton, Mass., American Engineering. He was an avid bridge and Wordle player. He also enjoyed deep sea fishing, boating, hiking, and playing golf. He is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a brother. 

 

Nov, 2023
54

Paul G. Benedum Jr. ’54, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Pittsburgh; May 17. He was the founder of the Paul G. Benedum Jr. Foundation, which provided educational opportunities to those less fortunate. In addition, he was active in the family business, Benedum Interests. He had an interest in the stock market and spent hours trading and researching. He was a life trustee of the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. An avid fly fisherman, he also enjoyed jazz music, which he could play by ear. He is survived by his wife Mary Ellen. 

Nov, 2023
52

Alexander R. Simpson ’52, of Pittsford, N.Y.; June 28. He earned a master’s degree in history from the University of Michigan and worked at the Washtenaw County Road Commission. In Rochester, he taught history at East High School from 1961 until 1990. He was a communicant of Christ Church Episcopal of Pittsford. He was a member of the American Civil Liberties Union, Metro Justice, and the American Federation of Teachers. He is survived by three children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. 

 

Nov, 2023
52

Mavis A. Payne Perkins ’52, of Cedar Grove, N.J.; May 2. She met her husband Raymond ’52, who predeceased her, at Brown and together they enjoyed raising their family and being active members of Bradford Bath & Tennis Club and Montclair Golf Club. She is survived by six children, including daughters Elizabeth Perkins ’76 and Kathleen Perkins ’80; 12 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. 

Nov, 2023
52

Herbert C. Helle ’52, of New Canaan, Conn.; May 16. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Army, where he was responsible for guided missiles at White Sands Proving Grounds, N. Mex., and at Huntsville, Ala. In 1959, he married his college sweetheart and they lived in New York City, followed by Bernardsville and New Vernon, N.J., and ultimately their forever home in New Canaan. He had a long career with IBM, beginning as a sales trainee in New Jersey. For most of his career, he traveled the country serving as an IBM brand and product ambassador and organizational leader for IBM’s business trade shows. He had a passion for collecting things that began with stamps and grew to include matchbooks of his favorite restaurants. Later it was beer cans, a hobby that included traveling around the country visiting and photographing local breweries and later led to finding new wines and wineries to visit and photograph in the U.S., France, and Italy. He also served as photographer for his wife, who was a freelance travel writer. Some of his photos have been published in Greenwich Review Magazine, the Stamford Advocate, and the Connecticut Sunday Post travel section. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Schuleen Helle ’55; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
52

Rawser P. Crank ’52, of Cumming, Ga.; May 27, from post-op complications from diverticular bleeding. In addition to 29 years of private practice in internal medicine and cardiology and a five year affiliation with Dekalb Medical Center, he served a year as assistant director of the stroke and vascular division of the U.S. Public Health Service in Washington, D.C., and another year as associate professor in cardiology at Emory University School of Medicine. He retired at age 90. He was a past member of the American Medical Society, Medical Association of Georgia, and Dekalb Medical Society. He served on numerous professional committees at Dekalb Medical Center, he lectured on medical ethics, and in 1970 he was cofounder of the Scottdale Clinic, a free clinic for the care of medically indigent people. He was the proud recipient of the Julius McCurdy award, chosen by his peers, for outstanding care and service to Dekalb Medical Center and the community. He enjoyed singing with the Atlanta Symphony Chorus and the Atlanta Choral Society. He was president and on the board of the Atlanta Bach choir and sang with the choir for two years. He was always very active in his local community church, and he enjoyed woodworking, fishing, and gardening, having landscaped and maintained the grounds of Meadowbrook Nursing Home (Ga.). He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two children; three step-children; and seven grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
49

Clarence H. Soderberg Jr. ’49, of East Greenwich, R.I.; May 15. While at Brown his education was interrupted by service during World War II. He attended Tufts Medical School and completed his internship and surgical residency at Rhode Island Hospital. In 1959, he began his private surgical practice at Rhode Island Hospital, and by 1960 he became a board certified specialist. One of his proudest accomplishments was being part of the team that performed the first open heart surgery in Rhode Island. Later he became the chief of Rhode Island Hospital’s second surgical service and also taught at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School, where he was a clinical associate professor and recipient of the Medicine Emeriti Award for outstanding service to medical education. He was active in national and international clinical research groups and he wrote/cowrote more than 30 papers published in surgical journals. He was chief of the Cancer and Acute Leukemia Study Group at Rhode Island Hospital, served as the secretary and treasurer of the Rhode Island Chapter of the American College of Surgeons, and was on the Executive Committee of the New England Cancer Society. He retired in 1995 and began oil and watercolor painting, eventually becoming an exhibiting/artist member of the Providence Art Club. He was also an active leader in Rhode Island Freemasonry, was medical director of the Palestine Temple Shriners, a member of the Board of Governors at the Shriner’s Children’s Hospital and a Knight Commander of the Temple. He enjoyed playing tennis at the Warwick Heights Tennis Club, going to the beach at The Dunes Club, going to the movies, and having a Bombay Sapphire martini every evening at 6:30 p.m. He is survived by three children and their spouses, and five grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
46

Shirley Sugarman Wolpert ’46, of Providence and Narragansett, R.I.; June 29, after a brief illness. She was the face that greeted everyone who entered Brown’s Maddock Alumni Center for more than 26 years. As former BAM Editor Norman Boucher put it, she was “Brown’s unofficial ambassador.” In addition to greeting thousands of alumni, students, parents, faculty, and staff, she also met and helped many celebrities through the years, including John F. Kennedy Jr. ’83, George Harrison, Peter Jennings, Andrew Young, Jonas Salk, Danny DeVito, Howard Cosell, and Jane Fonda, to name a few. She was an active member of the Pembroke Club of Providence, eventually serving as president, for which she received the President’s Award in 2001. She was a former member of the Brown Alumni Association Board of Governors and was secretary of her class for many years. She attended her 70th Reunion in 2016 and was upset that there was no 75th Reunion planned in 2021. She is survived by daughter Nancy Wolpert Rachman ’79; a son and daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; cousin Harold Gadon ’49; and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2023
51

James L.S. McLay ’51, of Bloomington, Ind.; May 30. After Brown, he served four years in the U.S. Navy. Upon discharge in 1955, he began a long and successful career with ALCOA. While working in Pittsburgh, he met his wife of 45 years, Barbara Lynn Gibson, who predeceased him. He remained with ALCOA for 30 years, serving as a managing director in subsidiary companies in the UK for several years, then relocated to Ft. Wayne, Ind., as a vice president of sales for Rea Magnet Wire, then went on to related engineering sales work before retiring in 2000. Active in the local community, his work with the Newcomers Club allowed him to meet Carroll Tolsma, who became his late-in-life-love and closest companion. Together they enjoyed traveling and cruising. He also studied financial markets and was a successful investor. He is survived by his companion, Carroll; four children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
51

Judith Brown MacDonald ’51, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; June 8. She was a professor of education at Montclair State College. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by daughter Rebecca MacDonald ’87; a son; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter. 

