Obituaries

Apr, 2020
52
Women’s Warrior
Arlene Gorton ’52, who fought for female athletes
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Photo of Arlene Gorton ’52
Apr, 2020
FAC

Robert M. Dowben, of Providence; Nov. 11. He had a distinguished career as a physician, as a scientist, and in academia. As a professor, he had faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania, Northwestern University, MIT, Harvard Medical School, the University of Bergen in Norway, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, and most recently at Brown, where he was named an emeritus professor. He was the author of more than 150 scientific publications and four books regarding cell and muscle physiology. He was the recipient of many accolades for his contributions to medicine and science, including the National Foundation for Neuromuscular Disease Award, and he served as a representative on the Baylor Research Foundation. He was named on eight patents. Following his retirement from Brown, he continued to mentor graduate students. He was an accomplished pianist and a former captain in the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife, Carla; three children; and six grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
GS 18

Benjamin P. Gudorf ’18 AM, of Dayton, Ohio; Oct. 29. He is survived by his wife, Lauren; a son; his parents; and four brothers.

 

Apr, 2020
GS 16

Kimberly A. Mailloux ’16 MPH, of Fall River, Mass.; Oct. 9. She worked for Lifespan in Providence as an operations analyst. She was on the board of the Massachusetts Organization of Genealogy Society and was a member of Somerset Genealogy and the BAA. She enjoyed going to farmer’s markets, camping trips, and history. She is survived by her husband, Robert; a daughter; her mother; a brother; a sister; and a niece.

Apr, 2020
GS 79

Albert R. Frackelton ’79 PhD, of Rumford, R.I.; Oct. 14. He was an associate professor of research at Brown for 30 years, as well as a staff member in the department of medicine and research at Roger Williams Medical Center. Upon retirement, he remained active with the research safety and radiation committees at Roger Williams Medical Center. He was passionate about climate change, demonstrated through his participation in RI Interfaith Power and Light and the Environmental Ministries of the United Church of Christ at the national conference and local levels. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie; two children and their spouses; six grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother-in-law.

Apr, 2020
GS 79

Jane E. Carvalho ’79 AM, of Mattapoisett, Mass.; Oct. 19, after a long illness. She earned a JD at Northeastern School of Law. She was fluent in several languages and worked as a translator and cryptologist for the FBI, spent several years as an ESL educator, and in 1983 passed the bar and became a family law attorney. She began her law career at the Law Office of Armand Fernandes, Jr., before opening a private practice in 1987 with offices in Boston, New Bedford, and Martha’s Vineyard. She was a member of the Board of Bar Overseers Hearing Committee and a past president of the Massachusetts Bar Association Family Law Section Council. She lectured frequently. She was a longtime member of the Pentecostal Assembly in New Bedford and traveled to India for mission work. She enjoyed hiking, biking, camping,
and being at the ocean. She is survived by four cousins.

 

Apr, 2020
GS 76

Shan Shih ’76 PhD, of Troy, Mich.; Nov. 12, of an infection while receiving treatment for bladder cancer. He worked for Rockwell Automotive/Arvin Meritor as principal engineer, chief engineer, and engineering director for 26 years. He also taught at Lawrence Technological University for eight years as an adjunct professor. He enjoyed developing computer simulation programs of automotive mechanical systems, as well as mountain climbing, hiking, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Carey; two sons; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2020
GS 73

James T. Fahey ’73 PhD, of Troy, N.Y.; Nov. 23. He taught philosophy at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the University of Albany, Siena College, and Sage College. He enjoyed volleyball, softball, soccer, kayaking, bicycling, hiking, camping, and Irish music. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2020
GS 72

Anthony F. Ross ’72 PhD, of Arundel, Me.; Nov. 23. He worked in the field of medicine both as a health care provider and in the laboratory in the field of biochemistry. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, was a member of the Lions Club in Kennebunk, and enjoyed fishing and karaoke. He is survived by five children and their spouses, two grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2020
GS 68

Louis R. Bedell ’68 ScM, ’71 PhD, of West Monroe, La.; Oct. 31. He taught physics at the University of Louisiana Monroe. He was a devout Catholic and enjoyed singing in the church choir. He also enjoyed fixing cars and repairing household items, spending time with his grandchildren, square dancing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary; five children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; a brother; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Apr, 2020
67

Richard T. Flood ’67 MAT, of Jamestown, R.I.; Oct. 30. He was a teacher, coach, and mentor at Pomfret School in Pomfret, Conn.; at Charterhouse School in Godalming, England, where he was a Fulbright Scholar; and for more than 20 years at Noble and Greenough School in Dedham, Mass. In 1988 he was appointed headmaster at Salisbury School in Salisbury, Conn. After retiring from Salisbury, he created Dick Flood Education Services, inspiring young educators to find jobs in independent schools. He was a Hall of Fame hockey coach who led the Nobles for more than 30 years. He founded the Summer Europa Cup, which graduated several NHL and Olympic athletes. He also enjoyed gardening and nature. He is survived by three children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
GS 61

Richard J. Sederstrom ’61 MAT, of Agawam, Mass., and York, Me.; Oct. 18. He served the Concord Public Schools and Concord-Carlisle Regional School District for 43 years before retiring in 2005. He taught math and science at Concord-Carlisle Regional High School for 16 years and represented the science department as chair for two terms, as well as holding elective office in the Concord Teachers’ Association. For the next 27 years, he was director of personnel for the school system; then, he served a three-year term as president of the American Association for Employment in Education. He received the Priscilla A. Scotian Award for distinguished service in the field of recruiting and training teachers. He enjoyed coaching youth sports and playing tennis and cards, reading, rooting for the New England Patriots, and spending time with family and friends. He is survived by three children and their spouses, and six grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
GS 60

Edgar L. Chapman ’60 AM, ’64 PhD, of East Peoria, Ill.; Oct. 11. He was professor emeritus in the English department at Bradley University, where he taught writing and literature from 1963 to 2002. He authored numerous articles and books, including The Magic Labyrinth of Philip Jose Farmer and The Road to Castle Mount: The Science Fiction of Robert Silverberg. He also co-edited Classic and Iconoclastic Alternate History Science Fiction. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and the Rhode Island National Guard. He is survived by two sons and their spouses, three grandchildren, and a brother.

Apr, 2020
GS 57

John W. Schultz ’57 PhD, of Centreville, Md.; Nov. 24. He was a professor of chemistry and taught at the U.S. Naval Academy and the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., for more than 40 years. In 1996 he was named professor emeritus. He was a member of the American Chemical Society and the American Physical Society. He was a volunteer for Special Olympics and an active member in his local church. He is survived by his wife, Helen; four sons; and 16 grandchildren.

Apr, 2020
09

Tara D. Parente ’09, of Philadelphia; Nov. 15. She is survived by her mother and sister.

 

Apr, 2020
08

Rukesh S. Samarasekera ’08, of Orange, Calif.; Nov. 19. He was an avid writer and communications professional who used his skills to introduce the world to the LEED projects that are changing the way we look at buildings and what they can do, to the people behind those projects, and to the concept that we really can make the world better if we each do our part. He was the Storyteller and Changemaker of the U.S. Green Building Council and the mastermind behind the Changemakers podcast series that highlighted the stories of sustainability champions. In 2014 he hosted inspirational events for Catalyst Week. In 2015 he established Sarong Shorts, a company that worked with single mothers in Sri Lanka to produce upcycled sarongs. He also started the Comeback Collective, an educational and inspirational multimedia project celebrating tenacity in the face of hardship. He is survived by his parents, grandmother, a brother, an aunt and uncle, and a cousin.

Apr, 2020
05

Danielle Wainer ’05, of Forest Hills, N.Y.; Nov. 6, from Burkitt lymphoma. She pursued a career that spanned the Human Rights Watch to a Fulbright Fellowship in Peru. She then completed a dual master’s degree and after working several years on Wall Street, accepted an offer in Bogota, Colombia, breaking into the field of impact investing and social venture capital at Elevar Equity before being diagnosed in June 2018. She is survived by her husband, Paolo; her father; a sister; and her grandmother.

 

Apr, 2020
87

Peter Zidlicky ’87, of Larchmont, N.Y.; Oct. 7. After graduating from Columbia Business School, he worked with both large and boutique investment companies, including Solomon Brothers, Donaldson Lufkin Jenrette, and Atlantic Pacific Capital, before forming his own company in 2004, Sound Shore Advisors. At Brown he was a member of Kappa Sigma and both the football and lacrosse teams. Later in life he enjoyed coaching his daughters’ lacrosse teams, eventually founding Black Paw Lacrosse. He also enjoyed spending time with family in Virginia and on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. He is survived by two daughters; his mother; brother Paul ’89; five nieces and nephews; and his former wife, Jennifer Ogden ’87.

 

Apr, 2020
80

Sallie McLean Ramsden ’80, of Lyme, N.H.; Oct. 28. A homemaker and community volunteer, she restored old homes, researched the genealogy of her family, and was instrumental in restoring the Lyme Congregational Church and Lyme Academy building. She was a leader of the Lyme Historians and co-authored a history of Lyme. She enjoyed gardening, sailing, skiing, hiking, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Richard Ramsden ’59; a daughter; two sons and their spouses; and seven grandchildren, including David Rabin ’14.

 

Apr, 2020
75

Cindy L. Greenhalgh ’75, of Atlanta; Oct. 27, after a six-year struggle with leukemia. After receiving degrees from Brown and Massachusetts College of Art and Design, she obtained her master’s degree from San Francisco Art Institute and Georgia State. For many years she taught English to non-native speakers in the middle and high schools of the Atlanta Public School system. She enjoyed working with pastels, drawing, photography, and collage work. She was pursuing her dream of opening a children’s art school prior to her health failing. She is survived by a daughter, a son, four sisters, and two brothers-in-law.

