Obituaries

Mar, 2019
GS 74

Fredric J. Spar ’74 AM, ’80 PhD, of Princeton, N.J.; Dec. 22. He was an elementary school teacher before completing his PhD at Brown, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan, at the Stanford Center. He later worked as a communications consul- tant at Kekst & Co. in Manhattan for 36 years. He served on several environmental and edu- cation boards, including the Watershed Insti- tute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, and was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge. He enjoyed birding, skiing, tennis, hiking, shing and rooting for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Winifred Hughes Spar ’73 AM, ’76 PhD; two sons; a sister and brother-in-law.

Mar, 2019
GS 63

Richard S. Allen ’63 AM, of Trumbull, Conn.; Dec. 16, 2017. He was a professor of English and director of creative writing at the Univ. of Bridgeport from 1968 to 2001. He was an acclaimed public speaker and poetry reader. He led poetry workshops and seminars and served as a judge for various competitions and selection committees in Connecticut. In 2010 he was named Connecticut’s poet laureate. He published in premier journals, including Poetry, the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, Hudson Review, and New Criterion, as well as in scores of national anthologies. He won numerous awards, including a Pushcart Prize, the Robert Frost prize, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and Ingram Merrill Poetry Foundation. His collection, Present Vanishing: Poems, received the 2009 Connecticut Book Award for Poetry. He was a member of the Academy of American Poets and the Modern Language Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Lori; a daughter; and son.

Mar, 2019
53
Joseph L. Tauro ’53
His decisions transformed countless lives, in the courtroom and beyond
Read More
Judge Joseph L. Tauro ’53
Mar, 2019
FAC

Aaron Wold, of Providence; Oct. 3. In 1963 he joined the Brown faculty and was the Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry until his retirement in 1992. He has written two books and published more than 300 papers in the field of solid state chemistry. He raised more than 550 orchids in his greenhouse and was a longtime member of the Rhode Island Orchid Society. After retiring from teaching, he volunteered with the Jewish Eldercare of Rhode Island creating music programs and traveling to several nursing homes throughout Rhode Island playing music for the residents. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; three children; and four grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

Peter Wegner, of Providence; July 27, following a brief illness. At the University of Cambridge he worked on the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator computer, the first practical general-purpose stored program electronic computer. In 1954 he briefly worked in the computer science department of Manchester Univ. before visiting Israel for an academic year. He returned to England in 1955 and was hired by Prudential Insurance to develop actuarial software. He left Prudential in 1956 for CAV Aerospace, where he worked on airline programming. He then held a position at Penn State Univ., where he spent two years before moving to MIT to work on the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service Project. In 1960 he moved to the mathematical laboratory of Harvard, helping faculty with their programming requirements, but he returned to England in 1961 to take on a lectureship at the London School of Economics, teaching economists about computing. He spent three years there before returning to the U.S. to be assistant professor in the mathematics department at Penn State. In 1969 he joined the Brown faculty and spent the rest of his career at Brown. In March 2017 he received a recognition award celebrating his sustained and dedicated work as editor of the Brown University Faculty Bulletin. He wrote or co-edited more than a dozen books on programming languages and software engineering. His most recent book, Interactive Computation: The New Paradigm, was published in 2008.

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

Patricia Heard Symonds ’79, ’84 AM, ’91 PhD, of Providence; Nov. 6. While her youngest children were still at home she enrolled at Brown through the RUE program to obtain her degrees in anthropology. She also played on the varsity women’s tennis team as an undergrad. With support from her husband, she did extensive research in the late 1980s in a Hmong village in northern Thailand. Her ethnographic study Calling in the Soul; Gender and the Cycle of Life in a Hmong Village was later published as a book by the University of Washington. She joined Brown’s faculty in 1992 as an adjunct associate professor in the anthropology department. During her tenure she taught courses in her areas of expertise and mentored several students who remained close friends and colleagues. She is survived by her husband, Alan Symonds ’04; six children; three grandchildren, including Marco A. Steinsieck ’08; two great-granddaughters; and a brother.
 

