Obituaries

Aug, 2023
FAC

Robert B. Litchfield, of Westport, Mass.; Feb. 9. He was professor of history emeritus at Brown, where he taught from 1968 until his retirement in 2003. Before Brown, he taught at Dartmouth College. He graduated from Harvard and earned a PhD from Princeton. He published Emergence of a Bureaucracy: The Florentine Patricians, 1530-1790, which won the American Historical Association’s Marraro Prize in 1987. He also translated works of Italian historians. After participating in a project for comparative census analysis, he published an e-book, Florence Ducal Capital 1530-1630, in 2004, which detailed the city’s changing urban geography. He is survived by his husband, W. Gardner Chace.

Aug, 2023
FAC

Mary D. Lekas, of East Providence, R.I.; Jan. 24. “Dr. Mary,” as she was fondly called by those who knew her, was a practicing otolaryngologist specializing in head and neck surgery. Her professional career included private practice with privileges at Rhode Island Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital, the Veterans Administration Hospital and Miriam Hospital. Her career featured many firsts, such as being the first woman to head the otolaryngology department at Rhode Island Hospital as chief surgeon from 1983 until she retired in 1996. She was also the first woman to be professor of clinical otolaryngology at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School and, in 1980, she was named the first woman to be elected president of the New England Otolaryngological Society. In 1992 Dr. Mary was named Rhode Island’s Woman Physician of the Year, and she was awarded the president’s citation from the Triological Society in 1993. She was past president of the Providence Medical Association and was recipient of the Providence Medical Association’s Distinguished Service Award. She won numerous recognitions and accolades during her 60-year career. She was an active member of the Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church in Cranston, R.I., singing in the church choir and serving as a member of the Good Samaritan Ladies Philoptochos Society. In recognition of her service to the Annunciation Church, she was named the 2009 recipient of the Metropolis of Boston Laity Award. She is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
FAC

R. Robert Barone, of Johnston, R.I.; Apr. 8. After graduating from Providence College in 1952 and University of Bologna School of Medicine in 1957, he completed a residency in obstetrics and gynecology at St. Raphael Hospital in New Haven, Conn. His career as an ob-gyn  consisted of more than 40 years practicing in Johnston and Providence. In addition, he directed the U.S. Government Maternal and Infant Care program at St. Joseph’s Hospital and was on the midwifery board for 10 years. He was a diplomate of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and was a member of the New England Ob-Gyn Society, the Rhode Island Medical Society, and the Providence Medical Association, as well as a clinical instructor at both Tufts Medical School and Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was past president of the University of Bologna Alumni Association and an active member of the Italian American Historical Society of Rhode Island. He was well read and especially liked reading histories and biographies. His interests were eclectic and he enjoyed sharing his stories and ideas. He is survived by his wife, Marie; five children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Aug, 2023
STU

Jon O. Habib ’24, of Hillsdale, Mich.; Apr. 11, following a fall while hiking in Morocco. At the time of his passing, he was studying Chinese, philosophy, and economics. He was a cofounder of the Brown Private Equity Club, participated in the Brown Journal of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, the Brown/RISD Arab Society, the economics Departmental Undergraduate Group (DUG), and the chess club. He also helped review college essays by victims of the Syrian conflict so they could access higher education. He was deeply proud of his Lebanese heritage and his family connection to the Bahamas and founded the Island Time Company, a nonprofit clothing company whose proceeds are donated to the Bahamas Hurricane Restoration Fund. He was a self-taught guitarist. The day after his accident the family was informed that he had been accepted into the most prestigious summer banking internship program, the Barclays Financial Sponsors group in New York City. He is survived by his parents and a brother.

Aug, 2023
GS 86

Peter H. Bond ’86 MAT, of Lords Valley, Pa.; Feb. 13. He was a retired history teacher for Randolph High School (N.J.). Aside from teaching, he also coached his children’s baseball teams and then went on to be an umpire for many years. In retirement, he enjoyed bird watching, gardening, and photography and started a small business called Bond Fire Hot Sauce. When time permitted, he enjoyed spending time at the family cottage on the Canadian side of Lake Erie. He is survived by six children, his mother, and five siblings.

Aug, 2023
GS 85

Virginia Copes Tenzer ’85 PhD, of New Haven, Conn.; Feb. 6, of cancer. She taught art history at UConn and curated exhibits at UConn’s Benton Art Museum. In retirement she volunteered at St. Thomas More Chapel Soup Kitchen and Yale New Haven Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Morton; a daughter; a son; a granddaughter; a sister; and numerous nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 85

Joyce Benjamin McKay ’85 PhD, of Hampton, Ill.; Feb. 22. Her career was spent as an archaeologist and architectural historian. She was the recipient of the 2010 Preservation Achievement Award from the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. In retirement she volunteered at the Rock Island County Historical Society and the Hampton Historical Society. She is survived by her husband, Tom; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 78

Elaine Mary Margaret Bell ’78 AM, of Coudersport, Pa.; Mar. 11. She was a technical writer independently and for several firms throughout the Northeast. She wrote plays, short stories, song lyrics, and poetry over a span of 60 years. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, two nephews, and a cousin.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Marilyn H. Fetterman ’71 AM, ’92 PhD, of Allentown, Pa.; Mar. 23. She is survived by her mother, a sister, and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
GS 76

Henry “Nick” Hanson Jr. ’76 PhD, of Charlottesville, Va., formerly of New York; Feb. 13. While studying at Brown, he met his future wife. After graduation, they were married and he began teaching at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn. After two years, he accepted a teaching position at Manhattan College (N.Y.) and spent summers studying finance at NYU. He was hired as a quantitative analyst at Kidder, Peabody & Co. and at Salomon Brothers, where he was promoted to vice president of derivative and quantitative research. He worked for investment firms until his retirement in 1996, when he moved to Charlottesville but continued his interest in the stock market. He is survived by his wife, Janice Rogers ’74 ScM; his mother-in-law; a sister; a sister-in-law; a brother; and two brothers-in-law.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Ralph L. Roberts III ’71 AM, of Cincinnati; Feb. 20. He was an assistant professor of anthropology. He is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, and three nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Dean C. Palmer ’71 ScM, ’75 PhD, of Excelsior, Minn.; Mar. 8, from primary progressive aphasia. After earning his undergraduate degree from Oberlin College and his PhD in physics from Brown, he began his career as a nuclear physicist. He had postdoctoral positions at the University of Liverpool, England, and the University of Minnesota. He was an expert in the field of magnetic recording, developing the technology used to store data on computer hard drives, first working at IBM in Rochester, Minn., for 20 years and later at Seagate in the Twin Cities. In retirement he enjoyed volunteering and working to make the world a better place for future generations through the Sierra Club and led a landscape renewal project for his community. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a stepdaughter; two grandchildren; and four siblings.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Robert G. Liotta ’71 AM, of Manchester, N.H.; Jan. 27. He had an extensive career in the U.S. Air Force. Having graduated from the U.S. Air Force pilot training in 1950, he began his career as an instructor pilot in Texas. He spent the next 40 years working alongside foreign nationals, student pilots, liaison officers, and exchange officers before retiring as regional manager for Northrop Aircraft. While at Brown, he became a commander of the Air Force ROTC program. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons and their spouses; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 71

Ashwani D. Budhiraja ’71 ScM, of Rehoboth, Mass.; Feb. 22. He had a 40-year career as a mechanical engineer. He was a founder of the Indian Students Association, which later became the Indian Association of Greater Rhode Island. He was an accomplished tennis player and swimmer and he enjoyed table tennis, billiards, and bridge. He sang, painted, and enjoyed gardening. He is survived by his wife, Rita; two daughters and their spouses, including daughter Pratisha Budhiraja ’91; two granddaughters; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
GS 70

Laurence A. Goldstein ’70 PhD, of Ann Arbor, Mich; Apr. 16, of a bacterial infection. He earned an undergraduate degree from UCLA, and following graduation from Brown, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan’s department of English Language and Literature in 1970. He retired as professor emeritus in 2016. As a poet and literary critic and historian, he authored, edited, and coedited 16 well-reviewed books and authored dozens of essays and book and film reviews. During his time at UCLA, he was arts editor for the Daily Bruin and would conduct interviews with local movie industry notables such as director Billy Wilder and Stan Laurel of Laurel and Hardy fame. Also as an undergraduate, and later in his career, he wrote several book reviews and op-ed pieces for the Los Angeles Times, and later for the New York Times. In addition to teaching and writing at the University of Michigan, he spent 32 years as editor of the University’s flagship scholarly and creative arts journal, Michigan Quarterly Review. He traveled widely and sometimes wrote poems about his travels. He enjoyed regular walks through the Old West Side neighborhood where he lived and baseball, especially cheering for Michigan. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons; and four grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 62

Henry R. Richardson III ’62 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Williamsburg, Va.; Dec. 25. He joined the mathematical consulting firm Daniel H. Wagner Associates (Pa.) and began a distinguished career using mathematics to plan and conduct searches at sea for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard. He was a leader in the formulation of fundamental concepts in search theory, as well as in the development of practical means for their implementation. He was the civilian on-scene analyst during the successful 1996 Mediterranean H-bomb search off the coast of Spain. He developed the concept of Search Effectiveness Probability (SEP). During the 1968 search in the Atlantic Ocean for the sunken nuclear submarine USS Scorpion, he led a stateside and on-scene search team in developing probability maps of search areas that helped locate the missing submarine in 1969. He led the project to develop a Computer Assisted Search Planning (CASP) system for the U.S. Coast Guard. For CASP, he extended the simulation techniques he developed for the Scorpion search to be used in planning searches for moving objects, specifically boats and people missing at sea. CASP became operational in 1975 at all USCG Rescue Coordination Centers. It remained in use until 2007. After 20 years at Wagner Associates, he joined the Center for Naval Analyses in 1985 as senior scientist and later as vice president and director of the Naval Warfare Operations Division. In 1987, he accepted a position at the U.S. Naval Academy as chair of operation analysis and supervised the research of midshipmen. In 1988, he joined former colleagues from Wagner Associates at Metron as head of the advanced mathematics division. In addition to running the division, he developed physical and mathematical models for laser detection of mines in shallow water. He was also interested in mathematical finance and published several technical papers in that area. In 1998 he retired from Metron, where his contributions were as numerous and varied as his many technical interests. He was a mentor and role model for many analysts at Metron as he had been at Wagner Associates. He enjoyed sailing, the study of languages, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
GS 70

Lillian T. Cochran ’70 PhD, of Westborough, Mass.; Feb. 15. She taught sociology at the University of Navarra in Pamplona, Spain, for a couple of years, then held a position as an assistant professor of sociology at Drew University. In addition to teaching, she dedicated time to academic research. She was a founding member of Social Science Research Associates, Inc., a research consulting firm. Years later, she worked as a technical writer for Data General Corporation.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 67

Herbert G. Schlegel ’67 MAT, of Beverly, Mass.; Mar. 2. He taught at Manchester High School for 38 years and was head of the math department. In addition to his teaching, he also was coach of the math team and served as a class advisor. He was varsity coach of the basketball, baseball, and softball teams for many years. He was active in the community coaching youth sports and served as president of the North Shore Skating Club. He enjoyed reading and trivia. He is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law and nine grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Martha G. Satz ’65 AM, of Dallas; Jan. 26. At the time of her death, she was a faculty member in the English department at Southern Methodist University, where she taught since 1976. One of her lasting legacies at the University, beyond the generations of students whose lives she positively impacted, was being one of the founding faculty members of the freshman honors program in the 1980s, a program that still thrives today. She published and presented numerous papers during her tenure on topics as diverse as philosophy, feminism, race, equality, motherhood, adoption, and disability advocacy. She served on and chaired university and national academic committees. At age 68 she earned a master’s degree in counseling from SMU and began a career as a counselor. She was so adept a teacher, mentor, and counselor that many of her former students and patients remained in contact with her throughout her life, some becoming close friends. She is survived by two children, two grandchildren, and six nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 67

Dennis E. “Tunky” Murphy ’67 AM, of Round Rock, Tex.; Dec. 4. After Brown, he moved with his family to Iowa for a position as an assistant English professor at Drake University. He left Drake for a position at Batten, Batten, Hudson & Swab, traveling the country delivering management seminars. He later joined Professional Training Associates (PTA), which specialized in monthly newsletters for workplace leaders. In 1980, he moved to Round Rock and established a branch of PTA, eventually becoming its sole owner. In the 1990s, he created and published Hard@Work, Inc. He was an active member of the Congregational Church of Austin, United Church of Christ and served as deacon, trustee, treasurer, and choir member. In retirement, he volunteered with Meals on Wheels and was an intake counselor at the Round Rock Serving Center, where he enjoyed helping serve Christmas meals. He also enjoyed astronomy, gardening, shortwave radio operating, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Norma “Nodie” Nice Murphy ’67 AM, ’75 PhD; a daughter; two sons; five grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Kenneth L. McKay ’65 MAT, of Decatur, Tex.; Feb. 25. He taught and was an administrator in public education for 46 years. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; four children; two daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren; a great-grandson; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 65