Nov, 2023
50

Zalman D. Newman ’50, of Scottsdale, Ariz., and Newport, R.I.; Apr. 28. After serving in the U.S. Navy and graduating from Brown, he attended Boston University School of Law and upon passing the Rhode Island Bar exam became a member of Burdick, Corcoran & Peckham. He remained with the firm until 1960, when he opened his own business and practiced for almost 50 years. He was also a probate judge for the city of Newport. After retiring, he moved to Arizona and would return to Newport during the summer months. He was a member and former president of Touro Synagogue and a member of the Rhode Island Bar Association, the Newport Lions Club, the Naval War College Foundation, and the Board of Governors of Newport Hospital. He enjoyed playing the violin, going to the beach, sightseeing, and traveling. He is survived by two nieces and two nephews. 

Nov, 2023
50

Irving A. Hiller ’50, of Gales Ferry, Conn.; June 16. After graduating with a degree in mechanical engineering, he spent two years in the U.S. Army followed by a career at Electric Boat and Otis Elevators. In 1990, he joined Habitat for Humanity of Eastern Connecticut and helped build more than 20 homes. Also in 1990, he joined the crew of the retreat and conference center of the American Baptist Churches of Connecticut, helping to maintain and improve the property. He was a 66-year member and deacon of the Poquonnock Bridge Baptist Church. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; five grandsons; and two great-grandchildren. 

Nov, 2023
48

Robert J. Welch ’48, of Southport, Mass.; June 8. After graduating from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, he was commissioned in the U.S. Navy as a dental corps officer from 1952 to 1954, then joined his father’s dentistry practice in North Attleboro, Mass. He retired in 1981 and joined the faculty of Tufts Dental School as an associate professor in the prosthodontic and clinic administration departments until retiring in 1993. He and his family were summer residents of New Seabury from 1963 and became full-time residents in 1989. He was active in the community, serving as a founding member and vice commodore of the New Seabury Sailing Club and as president and treasurer of the New Seabury Men’s Club. After assisting with the establishment of the dental clinic at the Community Health Center of Cape Cod, located in Mashpee, he treated dental patients for several years at the new facility. A long time parishioner of Christ the King Church, he served as a eucharistic minister. He and his wife moved to Southport in 2014. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; four children and their spouses, including son Robert Jr. ’80; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandson. 

Nov, 2023
48

Dolores Rego Forman ’48, of Centerville, Mass.; May 12. She married in 1952 and raised a family. She later attended Bridgewater State College and received her master’s degree in 1971. She taught remedial reading for three years and then became an administrative assistant for the Brockton school system for 20 years. She enjoyed collecting antiques, gardening, and reading. She is survived by three sons, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson. 

Nov, 2023
45

Briggs A. Hoffmann Jr. ’45, of St. Louis, Mo.; Apr. 25. He had a 44-year career in the insurance business and was a retired vice president and treasurer of the Charles L. Crane Agency. A World War II veteran, he was a member of the Annunziata Conference of St. Vincent de Paul Society for 18 years. He is survived by a son, two granddaughters, and five great-grandchildren. 

 

Aug, 2023
FAC

Robert B. Litchfield, of Westport, Mass.; Feb. 9. He was professor of history emeritus at Brown, where he taught from 1968 until his retirement in 2003. Before Brown, he taught at Dartmouth College. He graduated from Harvard and earned a PhD from Princeton. He published Emergence of a Bureaucracy: The Florentine Patricians, 1530-1790, which won the American Historical Association’s Marraro Prize in 1987. He also translated works of Italian historians. After participating in a project for comparative census analysis, he published an e-book, Florence Ducal Capital 1530-1630, in 2004, which detailed the city’s changing urban geography. He is survived by his husband, W. Gardner Chace.

Aug, 2023
FAC

Mary D. Lekas, of East Providence, R.I.; Jan. 24. “Dr. Mary,” as she was fondly called by those who knew her, was a practicing otolaryngologist specializing in head and neck surgery. Her professional career included private practice with privileges at Rhode Island Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital, the Veterans Administration Hospital and Miriam Hospital. Her career featured many firsts, such as being the first woman to head the otolaryngology department at Rhode Island Hospital as chief surgeon from 1983 until she retired in 1996. She was also the first woman to be professor of clinical otolaryngology at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School and, in 1980, she was named the first woman to be elected president of the New England Otolaryngological Society. In 1992 Dr. Mary was named Rhode Island’s Woman Physician of the Year, and she was awarded the president’s citation from the Triological Society in 1993. She was past president of the Providence Medical Association and was recipient of the Providence Medical Association’s Distinguished Service Award. She won numerous recognitions and accolades during her 60-year career. She was an active member of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Cranston, R.I., singing in the church choir and serving as a member of the Good Samaritan Ladies Philoptochos Society. In recognition of her service to the Annunciation Church, she was named the 2009 recipient of the Metropolis of Boston Laity Award. She is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
FAC

R. Robert Barone, of Johnston, R.I.; Apr. 8. After graduating from Providence College in 1952 and University of Bologna School of Medicine in 1957, he completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at St. Raphael Hospital in New Haven, Conn. His career as an ob-gyn  consisted of more than 40 years practicing in Johnston and Providence. In addition, he directed the U.S. Government Maternal and Infant Care program at St. Joseph’s Hospital and was on the midwifery board for 10 years. He was a diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and was a member of the New England Ob-Gyn Society, the Rhode Island Medical Society, and the Providence Medical Association, as well as a clinical instructor at both Tufts Medical School and Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was past president of the University of Bologna Alumni Association and an active member of the Italian American Historical Society of Rhode Island. He was well read and especially liked reading histories and biographies. His interests were eclectic and he enjoyed sharing his stories and ideas. He is survived by his wife, Marie; five children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Aug, 2023
STU

Jon O. Habib ’24, of Hillsdale, Mich.; Apr. 11, following a fall while hiking in Morocco. At the time of his passing, he was studying Chinese, philosophy, and economics. He was a cofounder of the Brown Private Equity Club, participated in the Brown Journal of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, the Brown/RISD Arab Society, the economics Departmental Undergraduate Group (DUG), and the chess club. He also helped review college essays by victims of the Syrian conflict so they could access higher education. He was deeply proud of his Lebanese heritage and his family connection to the Bahamas and founded the Island Time Company, a nonprofit clothing company whose proceeds are donated to the Bahamas Hurricane Restoration Fund. He was a self-taught guitarist. The day after his accident the family was informed that he had been accepted into the most prestigious summer banking internship program, the Barclays Financial Sponsors group in New York City. He is survived by his parents and a brother.

Aug, 2023
GS 86

Peter H. Bond ’86 MAT, of Lords Valley, Pa.; Feb. 13. He was a retired history teacher for Randolph High School (N.J.). Aside from teaching, he also coached his children’s baseball teams and then went on to be an umpire for many years. In retirement, he enjoyed bird watching, gardening, and photography and started a small business called Bond Fire Hot Sauce. When time permitted, he enjoyed spending time at the family cottage on the Canadian side of Lake Erie. He is survived by six children, his mother, and five siblings.