 

Related classes:
FAC, Class of 1979, GS Class of 1984
Mar, 2019
FAC

Mark B. Schupack, of Providence; Sept. 27. He taught at Brown from 1959 to 1999, serving as chairman of the economics department, dean of the graduate school, and vice provost. He also served as chairman of the Graduate Record Exam Board and was appointed to the R.I. Consumer’s Council by then Governor John Chafee. Additionally, he was a docent at the Rhode Island School of Design Art Museum and co-author of Tech Model Railroad Club of MIT: The First Fifty Years. He enjoyed classical music, photography, and model railroading. He is survived by his wife, Helaine; a daughter and son and their spouses; and three grandsons.  

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

William C. Crossgrove, of Providence; Nov. 29. He joined the Brown faculty in 1962 and rose through the ranks to become professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature. He taught a wide variety of courses in German language, literature, civilization, and culture, including interdisciplinary topics such as world agriculture and the history of hunger. The latter led to his co-editing Hunger in History. He spent sabbaticals in Germany working on medieval manuscripts in university libraries. He retired from Brown in 2003 and soon after was appointed administrative director of the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation, a position he held until 2016. With a strong commitment to social justice, he was a member of the Committee on Racial Equality and the American Civil Liberties Union and was actively involved in local environmental issues. He also was a docent at Roger Williams Park Zoo. He is survived by his wife, Lo; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and two sisters.
 

 

Mar, 2019
MD 87

Marie Anne Johantgen ’87 MD, of Olympia, Wash.; Nov. 16. She was an obstetrician/gynecologist in Olympia. In 2009 she started the local chapter of Dining for Women, an organization that raises money to support women’s health and safety worldwide. She made multiple medical trips abroad to help those with medical needs in Haiti, Peru, Kenya, Rwanda, and India, and volunteered locally for the Olympia Free Clinic and Rotary Club. She was the recipient of the 2017 Women of Achievement Award from the Olympia YWCA. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a son; a stepson; her parents; five siblings; and a niece.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 90

Derrick S. Best ’90 AM, of Syracuse, N.Y.; Feb. 22, 2018. During his tenure at the Univ. of Maryland, he was an academic advisor for the African-American Studies Program, an admissions counselor, and director of student affairs for the College of Arts and Humanities. At Drexel Univ. in Philadelphia he served as the assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Later he returned home to Syracuse to join the family real estate business working as a multi lines representative, where he remained until he became too ill to work. He was a 14-year member of Kappa Alpha Psi and is survived by his parents, a sister, and several family members.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 85

Paul D. Tolbert ’85 AM, of Indian Hills, Colo.; Aug. 2. In Denver he worked initially at Tattered Cover Book Store, then moved to become bookstore manager at Community College of Aurora and then at Arapahoe Community College, where he worked for more than 20 years. He composed and recorded his own music, performed in bands, and enjoyed cooking, playing Scrabble, and solving crossword and Sudoku puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Laura; two sons; two sisters; a brother; and many extended family members.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 82

Steven J. Keable ’82 MAT, of Dover, N.H.; Oct. 27. He taught in Salzburg, Austria, and toured Europe before returning to the U.S. to attend law school. He began his law career working as a prosecutor at Rockingham County in Exeter, N.H., and was later promoted to Deputy County Attorney. After working as a prosecutor for 20 years, he founded an independent law practice and worked until his retirement in July 2018. He was a fan of the New England Patriots and the Boston Celtics. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a son; his mother; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 73

Marlene C. Browne ’73 AM, ’76 PhD, of Mitchellville, Md.; Dec. 1. She was an English teacher at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis and retired in 2009 as director of the Writing Center. She was an accomplished violinist and played in various local concert symphonies. She is survived by a brother, a sister-in- law, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 69

William T. Kiley ’69 PhD, of Fairfax, Va.; Nov. 12. He taught in the department of mathematics at George Mason University. He was completely engaged in the University and assisted in creating recreational activities for faculty that included a duplicate bridge club, a hiking club, a gourmet group, and group vacations. He was a patron of the GMU Center for the Arts and cheered on the GMU athletes. In retirement he took classes, enjoying the opportunity to learn from expert colleagues about topics that had intrigued him over the years. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 69

Stanley I. Grossman ’69 PhD, of Acton, Mass.; Dec. 23. He taught at McGill University in Montreal before joining the University of Montana’s mathematics department faculty in 1972. In 1994 he retired and relocated to London, England, where he was a research associate at University College London for several years. Over the course of his career, he wrote college level mathematics textbooks and served as a director of Rocky Mountain Traders, Ltd, and Bloomsbury Innovations. He is survived by a daughter and two sons.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 67