 

Apr, 2020
72

Reid Coleman ’72, ’75 MD, of Columbia, Md.; Dec. 2. He practiced internal medicine for more than 20 years in Providence. In 2001 he became the medical director at Lifespan Health System, where he remained until 2011, when he became chief medical information officer for Nuance Communications. Throughout his career he continued to teach residents and students in the Brown system. He received many teaching awards and retired in 2017. He enjoyed traveling, woodworking, and playing bridge. He is survived by his wife, Katherine.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1972, MD Class of 1975
Apr, 2020
71

John K. Mell ’71, of Summit, N.J.; Nov. 21, from colon cancer. He worked in international finance at Bristol-Myers Squibb, Citibank, and Resources Global Professionals, serving as a chief administrative officer before retiring in 2014. In retirement he worked at SAGE’s Furniture Restoration Workshop. He was an avid genealogist and enjoyed reading. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. Phi Delta Beta. He is survived by his wife, Anne; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; his mother; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
71

Nancy Dadekhian Hersey ’71, of Cranston, R.I.; Oct. 31. She is survived by five children, including daughter Alicia Hersey ’15, ’20 MD.

 

Apr, 2020
71

David R. Bradley ’71, of Avon, Conn.; Nov. 30. After Brown, he entered the actuarial program at The Hartford, where he rose to executive vice president during his 29-year tenure. He was an accomplished musician and in addition to being the organist at Asylum Hill Congregational Church, he formed the Worthington Trio with his wife as a member. He was a member of the American Academy of Actuaries and the Rhode Island National Guard. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, and squash, and was an avid fan of the UConn women’s basketball team. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter and her spouse; a son; a grandson; a stepson; his mother; and a sister.

 

Apr, 2020
69

David H. Murray ’69, of Dublin, N.H.; Sept. 28. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; four children; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2020
69

Jonathan S. Hall ’69, of Kendall Park, N.J.; Oct. 28. He retired in 1989 as a pharmaceutical sales representative with Spex Industries, Edison. He is survived by his husband, William C. Guarini; sister Sheila Hall ’76; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
67

Jeffrey C. Foster ’67, of St. Louis, Mo.; Nov. 9, of pancreatic cancer. He spent most of his career at Bell Laboratories providing contributions to the developing field of computer-aided design, and retired as vice president from AT&T. He then formed his own company, Twin-Bridge Consulting, and worked for five years as a consultant for several Fortune 500 companies and for Duke University Medical School. He also taught classes as an associate professor at Stevens Institute of Technology. He enjoyed river cruising, playing golf, and spending time with family, especially each summer on the coast of Maine. He is survived by three children, including Karen de Foy ’94; seven grandchildren; sister Linda Henry ’63; and his former wife, Muriel McCormick Foster ’67.

 

Apr, 2020
67

Marvin A. Brookner ’67, of Berkeley, Calif.; Oct. 16, of pancreatic cancer. After receiving his JD from George Washington Law School, he moved to Berkeley and began working as a criminal defense attorney in the Public Defender’s Office of Solano County. He worked his way up to chief public defender in the Felony Department. He was known to wear bow ties and defend those without the means for legal counsel. In 2004 he retired. He was an avid cyclist, bird watcher, and gardener. He enjoyed crossword puzzles, the Los Angeles Angels and Raiders, and traveling. He is survived by his partner, Phylee; two daughters; two stepdaughters; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; and his brother Edward ’64.

Apr, 2020
67

Edward Branigan ’67 of Bellingham, Wash.; June 29, of acute myeloid leukemia. After graduating from Brown, he earned a JD and PhD in film studies from the University of Wisconsin. He joined the film and media studies faculty at UC Santa Barbara in 1984 and taught until his retirement in 2012. From 1989 to 1994 he served as chair of the department and later was instrumental in the design and implementation of the doctoral program in film and media studies at the school. He authored numerous books and articles. He enjoyed fishing, reading philosophy, watching sports, and photography. He is survived by his partner, Ellen Rabinowich; his mother; four sons; three sisters; a brother; and his former wife, Roberta Kimmel.

Apr, 2020
66

Donald S. Rae ’66, of Alexandria, Va.; Jan. 23, 2019. He worked as a research technician for 40 years, mostly at the National Institute of Mental Health. After retiring, he worked for the American Psychiatric Association. He was a member of the Society of Actuaries, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by a sister.

 

Apr, 2020
64

Mallory Hoover Decillis ’64, of Port Angeles, Wash.; Oct. 15, as a result of a stroke. She worked as an archaeological field excavator on the Ozette Indian Village at Cape Alava, Washington. After returning to school and acquiring a master’s degree from Antioch University in 1995, she worked in Port Angeles as a licensed mental health counselor until her retirement. She enjoyed kayaking and playing guitar. She is survived by her husband, Phil; sister Lee Truer ’75; and a brother.

Apr, 2020
64

Richard R. Rulon ’64, of Fort Washington, Pa.; Oct. 25. He obtained his JD from the University of Pennsylvania Law School and practiced immigration law for more than 30 years as a partner at Dechert, Price & Rhoads and later as a founding partner of the Klasko Immigration law firm. He served as commissioner for Upper Dublin Township, Pa., for several terms and ended his public service career as president of the board. He enjoyed skiing, fishing, and spending summers at the shore in Beach Haven, N.H., with family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; five daughters and sons-in-law; and 11 grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
64

John G. Lewis Jr. ’64, of Newton, Mass.; Oct. 8. He is survived by his wife, Jane; three sons and their spouses, including John G. Lewis III ’88; two stepchildren; and 12 grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
64

Bradford S. Gile ’64, of Belleville, Wisc.; Oct. 19. He continued his education at the University of Wisconsin­­-Madison in actuarial science and mathematics. He worked for American Family Insurance until retiring in 2005, when he resumed school to obtain his PhD. He was a fifth degree black belt in Shorin Ryu karate and mentored and instructed martial arts classes at the West Madison YMCA for 40 years. He enjoyed music and was an accomplished vocalist and trumpeter. He also enjoyed playing golf and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; two daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

Apr, 2020
64

Stephen W. Easton ’64, of Delmar, N.Y.; Nov. 27, after a long illness. He obtained his JD in 1972 from Albany Law School. He spent most of his career as a title attorney with the firm of Sneeringer Monahan Provost & Redgrave. He enjoyed sports and played amateur softball for many years. He also played golf up until the year before his death. He was an accomplished guitar and banjo player and enjoyed folk music. He also liked to read all types of literature. He was a member of Psi Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Diane; a daughter; three sons; six grandchildren; a sister; two brothers, including Albert ’60; and many nieces and nephews, including Nancy Easton ’86.

Apr, 2020
63

George W. Davidson III ’63, of Barrington, R.I.; Oct. 20. He was a veteran captain of the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Vietnam. He is survived by two sisters and eight nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
63

James L. Abernathy ’63, of New York City; Nov. 17, of complications related to the treatment of lymphoma. He held senior communications roles at ABC, CBS, and Warner Communications prior to founding Abernathy MacGregor in 1984, which grew to be a leading strategic and financial communications agency. Always willing to help those struggling with and recovering from alcoholism, and as director of The Caron Foundation, he helped to establish an alcohol and drug treatment program in the former Soviet Union in 1988 and in 1994 assisted in introducing that same program in Cuba. He also served as an overseer of the Brown University School of Medicine, a trustee emeritus of the Hackley School, a founder of Americans for Humanitarian Trade with Cuba, a member of the board of directors of The Caron Foundation, chairman of Caron New York, director of The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, and a former director of Episcopal Charities. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife, Kevin; three daughters, including Nell ’04, and their spouses; four grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
62

Harry F. Whiton ’62, of Norfolk, Va.; July 6. He was a mechanical engineer. He served on board the U.S.S. Traverse County and at Fleet Computer Programming Center. After naval service, he worked for several years in Ohio, then returned to Virginia. He is survived by three brothers, a sister-in-law, a nephew, and several cousins.

Apr, 2020
62

Peter H. Gould ’62, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Sept. 21, from a brain bleed. He earned a PhD from Georgetown in 1973 and a JD from the University of Virginia in 1979. After 29 years as general counsel at the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation writing briefs and representing the government before the Supreme Court, he retired in 2008. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was a national chess master. He is survived by a son and two brothers.

Apr, 2020
61

Theodore E. Tuck Jr. ’61, of Bowie, Md.; Nov. 6. He spent most of his career in the military, and later as a civilian in the U.S. Air Force as an agent of the Office of Special Investigations. He was the bass in the barbershop chorus The Bowie Knights of Harmony for more than 35 years and in later years took part in theater and choral productions in the Bowie area. He enjoyed reading and was a craftsman who enjoyed building things out of wood and metal. He is survived by his partner, Lynn Baldwin; two sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and three brothers.

 

Apr, 2020
61

Richard N. Tinker ’61, of Palm City, Fla.; Nov. 2. He was involved with his community and church. He served as a church verger and enjoyed playing golf, traveling, tai chi, painting and sketching. A former Jabberwock, he also enjoyed singing in church choirs. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a member of Kappa Sigma. He is survived by a daughter, a stepdaughter, two stepsons, six grandchildren, a brother, and a nephew.