Aug, 2023
GS 85

Virginia Copes Tenzer ’85 PhD, of New Haven, Conn.; Feb. 6, of cancer. She taught art history at UConn and curated exhibits at UConn’s Benton Art Museum. In retirement she volunteered at St. Thomas More Chapel Soup Kitchen and Yale New Haven Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Morton; a daughter; a son; a granddaughter; a sister; and numerous nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 85

Joyce Benjamin McKay ’85 PhD, of Hampton, Ill.; Feb. 22. Her career was spent as an archaeologist and architectural historian. She was the recipient of the 2010 Preservation Achievement Award from the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. In retirement she volunteered at the Rock Island County Historical Society and the Hampton Historical Society. She is survived by her husband, Tom; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 78

Elaine Mary Margaret Bell ’78 AM, of Coudersport, Pa.; Mar. 11. She was a technical writer independently and for several firms throughout the Northeast. She wrote plays, short stories, song lyrics, and poetry over a span of 60 years. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, two nephews, and a cousin.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Marilyn H. Fetterman ’71 AM, ’92 PhD, of Allentown, Pa.; Mar. 23. She is survived by her mother, a sister, and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
GS 76

Henry “Nick” Hanson Jr. ’76 PhD, of Charlottesville, Va., formerly of New York; Feb. 13. While studying at Brown, he met his future wife. After graduation, they were married and he began teaching at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. After two years, he accepted a teaching position at Manhattan College (N.Y.) and spent summers studying finance at NYU. He was hired as a quantitative analyst at Kidder, Peabody & Co. and at Salomon Brothers, where he was promoted to vice president of derivative and quantitative research. He worked for investment firms until his retirement in 1996, when he moved to Charlottesville but continued his interest in the stock market. He is survived by his wife, Janice Rogers ’74 ScM; his mother-in-law; a sister; a sister-in-law; a brother; and two brothers-in-law.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Ralph L. Roberts III ’71 AM, of Cincinnati; Feb. 20. He was an assistant professor of anthropology. He is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, and three nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Dean C. Palmer ’71 ScM, ’75 PhD, of Excelsior, Minn.; Mar. 8, from primary progressive aphasia. After earning his undergraduate degree from Oberlin College and his PhD in physics from Brown, he began his career as a nuclear physicist. He had postdoctoral positions at the University of Liverpool, England, and the University of Minnesota. He was an expert in the field of magnetic recording, developing the technology used to store data on computer hard drives, first working at IBM in Rochester, Minn., for 20 years and later at Seagate in the Twin Cities. In retirement he enjoyed volunteering and working to make the world a better place for future generations through the Sierra Club and led a landscape renewal project for his community. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a stepdaughter; two grandchildren; and four siblings.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Robert G. Liotta ’71 AM, of Manchester, N.H.; Jan. 27. He had an extensive career in the U.S. Air Force. Having graduated from the U.S. Air Force pilot training in 1950, he began his career as an instructor pilot in Texas. He spent the next 40 years working alongside foreign nationals, student pilots, liaison officers, and exchange officers before retiring as regional manager for Northrop Aircraft. While at Brown, he became a commander of the Air Force ROTC program. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons and their spouses; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Ashwani D. Budhiraja ’71 ScM, of Rehoboth, Mass.; Feb. 22. He had a 40-year career as a mechanical engineer. He was a founder of the Indian Students Association, which later became the Indian Association of Greater Rhode Island. He was an accomplished tennis player and swimmer and he enjoyed table tennis, billiards, and bridge. He sang, painted, and enjoyed gardening. He is survived by his wife, Rita; two daughters and their spouses, including daughter Pratisha Budhiraja ’91; two granddaughters; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
GS 70

Laurence A. Goldstein ’70 PhD, of Ann Arbor, Mich; Apr. 16, of a bacterial infection. He earned an undergraduate degree from UCLA, and following graduation from Brown, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan’s department of English Language and Literature in 1970. He retired as professor emeritus in 2016. As a poet and literary critic and historian, he authored, edited, and coedited 16 well-reviewed books and authored dozens of essays and book and film reviews. During his time at UCLA, he was arts editor for the Daily Bruin and would conduct interviews with local movie industry notables such as director Billy Wilder and Stan Laurel of Laurel and Hardy fame. Also as an undergraduate, and later in his career, he wrote several book reviews and op-ed pieces for the Los Angeles Times, and later for the New York Times. In addition to teaching and writing at the University of Michigan, he spent 32 years as editor of the University’s flagship scholarly and creative arts journal, Michigan Quarterly Review. He traveled widely and sometimes wrote poems about his travels. He enjoyed regular walks through the Old West Side neighborhood where he lived and baseball, especially cheering for Michigan. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons; and four grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 62

Henry R. Richardson III ’62 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Williamsburg, Va.; Dec. 25. He joined the mathematical consulting firm Daniel H. Wagner Associates (Pa.) and began a distinguished career using mathematics to plan and conduct searches at sea for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard. He was a leader in the formulation of fundamental concepts in search theory, as well as in the development of practical means for their implementation. He was the civilian on-scene analyst during the successful 1996 Mediterranean H-bomb search off the coast of Spain. He developed the concept of Search Effectiveness Probability (SEP). During the 1968 search in the Atlantic Ocean for the sunken nuclear submarine USS Scorpion, he led a stateside and on-scene search team in developing probability maps of search areas that helped locate the missing submarine in 1969. He led the project to develop a Computer Assisted Search Planning (CASP) system for the U.S. Coast Guard. For CASP, he extended the simulation techniques he developed for the Scorpion search to be used in planning searches for moving objects, specifically boats and people missing at sea. CASP became operational in 1975 at all USCG Rescue Coordination Centers. It remained in use until 2007. After 20 years at Wagner Associates, he joined the Center for Naval Analyses in 1985 as senior scientist and later as vice president and director of the Naval Warfare Operations Division. In 1987, he accepted a position at the U.S. Naval Academy as chair of operation analysis and supervised the research of midshipmen. In 1988, he joined former colleagues from Wagner Associates at Metron as head of the advanced mathematics division. In addition to running the division, he developed physical and mathematical models for laser detection of mines in shallow water. He was also interested in mathematical finance and published several technical papers in that area. In 1998 he retired from Metron, where his contributions were as numerous and varied as his many technical interests. He was a mentor and role model for many analysts at Metron as he had been at Wagner Associates. He enjoyed sailing, the study of languages, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
GS 70

Lillian T. Cochran ’70 PhD, of Westborough, Mass.; Feb. 15. She taught sociology at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain, for a couple of years, then held a position as an assistant professor of sociology at Drew University. In addition to teaching, she dedicated time to academic research. She was a founding member of Social Science Research Associates, Inc., a research consulting firm. Years later, she worked as a technical writer for Data General Corporation.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 67

Herbert G. Schlegel ’67 MAT, of Beverly, Mass.; Mar. 2. He taught at Manchester High School for 38 years and was head of the math department. In addition to his teaching, he also was coach of the math team and served as a class advisor. He was varsity coach of the basketball, baseball, and softball teams for many years. He was active in the community coaching youth sports and served as president of the North Shore Skating Club. He enjoyed reading and trivia. He is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law and nine grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Martha G. Satz ’65 AM, of Dallas; Jan. 26. At the time of her death, she was a faculty member in the English department at Southern Methodist University, where she taught since 1976. One of her lasting legacies at the University, beyond the generations of students whose lives she positively impacted, was being one of the founding faculty members of the freshman honors program in the 1980s, a program that still thrives today. She published and presented numerous papers during her tenure on topics as diverse as philosophy, feminism, race, equality, motherhood, adoption, and disability advocacy. She served on and chaired university and national academic committees. At age 68 she earned a master’s degree in counseling from SMU and began a career as a counselor. She was so adept a teacher, mentor, and counselor that many of her former students and patients remained in contact with her throughout her life, some becoming close friends. She is survived by two children, two grandchildren, and six nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 67