Judith Naughton Mitchell ’67 AM, of Providence; Dec. 2, from myelofibrosis. She joined the faculty of Rhode Island College in 1972 and retired from teaching as professor emerita, though she continued as an adjunct for several years in retirement. During her years as RIC she taught a range of courses, wrote for publications and professional journals, presented papers at numerous conferences, and provided workshops for teachers and other educators in Rhode Island and throughout New England. From 1990 to 1999 she held a joint appointment in secondary education, where she was instrumental in the training of student teachers. She was the recipient of the 1987 Paul Maixner Distinguished Teaching Award for Arts and Science. She retired from RIC and was called to the ministry. In 1992  she was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood. In 1993 she was the rector of The Church of the Advent in Pawtucket, R.I., followed by the position of rector of St. Matthew Church in Barrington, R.I., where she served for 10 years. After Barrington she was Priest in Charge of Saint John the Divine in Saunderstown, R.I. She retired due to health issues, but returned to be Vicar of St. James Church in North Providence and Priest in Charge at All Saints Memorial Church in Providence before her death. She is survived by her husband, Raymond; five children; three grandchildren; her parents; and five siblings.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 64

John M. Walker ’64 AM, ’67 PhD, of Lincoln, Neb.; Nov. 19. He taught philosophy at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and then at Nebraska Wesleyan University from 1969 until his retirement in 2002. He was the author of What the Hoops Junkie Saw: Poems, Stories, and Reflections on the Passing Scene. He was a long-time traveler with the Nebraska Arts Council Touring Artists program and performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. He also founded the independent music label Prairie Dog Music, featuring recordings by regional artists. He is survived by Dena Zimmer; a daughter; a son; two granddaughters; and a sister.

Mar, 2019
GS 50

Maurice J. McDowell ’50 PhD, of Media, Pa.; Nov. 18. He worked at DuPont from 1950 to 1983. After retiring from DuPont, he worked as a consultant in New Hampshire and Trinidad. He later joined the International Executive Service Corps as a volunteer. He and his wife enjoyed assignments through IESC to Thailand, Morocco, and Egypt. He was an avid gardener, a volunteer at Riddle Memorial Hospital, and a member of the Upper Providence Planning Council. He swam daily up to age 92 and won more than seven gold medals in the Delco Senior Games. He is survived by four children and their spouses, and three granddaughters.

Mar, 2019
12

Lucas Guangsheng Li ’12, of Singapore; Aug. 8. He was a development partner at ICT Media and a member of Omicron Delta Epsilon. He is survived by his father.

Mar, 2019
99

Monte D. Bryant ’99, of Attleboro, Mass.; Aug. 9. He retired after many years as a steelworker for various area businesses and worked at Brown until retiring in 2010. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed sailing, fishing, playing guitar, and spending time with family. He is survived by three children, six grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
92

Edward D. Preston ’92, of Winchester, Mass.; Nov. 17, of pancreatic cancer. He was the first CEO of The Achievement Network, a nonprofit focused on closing the achievement gap through data-driven instruction. He grew the organization from serving seven to serving more than 260 schools, while winning several awards for innovation. His career also included executive positions at Education First, Care.com, and the Decision Resources Group. Earlier he was the founding director of the Cincinnati chapter of Summer Bridge, now known as Breakthrough, to address inequities in education. In 2014 he was named a Fellow of the Pahara and Aspen Institute for his impactful work in education and consulting. Active in his community, he was a founding director and board chair for the Edward W. Brooke Charter School and an active member of the Smugglers Notch Ski and Snowboard Club. He enjoyed skiing, mountain biking and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Beth; three children; his parents; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
89

Katharine Willrich Nordahl ’89, of Westwood, Mass.; Aug. 15. She spent many years in leadership positions within MassHealth ranging from directing the MassHealth managed care program to designing the Senior Care Options program. She also served as an assistant commissioner for the Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy, where she led the agency’s work monitoring the impact of the state’s health reform law and analyzing health care cost trends in the Commonwealth. Lastly, she worked at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation directing the Massachusetts Medicaid Policy Institute. In 2016 she was honored with the Boston Center for Independent Living’s Marie Feltin Award for her work advancing innovative Medicaid policy in Massachusetts, and she was again honored in 2018 by the Massachusetts House of Representatives for a lifetime of dedicated public service. She is survived by her husband, Erik; two sons; her father and stepmother; and three brothers and their families.  