Shih-kuan “Ken” Hsu ’65 ScM, ’68 PhD, of Shrewsbury, Mass.; Feb. 5. He held a research position at Alden Research Labs in Holden, Mass., and also taught at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In the mid-’80s, he joined the MITRE Corp., where he continued to work into his 86th year. He had many interests but enjoyed any time spent working on cars and/or driving his family on long road trips. He also enjoyed any other activities where he could use his hands to create, such as cooking, sewing, remodeling, and building. His love of technology was equally great as he continuously kept up with the latest technological innovations. He kept active all his life, and well into his mid-80s he was biking and jogging around the streets of Shrewsbury. He is survived by his wife, Mei-sheng; two children and their spouses; two grandchildren; four siblings; and many nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 64

John R. Olsen ’64 MAT, of Cranston, R.I.; Mar. 29. He taught English for 30 years at Cranston High School West. During his tenure, he created Contempora, an annually printed collection of short stories, poems, and sketches by students. In retirement, he continued to teach as an associate professor at Johnson & Wales University until 2015. He also volunteered teaching adult literacy skills at Crossroads in Providence. He enjoyed listening and dancing to jazz and blues music and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Mily; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepdaughter; a granddaughter; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 61

Anne C. Brooke ’61 AM, ’69 PhD, of Norfolk, Va.; Apr. 17. She taught classics at UC Santa Barbara and was an assistant professor of classics at Vassar College. For a time she moved to Wales, learned Welsh, and worked with teachers, parents, and local nursery groups. She produced Welsh workbooks, educational materials, and children’s books. She was a charter member of the National Museum of the American Indian, a longtime supporter of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation,  and an advocate for the Weyanoke Bird and Wildflower Sanctuary. She was an avid reader and writer. She collected books and always gave them as gifts. She wrote letters to family and friends on a weekly basis, and after visits, she enjoyed raising a white handkerchief as you drove away in a car, keeping it up until you passed from view. She is survived by a sister, a niece, and two nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
GS 60

Robert K. Revicki ’60 MAT, of Fayetteville, Pa.; Jan. 8. He was a teacher, administrator, composer, musician, poet, and visual artist. He held positions of leadership and professorship while developing programs and workshops through the Department of Indian Affairs, the Ford Foundation, and as chair of the department of music for the Pennsylvania Department of Education in Harrisburg. Before arriving in Pennsylvania he was a teacher and a director of music in public schools throughout Vermont, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. He is survived by his partner, Diane C. Roland; two daughters; a son-in-law; a stepdaughter; three grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 58

Ernest M. Grunebaum ’58 AM, of New York City; Mar. 9, from Parkinson’s. He was a retired investment banker and dedicated himself to many Jewish organizations. He was chairman of the New York chapter of the Union for Reform Judaism, the head of the URJ’s Camp Kutz, and served for many years on the board of directors of Selfhelp Community Services. He was a pillar of Temple Beth El of Northern Westchester, where he served as president for three years and then as an active board member. He enjoyed woodworking, gardening, traveling, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie; a daughter; two sons; and a grandson.

Aug, 2023
GS 57

Louis J. Pierro ’57 PhD of Manchester, Conn.; Mar. 5. After Brown, he attended CalTech in Pasadena for a post-doctorate year. He then accepted a position as assistant professor at Wheeling College in West Virginia. After two years, he accepted a position at UConn, where he spent 38 years. During his tenure he worked closely with the Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health, and served on committees for land grant universities. After he retired from UConn, he was project manager for the university’s biotechnology center, which houses a conference room dedicated to him. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; a daughter; a son; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
GS 55

Ann Rademacher Burrow ’55 AM, of Hamden, Conn.; Jan. 29. She followed her husband to Japan, where he was working, and lived there for two years. She learned flower arranging and calligraphy while living in Japan. Once back in the U.S., she became active with nonprofit and charitable organizations. She was a member of the League of Women Voters and actively participated in the New Haven Garden Club. She is survived by three children and their spouses, including daughter Sarah Burrow ’86 and son Peter ’81, and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
GS 54

Paul W. Wittmer ’54 AM, of Bullhead City, Ariz., formerly of Canton, Conn.; Dec. 19. He was a professor of history and economics at Tunxis Community College for more than 30 years. During that time, he worked with Native American tribes in the Southwest providing access to improved healthcare. He coauthored several books on the Native American culture and he served as president of the Canon Historical Society.

Aug, 2023
20

Pierre S.M. Lipton ’20, of Charlotte, N.C.; Feb. 4, unexpectedly after crossing the finish line at the Mesa Marathon in Arizona. It was his personal best for distance in just over 3 hours and 10 minutes. He died of what doctors believe was “some sudden electrolyte imbalance that caused arrhythmia,” his father told the Boston Globe. He was valedictorian at Myers Park High School and volunteered at an orphanage in Panama to teach English and math before attending Brown to study economics and Middle Eastern studies. Always concerned about others, he started VitaLives while still a student—a company aimed at reducing malnutrition and vitamin deficiency. In addition, he became COO of the news company 1440 Media, cofounded by Tim Huelskamp and Andrew Steigerwald, which was created to share fact-focused information with the world. Pierre told EIN News in January 2022: “The news used to be something that brought people together. The whole family would sit around the TV, radio, or newspaper and consume the same information. Now, that couldn’t be further from the truth. At 1440, we believe the news can still be a way for people to connect.” As a result of his hard work and success, he was named Rhode Island INNO under 25 in 2020 and was featured on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list in 2022. “He accomplished more than anyone I know in just 26 years, but he still had so many plans,” his girlfriend, Eleanor Pereboom, wrote in an Instagram post. He spoke Spanish and Arabic and was learning Italian in anticipation of a planned trip in May. He was an adventurer and enjoyed travel, music, art, hiking, reading, geography, trivia, Scrabble, running, soccer, tennis, squash, and water skiing. He is survived by his parents, a sister, and his girlfriend Eleanor.

Aug, 2023
08

Verner S. Wilson ’08, of Bristol Bay, Alaska; Mar. 23. His passion for the environment led him to pursue a degree in environmental management at Yale. He went on to work with organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund, the Bristol Bay Native Association, and Friends of the Earth. In his role as the director of natural resources at the Bristol Bay Native Association, he worked on regional strategies to adapt to climate change, international shipping issues, comanagement of the region’s fisheries and other wildlife, and conservation of the land and waters for future generations. As a senior oceans campaigner at Friends of the Earth, he focused on shipping-related marine environmental issues in the Pacific Northwest and the Arctic. He devoted a substantial part of his adult life to campaigning against the proposed Pebble Mine in his home region of Bristol Bay. He was always willing to lend a helping hand and enjoyed traveling the globe and exploring new cultures. He is survived by his mother and father; two sisters; a brother; a niece; and four nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
07

Lakeshia D. Richardson ’07, of Hermitage, Tenn.; Apr. 11. She had a 16-year career that included being a manager and independent consultant for such companies as Ernst & Young, JP Morgan Chase, and PepsiCo, the co-owner of Norrah Marketing, and a self-employed independent education consultant. She is survived by her husband, Corey; a daughter; a brother; four sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and her best friend.

Aug, 2023
06

Kristen M. Leary ’06, of Denver; Dec. 8, of metastatic breast cancer. She worked for the Alliance Center in Denver as a dedicated nonprofit development director for seven years. She previously worked as an imagery analyst for the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency in Washington, D.C. She excelled in academics, track, soccer, field hockey, piano, and the oboe and was a lifelong explorer who enjoyed cooking, traveling the globe, hiking, camping, climbing, and pursuing new interests. She is survived by her husband, Loren Klein; two daughters; her parents; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
04

Timothy Marschner Jr. ’04, of Londonderry, N.H.; Apr. 1, of natural causes related to a brain injury. In 2003, during his final year at Brown, he underwent brain surgery and, as a result, acquired a brain injury. He was able to graduate that same year and following graduation he lived in Brooklyn, N.Y., and Washington, D.C., before returning to New Hampshire. He faced numerous health challenges throughout his life but was able to run his own business. He was a lifelong fan of Boston sports teams, especially the Red Sox, and he enjoyed trivia. He is survived by his father Timothy ’68; three sisters; and five nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
00

Jason M. Brennen ’00, of Chicago; Apr. 3. He began his career in advertising in Manhattan before taking time to teach English in China. He returned to Chicago and worked in advertising with Hyatt, Inc. He later devoted his career to mental health and social policy at Northwestern University, ending his career at Chapin-Hall, University of Chicago, as a senior policy analyst. He is survived by his wife, Frances; his parents; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
93

Robert H. Monnes ’93, of South Kingstown, R.I.; Mar. 14. He played baseball at Brown and held several pitching records. He was a member of the 1990 All-Ivy League team. In 1994 he began his career as an auditor at Coopers & Lybrand (now PwC) in Hartford, Conn. He obtained his masters in accounting from the University of Hartford in 1995 and went on to become a certified public accountant and a certified information systems auditor. In 2000, he transferred to PwC’s Boston office. After 14 years at PwC, he went on to work as the director of internal audit at Beacon Mutual in Warwick, R.I., for four years and then as the director of finance for three years. In 2015, he began his role as the chief financial officer at AmWins Group Benefits in North Kingstown. He was an inventor at heart and fulfilled his lifelong dream of holding a patent in 2020 when he was awarded one for a clamp-mounted stand-up desk that he designed. He believed in giving back to his community and coached and served as the board treasurer for both the Welcome House of South County and the Avenue Concept. He enjoyed spending time with his children, biking, hiking, skiing, swimming, and coaching. He is survived by his wife, Alicia; two children; his mother; two sisters; a brother; two brothers-in-law; and 13 nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
90

Colin W. Gillis II ’90, of Chatham, Mass.; Apr. 17, after a brief illness. After earning an MBA from NYU, he spent his career in finance in New York City. In 2018 he relocated to the Cape. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a child; his father; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; a brother; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
90

Theodore B. Choi ’90, of Norwood, N.J.; Oct. 27, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Juhee Lee, and four children, including daughters Minae Choi ’19, Mingee Choi ’20, and Minjoo Choi ’20.

 

Aug, 2023
88

James G. Grant ’88, of Dedham, Mass.; Feb 7. He was a self-employed carpenter and a former goalie on the Brown men’s hockey team. He is survived by a sister and three brothers.

Aug, 2023
86

Susan M. Kobayashi ’86, of San Francisco; Jan. 31, from metastatic breast cancer. She was a successful hedge fund manager, but her passions were community service, dance, and yoga. She was a lifelong dancer, part of the dance community at Brown and most recently part of ODC Dance Commons in San Francisco. She was a longtime student of Manouso Manos in the tradition of Iyengar Yoga. She was a board member and campaign fund manager for her children’s preschool, Nihonmachi Little Friends, and she served on the boards of the Japan Society of Northern California and the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California. She also served on the board of RAWdance, which was cofounded by fellow alums Wendy Rein ’99 and Ryan T. Smith ’02. She is survived by her husband, Chuck Han ’86; a daughter; a son; her parents Paul and Ann Hayashi Kobayashi ’59; and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
84

Vincent Stephens ’84, of Overland Park, Kans.; Mar. 21. He owned and operated Axiom. He is survived by his wife, Veronica; four sons; two daughters-in-law; nine grandchildren; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

Aug, 2023
81

David B. Zuckerman ’81, of Seattle; Apr. 8, after a long battle with posterior cortical atrophy. After Brown, he became a recording engineer at the Splice of Life Studio in Boston. After a while, he left the recording business and attended law school. Following law school, he moved to Seattle to work for the Public Defender Association. He later clerked for Federal Judge William Dwyer before opening his own practice. He was a criminal defense lawyer who received the 2017 William O. Douglas Award, Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers’ highest honor. He volunteered his time to provide advice or to speak at continuing education events and was passionate about protecting civil liberties, devoting countless hours to the American Civil Liberties Union. Aside from work, he was a talented musician and played piano in several rock bands, including his college band, the Geeks. He was also athletic and enjoyed skiing, swimming, diving, running, and hiking. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; twin daughters Anna Zuckerman ’21 and Leah Zuckerman ’21; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
80

Lansing D. Moore ’80, of Bronxville, N.Y.; Feb. 6, of cancer. He was one of New York’s premier fine art restorers and for 40 years served as the president of Center Art Studio, Ltd. He was an active member of the Onteora Club and enjoyed cooking. He is survived by his wife, Iliana Engelke Moore, and son Lansing Moore Jr. ’12.