Dennis E. “Tunky” Murphy ’67 AM, of Round Rock, Tex.; Dec. 4. After Brown, he moved with his family to Iowa for a position as an assistant English professor at Drake University. He left Drake for a position at Batten, Batten, Hudson & Swab, traveling the country delivering management seminars. He later joined Professional Training Associates (PTA), which specialized in monthly newsletters for workplace leaders. In 1980, he moved to Round Rock and established a branch of PTA, eventually becoming its sole owner. In the 1990s, he created and published Hard@Work, Inc. He was an active member of the Congregational Church of Austin, United Church of Christ and served as deacon, trustee, treasurer, and choir member. In retirement, he volunteered with Meals on Wheels and was an intake counselor at the Round Rock Serving Center, where he enjoyed helping serve Christmas meals. He also enjoyed astronomy, gardening, shortwave radio operating, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Norma “Nodie” Nice Murphy ’67 AM, ’75 PhD; a daughter; two sons; five grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Kenneth L. McKay ’65 MAT, of Decatur, Tex.; Feb. 25. He taught and was an administrator in public education for 46 years. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; four children; two daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren; a great-grandson; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Shih-kuan “Ken” Hsu ’65 ScM, ’68 PhD, of Shrewsbury, Mass.; Feb. 5. He held a research position at Alden Research Labs in Holden, Mass., and also taught at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In the mid-’80s, he joined the MITRE Corp., where he continued to work into his 86th year. He had many interests but enjoyed any time spent working on cars and/or driving his family on long road trips. He also enjoyed any other activities where he could use his hands to create, such as cooking, sewing, remodeling, and building. His love of technology was equally great as he continuously kept up with the latest technological innovations. He kept active all his life, and well into his mid-80s he was biking and jogging around the streets of Shrewsbury. He is survived by his wife, Mei-sheng; two children and their spouses; two grandchildren; four siblings; and many nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 64

John R. Olsen ’64 MAT, of Cranston, R.I.; Mar. 29. He taught English for 30 years at Cranston High School West. During his tenure, he created Contempora, an annually printed collection of short stories, poems, and sketches by students. In retirement, he continued to teach as an associate professor at Johnson & Wales University until 2015. He also volunteered teaching adult literacy skills at Crossroads in Providence. He enjoyed listening and dancing to jazz and blues music and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Mily; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepdaughter; a granddaughter; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 61

Anne C. Brooke ’61 AM, ’69 PhD, of Norfolk, Va.; Apr. 17. She taught classics at UC Santa Barbara and was an assistant professor of classics at Vassar College. For a time she moved to Wales, learned Welsh, and worked with teachers, parents, and local nursery groups. She produced Welsh workbooks, educational materials, and children’s books. She was a charter member of the National Museum of the American Indian, a longtime supporter of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation,  and an advocate for the Weyanoke Bird and Wildflower Sanctuary. She was an avid reader and writer. She collected books and always gave them as gifts. She wrote letters to family and friends on a weekly basis, and after visits, she enjoyed raising a white handkerchief as you drove away in a car, keeping it up until you passed from view. She is survived by a sister, a niece, and two nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 60

Robert K. Revicki ’60 MAT, of Fayetteville, Pa.; Jan. 8. He was a teacher, administrator, composer, musician, poet, and visual artist. He held positions of leadership and professorship while developing programs and workshops through the Department of Indian Affairs, the Ford Foundation, and as chair of the department of music for the Pennsylvania Department of Education in Harrisburg. Before arriving in Pennsylvania he was a teacher and a director of music in public schools throughout Vermont, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. He is survived by his partner, Diane C. Roland; two daughters; a son-in-law; a stepdaughter; three grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 58

Ernest M. Grunebaum ’58 AM, of New York City; Mar. 9, from Parkinson’s. He was a retired investment banker and dedicated himself to many Jewish organizations. He was chairman of the New York chapter of the Union for Reform Judaism, the head of the URJ’s Camp Kutz, and served for many years on the board of directors of Selfhelp Community Services. He was a pillar of Temple Beth El of Northern Westchester, where he served as president for three years and then as an active board member. He enjoyed woodworking, gardening, traveling, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie; a daughter; two sons; and a grandson.

Aug, 2023
GS 57

Louis J. Pierro ’57 PhD of Manchester, Conn.; Mar. 5. After Brown, he attended CalTech in Pasadena for a post-doctorate year. He then accepted a position as assistant professor at Wheeling College in West Virginia. After two years, he accepted a position at UConn, where he spent 38 years. During his tenure he worked closely with the Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, and served on committees for land grant universities. After he retired from UConn, he was project manager for the university’s biotechnology center, which houses a conference room dedicated to him. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; a daughter; a son; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 55

Ann Rademacher Burrow ’55 AM, of Hamden, Conn.; Jan. 29. She followed her husband to Japan, where he was working, and lived there for two years. She learned flower arranging and calligraphy while living in Japan. Once back in the U.S., she became active with nonprofit and charitable organizations. She was a member of the League of Women Voters and actively participated in the New Haven Garden Club. She is survived by three children and their spouses, including daughter Sarah Burrow ’86 and son Peter ’81, and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 54

Paul W. Wittmer ’54 AM, of Bullhead City, Ariz., formerly of Canton, Conn.; Dec. 19. He was a professor of history and economics at Tunxis Community College for more than 30 years. During that time, he worked with Native American tribes in the Southwest providing access to improved healthcare. He coauthored several books on the Native American culture and he served as president of the Canon Historical Society.

Aug, 2023
20

Pierre S.M. Lipton ’20, of Charlotte, N.C.; Feb. 4, unexpectedly after crossing the finish line at the Mesa Marathon in Arizona. It was his personal best for distance in just over 3 hours and 10 minutes. He died of what doctors believe was “some sudden electrolyte imbalance that caused arrhythmia,” his father told the Boston Globe. He was valedictorian at Myers Park High School and volunteered at an orphanage in Panama to teach English and math before attending Brown to study economics and Middle Eastern studies. Always concerned about others, he started VitaLives while still a student—a company aimed at reducing malnutrition and vitamin deficiency. In addition, he became COO of the news company 1440 Media, cofounded by Tim Huelskamp and Andrew Steigerwald, which was created to share fact-focused information with the world. Pierre told EIN News in January 2022: “The news used to be something that brought people together. The whole family would sit around the TV, radio, or newspaper and consume the same information. Now, that couldn’t be further from the truth. At 1440, we believe the news can still be a way for people to connect.” As a result of his hard work and success, he was named Rhode Island INNO under 25 in 2020 and was featured on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in 2022. “He accomplished more than anyone I know in just 26 years, but he still had so many plans,” his girlfriend, Eleanor Pereboom, wrote in an Instagram post. He spoke Spanish and Arabic and was learning Italian in anticipation of a planned trip in May. He was an adventurer and enjoyed travel, music, art, hiking, reading, geography, trivia, Scrabble, running, soccer, tennis, squash, and water skiing. He is survived by his parents, a sister, and his girlfriend Eleanor.