 

Mar, 2019
86

Carolyn M. Robinson ’86, of Washington, D.C.; Oct. 14, 2017, from pneumonia exacerbated by pulmonary arterial hypertension. She was a programmer analyst at ABT Associates for 21 years. She was known for her pop music knowledge and abiding support for D.C.’s sports teams. She is survived by her spouse, Angela E. Taylor ’87; a son; two brothers; two nieces; and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
79

Robert Deschene ’79, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Aug. 13. He worked for many years in the private banking sector before obtaining a law degree from the Univ. of Maine School of Law in 1990. After law school, he worked as a judicial law clerk at the Maine Supreme Judicial Court in Portland and followed with a federal court clerkship at the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston. He is survived by four siblings and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
71

Stephen A. Williamson ’71, of Danvers, Mass.; Nov. 24, as a result of stroke complications. He worked for several companies as a management consultant and eventually worked independently until his retirement. For many years he served on the Danvers School Committee and was active in local issues. He enjoyed coaching his children in soccer and following their sporting endeavors, and was able to enjoy his granddaughter playing soccer for a few years. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Mar, 2019
70

Robert G. Zapffe ’70, of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Nov. 22, from complications of diabetes. He retired in 2008 after 33 years of service with the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. He was an active legislative liaison with the Oklahoma Corrections Professionals and served as Oklahoma Jaycees criminal justice coordinator. He enjoyed hunting crows and shopping estate sales. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; a daughter and son-in-law; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and two nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
70

Amy Johnsen-Harris ’70, of Providence; Oct. 18, after a long illness. She moved to San Francisco after graduation and worked as an administrative assistant in the philosophy and English departments at the University of San Francisco. In 1972 she returned to Rhode Island and held various positions, including driving a school bus and working for Planned Parenthood of Rhode Island and as a freelance photographer. She then became a librarian and served in that capacity at the Providence Public Library, Ponaganset High School, Hugh B. Bain Middle School, and Cranston High School East. She was a flutist, pianist, and advocate for animal rights, human rights, and the environment. She enjoyed traveling, especially to national parks. She is survived by her son, Bart Johnsen-Harris ’12; a sister; brother, Dan Johnsen ’72; and her former spouse, Mark Harris ’70.
 

 

Mar, 2019
68

Susan Hindmarsh Penny ’68, of New Braunfels, Tex., formerly of El Paso; Oct. 25. She was an elementary school librarian in El Paso. She served in many roles to further education and reading as a member of various national and international reading associations, and on committees to further technology in school libraries. In 1996 she received a grant to start a puppetry club for elementary school children to help them vocalize their feelings through puppetry. Upon retirement she moved to New Braunfels, where she was an active member in the community and volunteered at her local church and elementary schools. She enjoyed yoga and water aerobics. She is survived by her husband, Roland; two daughters and their spouses; four grandsons; and four sisters.

 

Mar, 2019
68

Robert W. King Jr. ’68, of Edmond, Okla.; Nov. 27, after a short illness. He practiced nephrology with Associates in Internal Medicine at St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City. He was also a volunteer faculty member for the OU School of Community Medicine and instrumental in bringing organ transplants to the school. He helped develop the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) and was one of the original founders of LifeShare Oklahoma organ sharing network. In 1998 he moved to New Orleans, La., where he worked as a national medical director for United Healthcare, but returned to Oklahoma City in 2007. He enjoyed being a doctor, teaching, reading, and writing. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three daughters; a son-in-law; and two sisters and their husbands.