Aug, 2023
80

Douglas J. Haymaker ’80, of Warren, N.J.; Jan. 13, after a year-long illness. He completed a doctoral degree in clinical psychology at the University of Florida and subsequently established private practices in Princeton and Oldwick (N.J.), eventually practicing with his wife in Bridgewater (N.J.) for 10 years. He consulted at Morristown Memorial Hospital and St. Clare’s Hospital. He supervised Rutgers graduate students and was voted supervisor of the year by his colleagues and students in 2016. He also served as an alumni interviewer for Brown. He published several research articles during his time in academia. He is survived by his wife, Stephanie, and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
79

Christina Baker McKenrick ’79, of Seekonk, Mass.; Feb. 14, after a 12-year battle with breast cancer. She met her future husband during Brown’s orientation week and they married after graduation. She worked as an administrative assistant for a typing instruction company prior to joining the staff at Brown. She first worked for the Brown University Admission Office as the computer systems coordinator and then for the Brown University Management Information Services department. She took a few years off to raise a family and returned to the workforce teaching math and science at School One in Providence. She was involved with numerous boards, committees, and missions. Her mission work led her to multiple trips to Haiti. Subsequently, she enjoyed spending time with her husband traveling to England, Italy, Paris, Normandy, and later in life to the West Coast to see family and friends, though her “happy place” was Briggs Beach in Little Compton, R.I. In addition to raising her family, she welcomed a foster son and extended her home to countless family members and exchange students. She also enjoyed dancing and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Ross ’79; three children; a foster child; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

Aug, 2023
79

Marcia F. Katz ’79, of Winter Park, Fla., formerly of Houston; Mar. 26, after a three-year battle with pancreatic cancer. She was associate dean of clinical affairs at University of Central Florida College of Medicine before retiring in 2020 with the title of UCF professor emerita. During her tenure, she worked closely with UCF hospitals and the community to build an academic clinical service system. Prior to moving to Florida, she served as Baylor College of Medicine’s associate chair of medicine for clinical affairs and medical director of the department of medicine. In addition, she was the chief of adult medicine at Texas Children’s Pavilion for Women and spearheaded the development of Baylor’s lung institute. She had a powerful impact on the cystic fibrosis community. She was the medical director of the Baylor Maconda Brown O’Connor Adult CF Center and sat on the Center Committee of the CF Foundation. She also served as the coprincipal investigator of the CF Therapeutic Development Center in 2012. She was awarded the Ben and Margaret Love Foundation Bobby Alford Award for Academic Clinical Professionalism, Baylor’s highest award given to a medical school faculty member, recognizing her outstanding humanism. Marcia faced cancer without missing a beat by continuing to travel the world with her husband, visiting Rwanda, Botswana, and Namibia. She took a bike and river cruise on the Rhine with her twin sister and some of her best friends, and biked over 100 miles. During her last few years, she became an avid gardener and birder. She is survived by her husband, Asher; two daughters, including Rebecca Wolinsky ’14; two stepdaughters; her mother; three sisters; two brothers-in-law; and a nephew.

 

Aug, 2023
77

Daniel J. Kleinman ’77, of Marietta, Ga.; Mar. 30. He was a cardiologist in Marietta. He earned a medical degree from Wright State University and completed his internship/residency in internal medicine at Emory University, followed by a three-year fellowship in cardiovascular disease at the Medical College of Georgia. He enjoyed sports, music, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Julie; two sons; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
73

Suzanne Nolan ’73, of Windsor, Conn.; Feb. 21, after a brief illness. At Brown she played varsity ice hockey and was a senior orator at Commencement. In 1982 she earned a master’s in counseling from the University of St. Joseph in West Hartford. For almost a decade, she taught English and coached female athletes at Connecticut secondary schools. Later she was involved in nonprofit work at Covenant House in New York. She also explored hospital ministry. From 1990 to 1996, she worked as a pastoral associate on Saint Bridget’s Church Collaborative Pastoral Team in Manchester (Conn.). She then served as a chaplain at Manchester Memorial Hospital and Mercy Hospital in Springfield, Mass. In 2007, she was named director of pastoral care at Saint Francis Hospital (Conn.). She was instrumental in developing and implementing a certified pastoral education program and a one-year resident program for chaplains. In retirement, she continued her participation as a Mercy associate and expanded her engagement with St. Patrick–St. Anthony Church in Hartford. She enjoyed playing golf, sailing, and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Christopher Wagner; brothers John ’65 and David ’71; a sister-in-law and many nieces and nephews, including John O. Nolan II ’92, Suzanne Nolan ’95, and Caroline Nolan ’98.

 

Aug, 2023
73

Geoffrey P. Allsup ’73, of East Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 23. He was an engineer at Neil Brown Instrument Systems before joining the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in 1986 as a research assistant in the physical oceanography department. He was promoted several times throughout his career and retired after 32 years as a senior engineer. In 2018 he became an oceanographer emeritus and, in 2019, an emeritus research scholar. He was a skilled electronic engineer specializing in very low power and microprocessor-based sensor, instrument, and data logger electronics. He was past president of the Falmouth Amateur Radio Association. He enjoyed outdoor adventures and biking with his wife and children and reading the Lord of the Rings series to each of his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Kim Metz Allsup ’76; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
71

John A. Horneff ’71, ’75 MD, of Charlottesville, Va.; Mar. 24, from complications of metastatic colorectal cancer. He was a member of the “Charter Twelve” first graduating class of Brown medical students (see “Build Your Own MD,” Jan.-Mar. ’23). He completed residencies in anatomic pathology at the University of Chicago and in internal medicine at Northwestern University, and a fellowship in clinical oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Disillusioned by experiences with specific individuals and systems in academic medicine, he changed paths and pursued his other passion, photography. As an independent thinker and a creative photographer, he was drawn to seeing ideas and objects unconventionally. He particularly enjoyed finding obscure visual features and relationships in the natural and human-built worlds and creating new images based on, but not anchored to, conventional ways of seeing. He was an avid follower of current events, constantly connecting them to historical precedent to compare and contrast personalities and events in an effort to understand historical and political movements. He enjoyed playing chess. He is survived by his wife, Christine Peterson ’72.

Related classes:
Class of 1971, MD Class of 1975
Aug, 2023
69

Kirsten Hedberg Rockwood ’69, of Needham, Mass.; Mar. 25. She began her career in financial services working as an administrative assistant with Studley Schuper in Boston. Soon after, she married and raised a family. She returned to her career after her boys were grown, taking a position with Charles River Hospital in Wellesley as an administrative assistant until the facility closed in 1998. She went on to take a position with the daycare center at Saint Andrews Church in Wellesley and later resumed her role as an administrative assistant in financial services by accepting a job with Wachovia Securities. She remained with Wachovia through two mergers and retired from Wells Fargo in 2014. She enjoyed needlepoint, cross stitch, collecting antiques, baking, and playing tennis. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’68; two sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
69

Adam M. Albright ’69, of Bend, Ore.; Feb. 25, from Parkinson’s. He was an entrepreneur. He enjoyed skiing and hiking, and
was passionate about the environment. He is survived by his wife, Rachel; three children; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
68

Dennis M. Hagan ’68, of Perkinsville, Vt.; Mar. 24, after a long battle with MDS and leukemia. He was an elementary school teacher in Springfield, Vt., with a career that spanned 43 years. He was an avid reader, writer, and lover of the arts. He was known for his razor-sharp mind and innate talent for prescribing the perfect book to anyone for their must-read list. He was an accomplished actor and met his wife at the Weston Playhouse in 1978. He enjoyed gardening, hiking, cycling, snowshoeing, and skiing in Vermont. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Aug, 2023
68

Steven M. Daniels ’68, of Fircrest, Wash.; Nov. 26. He taught at the Moses Brown school in Providence after graduating. After two years, he received a teaching opportunity in the Pacific Northwest and joined Charles Wright Academy in 1970. During his 41-year career at CWA, he taught math and earth science, served as athletic director, and coached football, softball, and track. He also thrived in CWA’s Outdoor Education program, helping skipper the 40-foot sailboat, the Moonglow, and leading the 8th grade beach hike for many years. He rarely missed a day in the classroom. In the summer, he furthered his education traveling to distinguished programs, including the Colorado School of Mines to study geology and the University of Hawaii Hilo’s Volcanology program. He taught middle schoolers the properties of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. He fished the Puget Sound and hunted pheasant around the state with his Springer spaniels. He was a runner and continued team sports long into his life, playing rugby and softball. He also enjoyed skiing and he climbed Mount Rainier with CWA teaching colleagues. He is survived by his wife, Chris; a son and daughter-in-law; two grand- children; a sister; and a brother.

 

Aug, 2023
67

Mary Auten Psarras ’67, of Stratford, Conn.; Apr. 9. Upon graduation, she joined the Peace Corps and taught in Brazil from 1967 to 1969. After returning to Stratford, she worked for many years as an English as a Second Language teacher in the Bridgeport School system. She also taught GED preparation for adult women at Mercy Learning Center. She is survived by two sons, a granddaughter, and a brother.

Aug, 2023
67

George J. Pandapas Jr. ’67, of Concord, Mass.; Mar. 12. While at Brown, he played on the rugby team and attended classes at RISD, expanding his love of painting and fine art. He went on to spend many years in New York City working as an engineer for Con Edison and NASA. He also invented and patented Musifax—a slide rule for music composition and arrangement used by musicians. Eventually, he moved with his family to Massachusetts and worked as a software programmer. He enjoyed hiking and photographing the New England wilderness with his daughter. He is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, a sister, and three brothers.

 

Aug, 2023
66

William R. Powell ’66, ’67 ScM, of Horseheads, N.Y.; Jan. 30. In 1972, he joined the West Virginia University faculty teaching mechanical engineering and mechanics. He joined Corning Inc. in 1981 and moved to New York. He retired as a senior engineering associate in 2002 but continued his relations with Corning as an engineering consultant until 2017. He authored numerous publications and was the holder of 11 patents. He was an elder in Big Flats Presbyterian Church, a past president of the Big Flats Lions Club, and a board member for the food bank, and he applied his engineering skills to build accessibility ramps for homes. He also enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons, including Jeffrey ’01; two sisters; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1966, GS Class of 1967
Aug, 2023
66

Terrence D. Marr ’66, of Goldens Bridge, N.Y.; Mar. 29, of lung cancer. Following many years of teaching and coaching at the Winchendon School (Mass.) and St. Edward’s School (Fla.), he went on to work in financial planning. He retired in 2010 as president of NIA Securities in Paramus, N.J. He was a former member of Brown’s men’s hockey team and a fan of the New York Yankees and enjoyed fishing, traveling, and solving crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Ann Whipple Marr ’70; two daughters and their spouses, including Abigail Marr Doft ’91, ’92 AM; four grandchildren, including Matthew Doft ’27; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; two nieces and a nephew.

 

Aug, 2023
66

Jeffrey Alcorn ’66, of Newburyport, Mass.; Mar. 15. Following his military service in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, he worked in banking in New York City, married, and started a family. His job brought them to Newburyport, where he became a member of the Continental Navy, coached youth soccer, and was a member of the Exchange Club. He enjoyed collecting vintage items, including international flags, records, and diner and restaurant dishware and silverware. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Keenan Alcorn ’68; daughter Kristin Alcorn Masoud ’97; a son; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother; a niece and two nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
64

William D. Cutler ’64, of Mystic, Conn., formerly of Gales Ferry, Conn.; Feb. 14. He was a clinical psychologist in private practice until his retirement. In 2018, he moved to Mystic. He walked two miles daily for more than 30 years and he enjoyed playing the trumpet and studying French. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; and two sisters.

Aug, 2023
64

R. Lee West III ’64, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; Feb. 4, of respiratory failure secondary to pneumonia. He had a long career in consumer, business, and pharmaceutical advertising based in New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. He is survived by a son.

 

Aug, 2023
64

Robert J. Brindle Jr. ’64, of St. Augustine, Fla., formerly of Boston; Jan. 18, from Parkinson’s. He was the sales manager for former AMC and RGC Australian mining companies for many years. While at Brown, he was a member of both the varsity basketball and baseball teams and stayed fit later in life playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Christine; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
63

Richard P. Miller ’63, of Barrington, R.I., formerly of Arlington Heights, Ill.; Mar. 19. He was a trusts and estates attorney for almost 40 years in Arlington Heights. He served as president of the Northwest Suburban Bar Association, president of the Northwest Suburban Estate Planning Council, vice president for a term on the NCH Foundation Board, and a member of the Illinois State Bar Association Trusts and Estates Council. He was a founding member of two Rotary clubs and earned the distinction of Paul Harris Fellow. He is survived by his wife, Patrice; two daughters, including Rebecca Glenn ’96; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; and seven grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
63

Carolyn Jean Murphy Ahern ’63, of Lakewood, Ohio; Jan. 23. She was a former research coordinator in hematology/oncology at the Cleveland Clinic. She was also a dancer/choreographer for the Shalhevet International Folk Ensemble and a second degree black belt. She was a former member of the board of the Buddhist Churches of America. She is survived by her husband, Joseph; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
62

Denis J. FitzGerald ’62, of King of Prussia, Pa.; formerly of Worcester, Mass.; Mar. 25. After Brown, he graduated from New Jersey College of Medicine and New York Eye & Ear Infirmary. He served as lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy, chief of ophthalmology at the Fallon Clinic, CEO & president of St. Vincent’s Hospital, and New England Regional Medical Director of Veterans Affairs. He is survived by his wife, Joan; two sons, including James ’91; daughter Julie FitzGerald Hess ’93; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
61

Brenda Neubauer Straus ’61, of Palm Beach, Fla.; Dec. 31. She was a realtor for more than 35 years with Sotheby’s International Realty, as well as an active member of her community. She served on several boards and was a member of the Mayflower Society, Union Club, and Colony Club. She is survived by a daughter and eight nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
61

Dorrance T. Kelly ’61, of West Redding, Conn.; Mar. 30, after a year-long effort to recover from heart surgery. He was an oral surgeon in Danbury, Conn. In addition to his dental practice, he was an avid collector of old master prints. In the 1980s he became one of the top collectors of modern masters and old masters prints that included early 20th Century artists. He shared his prints for exhibits at local museums. In his younger years he collected coins and stamps. While at Brown, he played football and baseball. After graduating, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps, then attended dental school and completed an oral surgery residency at Ohio State University. He and his wife moved to Danbury in 1971 and settled in West Redding in 1979. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Vischi Kelly ’60; sons Sean ’89, ’89 ScM and Bryan ’91; and six grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
61