Apr, 2020
61

Stephen G. Malek ’61, of Wolfeboro, N.H., formerly of Simsbury, Conn.; Oct. 19, of Parkinson’s disease. He was employed with Liberty Mutual in Boston and moved on to Travelers Insurance Company in Hartford. In 1989 he became the IT operations manager for the new Travelers Reinsurance Co. Following his 27-year career with Travelers, he retired to Wolfeboro and enjoyed reading, gardening, playing tennis, and social functions. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps, rising to the rank of captain. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, and six nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
61

Robert E. Gorman ’61, of Bolivia, N.C., formerly of Berlin, N.J.; Oct. 19. After retiring from working many years in life insurance and financial planning, he moved to North Carolina and became an adjunct professor at UNC Wilmington, where he taught leadership and management. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren and golfing. He is survived by his wife, Ann; four daughters; eight grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
60

Norman J. Pineault ’60, of Fernandina Beach, Fla.; Oct. 24. After graduating from Brown, he served in the U.S. Air Force and attained the rank of second lieutenant. Following his military service, he earned an MBA at Northeastern University and went on to work in the finance department at General Electric in Lynn, Mass. He retired in 1986 and in 2004 moved to Florida. He was involved with Respect Life Ministry and a supporter of the St. Gerard maternity home and Christian high school for unwed mothers. He was also council program director at Respect Life for two years. He is survived by his wife, Sandy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
59

Richard E. Nelson ’59, of Madison, Conn.; Oct. 25. He began his career at Dun & Bradstreet before becoming a commercial banker. He spent 25 years at Union Trust and five years at Webster Bank. While at Union Trust, he held numerous senior positions, including leading the bank’s commercial lending activities in the greater New Haven area. He was proud of his many civic and charitable involvements, including as president of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, board member of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, chair of the board of directors of the New Haven Chamber of Commerce, director of the Ronald McDonald House of southern New England, and president of the Brown University Club of New Haven. He enjoyed golfing and was an active competitor in recreational softball and basketball and a fan of the Boston Red Sox. He also liked gardening, especially at his summer home in Chatham, Mass. He is survived by three sons and their spouses, including Peter ’81; six grandsons; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
58

Robert J. Lawton ’58, of Fort Myers, Fla.; Oct. 23. He was an international corporate executive of 27 years in Latin America and Asia. He enjoyed jazz music and sports. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; six grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Apr, 2020
58

George D. Lamborn ’58, of Vero Beach, Fla.; July 17. He had a long career in the commodities industry. He served numerous financial organizations, among them the Chicago Board of Trade and New York Mercantile Exchanges, the NY Commodities Exchange, as well as markets in London and Asia. In 2005 he was inducted into the Futures Industry Hall of Fame. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, skiing, fishing, hunting, and traveling. He is survived by four children, a grandchild, a sister, and two former wives.

 

Apr, 2020
58

Richard S. Harrison ’58, of Warwick, R.I.; Oct. 20. He taught biology and biochemistry at Cranston East High School, retiring as director of guidance in 1990. He is survived by his wife, Rose; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
58

Jane W. Givens ’58, of Frederick, Md.; Nov. 9. She was a special education teacher for Montgomery County Public Schools for 18 years and continued to teach in Frederick County until 2017. She volunteered as a teacher of illiterate adults in the Montgomery County Literacy Council Program and in church educational programs, and for 23 years she was a leader of Recovery Inc., a self-help group for those suffering from nervous disorders. She liked animals, especially dogs, and supported many charities to help protect and care for them. She is survived by her husband, Robert; five children and their spouses; 14 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
57

Donald J. Rhine ’57, of Wilmington, N.C.; Nov. 1. He worked in various fields, including retail and real estate development. His positions took him to areas such as Mississippi, Texas, Ohio, and North Carolina. As a senior vice president for Family Dollar Stores, he conducted business in China, Hong Kong, Korea, and Vietnam. He and his wife created the Rhine Family Endowment for Jewish History at UNC Wilmington. He enjoyed fishing, reading, playing golf, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Rebecca; two daughters; a son; six grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
57

Barry Merkin ’57, of Chicago; Nov. 24. He was an entrepreneur and professor of management and strategy at Northwestern University Kellogg School of Management from 1993 to 2011. He was honored with the Supporter of Entrepreneurship as part of Ernst & Young’s 2000 Entrepreneur of the Year Awards. He was actively involved in the Young President’s Organization and is survived by his wife, Jasminka; daughter Beth Merkin ’81; a son; and three grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
57

Edward T. O’Dell ’57, of Westwood, Mass.; Oct. 7. After Brown, he went on to earn his law degree from the University of Chicago Law School and then worked for the Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C. In 1966, he moved to Boston and joined the law firm Goodwin Procter, becoming partner in 1970. He was instrumental in the founding of the firm’s investment management practice. He retired in 2000 and mentored young entrepreneurs by volunteering with the northeast chapter of SCORE. He enjoyed playing pool,cards, and traveling. He is survived by daughter Christine Harrington ’90 and her spouse Nathan Harrington ’90; a son and his fiancé; a daughter-in-law; and six grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
57

Jerome R. Hanley ’57, of Savannah, Ga., formerly of Albany, N.Y.; Oct. 11, after two years of battling complications from a stroke. He joined the faculty of Dartmouth College and then SUNY Albany as a professor of theater before retiring in 1996 to Savannah. He was involved in the works of the Empire Theater in Savannah and directed several productions at the Methodist Church. He was also an accomplished singer and enjoyed being a member of the church choirs in Albany and Savannah. A history buff with an interest in the Civil War, he spent years researching and visiting numerous historical sites. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Ann; three daughters and their spouses, including Kate Hanley Durand ’87 and son-in-law John Durand ’87; four grandchildren, including Laura Durand ’16; a sister; and three brothers.

 

Apr, 2020
56

Allen W. Whittmore ’56, of Boynton Beach, Fla.; Oct. 20. He is survived by his wife, Terry.

 

Apr, 2020
56

James H. Rogers III ’56, of Wareham, Mass., formerly of Castine, Me.; Oct. 5. He taught English at the Collegiate School in New York City for five years before attending Harvard to earn his master’s in education. Upon graduation, he accepted a position in Brown’s Admission Office, where he was later promoted to the director of admissions, a post he kept until 1988. During his tenure he was proud that Brown’s applicant pool was the highest amongst the Ivy League as reported by the New York Times in 1983. After leaving Brown, he and his wife moved to Italy, where he opened an educational consulting business called The Rogers Group International. He worked with families outside the U.S. as a private secondary school and college consultant. In 1993, he and his wife moved back to the U.S. and settled in Maine. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by three daughters, including Whitney Scholfield ’88 and Jessica Mellon ’93; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2020
56

Lewis W. Petterson Jr. ’56, of New York City; Oct. 30. He had a career in advertising. A longtime member and former president of the Amateur Comedy Club, he acted in and directed numerous productions. He enjoyed sailing, football, oil painting, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. He is survived by his companion, Hillary Ghertler; three daughters, including Lisa Petterson ’84; and seven grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
56

Deborah Shupert Nimick ’56, of Sarasota, Fla.; Nov. 18. After receiving her master’s degree in educational psychology from Duquesne University, she entered the professional world as an advocate for children, focusing her attention on testing and counseling. She was also a curriculum writer in the emerging field of game theory, the use of games to help youngsters understand how to overcome specific learning deficits. She is survived by her husband, George; three children; three grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

 

Apr, 2020
56

Alexandra “Sandy” McCain Morgan ’56, of Annapolis, formerly of Houston, Tex.; Nov. 6., of advanced mesothelioma. She ran the microbiology lab at the Fourth Ward Clinic in Houston. She was a longtime dedicated cancer research volunteer at MD Anderson Hospital and continued her volunteer research work at Johns Hopkins Oncology Center after moving to Maryland in 1990. She participated in sailing on the Galveston and Chesapeake bays and was an avid bridge player and member of The Book Club of Annapolis. She is survived by her mother, two daughters, a son, four grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
56

Janet Price Falsgraf ’56, of Tucson, Ariz.; July 5. She taught elementary school prior to starting a family. Once her children were born, she became deeply engaged in the social and civic life of her community. She served as president of the League of Women Voters of Cuyahoga County and executive director of the Criminal Justice Information Center. She traveled the world with her husband, visiting six continents. She is survived by her husband, Bill; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Apr, 2020
56

Thomas F. Dacey ’56, of Agawam, Mass.; Nov. 18. He worked at the Agawam Junior High School as a geography teacher for several years and then took a position as a guidance counselor at the middle school. He retired in 2005 after 42 years of service. He was a 44-year member of the Agawam Lion’s Club and served as its secretary for more than 20 years. He was also a member of the Brown Faculty Club and a veteran of the U.S. Army.

 

Apr, 2020
55

Robert D. Fitzgerald ’55, of Lake Forest, Ill.; Nov. 11. He was a banker and worked for the Harris Bank, the Continental Bank, and the Bank of America. He enjoyed traveling and being with his family. He is survived by his wife, Patty; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
55

Richard M. Beers ’55, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Oct. 21. He served as a U.S. Naval officer from 1956 to 1959 before moving to Rochester, N.Y. He worked as a Realtor at Red Barn Properties for more than 47 years and in 1971 was a founding member and EMT at Pittsford Volunteer Ambulance. He retired in 2019. He was an active Pittsford community member and is survived by his wife, Patsy; four children, including daughter Karen Frutiger ’79; 14 grandchildren; a great-grandson; five stepchildren; eight step-grandchildren; and a step-great-grandson.