Aug, 2023
08

Verner S. Wilson ’08, of Bristol Bay, Alaska; Mar. 23. His passion for the environment led him to pursue a degree in environmental management at Yale. He went on to work with organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund, the Bristol Bay Native Association, and Friends of the Earth. In his role as the director of natural resources at the Bristol Bay Native Association, he worked on regional strategies to adapt to climate change, international shipping issues, comanagement of the region’s fisheries and other wildlife, and conservation of the land and waters for future generations. As a senior oceans campaigner at Friends of the Earth, he focused on shipping-related marine environmental issues in the Pacific Northwest and the Arctic. He devoted a substantial part of his adult life to campaigning against the proposed Pebble Mine in his home region of Bristol Bay. He was always willing to lend a helping hand and enjoyed traveling the globe and exploring new cultures. He is survived by his mother and father; two sisters; a brother; a niece; and four nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
07

Lakeshia D. Richardson ’07, of Hermitage, Tenn.; Apr. 11. She had a 16-year career that included being a manager and independent consultant for such companies as Ernst & Young, JP Morgan Chase, and PepsiCo, the co-owner of Norrah Marketing, and a self-employed independent education consultant. She is survived by her husband, Corey; a daughter; a brother; four sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and her best friend.

Aug, 2023
06

Kristen M. Leary ’06, of Denver; Dec. 8, of metastatic breast cancer. She worked for the Alliance Center in Denver as a dedicated nonprofit development director for seven years. She previously worked as an imagery analyst for the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency in Washington, D.C. She excelled in academics, track, soccer, field hockey, piano, and the oboe and was a lifelong explorer who enjoyed cooking, traveling the globe, hiking, camping, climbing, and pursuing new interests. She is survived by her husband, Loren Klein; two daughters; her parents; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
04

Timothy Marschner Jr. ’04, of Londonderry, N.H.; Apr. 1, of natural causes related to a brain injury. In 2003, during his final year at Brown, he underwent brain surgery and, as a result, acquired a brain injury. He was able to graduate that same year and following graduation he lived in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Washington, D.C., before returning to New Hampshire. He faced numerous health challenges throughout his life but was able to run his own business. He was a lifelong fan of Boston sports teams, especially the Red Sox, and he enjoyed trivia. He is survived by his father Timothy ’68; three sisters; and five nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
00

Jason M. Brennen ’00, of Chicago; Apr. 3. He began his career in advertising in Manhattan before taking time to teach English in China. He returned to Chicago and worked in advertising with Hyatt, Inc. He later devoted his career to mental health and social policy at Northwestern University, ending his career at Chapin-Hall, University of Chicago, as a senior policy analyst. He is survived by his wife, Frances; his parents; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
93

Robert H. Monnes ’93, of South Kingstown, R.I.; Mar. 14. He played baseball at Brown and held several pitching records. He was a member of the 1990 All-Ivy League team. In 1994 he began his career as an auditor at Coopers & Lybrand (now PwC) in Hartford, Conn. He obtained his masters in accounting from the University of Hartford in 1995 and went on to become a certified public accountant and a certified information systems auditor. In 2000, he transferred to PwC’s Boston office. After 14 years at PwC, he went on to work as the director of internal audit at Beacon Mutual in Warwick, R.I., for four years and then as the director of finance for three years. In 2015, he began his role as the chief financial officer at AmWins Group Benefits in North Kingstown. He was an inventor at heart and fulfilled his lifelong dream of holding a patent in 2020 when he was awarded one for a clamp-mounted stand-up desk that he designed. He believed in giving back to his community and coached and served as the board treasurer for both the Welcome House of South County and the Avenue Concept. He enjoyed spending time with his children, biking, hiking, skiing, swimming, and coaching. He is survived by his wife, Alicia; two children; his mother; two sisters; a brother; two brothers-in-law; and 13 nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
90

Colin W. Gillis II ’90, of Chatham, Mass.; Apr. 17, after a brief illness. After earning an MBA from NYU, he spent his career in finance in New York City. In 2018 he relocated to the Cape. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a child; his father; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; a brother; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
90

Theodore B. Choi ’90, of Norwood, N.J.; Oct. 27, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Juhee Lee, and four children, including daughters Minae Choi ’19, Mingee Choi ’20, and Minjoo Choi ’20.

 

Aug, 2023
88

James G. Grant ’88, of Dedham, Mass.; Feb 7. He was a self-employed carpenter and a former goalie on the Brown men’s hockey team. He is survived by a sister and three brothers.

Aug, 2023
86

Susan M. Kobayashi ’86, of San Francisco; Jan. 31, from metastatic breast cancer. She was a successful hedge fund manager, but her passions were community service, dance, and yoga. She was a lifelong dancer, part of the dance community at Brown and most recently part of ODC Dance Commons in San Francisco. She was a longtime student of Manouso Manos in the tradition of Iyengar Yoga. She was a board member and campaign fund manager for her children’s preschool, Nihonmachi Little Friends, and she served on the boards of the Japan Society of Northern California and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California. She also served on the board of RAWdance, which was cofounded by fellow alums Wendy Rein ’99 and Ryan T. Smith ’02. She is survived by her husband, Chuck Han ’86; a daughter; a son; her parents Paul and Ann Hayashi Kobayashi ’59; and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
84

Vincent Stephens ’84, of Overland Park, Kans.; Mar. 21. He owned and operated Axiom. He is survived by his wife, Veronica; four sons; two daughters-in-law; nine grandchildren; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

Aug, 2023
81

David B. Zuckerman ’81, of Seattle; Apr. 8, after a long battle with posterior cortical atrophy. After Brown, he became a recording engineer at the Splice of Life Studio in Boston. After a while, he left the recording business and attended law school. Following law school, he moved to Seattle to work for the Public Defender Association. He later clerked for Federal Judge William Dwyer before opening his own practice. He was a criminal defense lawyer who received the 2017 William O. Douglas Award, Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers’ highest honor. He volunteered his time to provide advice or to speak at continuing education events and was passionate about protecting civil liberties, devoting countless hours to the American Civil Liberties Union. Aside from work, he was a talented musician and played piano in several rock bands, including his college band, the Geeks. He was also athletic and enjoyed skiing, swimming, diving, running, and hiking. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; twin daughters Anna Zuckerman ’21 and Leah Zuckerman ’21; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
80

Lansing D. Moore ’80, of Bronxville, N.Y.; Feb. 6, of cancer. He was one of New York’s premier fine art restorers and for 40 years served as the president of Center Art Studio, Ltd. He was an active member of the Onteora Club and enjoyed cooking. He is survived by his wife, Iliana Engelke Moore, and son Lansing Moore Jr. ’12.

Aug, 2023
80

Douglas J. Haymaker ’80, of Warren, N.J.; Jan. 13, after a year-long illness. He completed a doctoral degree in clinical psychology at the University of Florida and subsequently established private practices in Princeton and Oldwick (N.J.), eventually practicing with his wife in Bridgewater (N.J.) for 10 years. He consulted at Morristown Memorial Hospital and St. Clare’s Hospital. He supervised Rutgers graduate students and was voted supervisor of the year by his colleagues and students in 2016. He also served as an alumni interviewer for Brown. He published several research articles during his time in academia. He is survived by his wife, Stephanie, and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
79

Christina Baker McKenrick ’79, of Seekonk, Mass.; Feb. 14, after a 12-year battle with breast cancer. She met her future husband during Brown’s orientation week and they married after graduation. She worked as an administrative assistant for a typing instruction company prior to joining the staff at Brown. She first worked for the Brown University Admission Office as the computer systems coordinator and then for the Brown University Management Information Services department. She took a few years off to raise a family and returned to the workforce teaching math and science at School One in Providence. She was involved with numerous boards, committees, and missions. Her mission work led her to multiple trips to Haiti. Subsequently, she enjoyed spending time with her husband traveling to England, Italy, Paris, Normandy, and later in life to the West Coast to see family and friends, though her “happy place” was Briggs Beach in Little Compton, R.I. In addition to raising her family, she welcomed a foster son and extended her home to countless family members and exchange students. She also enjoyed dancing and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Ross ’79; three children; a foster child; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
79