Gerald I. Flynn Jr. ’61, of Los Angeles; Apr. 13, of COPD. He founded TCI Leasing in 1978. He steadily grew the business and then founded TCI Transportation as a dedicated trucking company and lastly added TCI Logistics freight brokerage. He enjoyed family ski trips and trips to the lodge at Big Bear Lake. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; three children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
61

Donald L. Adams ’61, of Saxtons River, Vt., and Dunedin, Fla.; Jun. 10, 2022. He worked at the Federal Reserve until retiring and spending time between his two homes. He eventually donated his home in Vermont to the Vermont Academy and spent the remaining years in Florida playing golf. He also enjoyed gardening, cooking, and spending time with family. He is survived by a sister-in-law and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
60

John S. Moyle ’60, of Kingsport, Tenn., formerly of Scarsdale, N.Y. ; Feb. 7, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s. From 1960 through 1963 he served as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, reaching the rank of captain. Thereafter, he attended Columbia University and received a master’s degree and after teaching for several years received his doctorate from Columbia in supervision and consultation in science education. His teaching career spanned 35 years in the Bronxville Middle/High School in New York, where he served as science department chair and also coached the wrestling and track teams. From 1974 to 1983 he was an adjunct lecturer in geology at Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y. He also taught a class in science teaching preparation at Fordham University. In Scarsdale, he was a founder and board member of the Greenburgh Nature Center, president of the Edgemont Board of Education, president and field trip leader for the local Audubon Society, a Boy Scout leader, and coach for several youth recreational teams. He served as chair of the board of deacons and was financial secretary for the board of trustees at Scarsdale Community Baptist Church. He was also a member of the board of management for the Asa Wright Nature Centre in Trinidad, West Indies, for many years. He led CCD photographic and natural  history tours to East Africa for eight summers and led tropical ecology workshops in Trinidad and Tobago for two decades. He retired to Kingsport in 2004 and became an active member of the community. He sang tenor in the  Sanctuary Choir at the First Baptist Church Kingsport and was involved with Habitat for Humanity. For seven years he volunteered in the lab and led tours at the Gray Fossil Site and Museum in Gray, Tenn. He is survived by his wife, Polly; a daughter and son-in-law; sons John ’90 and Robert ’92; two daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; two brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law; and six nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
59

Judith Lister Yelle ’59, of Andover, Mass.; Feb. 2. She worked as a pediatric nurse before raising a family. Later in life she earned a master’s degree in psychiatric nursing from Boston University and worked in community mental health in the Merrimack Valley. She was engaged in a variety of volunteer activities. In the 1970s she was actively involved in the women’s equal rights movement. She was a board member of the Greater Lawrence Community Action Council and she enjoyed camping with her family on many trips across the United States and Canada. She also sang in the choir at the West Parish Church. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

Peter M.D. Nichols ’59, of New York City; Feb. 1, after a long battle with Parkinson’s. He was a writer and editor for Conde Nast and publications including Saturday Review, Signature Magazine, Columbia Journalism Review, and the New York Times, where he spent 16 years. He enjoyed sailing, traveling, and photography. He is survived by three children and a granddaughter.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Lawrence C. Moss ’59, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of New York; Jan. 30. He was a successful entrepreneur. He acquired Corson Manufacturing in the 1960s and, as president and CEO, he grew the business to become one of the largest folding paper carton companies in the Northeast. He received five Outstanding Quality Vendor awards from Union Carbide in the 1980s, having worked with such companies as Nabisco, Milk-Bone, Eveready, Beech-Nut, Glad, and Fisher Price. He retired to Vero Beach in 1990 but did not stay retired for long. As a lifelong entrepreneur, he was building businesses up until his last days. They included the Island Shipper, Storage 17, Window of the Eye Creations, and Mr. Barksmith’s Cool Treats Smoothies for Dogs. More recently, he found success with distribution of a children’s book series on sea life. Traveling was an important part of his life. He sailed on the Carinthia and Queen Elizabeth 2 and flew on the Concorde. He visited six continents; the seventh was on his 2023 bucket list. He also enjoyed the Adirondacks at his family’s Big Moose Lake lodge. He was a member of Grace Episcopal Church (N.Y.), where he served in several capacities, and was a trustee with multiple organizations. A former member of the Jabberwocks at Brown, he served in the N.Y. State National Guard and was a member of Psi Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Joy; three children; six grandchildren; and former wife, Marcia Earl Moss.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Betty Carleton Mahin ’59, of Los Osos, Calif.; Jan. 19. She earned her master’s in English from the University of Washington after Brown and taught English literature at Seattle Pacific University. She married in 1961 and lived in various places around the country before settling in Los Osos in 1978. She divorced in 1979 and began working at Wells Fargo Bank, where she remained for more than 20 years. She remarried in 1981 and enjoyed traveling the country. She also enjoyed swimming and gardening. She is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, and her brother Scott Carleton ’57.

 

Aug, 2023
59

Joseph W. Larimore Jr. ’59, of Wildwood, Mo.; Feb. 13. Upon graduating from Brown, he married and served in the U.S. Marine Corps, retiring as captain. He and his family settled in Missouri and he accepted a position as secretary of the St. Louis Police Department Board of Commissioners. There he learned software development and code and, as a result, designed and developed what became the first online warrant system. He went on to design and program a computer-assisted dispatch and records management software system for police and fire departments. In 1970, after participating in the creation of the forerunner of today’s 911 emergency response system, he started his own public safety software firm, Larimore Associates, providing custom public safety software applications to the law enforcement, fire, and emergency management markets. He grew his company over the span of 53 years and was responsible for many innovative firsts in the industry. As a hobby, he carved wood creations with chainsaws and hand carving tools that he shared with friends, making each person a special creation that spoke to their uniqueness. He enjoyed white-water rafting, canoeing, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three daughters; two sisters; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Aug, 2023
59

Kyu T. Lee ’59, of Wilmington, Del.; Feb. 10, from a stroke. He was director of biomedicine at DuPont de Nemours, Inc. for more than three decades. He was recruited by DuPont prior to receiving a full scholarship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he would receive his doctorate in chemical engineering in 1963. Due to his inventions in medicinal compounds, he has nine U.S. patents assigned to DuPont de Nemours and Bristol Myers Squibb. He retired in 1995. In 2015, on his 80th birthday, his contributions to Wilmington were honored by then Vice President Joe Biden. In retirement he enjoyed traveling to Europe and Southeast Asia, dinners at Michelin-starred restaurants, skiing, golfing, ballroom dancing with his late partner Yum Kim, and spending time between the East and West coasts with his children and grandchildren. He had a lifelong passion for classical music and found comfort in gardening and reading. He is survived by three children and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

William B. Hayes ’59, of Davidson, N.C., formerly of Chatham, N.J.; Apr. 7. After graduation and completion of Officer Candidate School, he accepted a commission in the U.S. Navy. Upon discharge, he settled in Washington, D.C. and forged a successful career in the home furnishings industry with such businesses as Simmons, Henredon Furniture, Drexel Heritage, Highland House, and Century Furniture, from which he retired in 2007. A highlight of his career was his collaboration with Oscar de la Renta. He was active in the civic life of Chatham, representing his community as town councilman. At Brown, he was a member of both the football and track teams and Delta Tau Delta. He enjoyed playing golf and was a fan of the Yankees, the Knicks, and the Giants. He is survived by his wife, Berkeley; three children, including William Jr. ’87 and Arthur ’89; and eight grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
59

Peter Gray ’59, of Marblehead, Mass.; Feb. 2, after a brief illness. He spent more than 60 years in the insurance industry, the last 25 at Arrow Mutual Insurance Company. During his career he was a member of several trade groups and sat on many nonprofit and professional boards. Being a former Brown baseball and hockey player, he later coached and mentored young athletes. He was a former member of the Boston Yacht Club, Madison Square Garden Club, and the Beach Club in Swampscott. He enjoyed politics and discussing current events. He is survived by his wife, Sue; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and several nieces.

Aug, 2023
59

Janet Delany ’59, of Rockville, Md., formerly of Pittsburgh; Mar. 30. She spent five decades as a computer programmer with companies such as Shell Oil, Westinghouse Credit, Westinghouse Communications, and the University of Pittsburgh. In 2021, she received the University of Pittsburgh Chancellor’s Award for Career Achievement, given for the lasting impact of her more than 20 years of service to Pittsburgh. She was active with St. Lawrence O’Toole Catholic Church and its liturgical music team, Sweet Rejoicing, first as an alto, but eventually she taught herself to play the electric bass, on which she performed for many years with both Sweet Rejoicing and the Pittsburgh Banjo Club. She also enjoyed solving puzzles. She is survived by her husband, Shaun; three children and their spouses; and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
58

Theodore D. Seager Jr. ’58, of Millis, Mass.; Jan. 29. He spent his entire career, more than 40 years, working at John Hancock. He was a member of the Society of Actuaries. He enjoyed reading and book collecting. In retirement he opened a used book store in Medway, Mass., called Village Books, which he operated for many years. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two sons and daughters-in-law, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
58

John J. Roach ’58, of San Diego; Feb. 20. He attended Brown through the Naval ROTC program and after graduation served as a Navy officer for three years. Upon discharge, he began a career in banking at Home Federal Savings & Loan. After leaving banking, he spent several years developing and building homes in San Diego and Orange counties. He was a member of several tennis and golf clubs in San Diego and Palm Desert, Calif. His other passions were gardening, travel, military history, and fly-fishing. He is survived by his wife, Judy; two sons, including Jason ’91; and two grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
58

Edmund P. Rihbany ’58, of Fairfield, Conn.; Mar. 19. He retired after a successful career in the plastics sales industry. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed drinking wine and spending time with friends and subsequently established a winemaking and tasting club. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a son; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
58

Martin A. “Tony” Philippi Jr. ’58, of Little Compton, R.I., formerly of Boston; Mar. 13. After Brown and time served in the U.S. Army, he worked for the First National Bank of Boston, the American Cancer Society, and Equitable Life Insurance Company. After he joined the Union Boat Club in 1967, rowing became his passion. Most mornings he could be found sliding along the waters of the Charles, and he participated in more than 40 Head of the Charles Regattas. He also enjoyed playing tennis. He is survived by a twin sister, a brother, and eight nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
57

Eugene G. Cohen ’57, of Scituate, Mass., formerly of Winthrop, Mass.; Mar. 20. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Army. Following his military service he was the proprietor of Schair’s Fuel Service and an active member of Winthrop Little League and Winthrop youth hockey. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
57

Henry S. Bernstein ’57, of Santa Rosa, Calif.; Feb. 11, after a long battle with COPD and kidney disease. He was a retired CPA. He enjoyed playing golf with his buddies at Bennett Valley Golf Course, where he shot a hole in one, and sharing the Thanksgiving holiday with his family. He is survived by his wife, Elayne; four children; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
57

Anne Brewer Alden ’57, of Newton, Pa.; Feb. 8. She was a homemaker and assisted in her husband’s medical office. She enjoyed gardening, birdwatching, and knitting. She is survived by four children, 11 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
56

David Pascal ’56, of Cumberland, R.I.; Feb. 6. He was a technical writer for more than 35 years at Raytheon Technologies. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and was an original member of the Blackstone Valley Amateur Radio Club. He biked and enjoyed classical music. He is survived by three children and three grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
56

Eugene A. Matteodo ’56, of Providence; Feb. 26. He taught at Bryant College and Rhode Island College. He is survived by his sister Ann Matteodo Dupre ’61 and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
56

Eleanor Norton MacQueen ’56, of Lexington, Mass.; Apr. 28. She was a water color artist. She served two terms as a member of the Lexington Historical District Committee and was a former president of the Lexington Arts and Crafts Society. She is survived by her husband, Duncan; two sons and daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
56

I. Joel Kane ’56, of Waban, Mass., and Key Biscayne, Fla.; Jan. 30. He worked for Elm Farm Foods, a family business, before joining the investment firm of Hayden Stone; he later became a member of the Chicago Board of Options Exchange. He was an accomplished skier, cyclist, and golfer. He also enjoyed kayaking, swimming, and sailing. He traveled widely. He is survived by his wife, Sara; daughter Gwen Kane-Wanger ’84 and her husband; son Jon ’86 and his wife; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
56

Edward B. Brown ’56, of Cherry Hill, N.J.; Feb. 15, after a long battle with Parkinson’s. He was a pediatrician with multiple offices in the Cherry Hill area and at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. During the Vietnam War, he was a captain in the U.S. Army stationed in Hawaii. He enjoyed traveling the world, beekeeping, pottery, and making pickles. He is survived by four children and their spouses, five grandchildren, a sister, and a niece.