 

Apr, 2020
54

Robert A. Seligson ’54, of Oakland, Calif.; Nov. 24. After graduation from the Boalt Hall School of Law at UC Berkeley, he embarked on a law career that spanned more than three decades. He worked for the San Francisco law firm Bledsoe, Smith, Cathcart, Johnson & Rogers for 15 years, becoming a partner in 1963. In 1973, he opened his own law practice in San Francisco and specialized in insurance law and appellate work, and he taught both of those subjects at UC Hastings College of the Law. He served on a variety of committees and boards with the San Francisco and California State Bar associations and retired early to travel with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; three children; six grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

 

Apr, 2020
54

George Monteiro ’54, ’64 PhD, of Windham, Conn.; Nov. 5. He taught American literature at Brown for 42 years, retiring in 1998. He authored more than 30 books and hundreds of articles on American and Portuguese literature and culture and was an accomplished poet. He was knighted by the Portuguese Government with the Order of Prince Henry the Navigator for distinguished contributions to the study and dissemination of Portuguese culture. He was an avid supporter of the UConn women’s basketball team and a fan of both the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees. He is survived by his wife, Brenda Murphy ’75 PhD; two daughters; son Stephen ’90;
three grandsons; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1954, GS Class of 1964
Apr, 2020
54

Elton P. Katz ’54, of West Hartford, Conn.; Nov. 19. He earned a PhD at MIT focusing on physical chemistry and received an appointment at Harvard University as research associate in biological chemistry in the department of orthopedic surgery. This was followed by a two-year sabbatical in Israel at the Weizmann Institute of Science. He ended his career as a professor in UConn’s department of biostructure and function. He was an expert in the use of x-ray crystallography as a means to understand the molecular structure of connective tissue with a special interest in collagen. He was an avid sailor, having spent many summers sailing from Rhode Island to Maine and Canada. He played basketball for Brown and enjoyed hiking, swimming, tennis, and biking. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Rosalind; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; two stepsons and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and a sister-in-law.

 

Apr, 2020
54

Bruce H. Hunt ’54, of Marshfield, Mass., formerly of Skiathos, Greece; Oct. 9. After graduating, he served two years in the U.S. Navy, then took a position as a social studies teacher at Northport High School on Long Island, N.Y., beginning a 38-year career as an educator. During his tenure he helped design and implement unique classes and novel teaching methods. During the 1960s he was an active civil rights leader, head of the Fair Housing Association of Huntington, N.Y., and chair of the Huntington Human Relations Committee. He went to Alabama to march with Dr. Martin Luther King from Selma to Montgomery. In 1970 he took his family to Greece, where he taught at the American Community Schools for six years. After retiring from Northport High School, he took positions at the American Embassy School in Damascus, Syria, and lived there for five years. In 1998 he permanently retired and moved to Skiathos, living there for 16 years. In 2014 he moved back to the U.S. and enjoyed time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Marcia Pickering Hunt ’55; a daughter and her husband; two sons and their spouses, including Peter ’84; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; brother Albert ’50; and many nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2020
54

Stephen F. Honan ’54, of Concord, Mass.; Oct. 30. His career centered around publishing and book manufacturing as a senior account manager for the Banta Corp., now known as RR Donnelley. He was a member of Book Builders of Boston and a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed reading, birdwatching, astronomy, and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Frances; four children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a sister, Ann Rodrigues ’66; and a brother.

Apr, 2020
54

Arthur Hacking Jr. ’54, of Milton, Mass.; Sept. 29. He was a retired architect. Much of his work was in the biomedical community helping to build functional patient care, administrative, and research spaces at such places as Lahey Clinic and Brigham & Women’s Hospital of Harvard Medical School. He was also a trusted adviser in Boston for more than 30 years. He is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020
54

Elizabeth Kelly Dudley ’54, of Chaska, Minn.; Nov. 18. She resided in several states before retiring to Minnesota. Over the course of her career, she was employed as secretary to the vice president and legal counsel of Bridgeport Brass of Bridgeport, Conn. and as the secretary to the vice president and treasurer of American Water Works in Philadelphia, and later was active with Welcome Wagon in Minnesota. She enjoyed playing duplicate bridge, golf, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Dana Dudley ’54; a daughter and son-in-law; three grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
54

John L. Dodge ’54, of Charlottesville, Va.; Oct. 28. He joined Habitat for Humanity and started the HFH store. He later became a director and then served as chair of the board of directors for many years. He is survived by his wife, Anne Peasley Dodge ’65; three children; and a stepdaughter.

Apr, 2020
53

Jane Wilderson Yount ’53, of Nashville, formerly of Oak Ridge, Tenn.; Nov. 18. She taught speech therapy and was on the board of the Daniel Arthur Rehabilitation Center in Oak Ridge and the Webb School of Knoxville. She enjoyed traveling with her family and writing poems that she would send to nursing homes and care facilities and VA Hospitals in Tennessee. She is survived by three daughters, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Stanley E. Pratt ’53, of Wellesley, Mass.; Nov. 25. He worked for the Boston office of W.E. Hutton & Co. before developing several successful startups. His first company was Diversified Corporate Services. He later formed State Street Leasing. In 1986 he cofounded Abbott Capital Management, a private equity portfolio construction and management company for institutional investors. For several years he published a trade publication, Venture Economics Journal, for and about venture capitalists and their growing world. Along with the Journal, he published several books about the industry, including the annual Pratt's Guide to Venture Capital Sources. In 2005 he was inducted into the Private Equity Hall of Fame for his work on behalf of the venture capital industry. During the Korean War he served aboard the U.S.S. Saufley as a communications officer and later attended Fleet Training School at Guantanamo Bay, where he served as a ship inspector. He is survived by his wife, Maryanne Thomas Pratt ’55; four children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Janice Swanson Post ’53, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Dec. 17, of complications following hip replacement surgery. She worked in Brown’s biology department for four years before moving to Massachusetts and becoming a stay-at-home mother. She later worked part-time for a company that did convention planning for groups coming to the Boston area, eventually becoming treasurer of the company. She took classes in tailoring, upholstery, and hat making and was involved in her church in Belmont, Mass. She also served as vice president and president of her Brown class and was a member of VASA, a Swedish society, and P.E.O. Sisterhood. She retired to Saunderstown and was treasurer of the Willett Free Library. She enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, Arthur; three daughters and their spouses, including Martha Gale ’83; six grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Robert L. Noddin ’53, of Osterville, Mass.; Nov. 17. Under the NROTC program at Brown he was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy. In the mid-1950s he was transferred to the Naval Reserves and then joined JP Morgan as a financial analyst. In 1961 he joined J&W Seligman as a senior utility analyst. During his years at Seligman he advanced to the ranks of vice president and chief planning officer. In 1982 he left New York for Boston and joined Venture Capital. In 1992 he and his wife settled on the Cape in Osterville and he continued to provide pro bono services to emerging companies. He was a member of the International Association of Financial Planners and of both the New York Society of Securities Analysts and the Boston Security Analysts Society. He is survived by three children and their spouses, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, a sister, and a nephew.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Theodore J. Metzger ’53, of New Paltz, N.Y., formerly of New York City; Nov. 9. After earning a master’s degree from NYU, he began working as a writer/producer for ABC and CBS network news. Later in life he started a second career as a caseworker for the New York City Department of Social Services, caring for older New Yorkers who lived by themselves. He retired and moved to New Paltz. He is survived by a daughter, a son, three grandsons, and his former wife, Nancy Van Laan.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Joan Webster McSherry ’53, of Needham, Mass., formerly of Charleston, S.C.; Oct. 30. She worked in research at the Harvard School of Public Health before marrying. She moved several times with her family and settled in Charleston in 1989. There she was honored with the JV Nichols award for her volunteer work with the Coastal Crisis Chaplaincy, providing support for individuals who have lost a loved one due to a tragic death. She enjoyed painting, needlework, interior design, and traveling. She especially liked summering at Periwinkle on Chapoquoit Island, Mass. She is survived by four sons and their spouses, including Peter ’78; 11 grandchildren; a brother, Gordon Webster ’54, and his wife Joan Edgley Webster ’58; and two nieces, including Alison Webster ’83.

 

Apr, 2020
53

Gloria Villany Holland ’53, of Lexington, Mass.; Oct. 28.

 

Apr, 2020
52

 Allen D. Haight ’52, of Hilton Head Island, S.C., formerly of Darien, Conn.; Oct. 23. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War before obtaining his MBA from Harvard in 1961. While living in Connecticut, he purchased Richard Dudgeon, Inc., in 1969 and the family-owned company continues today manufacturing hydraulic jacks and pumps for lifting buildings and bridges. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
51

Theodore A. Lobsenz ’51, of Round Rock, Tex.; Nov. 16. After his graduation from law school, he served in the U.S. Air Force. A career in commercial real estate followed, but his real loves were his family; serving the Barnert Temple of Franklin Lakes, N.J., in a host of capacities; repairing and building almost anything; gardening; current events; and playing duplicate bridge. He is survived by his wife, Janet; three children and their spouses, including Jim Lobsenz ’87; and seven grandchildren, including Josh Lobsenz ’24.

Apr, 2020
50

Richard H. Moody ’50, of Andover, Mass.; Nov. 11. As an entrepreneur, he built textile, computer hardware, and rubber recycling facilities. In later years he worked with his wife in real estate for 19 years. He enjoyed all Andover had to offer and his mountain retreat in Rangeley, Me. During World War II he served in the U.S. Merchant Marines. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; five children, including Meredith Moody ’77, Heather Moody ’78, Janice Moody Holden ’83, and Richard ’81; 12 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
50

Harvey Lapides ’50, of Barrington, R.I.; Nov. 23. He was the cofounder of Harvey Ltd., a men’s haberdashery in Providence, for more than 50 years. He enjoyed sports, family, and friends. He is survived by three children and their spouses, six grandchildren, three brothers, and nieces and nephews, including Beth Lapides ’78 and Michael Lapides ’91.