Marcia F. Katz ’79, of Winter Park, Fla., formerly of Houston; Mar. 26, after a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer. She was associate dean of clinical affairs at University of Central Florida College of Medicine before retiring in 2020 with the title of UCF professor emerita. During her tenure, she worked closely with UCF hospitals and the community to build an academic clinical service system. Prior to moving to Florida, she served as Baylor College of Medicine’s associate chair of medicine for clinical affairs and medical director of the department of medicine. In addition, she was the chief of adult medicine at Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women and spearheaded the development of Baylor’s lung institute. She had a powerful impact on the cystic fibrosis community. She was the medical director of the Baylor Maconda Brown O’Connor Adult CF Center and sat on the Center Committee of the CF Foundation. She also served as the coprincipal investigator of the CF Therapeutic Development Center in 2012. She was awarded the Ben and Margaret Love Foundation Bobby Alford Award for Academic Clinical Professionalism, Baylor’s highest award given to a medical school faculty member, recognizing her outstanding humanism. Marcia faced cancer without missing a beat by continuing to travel the world with her husband, visiting Rwanda, Botswana, and Namibia. She took a bike and river cruise on the Rhine with her twin sister and some of her best friends, and biked over 100 miles. During her last few years, she became an avid gardener and birder. She is survived by her husband, Asher; two daughters, including Rebecca Wolinsky ’14; two stepdaughters; her mother; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; and a nephew.

 

Aug, 2023
77

Daniel J. Kleinman ’77, of Marietta, Ga.; Mar. 30. He was a cardiologist in Marietta. He earned a medical degree from Wright State University and completed his internship/residency in internal medicine at Emory University, followed by a three-year fellowship in cardiovascular disease at the Medical College of Georgia. He enjoyed sports, music, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Julie; two sons; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
73

Suzanne Nolan ’73, of Windsor, Conn.; Feb. 21, after a brief illness. At Brown she played varsity ice hockey and was a senior orator at Commencement. In 1982 she earned a master’s in counseling from the University of St. Joseph in West Hartford. For almost a decade, she taught English and coached female athletes at Connecticut secondary schools. Later she was involved in nonprofit work at Covenant House in New York. She also explored hospital ministry. From 1990 to 1996, she worked as a pastoral associate on Saint Bridget’s Church Collaborative Pastoral Team in Manchester (Conn.). She then served as a chaplain at Manchester Memorial Hospital and Mercy Hospital in Springfield, Mass. In 2007, she was named director of pastoral care at Saint Francis Hospital (Conn.). She was instrumental in developing and implementing a certified pastoral education program and a one-year resident program for chaplains. In retirement, she continued her participation as a Mercy associate and expanded her engagement with St. Patrick–St. Anthony Church in Hartford. She enjoyed playing golf, sailing, and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Christopher Wagner; brothers John ’65 and David ’71; a sister-in-law and many nieces and nephews, including John O. Nolan II ’92, Suzanne Nolan ’95, and Caroline Nolan ’98.

 

Aug, 2023
73

Geoffrey P. Allsup ’73, of East Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 23. He was an engineer at Neil Brown Instrument Systems before joining the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in 1986 as a research assistant in the physical oceanography department. He was promoted several times throughout his career and retired after 32 years as a senior engineer. In 2018 he became an oceanographer emeritus and, in 2019, an emeritus research scholar. He was a skilled electronic engineer specializing in very low power and microprocessor-based sensor, instrument, and data logger electronics. He was past president of the Falmouth Amateur Radio Association. He enjoyed outdoor adventures and biking with his wife and children and reading the Lord of the Rings series to each of his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Kim Metz Allsup ’76; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
71

John A. Horneff ’71, ’75 MD, of Charlottesville, Va.; Mar. 24, from complications of metastatic colorectal cancer. He was a member of the “Charter Twelve” first graduating class of Brown medical students (see “Build Your Own MD,” Jan.-Mar. ’23). He completed residencies in anatomic pathology at the University of Chicago and in internal medicine at Northwestern University, and a fellowship in clinical oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Disillusioned by experiences with specific individuals and systems in academic medicine, he changed paths and pursued his other passion, photography. As an independent thinker and a creative photographer, he was drawn to seeing ideas and objects unconventionally. He particularly enjoyed finding obscure visual features and relationships in the natural and human-built worlds and creating new images based on, but not anchored to, conventional ways of seeing. He was an avid follower of current events, constantly connecting them to historical precedent to compare and contrast personalities and events in an effort to understand historical and political movements. He enjoyed playing chess. He is survived by his wife, Christine Peterson ’72.

Related classes:
Class of 1971, MD Class of 1975
Aug, 2023
69

Kirsten Hedberg Rockwood ’69, of Needham, Mass.; Mar. 25. She began her career in financial services working as an administrative assistant with Studley Schuper in Boston. Soon after, she married and raised a family. She returned to her career after her boys were grown, taking a position with Charles River Hospital in Wellesley as an administrative assistant until the facility closed in 1998. She went on to take a position with the daycare center at Saint Andrews Church in Wellesley and later resumed her role as an administrative assistant in financial services by accepting a job with Wachovia Securities. She remained with Wachovia through two mergers and retired from Wells Fargo in 2014. She enjoyed needlepoint, cross stitch, collecting antiques, baking, and playing tennis. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’68; two sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
69

Adam M. Albright ’69, of Bend, Ore.; Feb. 25, from Parkinson’s. He was an entrepreneur. He enjoyed skiing and hiking, and
was passionate about the environment. He is survived by his wife, Rachel; three children; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
68

Dennis M. Hagan ’68, of Perkinsville, Vt.; Mar. 24, after a long battle with MDS and leukemia. He was an elementary school teacher in Springfield, Vt., with a career that spanned 43 years. He was an avid reader, writer, and lover of the arts. He was known for his razor-sharp mind and innate talent for prescribing the perfect book to anyone for their must-read list. He was an accomplished actor and met his wife at the Weston Playhouse in 1978. He enjoyed gardening, hiking, cycling, snowshoeing, and skiing in Vermont. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Aug, 2023
68

Steven M. Daniels ’68, of Fircrest, Wash.; Nov. 26. He taught at the Moses Brown school in Providence after graduating. After two years, he received a teaching opportunity in the Pacific Northwest and joined Charles Wright Academy in 1970. During his 41-year career at CWA, he taught math and earth science, served as athletic director, and coached football, softball, and track. He also thrived in CWA’s Outdoor Education program, helping skipper the 40-foot sailboat, the Moonglow, and leading the 8th grade beach hike for many years. He rarely missed a day in the classroom. In the summer, he furthered his education traveling to distinguished programs, including the Colorado School of Mines to study geology and the University of Hawaii Hilo’s Volcanology program. He taught middle schoolers the properties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. He fished the Puget Sound and hunted pheasant around the state with his Springer spaniels. He was a runner and continued team sports long into his life, playing rugby and softball. He also enjoyed skiing and he climbed Mount Rainier with CWA teaching colleagues. He is survived by his wife, Chris; a son and daughter-in-law; two grand- children; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
67

Mary Auten Psarras ’67, of Stratford, Conn.; Apr. 9. Upon graduation, she joined the Peace Corps and taught in Brazil from 1967 to 1969. After returning to Stratford, she worked for many years as an English as a Second Language teacher in the Bridgeport School system. She also taught GED preparation for adult women at Mercy Learning Center. She is survived by two sons, a granddaughter, and a brother.