Aug, 2023
56

Robert M. Balas ’56, of Vail, Colo.; Feb. 19. He was a pharmaceutical salesman for Ayerst Laboratories before enrolling in the Chicago College of Osteopathy and becoming an anesthesiologist. He worked at Chicago Osteopathic Hospital. In 1979, he moved to Denver and began practicing emergency medicine. He practiced at the former Humana Hospital in Thornton, Colorado, from 1979 to 1988. In addition, he opened a general medical practice in Thornton. He maintained a vacation home in Vail and enjoyed skiing, fly-fishing, hiking, rafting, and camping. He collected paintings and was a donor to both the Colorado Symphony Orchestra and Bravo Vail Music Festival. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; two stepsons and their spouses; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
55

Diana Deliniks Schaumann ’55, of Norwalk, Conn.; Feb. 13. While attending Brown, she was one of the founding members of the Chattertocks. After college, she went to work at New York Life in Manhattan. She married and settled in Norwalk to raise her family. As her children grew, she continued her own studies at the University of Bridgeport and became an accredited elementary educator. She went on to teach grade school in the Norwalk school system for many years. She was equally supportive of her students at Fox Run, Columbus, and the other schools where she taught over the years. She remained a faithful parishioner at St. Jerome’s Catholic Church in Norwalk for as long as she could continue to attend Mass and volunteered in a number of parish community activities and charitable causes. She enjoyed reading, travel, art, music, visiting historic places, gardening, trying out new recipes, tennis and paddle tennis, golf, shopping, and any form of socializing. She especially enjoyed beach visits up and down the U.S. coasts, including annual family vacations on Cape Cod, but even more enjoyable was her own screened-in porch and spending time with her kids and grandkids—and anyone else’s kids—who were always invited to come use the pool and have a snack and a drink. She is survived by three children and their spouses, including daughter Kathrin Schaumann Gaffney ’84; six grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
55

Adrienne Farr Sabatier ’55, of Naples, Fla., and Vt.; Feb. 12, of acute respiratory failure after dealing with Alzheimer’s for many years. In Florida, she was a docent at the Baker Museum for many years and a member of St. Peter’s Catholic Church and the church’s choir. She was also a member of the Big Cypress Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Naples and a staunch supporter and member of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants. She lived in several places, including Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, and France, and she enjoyed traveling the world. She is survived by four children and their spouses, including sons Luke ’82 and James ’87; seven grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
55

Maryanne “Burkey” Thomas Pratt ’55, of Wellesley Hills, Mass.; Jan. 26. An active member of her community, she cofounded the House and Garden Club of Wellesley. She was a member of the Wellesley Junior Service League, a volunteer at the Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and a member of the Wellesley Hills Congregational Church. She is survived by four children and their spouses and eight grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
55

Robert O’Such ’55, of Guilford, Conn.; Mar. 13. After graduating, he and his wife moved to New York City, where he became an advertising executive. Eventually, he moved back to Connecticut and worked at Herlin Press Inc., retiring from there many years later as president. He was a longtime member of the Fairfield Beach Club and enjoyed traveling annually to Puerto Vallarta to spend time with friends. He volunteered at the Guilford Food Bank and delivered food for Meals on Wheels. Phi Beta Kappa. As a true Irishman, he loved telling stores and was known for saying “lo and behold.” He is survived by his wife, Sally; three children; seven grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Aug, 2023
55

Francis C. Mangione ’55, of Barrington, Ill.; Mar. 23. He was a pension and benefit plan consultant and worked for John Hancock, William Mercer and Marsh McLennan before retiring in 1998. He volunteered and served on several committees in Duxbury, Mass., including the Duxbury Fiscal Advisory Committee, Duxbury Finance Committee, Duxbury Insurance Advisory Committee, Town Manager Search Committee, Finance Director Screening Committee, Land Acquisition Task Force and Public Building Feasibility Study. He also volunteered as a docent for Duxbury Rural and Historical Society. In recognition of his years of dedicated service to Duxbury, he was the recipient of the 2019 President’s Volunteer Service award. He is survived  by his wife, Susan; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
55

Charles J. LeBlond ’55, of Montgomery, Ohio;Apr. 3, of pancreatic cancer. His entire career was spent working at LeBlond Machine Tool, a family business. He began sweeping floors and rose to treasurer of the company. Music was an important part of his life and he and his wife followed Dixieland jazz bands across the United States and in Europe. He was a lifelong member of the Les Cheneaux Club and served as its president for two years. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; six children and their spouses, including son Geoffrey ’78; six grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
55

Carlyn Wegner Duncan ’55, of Andover, Mass., formerly of Danielson, Conn.; Feb. 7. She raised her family while also tutoring at the Rectory School in Pomfret, Conn. She was an active member of Christ Church in Pomfret. She sang in the choir and prepared community kitchen meals. She led the prayer chain for many years and enjoyed knitting prayer shawls for those in need. She was an avid reader. In retirement, she enjoyed doing crossword puzzles, traveling, and spending time with her grandchildren. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two granddaughters, a sister-in-law, and a brother-in-law.

Aug, 2023
54

A. Blyth Steere ’54, of Oakmont, Pa., formerly of Pittsburgh; Mar. 8. She met her husband at Brown and after graduation, they married and started a family. Eventually his job at Mellon Bank took them to Buenos Aires from 1970 to 1972. During that time she became fluent in Spanish and once back in Pennsylvania she taught Spanish, for Chatham College community programs. She served in leadership positions on numerous boards over the years in Pittsburgh, as well as on committees and campaigns for Brown. She was an athlete and excelled in horseback riding, field hockey, and lacrosse in her younger years and later played tennis and golf. She is survived by two daughters, including Margaret Steere ’91; son Jamie ’81; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2023
54

Richard C. Nickerson ’54, of Schenectady, N.Y.; Feb. 26. He worked at General Electric until retiring in 1993. He is survived by his wife, Priscilla.

Aug, 2023
54

Joan Girard Murphy ’54, of Wilmington, Del.; Feb. 2, after a long illness. At Brown, she was active in Brownbrokers. After graduation, she worked as a chemist with the DuPont Company in Georgia and her supervisor later became her husband. They moved to Nashville in 1958 and started a family. In 1963, the family moved to Wilmington. She enjoyed being a mother and homemaker and was a skillful seamstress, making draperies for the home and clothing for herself and her children. Later, she became a tax preparer for H&R Block. She served as treasurer and member of the finance committee for her church, St. David’s Episcopal, and was a longstanding member of a local investment club. She taught classes in tax preparation and personal finance. She enjoyed vacations at the beach, dance classes, birdwatching, gardening, a nightly cocktail, tutoring in elementary schools, teaching her granddaughters to knit, do needlework, cryptograms, and puzzles of all kinds. She is survived by four children and their spouses and 11 grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
54

Vaughn D. Fuller ’54, ’68 MAT, of Scarborough, Me.; Feb. 15. He attended Brown through the ROTC program, married, graduated, and began his naval career in Corpus Christi, Texas. He was a flight instructor and a pilot flying off aircraft carriers during the Korean War. After the Navy, he and his wife returned to Maine and he taught for a short time at Erskine Academy. He reenlisted and later continued his teaching career at Lincoln Academy (Me.), but the majority of his teaching career was spent in Yarmouth teaching and coaching at South Portland High School, where he remained for 26 years. After retiring, he taught for a few years at North Yarmouth Academy, then headed to Dover Foxcroft, where he and his wife opened the Foxcroft Bed and Breakfast. He enjoyed canoeing, camping, fishing, and annual motorcycle trips. He had a passion for flying and spent summers flying helicopters over potato fields in northern Maine and delivering anglers to remote Maine lakes via float planes, as well as crop dusting. He also enjoyed painting, photography, and reading. He is survived by his wife, Marie; six children and their spouses; grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1954, GS Class of 1968
Aug, 2023
54

Joyce Larkin Defandorf ’54, of North Billerica, Mass., formerly of Lexington and Lynnfield, Mass.; Jan. 19. After graduating from Brown, she moved to Boston and held jobs at mutual fund and engineering firms before marrying and raising a family. Her second career consisted of buying and selling antiques for many years. She enjoyed traveling, reading mystery novels, baking, sightseeing, and the Boston Pops. She is survived by her husband, John; three sons, including Chuck ’84 and Jack ’86; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; a brother; and many nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
54

Ralph E. Brisco ’54, of Farmington, Conn., formerly of East Lyme, Conn.; Jan. 22. After serving in the U.S. Army, he joined CL&P in 1959 as a chemist. In 1967, he was recruited to supervise the radiochemistry and health physics departments and develop the security and radiation protection safety programs at Millstone Nuclear Power Station. In 1979, he transferred to Northeast Utilities to develop and implement emergency preparedness programs for the state of Connecticut. At Northeast he was also involved with fossil fuel power plant chemistry programs, and he served on the Chemistry Committee of the Edison Electric Institute. He retired in 1991. At Brown, he was a member of the men’s swim team, selected as an NCAA All-American in 1953, and inducted into the Rhode Island Aquatic Hall of Fame in 1990. He enjoyed traveling, painting, swimming, sailing, and helping others by being involved with Care & Share of East Lyme. He is survived by his wife, Mary Lou; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
53

Arthur F. Brunner ’53, of Cape May, N.J., formerly of Philadelphia; Jan. 28. After graduating from Brown, he entered the U.S. Army during the Korean War. Upon completion of his military service, he worked at Midvale Steel Company while attending Temple University, from which he graduated in 1958. He then attended and graduated from Philadelphia Divinity School in 1960. The Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania (DIOPA) called him to serve as rector of St. Stephen’s and St. David’s in Philadelphia before he accepted a call to Calvary Church in Delaware County, where he served in conjunction with Delaware County Human Services feeding those in need for 27 years before his retirement in 1997. In addition to serving as rector, he was also a two-time dean of the Brandywine Deanery of the DIOPA. Following retirement to Cape May, he assisted at St. Simeon’s By The Sea for many years. He also served on numerous nonprofit boards, including Episcopal Community Services, North Light Boys Club, and Contact Philadelphia. He was a past member of other service organizations, including the Kiwanis and Rotary International, where he had been president of the Glen Riddle Club. Of his many achievements, he was proud to have received the Philadelphia Human Rights Award, given by the City of Philadelphia. An avid boater, he spent time sailing on the Chesapeake Bay and at Harbor North Yacht Club and Great Oak Yacht Club. He is survived by his wife, Joan; five children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2023
52

Paul E. Seifert ’52, of Southbury, Conn., formerly of New Milford, Conn.; Jan. 13. After graduating from Brown and serving in the U.S. Army, he began a career in New Milford that consisted of working with two family businesses. He was a manager at Prox Furniture and later a manager at H.H. Taylor and Sons, Inc, from which he retired in the late 1990s. He was active in the New Milford community, serving in several capacities at the United Methodist Church, volunteering as commissioner and coach for the New Milford Little League, and being a scout leader. He was a skilled craftsman and woodworker and enjoyed pastel and watercolor painting. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
53

Sarkis “Ted” Nahabedian ’53, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Jan. 31. After Brown he earned an MBA from New York University and served in the U.S. Army. He then was a human services manager for Fisons Corp. In addition to being a black belt, he learned to play the piano in retirement and was an avid sports watcher. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law.

Aug, 2023
53

Paul K. Chapman ’53, of Guilford, Conn.; Mar. 12.

Aug, 2023
53

Lyle E. Bourne Jr. ’53, of Boulder, Colo.; Mar. 2. After receiving his PhD in psychology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he joined the faculty at the University of Utah as an assistant professor and served there until 1963. He then moved to the University of Colorado, Boulder (CU Boulder), where he was promoted to professor and became professor emeritus in 2002. His contributions to the field of psychology were both local and national. He wrote and/or cowrote many books, including Human Conceptual BehaviorPsychology: Its Principles and Meanings, and Train Your Mind for Peak Performance. He was the first director of the Institute of Cognitive Science (ICS) at CU Boulder, a position he held from 1980 to 1983. He was the chairman of the psychology department from 1983 until 1991 and served on the executive board of the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology from 1986 to 1989. On the national level, he served as chair of the Governing Board of the Psychonomic Society (1981-1982), president of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association (1987-1988), president of both Division 3 (1991-1992) and Division 1 (2000-2001) of the American Psychological Association, and president of the Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences (1995-1997). In his last position, he helped the Federation present psychology to the executive and legislative branches of the U.S. Government. He also held a six-year position as editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory (1975-1980). He published more than 150 articles in preeminent journals and chapters exploring conceptual behavior, mental arithmetic, classification skill acquisition and training, retention, and transfer. He enjoyed being a jazz drummer, watching football and hockey on both the college and professional level, and sailing trips to exotic lands. He is survived by his wife, Rita Yaroush; three children; and a grandson.

Aug, 2023
51

Polly Welts Kaufman ’51, of Harpswell, Me.; Jan. 22. She was the former program director of elementary and middle school libraries for Boston Public Schools. She cocreated and cotaught the core course for training women to serve as librarians in the Boston Public Schools while at the University of Massachusetts. As a founding member of the Boston Women’s Heritage Trail, she was lead author of all the BWHT guidebooks. She moved to Harpswell in 1991 and was a visiting professor at Bowdoin College for a year and then became an associate professor at the University of Southern Maine, where she remained from 1995 to 2014. During her tenure, she created an original course in the history of the inhabitants of the Casco Bay Islands and developed women’s history trails in Portland and Brunswick. She was also a Fulbright Scholar teaching American Studies in Norway from 1999 to 2000 and developed a walking trail to statues of named women in Oslo that was printed in both Norwegian and English. She wrote and/or cowrote numerous books and articles, including being coauthor of Her Past Around Us: Interpreting Sites for Women’s History. She was the author of National Parks and the Woman’s Voice: A History; Boston Women and City School Politics, 1872-1905; and Women Teachers on the Frontier. Her scholarly work focused on the personal experiences and practical achievements of diverse women in American history, and she was a lifelong advocate for the empowerment of all women. She was on the board of the Pejepscot Historical Society, serving as its president during the 1990s. Her lifelong affection for the natural world, especially Haskell Island, led to the publication of The Changing Tides of Maine: Rediscovered Poems (2021). She and her since deceased husband, Roger W. Kaufman ’50, hiked all 48 of the 4,000 footers in New Hampshire’s White Mountains. She is survived by a daughter; son Roger Jr. ’83; and a brother-in-law.