 

Apr, 2020
50

Donald W. Harrison ’50, of Fairfield, Conn.; Mar. 4, 2019. He was the former president and owner of Connecticut Distributors, Inc., of Stratford, Conn., from 1960 until he sold the company in 1986. He served on the board of Lafayette Bank and Trust for 27 years and was a recipient of the Man of the Year award from the Connecticut State Package Store Assoc. He was an accomplished songwriter and advertising jingle writer and a member of the men’s singing group The Hoot Owls. He is survived by a daughter and a son.

 

Apr, 2020
50

Robert W. Finlay ’50, of Akron, Ohio; Nov. 7. He had a 39-year career at Goodyear, which moved him throughout the U.S. with his family until settling in Akron, where he became the marketing manager for auto tires for the U.S. He enjoyed yearly family vacations to Cape Cod, the Cayman Islands, and Sanibel Island. He was a U.S. Army World War II veteran. He is survived by his wife, Georgine; two sons and their spouses, including Brad ’76; eight grandchildren; and 17 great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2020
50

Nathan S. Ellis III ’50, of Falmouth, Mass., and Mocksville, N.C.; Oct. 18, after a brief illness. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and the National Guard and graduating from Brown, he worked   for the Massachusetts Department of Public Works as commissioner for the city of New Bedford from 1950 to 1956 and then as water superintendent from 1956 to 1963. From 1963 to 1983 he worked for the Department of Public Works for the city of Falmouth. He later worked as a manager of the Mashpee Water District and retired in 1998 as a disaster assistant engineer for FEMA. He served as a director and president of the Barnstable County Agricultural Society and a director of Oak Grove Cemetery, was a 70-year member of Falmouth Rod & Gun Club, and was a Mason and a Shriner. He enjoyed fishing, hunting, gardening, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Vivian; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepson; six grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
50

Susanne Day ’50, of Westerly, R.I.; Oct. 27, after a brief illness. She had a long career working as a sales executive for Trans World Airlines. In retirement, she enjoyed gardening and traveling. She is survived by a sister, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020
49

Marilyn Silverman Ehrenhaus ’49, of Providence, formerly of Fall River, Mass.; Nov. 11. She taught school in Fall River and worked in the family business with her husband. She was twice president of the Fall River Chapter of Hadassah, she was on the board of directors of the Ninth Street Day Nursery, and she volunteered for the Fall River Food Pantry, in addition to being an active member of the Pembroke/Brown class. She enjoyed spending time at the beach with her family, solving crossword puzzles, traveling, and writing skits that she and her friend performed for years on New Year’s Eve. She is survived by three daughters, including Ellen Ehrenhaus Pasch ’78; two sons-in-law; eight grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
49

Anthony D’Antuono ’49, of Naples, Fla.; Oct. 17. He was a high school principal in Cohasset, Mass. He later moved to Brockton, Mass., and was superintendent of public schools for many years. He followed that position by moving to Falmouth, Mass., to work as superintendent of the Sandwich/Mashpee public schools. He began wintering in Naples in 1979 before moving permanently in 1986. After retiring, he accredited colleges and universities for the government and eventually ended his long educational career by becoming a founder of Schiller International University in Dunedin, Fla. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
49

Shirley Gfroerer Buck ’49, of Bedford, Mass., formerly of Lexington, Mass.; Oct. 25. She was a former writer for the Lexington Minuteman. She is survived by a daughter and a son and their spouses, two grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
49

Eloise Fleischer Pollack ’49, of Coconut Creek, Fla., and White Plains, N.Y.; Aug. 21, after a short illness. She is survived by three children and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
49

Charles H. Keenoy ’49, of Hackettstown, N.J.; Nov. 25. His education was interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, for which he received the Bronze Star and citations. He returned to Brown and upon graduation worked as a sales executive with McCall’s Corp. He lived in New Jersey, North Carolina, Vermont, and Massachusetts. He volunteered with Meals on Wheels, was a past member of the board of directors of Latham Centers (Mass.), and worked with the Governor’s Commission in Vermont for the employment of individuals with disabilities. He enjoyed baseball, football, listening to jazz and classical music, attending grandchildren’s sporting events, and building dollhouses for his grandchildren. He is survived by seven children and their spouses; 13 grandchildren and their spouses; two step-grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Apr, 2020
48

Robert C. Spencer ’48, of Burnt Hills, N.Y.; Oct. 19. After serving in the U.S. Navy and graduating from Brown and Columbia University with a master’s degree in mechanical engineering, he joined General Electric Co. He held various engineering and management positions at GE for his entire professional career, retiring in 1987. He participated in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and was elected a Fellow in 1976. He co-authored a groundbreaking paper in 1963 providing a method for predicting the performance of steam generators and participated in the development and authorship of the ASME steam tables, for which he received the George Westinghouse Gold Medal in 1987. He was a member of the Adirondack Mountain Club and enjoyed whitewater canoeing, camping, mountain climbing, Sunfish sailing on area lakes, and sculling on the Mohawk. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
48

Leon D. Sadow ’48, of Plymouth, Mass., formerly of New Bedford, Mass., and West Palm Beach, Fla.; Oct. 29. After serving in the U.S. Navy and graduating from Brown, he was the proprietor of Sadow’s Clothing Store in New Bedford. He enjoyed playing bridge and became a Life Master in 2018. He is survived by his wife, Alma; two daughters and their spouses, including Debra Koenig ’75; son Richard ’83 and his spouse; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
48

Robert H. Rothman ’48, of Providence; Nov. 4. After serving in the U.S. Army for two years, he returned to Brown and, after graduating, joined his father’s jewelry manufacturing business, the Charles Rothman Co. He was actively involved in community projects and associations, including as past master of Redwood Masonic Lodge, past president of Providence Radio Association, and chair of the board of the Roger Williams Medical Center. He obtained a private pilot license and flew for 50 years, visiting 26 countries. He is survived by his wife, Janis; two daughters and their spouses; son William ’73 and his wife; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
 

 

Apr, 2020
48

Lucille Pieri Martin ’48, of Cumberland, R.I.; Sept. 15. She served on the Cumberland Conservation Commission for more than 30 years, was a member of the Cumberland Garden Club, and was a charter member of Abbott Run Valley Club. She is survived by two daughters, two sons, six grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
48

Earl M. Bucci ’48, of Schenectady, N.Y.; Oct. 10, after a brief illness. An Eagle Scout, he was scoutmaster of Troop 523 in Manhattan for three years and worked at the New York Times before entering law school. He maintained his own law offices as a practicing attorney for more than 50 years. He served as associate counsel to the president pro tempore of the New York Senate and routinely volunteered his talents as chair of the committee for the administration and distribution of decedents’ estates for the American Bar Association, as a member of the executive committee of the Trusts and Estates Section of the New York State Bar Association, as president of the Estate Planning Council of Eastern New York, and, by appointment of the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, on the Committee on Character and Fitness. He was committed to civic engagement, serving as president of the boards of Schenectady’s Symphony Orchestra Association and its Senior Citizens Center, and as president of the Brown University Club of northeastern New York. He was an honorary life member of The Nature Conservancy for his gift of 100 acres in Adirondack Park and a member of Beta Theta Pi. He is survived by his son Michael ’78, two daughters and six grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
46

James M. Stewart ’46, of New York City; Nov. 11, from Alzheimer’s. He had a long career in the advertising industry before embarking on a global banking career. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. In retirement he enjoyed gardening. He is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, grandchildren, a sister-in-law, a niece, and a nephew.

 

Apr, 2020
46

Elizabeth Roby Manners ’46, of Clinton, Conn.; Oct. 22. She taught kindergarten and elementary school art in Meriden, Conn. At the end of World War II, she traveled to Paris to take care of children orphaned by the war. She married in 1949 and moved to Omaha, Nebraska, where she and her husband founded Countryside Community Church. They moved back to Connecticut in 1959. She enjoyed being both a mother and a pastor’s wife and later taught at the Mandana Armstrong Nursery School, eventually becoming its director. She moved to Clinton in 1985 and was active in the First Congregational Church of Westbrook. She and her husband founded a nonprofit called The American Friends of the Asian Rural Institute to support mission work. She enjoyed camping, boating, sketching, painting, traveling, and volunteering. She is survived by four children, five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
45

Leonard S. Michelman ’45, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Springfield, Mass.; Nov. 10. After graduating from Boston University Law School, he practiced law in Springfield until his retirement in 2011. During World War II he served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a radio transmitter technician and was awarded a Battle Star. A member of the Hampden County and Massachusetts bar associations, he was also a lifelong member of Congregation Kodimoh and served on its board of trustees. He was a past chairman of the Hartford-Springfield Israel Bond Committee, a board member of the Springfield Jewish Federation, a member of B’nai B’rith, the Jewish War Veterans, and the Jewish Geriatric Services, and served as the commander of the Longmeadow Post of the American Legion. He was a competitive bridge player and obtained the title of American Contract Bridge League Life Master. An avid golfer, he was a member and past secretary of Crestview Country Club and Boca Lago Country Club. He is survived by a daughter; two sons and their spouses, including son Eric ’80; and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
45

Leon S. Mass ’45, of Providence; June 4. His entire career was spent at Hasbro, where he retired as senior vice president of operations. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed traveling and playing golf. He is survived by three daughters; a son; son-in-law Bill Fink ’67; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; a sister; and a sister-in-law.