Aug, 2023
67

George J. Pandapas Jr. ’67, of Concord, Mass.; Mar. 12. While at Brown, he played on the rugby team and attended classes at RISD, expanding his love of painting and fine art. He went on to spend many years in New York City working as an engineer for Con Edison and NASA. He also invented and patented Musifax—a slide rule for music composition and arrangement used by musicians. Eventually, he moved with his family to Massachusetts and worked as a software programmer. He enjoyed hiking and photographing the New England wilderness with his daughter. He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, a sister, and three brothers.

 

Aug, 2023
66

William R. Powell ’66, ’67 ScM, of Horseheads, N.Y.; Jan. 30. In 1972, he joined the West Virginia University faculty teaching mechanical engineering and mechanics. He joined Corning Inc. in 1981 and moved to New York. He retired as a senior engineering associate in 2002 but continued his relations with Corning as an engineering consultant until 2017. He authored numerous publications and was the holder of 11 patents. He was an elder in Big Flats Presbyterian Church, a past president of the Big Flats Lions Club, and a board member for the food bank, and he applied his engineering skills to build accessibility ramps for homes. He also enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons, including Jeffrey ’01; two sisters; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1966, GS Class of 1967
Aug, 2023
66

Terrence D. Marr ’66, of Goldens Bridge, N.Y.; Mar. 29, of lung cancer. Following many years of teaching and coaching at the Winchendon School (Mass.) and St. Edward’s School (Fla.), he went on to work in financial planning. He retired in 2010 as president of NIA Securities in Paramus, N.J. He was a former member of Brown’s men’s hockey team and a fan of the New York Yankees and enjoyed fishing, traveling, and solving crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Ann Whipple Marr ’70; two daughters and their spouses, including Abigail Marr Doft ’91, ’92 AM; four grandchildren, including Matthew Doft ’27; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; two nieces and a nephew.

 

Aug, 2023
66

Jeffrey Alcorn ’66, of Newburyport, Mass.; Mar. 15. Following his military service in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, he worked in banking in New York City, married, and started a family. His job brought them to Newburyport, where he became a member of the Continental Navy, coached youth soccer, and was a member of the Exchange Club. He enjoyed collecting vintage items, including international flags, records, and diner and restaurant dishware and silverware. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Keenan Alcorn ’68; daughter Kristin Alcorn Masoud ’97; a son; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother; a niece and two nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
64

William D. Cutler ’64, of Mystic, Conn., formerly of Gales Ferry, Conn.; Feb. 14. He was a clinical psychologist in private practice until his retirement. In 2018, he moved to Mystic. He walked two miles daily for more than 30 years and he enjoyed playing the trumpet and studying French. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; and two sisters.

Aug, 2023
64

R. Lee West III ’64, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; Feb. 4, of respiratory failure secondary to pneumonia. He had a long career in consumer, business, and pharmaceutical advertising based in New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. He is survived by a son.

 

Aug, 2023
64

Robert J. Brindle Jr. ’64, of St. Augustine, Fla., formerly of Boston; Jan. 18, from Parkinson’s. He was the sales manager for former AMC and RGC Australian mining companies for many years. While at Brown, he was a member of both the varsity basketball and baseball teams and stayed fit later in life playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Christine; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
63

Richard P. Miller ’63, of Barrington, R.I., formerly of Arlington Heights, Ill.; Mar. 19. He was a trusts and estates attorney for almost 40 years in Arlington Heights. He served as president of the Northwest Suburban Bar Association, president of the Northwest Suburban Estate Planning Council, vice president for a term on the NCH Foundation Board, and a member of the Illinois State Bar Association Trusts and Estates Council. He was a founding member of two Rotary clubs and earned the distinction of Paul Harris Fellow. He is survived by his wife, Patrice; two daughters, including Rebecca Glenn ’96; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; and seven grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
63

Carolyn Jean Murphy Ahern ’63, of Lakewood, Ohio; Jan. 23. She was a former research coordinator in hematology/oncology at the Cleveland Clinic. She was also a dancer/choreographer for the Shalhevet International Folk Ensemble and a second degree black belt. She was a former member of the board of the Buddhist Churches of America. She is survived by her husband, Joseph; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
62

Denis J. FitzGerald ’62, of King of Prussia, Pa.; formerly of Worcester, Mass.; Mar. 25. After Brown, he graduated from New Jersey College of Medicine and New York Eye & Ear Infirmary. He served as lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy, chief of ophthalmology at the Fallon Clinic, CEO & president of St. Vincent’s Hospital, and New England Regional Medical Director of Veterans Affairs. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two sons, including James ’91; daughter Julie FitzGerald Hess ’93; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
61

Brenda Neubauer Straus ’61, of Palm Beach, Fla.; Dec. 31. She was a realtor for more than 35 years with Sotheby’s International Realty, as well as an active member of her community. She served on several boards and was a member of the Mayflower Society, Union Club, and Colony Club. She is survived by a daughter and eight nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
61

Dorrance T. Kelly ’61, of West Redding, Conn.; Mar. 30, after a year-long effort to recover from heart surgery. He was an oral surgeon in Danbury, Conn. In addition to his dental practice, he was an avid collector of old master prints. In the 1980s he became one of the top collectors of modern masters and old masters prints that included early 20th Century artists. He shared his prints for exhibits at local museums. In his younger years he collected coins and stamps. While at Brown, he played football and baseball. After graduating, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps, then attended dental school and completed an oral surgery residency at Ohio State University. He and his wife moved to Danbury in 1971 and settled in West Redding in 1979. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Vischi Kelly ’60; sons Sean ’89, ’89 ScM and Bryan ’91; and six grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
61

Gerald I. Flynn Jr. ’61, of Los Angeles; Apr. 13, of COPD. He founded TCI Leasing in 1978. He steadily grew the business and then founded TCI Transportation as a dedicated trucking company and lastly added TCI Logistics freight brokerage. He enjoyed family ski trips and trips to the lodge at Big Bear Lake. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; three children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
61

Donald L. Adams ’61, of Saxtons River, Vt., and Dunedin, Fla.; Jun. 10, 2022. He worked at the Federal Reserve until retiring and spending time between his two homes. He eventually donated his home in Vermont to the Vermont Academy and spent the remaining years in Florida playing golf. He also enjoyed gardening, cooking, and spending time with family. He is survived by a sister-in-law and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
60

John S. Moyle ’60, of Kingsport, Tenn., formerly of Scarsdale, N.Y. ; Feb. 7, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s. From 1960 through 1963 he served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, reaching the rank of captain. Thereafter, he attended Columbia University and received a master’s degree and after teaching for several years received his doctorate from Columbia in supervision and consultation in science education. His teaching career spanned 35 years in the Bronxville Middle/High School in New York, where he served as science department chair and also coached the wrestling and track teams. From 1974 to 1983 he was an adjunct lecturer in geology at Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. He also taught a class in science teaching preparation at Fordham University. In Scarsdale, he was a founder and board member of the Greenburgh Nature Center, president of the Edgemont Board of Education, president and field trip leader for the local Audubon Society, a Boy Scout leader, and coach for several youth recreational teams. He served as chair of the board of deacons and was financial secretary for the board of trustees at Scarsdale Community Baptist Church. He was also a member of the board of management for the Asa Wright Nature Centre in Trinidad, West Indies, for many years. He led CCD photographic and natural  history tours to East Africa for eight summers and led tropical ecology workshops in Trinidad and Tobago for two decades. He retired to Kingsport in 2004 and became an active member of the community. He sang tenor in the  Sanctuary Choir at the First Baptist Church Kingsport and was involved with Habitat for Humanity. For seven years he volunteered in the lab and led tours at the Gray Fossil Site and Museum in Gray, Tenn. He is survived by his wife, Polly; a daughter and son-in-law; sons John ’90 and Robert ’92; two daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; two brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law; and six nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
59