Aug, 2023
52

John F. Novatney Jr. ’52, of Hilton Head Island, S.C., formerly of Ohio; Mar. 24. After earning his J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law, he practiced law at the Cleveland office of Baker & Hostetler for more than 35 years. Late in his professional career, he was general counsel of Central Reserve Life and volunteered as a municipal judge. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he attained the rank of captain and earned a Bronze Star, a Purple Heart, and the Marine Corps Presidential Unit Citation. He enjoyed the water, piloting power boats on Lake Erie and around the Great Lakes for most of his life, and was a longtime member of both the Catawba Island Club and the Cleveland Yachting Club. He was a member of Brown’s basketball team and an avid fan of Cleveland professional sports, particularly his beloved Guardians (formerly Indians). He also enjoyed Broadway musicals, especially soundtracks of Rodgers and Hammerstein classics. He is survived by his wife, June; three children and their spouses, including son John III ’84; and seven grandchildren, including
Anna E. Novatney ’24.

Aug, 2023
52

Paul E. Burton ’52, of Baton Rouge, La.; Mar. 18. He was employed with ExxonMobil for 40 years. He served in the U.S. Navy in the Korean War and, upon leaving active duty, he retained a commission as a naval officer and served in the Reserves. He enjoyed building miniature model Navy ships, reading about the Civil War, and playing guitar and keyboard. He is survived by his wife, Geraldine; a daughter; two stepdaughters and step-sons-in-law; and many step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
51

Robert L. Newton ’51, of Durham, Conn.; Mar. 20. He is survived by his wife, Emily; four children; four grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; a great-great-granddaughter; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
51

Mary Harris Marks ’51, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Feb. 24. She was an interior designer and owner of Design Center, Inc. of Chicago. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; two sons, including William ’75; two daughters-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
51

Robert G. Lopez ’51, of Glen Ellen, Calif.; Jan. 6. He served with the U.S. Air Force Intelligence in the Korean War and then had a career with Kaiser Aluminum in the Bay Area and throughout Europe and the Middle East. After returning to the Bay Area, he and and his longtime partner, Gary Bottone, owned and operated a vineyard in Glen Ellen for many years before enjoying 20-plus years of retirement. He was an accomplished pianist and music was his lifelong passion, including opera and symphony performances. He also enjoyed reading books of all genres. He is survived by his partner, Gary, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
51

Carl K. Kuester ’51, of Guilford, Conn.; Feb. 27. He worked at United Illuminating Company for 25 years in engineering, plant operations, and new construction. He opened his own business in 1975 called Condenser Technology Inc. His company serviced power plant operations throughout the world. He eventually sold his share of the company to his partner and transitioned to a successful consulting firm in the same field. He attempted retirement three times before finally retiring in 2020. He was a licensed pilot and, in addition to flying, he also got pleasure out of restoring and driving his 1928 Model T truck and 1931 Plymouth sedan. He was a veteran of the Korean War. He is survived by five children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
51

Donald H. Kallman ’51, of New York City; Mar. 30. After Columbia Law School and service in the U.S. Coast Guard, he joined the law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore. He later became vice chairman of Manhattan Industries, where he worked for more than 20 years. Additionally, he was an executive vice president of Calvin Klein in charge of worldwide licensing. He retired in 1992. He and his wife, who predeceased him, traveled extensively, visiting more than 100 countries and all 50 states during their 37 years of marriage. He enjoyed reading, rare book collecting, painting, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by two children and their spouses, including son James ’84; and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
51

Lloyd H. Hill ’51, of Milton, Mass.; Apr. 15. He was an educator serving the Quincy community through a career spanning 35 years as an administrator and coach with his final 20 years as the principal of Quincy High School. Subsequently, the Lloyd Hill Center for Performing Arts at Quincy High School was named in his honor. He was an adjunct professor at Northeastern University and Quincy College. In addition to being captain of Brown’s football team and named All-American and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame, he completed 37 Boston Marathons. He is survived by his wife, Marguerite; a daughter and son-in-law; four sons; three daughters-in-law; eight grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
51

Everett H. Greene ’51, of Newport, R.I.; Mar. 6. He is survived by three children and their spouses, 10 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
50

Susan Linial Small ’50, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; Feb. 25. She is survived by four children, six grandchildren, a great-grandchildren, a sister, and many nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
50

Donald C. Shaffer ’50, of Iron River, Mich. formerly of Ponte Verde, Fla.; Apr. 9. He had a long career in sales, marketing, and clothing manufacturing with JCPenney and Oxford Industries, which led him and his family to live in California, New York, Georgia, and Connecticut. Upon retirement in 1989, he and his wife moved to Florida. He volunteered at M.K. Rawlings School as a classroom reader and was a hospice volunteer for 10 years. He was a member of Palms Presbyterian Church and served as an usher on many committees. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran and he enjoyed playing tennis, reading, solving crossword puzzles, and watching wildlife. He is survived by four children, five grandchildren, a sister, brother Russell ’54, and a brother-in-law.

Aug, 2023
50

Edward F. Mastrangelo ’50, of Osterville, Mass.; Mar. 15. He and his family owned and operated the former Angel Motel in Hyannis. He was a longtime member of the Osterville Rotary Club and he enjoyed skiing, tennis, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters and sons-in-law; two grandchildren; four sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
50

James R. Hebden ’50, of Indianapolis; Mar. 5. After serving in the Korean War, he began a 40-year career with General Motors in U.S. cities including Anderson, Detroit, Dayton, and Kokomo, as well as Luton, England. He was a member of Phi Kappa Psi and Phi Beta Kappa. Jim was an avid Colts and Pacers fan and he enjoyed playing golf, reading, gardening, solving crossword puzzles, playing corn toss and calling bingo. He especially enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. He is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law; seven grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.

Aug, 2023
50

Robert D. Hall Jr. ’50, of Northfield, Mass., formerly of Needham, Mass.; Jan. 20. He is survived by his wife, Celine; six children; 10 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
50

Jerome F. Green ’50, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich.; Mar. 23. He was a legendary sports journalist who attended the first 56 Super Bowls. He began his journalism career in 1952, prior to serving in the Navy for four years. He returned to the profession in 1956, joining the Associated Press. He moved on to the Detroit News in 1963 and remained there until his retirement in 2004, serving as the Lions beat reporter from 1965-72 before taking on a columnist role. He continued to cover the Super Bowl and write occasional guest columns for the News through this year, opining on this year’s championship game from the setting of his home for the first time. He is survived by his daughter, son-in-law, and two granddaughters.

 

Aug, 2023
50

Edward B. “Ned” Corcoran ’50, of Middletown, R.I.; Jan. 25. After high school he enlisted in the Army and then attended Brown, where he played on the men’s basketball team. After graduating from law school, he practiced law at the firm of Corcoran Peckham & Hayes in Newport for almost 70 years, retiring at the age of 95 in 2022. The firm was founded by his father Edward (Brown 1919), who practiced until the age of 103. Ned also practiced with his brother Bill ’52 for more than 60 years, until Bill’s death in 2020 at the age of 91, and he practiced with his son, Edward J. Corcoran II ’79, for eight years until his son moved to Boston in 1991. He served on numerous municipal and charitable boards. He was president of the Middletown Town Council and was a founding member and past president of the board of the Boys & Girls Club of Newport. He and his wife Ruth cochaired two major capital campaigns for Newport Hospital and for St. Lucy’s Church in Middletown. He was instrumental in orchestrating a major land swap to preserve Sachuest Point as a wildlife refuge and to make Third Beach into a public beach. He also drove for Meals on Wheels. Up until last year, he could be seen swimming the buoy line every summer evening at Third Beach. He had a great sense of humor and was always quick with a joke. He enjoyed history, gardening, and art—most of his paintings were of Second and Third Beach and were displayed around his home. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Chatterton Corcoran ’49; six children and their spouses, including Ned II ’79; a daughter-in-law; a brother; 17 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and nieces Margaret Corcoran-Leys ’86 and Jane Corcoran ’91.

Aug, 2023
50

Caroline Decatur Chick ’50, of Rumford, R.I.; Mar. 17. She was an elementary school teacher in the East Providence school system. She served as copresident of her Brown class and was a member of the Pembroke Club and the Brown Club of Cape Cod. She was a former member of the East Providence Historical Society, the East Providence Land Trust, the Embroiderers Guild of America, the Rumford Junior Women’s Club and the Pawtucket Women’s Club. She had also been a member of the Church of Epiphany in Rumford, where she was a member of the Vestry and taught Sunday School. She was a skilled knitter and enjoyed creating knitted sweaters, baby blankets, and socks. She also enjoyed needlepoint, embroidery, quilting, tole painting,  gardening, and playing bridge. She is survived by daughters Deborah Chick Burke ’77 and Nancy Chick Hyde’80; six grandchildren, including Sara B. Hyde ’17 and Nathan W.K. Hyde ’17; a great granddaughter; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
49

Adele Goodman Pickar ’49, of Santa Rosa, Calif., formerly of Albany, N.Y.; Feb. 18. While at Brown, she met her future husband, Irving Pickar ’43, and after marrying and settling in Albany they started raising a family. In 2000, they moved to Santa Rosa and enjoyed six years there together before Irving’s passing. She was known for her ability to connect with all people. She is survived by four sons and daughters-in-law, including Joel ’73, Daniel ’78, and Andrew ’81 and his wife, Judith Levine ’80; eight grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
49

Theodore F. Low ’49, of Providence, R.I.; Mar. 13. He was the former president of the Sims Corporation and worked in alternative energy for the Widmer Ernst Company and Blount Energy before retiring from his own company, TFL and Associates. He was a state representative from 1966 to 1976. He served during World War II and the Korean War, as well as in the R.I. Army National Guard. He was the recipient of the Bronze Star. Low was instrumental in the development and construction of the Korean War Monument in Providence and he was appointed Rhode Island Civilian Aide to the Secretary of the Army from 2005 to 2017. He was a member of the University Club of Rhode Island and enjoyed sailing, swimming, and football. He is survived by his wife, Kay; two daughters, including Sara B. Low ’83; a son-in-law; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2023
49

Ralph F. Gossler ’49, of Seekonk, Mass.; Mar. 5. He was the founder of American Trophy in East Providence, R.I., a family business still operating. During high school he was an elite swimmer and by his senior year at Pawtucket High School he ranked first in the nation. He defended his national freestyle record and, in doing so, set a new national record for a long course pool, a record held at Pawtucket High School for 27 years. After the war, he resumed his education at Brown and set a New England intercollegiate record in the sprint events. In 1984, he was inducted into the Rhode Island Aquatic Hall of Fame. After college he began designing and casting trophies out of post-war scrap metal in the basement of the house he grew up in and his wife, Virginia Gately Gossler ’50—whom he met at Brown and who predeceased him—made hand-engraved plates for the trophies. American Trophy grew through the years, headquarted in a building in East Providence, and they ran it for 48 years before selling it to their son and son-in-law. Ralph continued to stay involved part-time in the business but also enjoyed riding his bike 20 miles each day, writing, and painting. At the time of his death he was completing a memoir, and some of his artwork had been shown in a Warren (R.I.) gallery. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, and a son and daughter-in-law.

 

Aug, 2023
49

Joan Daly Ceglarski ’49, of Middletown, R.I.; Mar. 15. She met her husband, Frank ’48, who predeceased her in 1987, while attending Brown. They married and she became an active community member while raising three children. She was a Cub Scout den mother and Girl Scout troop leader, taught catechism at St. Lucy’s Church, and volunteered at Newport Hospital and for Meals on Wheels. A member of the Viking Bridge Club for 40 years, she achieved the status of Ruby Life Master through the American Contract Bridge League and played in tournaments all over the country. She taught bridge at the Clambake Club, Swinburne School, and the Misquamicut Club, and in private homes on Aquidneck Island. She also enjoyed solving the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzles. She is survived by three children, four granddaughters, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
48

Elizabeth Montali Smith McKenzie ’48, of Annapolis, Md., formerly of Warren, R.I.; Feb. 5. She met and married her first husband, Peirce Baker Smith ’49, while attending Brown. She was the May Queen and president of the Student Government Association and remained active with Brown, participating in many commencement marches down College Hill. She raised a family and was involved with the Attleboro Community Theatre before becoming an art history teacher at the House in the Pines School (Mass.) in the early 1970s. She later was a docent at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. She enjoyed playing tennis and received many trophies for her playing. In 1988, she and Peirce purchased an old farm house in Warren that they renovated and she remained there until 2011, although Peirce passed away in 1999. She was very involved in the Warren community. In 2008, she remarried and moved to Annapolis. She enjoyed playing duplicate bridge and solving the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzles. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, a stepdaughter, a stepson, and a niece and nephew.