 

Apr, 2020
44

Mary Manton Lesperance ’44, of Warwick, R.I., formerly of Pawtucket, R.I.; Oct. 17. She was an elementary school teacher in the Pawtucket school system for many years until retiring in 1982. She enjoyed knitting, reading, and traveling and was an avid fan of the Boston Red Sox and the New England Patriots. She is survived by a daughter; two sons; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
43

Phyllis Grossman Spear ’43, of Clearwater, Fla.; June 22.

 

Apr, 2020
43

Sybil Pilshaw Gladstone ’43, of Dedham, Mass.; Nov. 27. She was an English teacher in Marlborough, Mass., before becoming a journalist for the Boston Traveler. After earning a master’s degree in counseling, she worked as a guidance counselor at Thurston Junior High School in Westwood, Mass. She continued her education by taking courses at Boston University, Brandeis, and the Museum of Fine Arts. She volunteered at the Women’s Lunch Place, tutored immigrants through Literacy Volunteers of America, served domestic violence survivors at Second Step in Newtonville, and helped launch Newton’s Child Assault Prevention Program. She also launched the Family Table food collection program. As a founding member of Temple Shalom of Newton, she served on the Temple’s PTA and board of trustees and on the committees for Cantor Search, Social Action, Caring Community, and Religious Practices. She thoroughly enjoyed helping people any way she could. She is survived by three children, including daughter Susie Schub ’76 and son-in-law Barry Schub ’76; six grandchildren, including grandsons Robert Schub ’06 and Jeffrey Schub ’07; and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
42

Robert M. Wood ’42, of Easton, Md.; Sept. 20. During his time at Brown he received a commission to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He served in the army during World War II and was recalled for the Korean War, during which he was assigned to the general staff at West Point. In 1954 he began his civilian career in finance and utilities, working in Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C. He remained in the army reserves and retired in the 1970s with a rank of lieutenant colonel. An avid sailor, he taught midshipmen sailing fundamentals as a coach in the U. S. Naval Academy’s Sailing Squadron program. He is survived by a daughter; two sons, including Robert Jr. ’81; six grandchildren; and 10 great-
grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020
39

Mildred Carleen Hulse ’39, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Dec. 3 at the age of 102. She graduated from Pembroke Phi Beta Kappa and continued her education at Mt. Holyoke College, where she received her master’s degree. She worked as a laboratory research assistant at Harvard Medical School and later worked as a biochemist researcher at NYU Medical Center until her retirement at age 72. She is survived by four children, four grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 86
Bye, Felicia
Suzanne Whang ’86 ScM found the humor in everything, even if it killed her
Read More
Suzanne Whang ’86 ScM photo doing standup comedy
Jan, 2020
FAC

R. Douglas Cope, of Woonsocket, R.I.; Oct. 6. He taught at the University of Oregon and the University of Miami before arriving at
Brown in 1988. He was taught courses on colonial Latin America, the early modern Atlantic world, Mexico, and Guatemala. His book The Limits of Racial Domination:
Plebeian Society in Colonial Mexico City,1660-1720
, received honorable mention forthe Herbert E. Bolton Prize for the best book in Latin American Studies. He was also a recipient of the William G. McLoughlin Award for Teaching Excellence in the Social Sciences from Brown. He spoke several languages and enjoyed baseball, music, reading and traveling. He is survived by three sisters, brothers-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2020
GS 75

Pierre Perrolle ’75 PhD, of Takoma Park, Md.; Aug. 27, after a long illness.  The majority of his career was spent in the senior executive service with the National Science Foundation. He held assignments at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and at the U.S. Diplomatic Mission in Beijing. In retirement he volunteered with Historic Takoma. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Lois; daughter Jeanette Offenbacher ’90; a son; and four grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 72

David M. Goodblatt ’72 PhD, of La Jolla, Calif.; Sept. 25, in a pedestrian accident. He taught at the University of Haifa in Israel and the University of Maryland before moving to an endowed chair in Judaic Studies at UC San Diego, where he spent the remainder of his career. He retired in 2017.  His books include Rabbinic Instruction in Sasanian Babylonia, The Monarchic Principle: Studies in Jewish Self-Government in Antiquity, and Elements of Ancient Jewish Nationalism. He also made important contributions to the Cambridge History of Judaism and wrote numerous articles. He was an elected member of the American Academy for Jewish Research. He is survived by his wife, Sasona; three children; a granddaughter; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 68

Renata M. Sharan-Olearchyk ’68 AM, of Cherry Hill, N.J.; Sept. 14. She was a professor of sociology at Marywood College in Scranton, Pa. After marrying, she moved several times before settling in Cherry Hill, where she assisted her husband’s growing medical practice. She was proud of her Ukrainian heritage and became a member of the CYM (Ukrainian Youth Assoc.). She taught at the Ukrainian School in Jenkintown, Pa., and worked as an instructor at CYM summer camps for many years. She enjoyed trips back to her ancestral homeland and taking care of her family members. She is survived by her husband, Andrew Olearchyk; three children and their spouses; and 10 grandchildren.
 

 

Jan, 2020
GS 66

James B. Jamieson ’66 PhD, of San Luis Obispo, Calif.; Sept. 18. He began working at Pitzer College as an associate professor in 1968 and left in 1983 as vice president to serve as vice president of Claremont McKenna College. He held that position until 1987. After moving to San Luis Obispo, he became the executive director for the Performing Arts Center at Cal Poly, where he was instrumental in raising funds to build a performing arts center on the Cal Poly University campus. He retired in 1995. He enjoyed restoring automobiles, playing tennis, writing humorous short stories, and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Perry; two sons; two grandsons; four step-granddaughters; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2020
GS 64

Norma Cassell Thomas ’64 MAT, of West Richland, Wash.; Aug. 18, after a long battle with dementia. She enjoyed a variety of jobs throughout her life, including teaching high school math, selling real estate, doing taxes, and secretarial work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. She also enjoyed knitting, quilting, reading, and bird watching. Along with her husband, she traveled to various locations to view interesting birds and various cultures and environments. She is survived by her husband, Montcalm Thomas ’66 PhD; a daughter; two grandsons; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2020
GS 63

Richard H. Robillard ’63 PhD, of Boucherville, Quebec, Canada; Aug. 29. For 30 years he was a professor of American Literature at the University of Montreal. Following his retirement, he pursued his interest in the study of Biblical Greek and Latin to more fully analyze the translations and interpretations of the New Testament. He enjoyed hiking, mountain biking, skiing, and playing cribbage. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three children; and two grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 63

Earl G. Alexander ’63 PhD, of Amarillo, Tex.; Aug. 28. He joined the technical staff of Texas Instruments in Dallas, where he was employed in the area of research and development in semiconductor devices. In 1975, he and his family moved to Hawaii and became involved in Youth with a Mission. That was followed with a move to Texas in 1978, where he was employed by Arrowhead Mills, a whole foods company. In 1984, he returned to Youth with a Mission and moved to Guatemala, Central America. There he directed a bilingual school of evangelism and oversaw a mercy ministries team. In 1988, he returned to Texas and worked for General Dynamics until his retirement in 2003. He enjoyed singing in the Schola Cantorum of Texas chorus. He also enjoyed gardening and became a certified master gardener and was a member of both the Tarrant County and Randall County master gardeners associations. He is survived by his wife, Olive Jeanfreau Alexander ’60; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; 10 grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.   

 

Jan, 2020
GS 60

Chuan “Tony” Chen ’60 PhD, of Tucson, Ariz.; Aug. 17. He worked at Hydronautics, Inc. in Laurel, Md., before embarking on a 50-year academic career. He spent 17 years at Rutgers University, where he was chairman of the department of mechanical & aerospace engineering. In the summer of 1968, he was a fellow at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.  In 1980 he moved to Tucson and was head of the department of aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Arizona from 1980 to 1989. He became professor emeritus in 2002. He was an internationally recognized scientist in fluid dynamics; he published numerous scientific articles; he gave several seminars and lectures at universities and institutions across North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia; and he chaired multiple national and international conferences. He was a senior visiting fellow at the University of Cambridge, England; a visiting fellow at Australian National University; a visiting scientist at the Institut für Angewandte in Germany; and director of the Fluid Dynamics and Hydraulics Program at the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. He enjoyed building model ships and planes with his sons, hiking, swimming, listening to classical music, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Frances; three sons; seven grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 58

Irwin H. Polishook ’58 AM, of Teaneck, N.J.; Sept. 15. He began his teaching career at Hunter College in September 1961 and continued at Lehman College. He authored numerous articles and published two books: Roger Williams, John Cotton, and Religious Freedom: A Controversy in New and Old England and Rhode Island and the Union 1774-1795. He cofounded the Professional Staff Congress, the faculty union for CUNY, and served as its president from 1976 to 2000. He was a vice president of the American Federation of Teachers, chair for the AFT Higher Education Program and Policy Council, member of the executive committee and board of directors of the New York State United Teachers, and an officer of the American Association of University Professors. He was also an active member and former trustee of Temple Emeth in Teaneck. He is survived by his wife, Sheila; son Lewis ’92; a daughter-in-law; and two granddaughters.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 55

Kurt Mueller-Vollmer ’55 AM, of Stanford, Calif.; Aug. 3. He was a Stanford University professor emeritus of German studies and humanities. He retired in 1995 and continued to publish, advise students, give lectures, and hold seminars. He also held guest professorships, seminars, and lectures at various American and German universities, including UC Berkeley and the University of Goettingen, Germany. He was the recipient of the 2000 Commander’s Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and the 2007 Wilhelm-von-Humboldt Foundation Award. He is survived by his wife, Patricia, and two sons.