Judith Lister Yelle ’59, of Andover, Mass.; Feb. 2. She worked as a pediatric nurse before raising a family. Later in life she earned a master’s degree in psychiatric nursing from Boston University and worked in community mental health in the Merrimack Valley. She was engaged in a variety of volunteer activities. In the 1970s she was actively involved in the women’s equal rights movement. She was a board member of the Greater Lawrence Community Action Council and she enjoyed camping with her family on many trips across the United States and Canada. She also sang in the choir at the West Parish Church. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

Peter M.D. Nichols ’59, of New York City; Feb. 1, after a long battle with Parkinson’s. He was a writer and editor for Conde Nast and publications including Saturday Review, Signature Magazine, Columbia Journalism Review, and the New York Times, where he spent 16 years. He enjoyed sailing, traveling, and photography. He is survived by three children and a granddaughter.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Lawrence C. Moss ’59, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of New York; Jan. 30. He was a successful entrepreneur. He acquired Corson Manufacturing in the 1960s and, as president and CEO, he grew the business to become one of the largest folding paper carton companies in the Northeast. He received five Outstanding Quality Vendor awards from Union Carbide in the 1980s, having worked with such companies as Nabisco, Milk-Bone, Eveready, Beech-Nut, Glad, and Fisher Price. He retired to Vero Beach in 1990 but did not stay retired for long. As a lifelong entrepreneur, he was building businesses up until his last days. They included the Island Shipper, Storage 17, Window of the Eye Creations, and Mr. Barksmith’s Cool Treats Smoothies for Dogs. More recently, he found success with distribution of a children’s book series on sea life. Traveling was an important part of his life. He sailed on the Carinthia and Queen Elizabeth 2 and flew on the Concorde. He visited six continents; the seventh was on his 2023 bucket list. He also enjoyed the Adirondacks at his family’s Big Moose Lake lodge. He was a member of Grace Episcopal Church (N.Y.), where he served in several capacities, and was a trustee with multiple organizations. A former member of the Jabberwocks at Brown, he served in the N.Y. State National Guard and was a member of Psi Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Joy; three children; six grandchildren; and former wife, Marcia Earl Moss.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Betty Carleton Mahin ’59, of Los Osos, Calif.; Jan. 19. She earned her master’s in English from the University of Washington after Brown and taught English literature at Seattle Pacific University. She married in 1961 and lived in various places around the country before settling in Los Osos in 1978. She divorced in 1979 and began working at Wells Fargo Bank, where she remained for more than 20 years. She remarried in 1981 and enjoyed traveling the country. She also enjoyed swimming and gardening. She is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, and her brother Scott Carleton ’57.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Joseph W. Larimore Jr. ’59, of Wildwood, Mo.; Feb. 13. Upon graduating from Brown, he married and served in the U.S. Marine Corps, retiring as captain. He and his family settled in Missouri and he accepted a position as secretary of the St. Louis Police Department Board of Commissioners. There he learned software development and code and, as a result, designed and developed what became the first online warrant system. He went on to design and program a computer-assisted dispatch and records management software system for police and fire departments. In 1970, after participating in the creation of the forerunner of today’s 911 emergency response system, he started his own public safety software firm, Larimore Associates, providing custom public safety software applications to the law enforcement, fire, and emergency management markets. He grew his company over the span of 53 years and was responsible for many innovative firsts in the industry. As a hobby, he carved wood creations with chainsaws and hand carving tools that he shared with friends, making each person a special creation that spoke to their uniqueness. He enjoyed white-water rafting, canoeing, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three daughters; two sisters; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Aug, 2023
59

Kyu T. Lee ’59, of Wilmington, Del.; Feb. 10, from a stroke. He was director of biomedicine at DuPont de Nemours, Inc. for more than three decades. He was recruited by DuPont prior to receiving a full scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he would receive his doctorate in chemical engineering in 1963. Due to his inventions in medicinal compounds, he has nine U.S. patents assigned to DuPont de Nemours and Bristol Myers Squibb. He retired in 1995. In 2015, on his 80th birthday, his contributions to Wilmington were honored by then Vice President Joe Biden. In retirement he enjoyed traveling to Europe and Southeast Asia, dinners at Michelin-starred restaurants, skiing, golfing, ballroom dancing with his late partner Yum Kim, and spending time between the East and West coasts with his children and grandchildren. He had a lifelong passion for classical music and found comfort in gardening and reading. He is survived by three children and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

William B. Hayes ’59, of Davidson, N.C., formerly of Chatham, N.J.; Apr. 7. After graduation and completion of Officer Candidate School, he accepted a commission in the U.S. Navy. Upon discharge, he settled in Washington, D.C. and forged a successful career in the home furnishings industry with such businesses as Simmons, Henredon Furniture, Drexel Heritage, Highland House, and Century Furniture, from which he retired in 2007. A highlight of his career was his collaboration with Oscar de la Renta. He was active in the civic life of Chatham, representing his community as town councilman. At Brown, he was a member of both the football and track teams and Delta Tau Delta. He enjoyed playing golf and was a fan of the Yankees, the Knicks, and the Giants. He is survived by his wife, Berkeley; three children, including William Jr. ’87 and Arthur ’89; and eight grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

Peter Gray ’59, of Marblehead, Mass.; Feb. 2, after a brief illness. He spent more than 60 years in the insurance industry, the last 25 at Arrow Mutual Insurance Company. During his career he was a member of several trade groups and sat on many nonprofit and professional boards. Being a former Brown baseball and hockey player, he later coached and mentored young athletes. He was a former member of the Boston Yacht Club, Madison Square Garden Club, and the Beach Club in Swampscott. He enjoyed politics and discussing current events. He is survived by his wife, Sue; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and several nieces.

Aug, 2023
59

Janet Delany ’59, of Rockville, Md., formerly of Pittsburgh; Mar. 30. She spent five decades as a computer programmer with companies such as Shell Oil, Westinghouse Credit, Westinghouse Communications, and the University of Pittsburgh. In 2021, she received the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Award for Career Achievement, given for the lasting impact of her more than 20 years of service to Pittsburgh. She was active with St. Lawrence O’Toole Catholic Church and its liturgical music team, Sweet Rejoicing, first as an alto, but eventually she taught herself to play the electric bass, on which she performed for many years with both Sweet Rejoicing and the Pittsburgh Banjo Club. She also enjoyed solving puzzles. She is survived by her husband, Shaun; three children and their spouses; and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
58

Theodore D. Seager Jr. ’58, of Millis, Mass.; Jan. 29. He spent his entire career, more than 40 years, working at John Hancock. He was a member of the Society of Actuaries. He enjoyed reading and book collecting. In retirement he opened a used book store in Medway, Mass., called Village Books, which he operated for many years. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two sons and daughters-in-law, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

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