 

Aug, 2023
48

Daniel Maffuccio ’48, of Salt Lake City; Feb. 20. He had a 38-year career as an engineer at Texaco, retiring in 1985. He and his wife moved to Washington state in 1996 and settled in Salt Lake City in 2020 to be closer to family. He was active in his local church and enjoyed playing golf and painting. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; three sons and daughters-in-law; 10 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2023
48

John J. Frazier ’48, of Danvers, Mass.; Apr. 3. Service in the U.S. Army Air Corps interrupted his studies at Brown, but after graduating, he earned a master’s from MIT and became an engineer at General Electric. He later moved to the defense industry and retired from Raytheon. He was a founding member of the Locust Lawn Ski Club, a Boy Scout leader, and a longtime member of the Danvers Recreation Committee and the Danvers Rotary Club. An avid outdoorsman, he enjoyed mountain climbing, skiing, and sailing. He is survived by three children and their spouses, five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
46

Bunny Cohan Meyer ’46, of Atlanta, formerly of Miami; Mar. 5. After marrying and moving to Miami, where her husband built a residential architecture practice, she pursued a wide range of activities on behalf of her community and Brown. She was instrumental in the founding of the Pembroke Alumnae Club and was president of the Brown Club in 1981, the year she received the Brown Bear Award. She held board positions with the Visiting Nurses Association and Florida International University. In her 90s, she was an honoree at the Profiles of Positive Aging sponsored by LeadingAge, and her memoir encapsulated how she lived her life: “Stay constructively busy and think creatively.” She is survived by a daughter; son James ’76; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; two great-granddaughters; and sister Marcia Cohan Blacher ’49.

 

Aug, 2023
44

John A. Zinke ’44, of Cincinnati; Feb. 15, at 102 years of age. He was an executive for the Mead Corp. and president of Fibre Box Association in Chicago. Active in his community, he served as governor of the Ohio Society of Colonial Wars, was a volunteer with Winners Walk Tall character education program, and was head usher and vestryman at Indian Hill Church. He was also part of the church’s ecumenical group, which provided Christmas gifts to nursing homes. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran. He is survived by three children and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2023
43

Robert Traill ’43, of South Portland, Me.; Mar. 6, at 100 years of age. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and earning the Bronze Star for meritorious service, he joined Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, a predecessor to ExxonMobil, and was employed for 33 years as a marketing representative and manager. In 1979, he and his wife founded Olsten of Southern Maine in Portland, a temporary help franchise. It was sold in 1991, after which he joined St. Joseph’s College as director of corporate relations. In later years, he was a professional recruiter and retired as director of diversified recruitment for Bonney Staffing Center. He was a member of the Portland YMCA board of directors, chair of the Cumberland County Private Industry Council, president of the Rotary Club of Portland, and past chairman and life member of the Salvation Army Advisory Board of Portland. He stayed physically fit by biking and working out at the gym weekly well into his nineties. He enjoyed cruising with his wife and volunteering to help kids read at Lyseth Elementary School. He is survived by four children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Aug, 2023
00
A Disability Rights Pioneer
Elias Wolff ’00 devoted his life to making sure people like him could participate in sports, fully and joyfully.
Read More
Image of Eli Wolff and his family.
Related classes:
Class of 2000, Class of 2023
Jun, 2023
FAC

Frank G. Rothman, Wayne, Pa.; Oct. 23, from bladder cancer. He arrived in the U.S. in 1944 and matriculated at the University of Chicago, then went to Harvard for his doctorate. After two years of service in the U.S. Army, where he was assigned to the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, he moved to the University of Wisconsin—Madison and became a postdoctoral fellow in the departments of chemistry and bacteriology. He broadened his training in molecular genetics at MIT (1957-1960), working in the lab of Cy Levinthal on the alkaline phosphatase gene of the bacterium E. coli. In November 1960, he was a visiting fellow at the Institut Pasteur in Paris, where fundamental discoveries were being made on gene regulation; in 1961, he joined the faculty at Brown and rose through the ranks as assistant professor (1961-1965), associate professor (1965-1970), professor of biology and then dean of biology (1970-1990), teaching courses in biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and aging. He was the recipient of numerous teaching awards. His work on the studies of bacteria and Dictyostelium was funded by nine consecutive grants from NSF between 1961 and 1984. ​​In 1987, he began to study the biology of aging in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. He was published in many journals including Cell, Nature Biotechnology, Journal of Cell Biology, Genetics, Journal of Molecular Biology and others. From 1990 to 1995, he served as Brown’s Provost, eventually returning to faculty duties until he retired in 1997. In 1994, he was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and in 1995, the Frank and Joan Rothman Commencement Forum lecture was established by President Vartan Gregorian recognizing the career-long contributions Frank and his wife made to Brown. In retirement, he remained active with the Progeria Research Foundation and with Project Kaleidoscope on undergraduate science education. He is survived by four children, including daughter, Maria Rothman Boyd ’82 and her spouse Taylor Boyd ’86; five grandchildren, including granddaughter Elizabeth Rothman ’13; and grandson Alex Rothman’10; and one great-grandchild. A celebration of life is planned for Oct. 27 at 4:oo in Manning Chapel.  For more information, contact Maria at mrothman123@yahoo.com.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Arnold S. Rosenbaum, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Dec. 2. He served as a surgeon and lieutenant commander in the Commissioned Corps of the U.S. Public Health Service during the Vietnam War and later as a general surgeon at the Miriam Hospital in Providence for more than 30 years. While there, he was also a clinical assistant professor of surgery at the Warren Alpert Medical School and recipient of the distinguished teacher award. He graduated from both Ursinus College and Jefferson Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. During his medical residency he helped develop the heart-lung pump used in open-heart surgeries and created a synthetic aortic seal. He was a musical prodigy and at just 13 years of age he played a trumpet solo with the Philadelphia Orchestra and famed conductor Eugene Ormandy. He also played trumpet and percussion for the Monte Carlos, a Philadelphia band, in the 1960s. An avid outdoorsman, he enjoyed sailing, hiking, fishing, and especially skiing with his family in New Hampshire and traveling the world with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Judith; three children; seven grandchildren; three nieces; and a nephew.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Meenakshi Narain, of Providence, R.I.; Jan. 1, following a brief illness. She was a high energy experimental physicist who joined the Brown faculty in 2007 after spending nine years at Boston University. She served as Brown’s physics department chair from July 1, 2022, the first woman to hold that title. She had been involved with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment and was elected chair of the USCMS collaboration board from June 2018 until June 2022, subsequently being the first female collaboration board chair, and she was a leader of the CMS group from Brown. She was a founding chair of the CMS Diversity Office and a leader of the CMS Women’s Forum. In this capacity, she represented the U.S. members collaborating on the CMS experiment. She was instrumental in discovering the top quark, the heaviest fundamental particle, in 1995. She authored more than 850 peer-reviewed studies in leading physics journals and gave numerous public lectures and invited conference presentations. In 2000, she received both an outstanding junior investigator award from the U.S. Department of Energy and a National Science Foundation early career development award. In 2007, she was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society, and in 2012, she was elected a fellow of the LHC Physics Center at Fermilab. Her outreach efforts were numerous, including organizing and founding the Big Bang Science Fair at WaterFire Providence, a public outreach event that brought hands-on science experiences to local kids and community members. She is survived by her husband, Ulrich Heintz, a fellow professor of physics at Brown, and two sons.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Anthony Lancaster, of Providence; Dec. 10. He taught economics at Brown and served as department chair from 1999 to 2002. He received his BA from Liverpool University in 1959 and his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 1964. He taught at the University of Birmingham, where he was the thesis advisor for noted British statistician Andrew Chesher, and at the University of Hull before joining the Brown faculty in 1986. He was a visiting professor in the economics department at Harvard University in 1992. He was instrumental in establishing the field of econometrics at Brown through teaching and advising. He arrived at Brown with two of his graduate students from Hull, one of whom was Guido Imbens, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics in 2021. He published papers in microeconometrics in the major economics and statistics journals. His publications also included an influential monograph, The Econometric Analysis of Transition Data (1990). Later in his career he wrote a textbook, Modern Bayesian Econometrics (2003). He was elected a fellow of the Econometric Society in 1991. He is survived by his wife, Jane Heawood Lancaster ’93 AM, ’98 PhD; a daughter; two sons; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2023
FAC

R. Ross Holloway, of Carrboro, N.C.; June 20, 2022. In 1964, after two years of teaching at Princeton and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he joined the classics department at Brown and rose from assistant professor to associate professor in 1967 and full professor in 1970. In 1978, he teamed up with Brown art historian Rolf Winkes and founded the Center for Classical Archaeology and Art at Brown. He was awarded a named chair as Brown’s Elisha Benjamin Andrews Professor in 1990. In 1989 to 1990, the Archaeological Institute of America selected him as their Charles Eliot Norton lecturer and, in 1995, awarded him the gold medal for distinguished archaeological achievement, its highest honor. During the course of his career, he published 33 books, 151 articles, and 50 book reviews. He directed four major excavations in South Italy and Sicily. He promoted the publication of such substantial fieldwork through the series Archaeologia Transatlantica. He was a fellow of various professional organizations and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Field Archaeology and the American Journal of Archaeology. In 1984, Prof. Martha Sharp Joukowsky joined him at the Center; he was its director from 1978 to 1987 and again from 1994 to 2000. The Center further expanded in 2006 and became the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World. He is survived by two daughters and five grandchildren.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Norman Fruchter, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Jan. 4, caused by complications of injuries sustained when he was struck by a car on Dec. 22 while crossing the street near his home. After college, he taught high school students in England on a Fulbright scholarship before returning to Newark to join Tom Hayden and other political organizers from Students for a Democratic Society to teach high school. He then established the Newark Community Union Project and, with Robert Machover, filmed Troublemakers, a documentary film about civic action in Newark. He published two novels, Coat Upon a Stick and Single File. He founded and directed the Center for Education and Community at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown prior to being appointed to the New York City Panel for Educational Policy, where he worked to guarantee that all students receive a sound basic education regardless of their race, ethnicity, class, or income. He founded and was director of the Institute for Education and Social Policy at NYU and headed the Ford Foundation’s National Dropout Prevention Program. He is survived by his wife, Heather; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; four stepchildren; and four step-grandchildren.

Jun, 2023

Frank Durand, of Providence; Aug. 3, 2022. Professor emeritus of Spanish literature. He came to Brown in 1960 as an instructor in Spanish. He was promoted to associate professor in 1962 and full professor in 1972. He specialized in 19th Century and modern South American fiction. He taught seminars on Don Quijote, carrying on a tradition from his teacher Enrique Anderson-Imbert. He was also an administrator, serving as chair of the department of Hispanic studies twice. He was appointed associate dean of the faculty in 1978 and associate provost in 1980. He received his bachelor’s degree from NYU and his master’s degree from Northwestern University. He entered the Army in 1954, married in 1955, and spent the following year in Tokyo as he finished his service. On return to the U.S., they both went to University of Michigan for doctoral study. They both enjoyed traveling and subsequently shared their love for the culture and literature of the countries they studied by frequently guiding alumni trips as part of the Brown Travelers program. He is survived by sons David ’83 and John ’87; two daughters-in-law, including Kate Hanley Durand ’87; and three grandchildren, including Laura Durand ’16.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Dr. John DiGiovanna, of Bethesda; Feb. 6, of metastatic pancreatic cancer. In addition to the practice of dermatology, he was a senior research physician at the National Cancer Institute, where his research involved inherited skin disorders, particularly those causing skin cancer. He was involved in pioneering studies of use of oral retinoids for treatment of acne and for prevention of skin cancer. He also served as head of the Dermatology Clinical Research Unit in the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. He was a longtime consultant to the Federal Drug Administration over three decades. In addition, he served as the director of dermatopharmacology and professor in the department of dermatology at the Warren Alpert Medical School, where he was an investigator on more than 70 clinical trials. He coauthored more than 200 scientific articles and 33 book chapters, and he lectured widely at national and international conferences. He was a member of several prestigious dermatology societies, including the American Dermatological Association, the American Academy of Dermatology, and the Washington, D.C. Dermatology Society. He enjoyed traveling, gardening, the theater, being with his close friends and endlessly talking about science and medicine. He is survived by his husband, Julian Trail; two sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
FAC

Duane Bishop of Providence; Feb. 7, from multiple system atrophy. He was a general practioner and medical director of Mount Royal College in Calgary prior to moving to Rhode Island in 1978 to become the clinical director of Butler Hospital and an associate professor at Brown. He later worked at Rhode Island Hospital as a psychiatrist specializing in rehabilitation and then at Southern New England Physicians Associates, where he served as president and CEO. During his career he wrote more than 200 peer-reviewed articles with a clinical focus being on family relationships. After his diagnosis of MSA, he would describe the mechanisms of his disease and how it affected him in order to help those around him to better understand it. He continued to garden, sculpt, travel and play golf, demonstrating  determination to slow down disease progression. He is survived by his wife, Jody; three children; and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2023
GS 22

Manfred Steiner ’22 PhD, of Riverside, R.I.; Jan. 7. At the age of 89, he was finally what he always wanted to be: a physicist (read “It’s Never Too Late,” Sept.-Oct. ’22, online at brownalumnimagazine.com). He is survived by his wife, Sheila; a daughter; a son; and six grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 13

Vladimir Vlaovic ’13 PhD, of Riverside, R.I.; Jan. 21, as a result of an underlying medical condition. He is survived by his mother
and family and friends in Europe, Canada, and the U.S.