 

Jan, 2020
GS 51

John G. Mavroides ’51 ScM, ’53 PhD, of Okeechobee, Fla., formerly of Lexington, Mass.; Oct. 3. Before attending Brown, he  served in the U.S. Navy, followed by a position at the U.S. Navy underwater sound laboratory in New London, Conn. as project engineer in the development of electro-acoustical devices for the detection of submarines and in the development of an underwater telephone. After graduating from Brown, he joined the research staff at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, where he spent 32 years doing research on solid state materials. He published more than 50 articles and presented his work at numerous conferences and lectures, both nationally and internationally. He was a founding member of the St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Lexington and served on the first parish council. He is survived by two sons and their spouses, nine grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jan, 2020
12

Alexander J. Jacobs ’12, of Dana Point, Calif.; Aug. 21. At the time of his death, he was three weeks shy of completing the Luthier Program at the Musicians Institute of Hollywood. He worked providing in-home behavioral therapy to autistic children before changing his career path. He is survived by his parents and numerous family members.

 

Jan, 2020
92

Robert J. Greer ’92, ’96 MD, of LaGrange, Ga.; Oct. 7, after a lengthy battle with cancer. He began his medical practice at St. Luke’s Hospital in Missouri. In 2006 he moved his family to LaGrange and continued to practice neurology until his health would no longer allow him to continue. He is survived by his wife, Liz; a daughter; a son; his mother; and two sisters.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1992, MD Class of 1996
Jan, 2020
89

David L. Swanson ’89, of Durham, N.C.; Sept. 2, of cardiac arrest while hiking Roan Mountain. He hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and trails around the country and the world. For the past 25 years he worked as an investment advisor with his father. He worked to improve health care in developing countries, especially in Africa, and he fought for racial and economic justice. He enjoyed writing prose and poetry and songs and also spending time with family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two children; his father; a sister; two brothers; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020
88

Nicholas Matarangas ’88, of San Jose, Calif., formerly of Seattle; Sept. 3, of cancer. After being inducted into Bellarmine College Prep’s Hall of Fame, he went on to play water polo at Brown and achieved All-American status. He worked for the U.S. Government regulating tuna fishing laws in South America before returning to school to earn a JD in environmental law at Lewis and Clark Law School in Portland, Ore. He was diagnosed with cancer in 2012 and subsequently retired from law and went on to earn teaching credentials and become a biology teacher at Gilroy High School. Over the course of his career he studied Tribal Law in Cape Town, South Africa and International Law in London, England. He was an avid reader and enjoyed traveling the world, hiking, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a daughter; two sons; his father and stepmother; three brothers; and seven nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2020
81

Christopher E. Stenberg ’81, of East Providence; Sept. 14. For many years he was the owner of New England Research Associates, a private investigation firm, and more recently, he was a freelance editor for screenplays. He enjoyed good conversation, reading, trivia, and making lists. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a son-in-law, and his brother Kurt ’83.

 

Jan, 2020
81

Francis G. Hale IV ’81, of Gulfport, Fla., formerly of Portland, Me.; Aug. 5, after a brief illness. He taught religion and chemistry and coached a state championship soccer team for several years at Bishop Cheverus High School in Portland. He also spent time teaching and coaching in Belize. He had a passion for the theater and received awards for designing sets and lighting for numerous high school and community productions in Maine, as well as in Florida. He also obtained the rank of Eagle Scout. He is survived by five siblings and their spouses, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020
81

Laura Cutler Aoki ’81, of Fukuoka, Japan; Sept. 29, of ovarian cancer. She moved to Japan in 1983 and taught English at the university level. She was involved with Buddhism and engrossed with Japanese culture. She enjoyed coming to the U.S. nearly every year to catch up with family and friends and eat the American food unavailable to her in Japan. She was an avid reader. She is survived by her husband, Jiro Aoki; her father John H. Cutler ’56 and stepmother; three brothers, including Jeffry Cutler ’86; and two stepsisters.

 

Jan, 2020
79

Jean-Francois Hibbert ’79, of New York City; Sept. 1. He was an emergency medicine physician. He enjoyed playing tennis, skiing, and cycling. He is survived by his wife, Jocelyne; two daughters; a son-in-law; his mother; and seven siblings.

 

Jan, 2020
78

Edwin L. Gaskin ’78, of Bowie, Md.; Aug. 22. He is survived by his wife, Kindra.

 

Jan, 2020
76

Charles F. Wochomurka III ’76, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Franklin, Tenn.; July 28. After graduating, he went to work for his family’s button business. He then went on to work for more than 20 years at Cummins Engine Co. in various roles spanning several states. He was strong in his Catholic faith and active in parishes where he lived. He enjoyed sports, both professional and local. He is survived by his wife, Jayne; three sons; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.  

 

Jan, 2020
75

Philip A. Mousin ’75 of Teaneck, N.J.; Aug. 2, of pancreatic cancer. He was an executive director for JP Morgan Chase bank. An accomplished runner, he was a former member of the Warren Street Running Club and the Atlanta Track Club. He also served on the board of the Bacchanalia String Orchestra in New York City for many years. He is survived by his wife, Christine; a daughter; two sons; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Jan, 2020
73

Ruth Kissin Helman ’73, of New York City; Oct. 2. She spent 40 years teaching history and literature at the Brearley School. She enjoyed classical music and traveling.

 

Jan, 2020
73

Kevin Hart ’73, of Oak Island, N.C.; Aug. 1, as a result of an automobile accident. He was a retired director of Putnam Northern Westchester Board of Cooperative Education Services. He received national recognition by the Ford Foundation for his innovative work linking the business and educational communities. He later worked at Cape Fear Community College in North Carolina. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; a daughter; a son; and brother Gerald ’71.

 

Jan, 2020
72

James J. Hughes ’72, of Brielle, N.J., formerly of New York City; Sept. 17. He received his MBA from NYU and worked on Wall Street before transitioning to the FDIC, where he worked for many years. In retirement he served as a civil mediator at the Monmouth and Ocean County courthouses. He was a member of Brown’s football team. He is survived by his wife, Angela; two sons; a stepdaughter; two sisters; and a brother-in-law.

 

Jan, 2020
71

Andrew J. Black ’71, of Millbrook, N.Y.; Aug. 27. Shortly after graduating, he joined the Bilous family real estate business in Queens, N.Y. and remained there until his retirement in 2002. He was an active participant in the Millbrook community and enjoyed traveling the world and attending the theater in Manhattan. He also enjoyed military history and making annual pilgrimages to Pennsylvania to play “war games,” which went on for days.

 

Jan, 2020
69

George W. Muller Jr. ’69, of Crofton, Md.; Sept. 18, of a cardiac arrest. He obtained his master’s degree in English from URI and pursued doctoral studies in English at Indiana Univ. He retired after 30 years of service with the federal government as an information technology professional. He is survived by his wife, Delice Richards; a son; his mother; four siblings; and five nieces and nephews.   

 

Jan, 2020
68

John S. Satterthwaite ’68, of Spokane, Wash.; Aug. 1, from pancreatic cancer. For 25 years he served in the military before changing careers and entering the financial world. After Officer Training School and pilot training school, he was assigned to train other pilots at Vance AFB (Okla.). He then was stationed at Lackland AFB (Tex.), where he was a supersonic jet trainer. Following that assignment, he was sent to George AFB (Calif.) to serve as a security forces officer that specialized in air base defense. Eventually he was stationed at Dover AFB (Del.), where he flew the largest cargo airplane at that time. In 1981 he and his family moved overseas to Ankara, Turkey to serve at Balgot AFB. In 1983, he returned to the U.S. at Randolph AFB (Tex.) and instructed again. His final assignment led him to Scott AFB (Ill.), where he served as Commander HQ Section Air Mobility Command, then Commandant for the Airlift Operations School, and finally as Deputy Branch Chief AMC Acquisitions for the C-17. He retired in 1993 as a lieutenant colonel. He moved to Spokane and pursued a second career in finance beginning at UPSA & IRA but within a few years moved to Washington Trust Bank Investment Services. He retired from Washington Trust as a vice president in 2014. He spent his free time as a skydiving pilot for Skydive West Plains and enjoyed antique furniture restoration projects, reading, and traveling.  He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and four grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2020
67

Carol Schweitzer Kovall ’67, of New York City; Dec. 18, 2018. She is survived by her husband, Geoffrey; two sons; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2020
66

Bonnie J. Caruth ’66, of Kansas City, Kans.; July 25. She is survived by four children and their spouses, two grandsons, and a sister.

 

Jan, 2020
65

Peter H. Laurie ’65, ’75 PhD, of Gilsum, N.H.; Sept. 13. He was awarded an Arnold Traveling Fellowship from Brown allowing him to visit Italy and Greece and continue his work on a new version of Homer’s Odyssey. He later spent a year in France at the Center for Advanced Medieval Studies, studying romance languages, literature, and music. He was a Fulbright lecturer in American Letters at the University of Bologna, Italy; a visiting professor of American literature and culture at the University of Bilkent in Ankara, Turkey; and a writing teacher at Santa Rosa Junior College (Calif.), Keene State College (N.H.), and Franklin Pierce University (N.H.). He addressed writing symposiums in Europe and America, wrote articles in cultural journalism, and published both original poems and translations of foreign language poets. In 1986 he gave a five-part lecture series on American classicism at Dartmouth College. He enjoyed building custom furniture, cooking, and playing the piano. He is survived by his wife, Johanna; two children; five grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1965, GS Class of 1975
Jan, 2020
63

Carol Van McGee ’63, of Dexter, Mich.; Aug. 30; As a career navy officer’s wife, she moved frequently. She was an English Language Arts assistant and executive assistant to a real estate firm vice president. She was involved with the Girl Scouts of America and played soccer for 10 years in an adult women’s league. She enjoyed raising a family, quilting, and antiquing. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’63; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Jan, 2020
62

Ann R. Leven ’62, of New York City; June 26. She worked at the Colgate-Palmolive Company before becoming treasurer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1972. She left the Met in 1979, and after a brief tenure as vice president at Chase Manhattan Bank, she became staff director on Ronald Reagan’s Presidential Task Force for the Arts and Humanities in 1981. From 1984 to 1990 she was treasurer and chief financial officer at the Smithsonian Institution. Under her leadership, the Smithsonian’s endowment fund nearly doubled in value as she oversaw numerous exhibitions across the Institution’s collection of museums. In 1990 she became deputy treasurer of the National Gallery of Art and financially engineered dozens of famed exhibitions. For a majority of her career she also served as an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of Business, where she taught courses in business strategy and administration (1975-1993). After retiring from full-time work in 2000, she remained active serving institutions, including  being a trustee of the Corporation of Brown, as an executive-in-residence at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, as a member of the visiting committee at Harvard Business School, and additionally served on numerous boards, including the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the New Leadership Division of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. She is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, six nieces and nephews, and numerous cousins.

 

Jan, 2020
61

James F. Twaddell ’61, of Providence; July 17. He was a Foreign Service officer assigned to the GATT Kennedy Round trade negotiations in Switzerland. After six years, he returned to Washington and joined the office of Sen. Claiborne Pell. By 1969, he moved to Rhode Island and joined Kidder Peabody securities firm and ran an unsuccessful bid for a state senate seat. By 1972 he was chairman of Barclay Investments, a regional brokerage firm, and soon after became chairman of NIBA, an investment banker’s association. He enjoyed salmon fishing in the Canadian rivers of Quebec. He is survived by his wife, Marlene Marx Twaddell ’72 MAT; two daughters; a son, Justin ’90; seven grandchildren; and brothers Bill ’63 and Steve ’57.

 

Jan, 2020
58

Martin Bernheimer ’58, of New York City; Sept. 29, of a long battle with sarcoma. He was a former Los Angeles Times music critic and a Pulitzer Prize winner. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1940 and at the age of 14 submitted his first article to Opera News, which was accepted but later scrapped. At Brown, he studied music history and musicology. He also moonlighted as a supernumerary in opera productions with professional companies performing in Boston. As a graduate student back in Munich, he attended the renowned Hochschule für Musik und Theater München, where he studied musicology on a grant from the German state of Bavaria. Around this time, he published his first article in the New York Times, a short piece on Munich opera. Upon returning to the U.S., he enrolled at NYU and was a NYU part-time lecturer. In 1961 he became a temporary music critic at the New York Post and that same year was made a contributing editor for the Musical Courier. From 1962 to 1965, he served as assistant to the music editor of the Saturday Review and managing editor of the Philharmonic Hall Program. He joined the Los Angeles Times in 1965 and became the chief music critic. He stayed with the newspaper for 31 years and won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1982 and ASCAP’s Deems Taylor Award in 1974 and 1978. He was a member of several music-related education programs and became a faculty member of the Rockefeller program for the training of music critics at USC in 1966. In 1969 he joined the music faculty of UCLA and in 1982 became an honorary member of Pi Kappa Lambda. He was a regular lecturer and taught criticism at Cal State Northridge, San Diego State, and California Institute of the Arts. After leaving the paper, he served as a correspondent in New York for the London-based Financial Times covering opera, classical music, and dance. He also served on the board of Opera Magazine. He is survived by his wife, Linda; three daughters; a son; and his former wife, Cindy Bernheimer. (See “Music Appreciation” in the 2012 November/December BAM)  

 

Jan, 2020
59

William F. Wenning Jr. ’59, of Sewickley, Pa.; July 31.  He was employed with Ceramic Color and Chemical Company for 64 years and served as president of the company for 40 of those years.  He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter; a granddaughter; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020
59

Joanna Kellogg Uhry ’59, of New York City; Aug. 26, from complications of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Joanna was a teacher at Calhoun School in New York City for many years. While there she developed an interest in learning disabilities and enrolled in a master’s program at Teachers College. She went on to earn two master’s degrees in education at Columbia Univ. She was a faculty member at Teachers College until she joined the faculty at Fordham University, where she served as a leader in preparing teachers at the Graduate School of Education for more than 20 years. The focus of her years of research was on understanding how to teach children to read, especially children with dyslexia. She authored numerous publications, including Dyslexia: Theory and Practice of Instruction and Finger-Point Reading in Kindergarten: The Role of Phonemic Awareness, One-to-One Correspondence, and Rapid Serial Naming. She was the director for the Advanced Certification Program in Literacy and the Initial Teacher Certification Program, and coordinator of the Childhood Education Program. In addition, she mentored doctoral students and served as chair of the division of curriculum and teaching for four years. In retirement she was awarded professor emeritus status at Fordham. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, painting, making ceramics, weaving, and had a passion for photography and directing family plays and home movies. She is survived by her husband, Alfred Uhry ’58, four daughters, including Emily Rhea ’83; eight grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Jan, 2020
58

Cynthia N. Peterson ’58, of Petersburg, N.Y.; June 16. After Brown, she went to the Yale School of Architecture. Among her jobs while studying at Yale was working on projects with the noted architect Paul Rudolph. After Yale, she then went to New York City, where she worked for the firm of Davis Brody. While there she worked on design plans for a University of Buffalo renovation, among her many projects. Leaving Davis Brody, she was then a professor of architecture at City College in New York City, a position she held until 1992, when she retired to Petersburg. In her retirement she served as an architectural consultant for the rebuilding of a portion of the public library in Petersburg, and for a while she was a rural mail carrier and even a ski instructor at Jiminy Peak. She donated her body to Albany Medical College and is survived by her sister, Diana Peterson Muzzarelli ’62.

 

Jan, 2020
58

Jean White Mosler ’58, of Hackettstown, N.J.; Aug. 26. She was a library director  at Hackettstown Library for many years before retiring. She is survived by many friends.

 

Jan, 2020
58

Alfred U. Howes ’58, of Providence; Aug. 22. He was a licensed navigator in the Merchant Marine for most of his career. He enjoyed spending time at the family farm in North Hero, Vt. and in 2000 donated the property to the Lake Champlain Land Trust. He was active at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church.  

 

Jan, 2020
57

Dorelyn Foster Anderson ’57, of St. Cloud, Minn.; Aug. 22. She was an avid reader and community activist. She is survived by her husband, Myron ’59 PhD; a son; a grandson; and two brothers.

 

Jan, 2020
56

Alden R. Walls Jr. ’56, of Jamestown, R.I., formerly of Wilton, Conn.; Sept. 5. He was a marketing manager for Monsanto Company in New York City for 20 years. He later worked for Unifi Company as vice president. He retired in 1985. After retiring, he worked in real estate for 15 years in Jamestown. He was a senior warden at St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church in Jamestown and a volunteer with the Jamestown Ambulance Assoc. He is survived by three sons, including Jeffrey ’83; two daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2020
56

Gordon L. Parker ’56, of Little Compton and Providence, R.I.; Sept. 21, after a long illness. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he joined Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank’s investment department and retired after 30 years as head of the Investment Management and Trust Division. Upon leaving the bank, he took courses at RISD and became an artist member at The Providence Art Club. He was involved in numerous organizations and served as past president of The Boys and Girls Clubs of Providence and on several boards, including the Providence Preservation Society and the Rhode Island Philharmonic. He enjoyed reading, classical music, gardening, sailing, tennis, fishing, and duck hunting. He is survived by his wife, Jane; son Gordon L. Parker III ’15; a daughter-in-law; two nieces, including Tuppett M. Yates ’97; and a nephew.

 

Jan, 2020
55

Peter W. Lisbon ’55, of San Diego, Calif.; May 2.  

 

Jan, 2020
55

Stephen D. Booth ’55, of Brattleboro, Vt.; Aug. 19, of kidney and respiratory failure. He had a long career teaching at schools in Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Rhode Island before retiring to a slower paced life in Vermont. He was a voracious reader and historian and enjoyed researching his family tree. He also enjoyed jazz music and Broadway tunes. He is survived by his wife, Steffi; two sons; a stepdaughter; two stepsons; and four grandchildren.   

 

Jan, 2020
54

John E. Orton III ’54, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 20. He was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar Association in 1962 and practiced law in Warwick and Providence. In 1969 he was appointed an Associate Justice of the R.I. District Court and then appointed an Associate Justice of the R.I. Superior Court in 1974 before retiring as acting presiding judge in 1991. He was a member of the Brown football team and also played on the U.S. Marine Corps football team. He is survived by his wife, Denise; three sons; two stepdaughters; eight grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020
54

John D. Greene ’54, of Pine Plains, N.Y.; Sept. 20. After discharge from the U.S. Army, he joined his father in starting the firm Greene & Greene on the floor of the American Stock Exchange. In 1973 he merged his firm into Spear, Leeds & Kellogg, where he remained a partner until his retirement in 1987. He had a second 30-year career as a painter and sculptor.  He studied at both the American Academy of Art and the New York Sculpture Center. Over the years he became recognized for his use of encaustic (beeswax), painting primarily abstract landscapes noted for their richness of color and surface and exhibiting throughout the country. His work can be seen at Windham Fine Arts in Windham, N.Y. and Main Street Arts in Clifton Springs, N.Y. He was a member of the board of the University of Rochester and is survived by his wife, Gwen; two daughters; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and two nieces.

 

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