Jun, 2023
GS 98

Eva Jane Neumann Fridman ’98 PhD, of Sudbury, Mass.; Jan. 15, after a brief illness. She was a clinical social worker for more than 60 years. She enjoyed studying shamanism in Mongolia, her fieldwork for her Brown dissertation. She had multiple trips to Mongolia in the late 1990s through 2010. She was the author of two books on shamanism studies of southeastern parts of Russia and Mongolia. She enjoyed weaving and reading. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and three granddaughters.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 85

Rebecca Stiles Hinkle ’85 ScM, of Kiawah Island, S.C.; Apr. 27, 2022, from pancreatic cancer. She is survived by her husband Eric ’84; two children; her parents; and a sister.

Jun, 2023
GS 78

Steven A. Haaser ’78 AM, of Jonesborough, Tenn.; Nov. 15. He began his professional career at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a research scientist. He later worked as a biohydrologist for The Nature Conservancy. His final years of professional work were as a subcontractor to DOE supporting their environmental restoration program in Oak Ridge, Tenn. He enjoyed traveling, photography, gardening, growing orchids, music, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two brothers-in-law; and a niece and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 77

Oldegard Wahnon ’77 AM, of Philadelphia; Nov. 1. He was a third and fourth grade teacher in the Providence, R.I., school district for more than 30 years. He is survived by his wife, Maria; three children, including Sandra Wahnon Lopes ’89 and Carla Wahnon ’91; a grandchild; and four siblings.

Jun, 2023
GS 73

Anthony Catalano ’73 PhD of Spokane, Wash.; Oct. 21; of complications from ALS. He graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and, following graduation from Brown, began working at RCA’s David Sarnoff Research Center, where he developed amorphous silicon solar cells. He received an RCA Outstanding Achievement Award for this accomplishment. In 1992, he was the director of the photovoltaic division of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Colo.). He founded Terralux Inc. in 2003, working to commercialize LED lighting with products designed to replace traditional incandescent bulbs, resulting in more than 50 patents. He maintained a weather tracking site for many years, contributing data to NOAA. His photography interest grew to include astrophotography. He also enjoyed wine making, website development, and travel. He is survived by his wife, Patricia, and three daughters.

Jun, 2023
GS 77

Stuart H. Zamlong ’72 ScM, ’77 PhD, of Clifton Park, N.Y.; Jan. 15. He taught math at several universities and worked in the financial services division of New York State before becoming certified as an actuary. He enjoyed playing checkers and chess and was an avid Yankees fan. He is survived by a brother and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 72

Robert S. Sparks ’72 MAT, of St. Louis, Mo., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; Jan. 12. He taught history in the Cranston school district before moving to St. Louis, where he joined Lumberyard Supply Co, the family business, for nearly 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Zelda; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 72

Karen Schroeder Nicholas ’72 PhD, of Oswego, N.Y.; Dec. 2, of complications related to a diverticular abscess. After Brown, she married and moved to Lincoln, Neb., to start a family, completing her PhD in 1972 and working as a substitute teacher before becoming an instructional designer at the University of Mid-America.When her marriage ended in 1982, she accepted positions at the University of Iowa and Central Michigan University, eventually accepting an associate professorship of history at the State University of New York at Oswego, where she taught for more than 30 years. She was a singer and instrumentalist and once a member of the Schola Cantorum of Syracuse. She was an avid reader fond of travelogs, historical romance, and science fiction. She enjoyed knitting and swimming. In retirement she focused on charity work. She is survived by a daughter, a son, two grandchildren, and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 70

John Mingo ’70 PhD, of Livingston, Mont.; Nov. 8. He taught economics at the University of Montana. In 1972, he began working at the Federal Reserve in Washington, D.C. He authored the Monetary Control Act of 1980. In the 1980s he was a partner at Golembe Associates but returned to the Federal Reserve in the 1990s as senior advisor to the board of governors, then spent most of the remainder of his career with his own company, Mingo & Co., advising major financial institutions and the U.S. government. He was recognized as a leading expert in regulation of risk management. He was an avid fly fisherman, fishing all over America and the world, lecturing for angling clubs, and writing magazine articles and three books: Fly Fishing the Montana Spring Creeks: The Rainbows of Paradise; Fly Fishing the Western Spring Creeks and Tail-Waters; and Introduction to Hybrid Nymphing Tactics. He also has spent time teaching shooting defense and wrote Defensive Pistol—A Complete Introduction. In retirement, he was the founder, managing principal, and chief designer of special servers of Baetis Audio. Baetis Audio media servers have won annual recommended component awards from The Absolute Sound from 2014 through 2020 and the Baetis Reference server has won the coveted Golden Ear award from The Absolute Sound and an A+ rating for digital equipment from Stereophile. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne Martin Mingo; two sons; and three grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 69

William V. Lipton ’69 ScM, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Dec. 20, from ALS. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Army. Upon leaving the Army in 1970, he returned to school at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, where he earned degrees in environmental protection. He started his career as a radiation protection engineer at Argonne National Lab outside Chicago and earned an MBA from Illinois Institute of Technology. In 1981, he was recruited by Detroit Edison to lead the radiation protection team at Fermi nuclear power plant in Michigan. He also taught classes in environmental science at Wayne State University and served as an adjunct professor at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. He was a member of the American Nuclear Society and created and maintained a website on radiation protection. He retired in 2008. He and his wife were a team in all they were involved in including traveling to Europe, the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, China, India, South America, the Galapagos, and sailing through both the Suez and Panama canals. They were both active members of First United Methodist Church, where they served as coordinators for Alpha House outreach program and the Love Thy Neighbor program and organized the holiday giving tree. He is survived by his wife, Beth, and two daughters.

Jun, 2023
GS 68

Nicholas E. Pingitore ’68 ScM, ’73 PhD, of El Paso, Tex.; Oct. 24. He was a professor of Earth, Environmental, and Resource
Sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso for 45 years. Previously, he was on the faculty of Brooklyn College for five years. He was a geoscientist and analytic geochemist. He was director of the geosciences Electron Microprobe Laboratory and a founding partner and science editor of Scientific American Discovering Archaeology until 2002. He was also on the board of directors of Texas Mineral Resources Corp. During his career, he was awarded more than $17 million in research grants and published 136 manuscripts. He conducted important particle work at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource in Palo Alto for many years and was frequently consulted locally, nationally, and internationally for his expertise in science. He served as adjunct professor in the College of Nursing and the College of Health Sciences. He received the 2008 UTEP Distinguished Professor in Research Award, and the 2007 and 2008 UT System STAR awards and was a member of several professional organizations. He is survived by his life partner, Maria Alvarez Amaya.

Jun, 2023
GS 68

Mary P. Hupfauf ’68 MAT, of Green Bay, Wisc.; Dec. 31. She was a member of the Sisters of St. Francis of the Holy Cross. She entered the convent in 1950, professed her vows in 1953, and celebrated her 70th jubilee in religious life in 2021. She served as a teacher and principal at several schools, including the former Abbot Pennings High School in DePere. After certification in clinical pastoral education, she served as chaplain and director of pastoral care at St. Vincent and St. Mary hospitals in Green Bay. She is survived by the sisters and associates of the Sisters of St. Francis of the Holy Cross, her sister, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 67

C. Wayne Williams ’67 AM, of Glenmont, N.Y.; Nov. 5, after an extended illness. He devoted his entire career to higher education and served in multiple capacities at the New York State Education Department, Mid-America Universities International, Brown, and Excelsior College, where he served as Excelsior’s first president. He also served on the board of trustees for the Albany Institute of History and Art. He is survived by his wife, Deborah Sopczyk; a brother; two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; and eight nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 66

Elizabeth Sullivan ’66 AM, of Fall River, Mass.; Jan. 18. She taught English at B.M.C. Durfee High School for more than 30 years and part-time at Bristol Community College, both in Fall River. She enjoyed traveling, knitting, cooking, and reading. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, and two granddaughters.

Jun, 2023
66

Werner C. Maki ’66 MAT, of Goodrich, Mich.; Oct. 26, of Parkinson’s. He was a physics teacher for 30 years at Grand Blanc High School. He sang in the choir and taught Sunday school at Goodrich United Methodist Church. He enjoyed old cars and taking people for a ride in the Model T he built, as well as traveling with his family. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three sons and their spouses; five grandchildren; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 65

Lorrena Miller Preble ’65 MAT, of Hope Valley, R.I.; Jan. 21. In addition to teaching in the Warwick (R.I.) school system for 35 years, she also was a research associate in leukemia epidemiology for the Rhode Island Hospital department of oncology. She is survived by a sister, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2023
GS 61

Thomas M. Jones ’61 MAT, of North Adams, Mass.; Jan. 17. He was vice president of finance & administration at North Adams State College, where he worked for 33 years until his retirement. Prior to North Adams, he worked in higher education administration at several other institutions. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and he enjoyed gardening and photography. He is survived by his wife, Elaine; two daughters; three sons; six grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2023
GS 60

Martin A. Buzas ’60 ScM, of Washington, D.C.; Nov. 8. He enlisted in the Navy at 17 and attended the selective Naval Air Technical Training Center. He was stationed at Hickam Air Force Base and flew in the Pacific Theater during the Korean War as a radio operator. He graduated from UConn in 1958, Brown in 1960, and earned a PhD from Yale in 1963. He had a distinguished career as curator of Benthic Foraminifera at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History beginning in 1963 and continuing until his death. He was the author and/or coauthor of 15 books and more than 100 scientific papers. His accomplishments were recognized by many honors and awards, foremost being the Joseph A. Cushman Award for excellence in foraminiferal research in 2004, the Paleontological Society Medal in 2004, and the Brady Medal from the Micropalaeontological Society in 2015. Also a teacher and a mentor, he advised numerous graduate students and post-doctoral fellows during his career. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and two sisters.

Jun, 2023
STU

Jeffrey Schlyer ’23, of Providence; Jan. 7, in a tragic bike accident. He had been studying applied mathematics at the time of his passing. He enjoyed historical societies and libraries and worked at the Rockefeller Library. He had an appreciation for art, was an avid cyclist, and enjoyed snowboarding and nature, taking every opportunity he could to be outdoors. In 2016, he competed as a member of the U.S. National Youth Rowing team. He is survived by his mothers, Sabine Ruppel and Delphine; his twin sister; a sister and brother-in-law; his grandmother; and his girlfriend Elvira.

Jun, 2023
15

Daniel D. Flowers ’15, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of Dexter, Mich.; Sept. 8, of an accidental drowning. At the time of his death, he was working as a graphic designer in Ft. Lauderdale. While at Brown, he was a member of the wrestling team and a photographer for the athletic department. He also became active in the Beat the Streets Wrestle4Fun program in Providence, dedicated to improving the lives of children through wrestling. He was an avid golfer, enjoyed painting, and developed a deep interest in philosophy. He is survived by his parents, a sister, a brother, three nieces, a nephew, two grandmothers, and several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

 

Jun, 2023
10

Katherine M. Fritzsche-Peterson ’10, of Brunswick, Me.;, formerly of Washington, D.C.; Nov. 10, from glioblastoma. She worked for two years at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston as a research assistant, then earned a master’s degree from Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs. She won a prize at graduation for the best student in domestic policy. After graduating, she worked at the Congressional Budget Office for six years as a principal analyst. She worked tirelessly to provide Congress with objective and timely analysis of the effects of legislation on the federal budget and health insurance coverage. She made significant contributions to the agency’s groundbreaking report estimating the effect of implementing a system of universal health insurance on the federal budget and national health spending. While she lived in Washington, she frequently participated in the Social Justice Initiative and other charitable volunteer efforts as part of St. Peter’s Church on Capitol Hill. In early 2020, she moved back home to Maine to work in the Commissioner’s office at the Department of Health and Human Services as director of research and evaluation. She provided research and data analysis to guide Maine’s COVID response. She was proud that she had been able to devote her entire career to public service. She was a seven-year breast cancer survivor and newlywed. She is survived by her husband, Lars; her parents; three siblings and their spouses; three nieces; and a nephew.

Jun, 2023
03

Kevin M. Garrity ’03, of East Hampton, Mass., formerly of Watertown, Conn.; Nov. 3. A gifted athlete, during his high school years he was a member of the Frederick Gunn School varsity rowing, soccer, and basketball teams and was selected for the U.S. Development rowing team, earning a spot on the national team in 1999, which led to training and international competition in Canada and Bulgaria. At Brown, he was a four-year student-athlete on the crew team. He then joined the faculty at the Frederick Gunn School, teaching science and coaching basketball and rowing. He was the recipient of the Class of 1955 Distinguished Teaching Award. In 2014, he and his wife both accepted faculty positions at Williston Northampton School, where he taught chemistry and served as an advisor and coach. He is survived by his wife, Kate; a daughter; a son; his parents; and four siblings.

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