 

Mar, 2019
66

Kenneth S. Muldoon ’66, of Needham, Mass.; Nov. 29. He was an attorney in a small Manhattan law firm and also practiced with the Legal Aid Society of Minneapolis and VISTA. After a time practicing law, he changed his career and became a journalist. He was an associate editor of the Star-Ledger in Newark, N.J., before moving to Massachusetts to join the Harvard Business Review. Following that he was senior writer and editor for New England Mutual Life Insurance Co. and edited a newsletter for Tufts Univ. He was a member of Chorus Pro Musica for more than 20 years, serving on its board and as its president. He performed with the chorus at Symphony Hall, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and the Boston Garden. He also performed with the Betty Singers, who brought comfort through music to the infirm and ailing. He volunteered for Generic Ministry supporting the homeless and tutoring high school students and adults. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a son; two stepdaughters; an exchange daughter; two sisters; six grandchildren, several nieces and nephews; and his former wife, Freda Bein.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Allan T. Walsh ’65, of Philadelphia; Oct. 2. After graduate school he pursued a career in real estate development in the Southeastern and Middle Atlantic regions. At Brown, he played goalie on the men’s soccer team and was named first team All-Ivy and All-New England. He was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame in 1976. He is survived by a sister and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Roger B. Hirschland ’65, of Washington, D.C.; Aug. 18, of amyloidosis. At Brown he worked with Dr. J. Louis Giddings at Onion Portage, a major archaeological site in northwest Alaska. After Brown he spent two years in Sierra Leone in the Peace Corps., and upon his return he studied another year at Brown before entering the Navy’s Officer Candidate School in Newport. He was commissioned and deployed to the Mediterranean. He taught for eight years at the Gordon School in East Providence and eventually became vice-headmaster. Later he worked for two years in the newsroom of the Providence Journal and then joined the staff of the National Geographic Society, where he wrote and edited books and the children’s magazine, World, for eight years. For the next 14 years, he wrote and edited geography materials for students and teachers nationwide. He worked for many years on the National Geographic Society’s style committee and served as a guide and lecturer on several National Geographic excursions to Australia, New Zealand, and Europe. He also wrote a book for National Geographic in 1987 titled Animals and Their Babies. Upon retirement from National Geographic he went to work at the headquarters of the Peace Corps as an editor of teaching materials for schools across the country. He continued to edit the series Journeys in Film until the end of his life. He was a collector of model cars, trucks, fire engines, and deer antlers. Additionally, he founded a monthly newsletter for fellow car and truck enthusiasts, Capitol Miniature Auto Collectors Club Journal, and single-handedly wrote and edited most of the articles. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a sister; a brother, Edward ’70, ’70 AM; and 10 nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Edwin Farnworth ’65 of Pasadena, Calif.; Oct. 21.
 

Mar, 2019
64

Elnora Beth Livezey ’64, of Inwood, Calif.; July 9. After college she worked for two years with the civil rights movement as a field worker with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where she initiated a Head Start program and participated in the march from Selma to Montgomery. She earned a law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1969 and was selected to serve as assistant editor on the Law Review. After law school she worked for a year for the nonprofit Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City, where she participated in the defense of the “Chicago Seven.” She later joined a pioneering law collective in Los Angeles, where she litigated some of the first Title VII cases to go to trial following the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. She moved to Shasta County, Calif., in 1979 when hired by Dugan Barr to work at his law firm handling civil lawsuits. In 1985 she became a partner in the firm of Barr, Newlan & Sinclair, but resigned in 1988 to open an independent law practice. A year later she was selected Commissioner by the Judges of the Shasta County Municipal Court. She retired in 2004. In retirement she volunteered legal expertise, was involved in a local dance group, and enrolled in Timeless Wisdom Training. She is survived by three sisters, nieces and nephews, and many friends.

Mar, 2019
64

Robert G. Bidwell ’64, of Reston, Va.; Oct. 20. He retired as special assistant to the deputy assistant secretary of the Department of Energy. He coached Reston youth soccer and basketball and enjoyed playing golf, fly-fishing, scuba diving, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Sue; three sons; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Jerry Rhine ’60, of Greenwich, Conn.; Aug. 12, after a long illness. He was a commercial real estate broker and is survived by his wife, Jennifer; a daughter; a son; and a brother, Donald ’57.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Robert W. McCourt ’60, of Short Hills, N.J.; Oct. 26. He worked for 43 years in various management positions at Public Service Electric & Gas Co. in Elizabeth, N.J., planning the electrical infrastructure of Newark Liberty International Airport and the redevelopment of Liberty State Park and Ellis Island. He specialized in electromagnetic field issues management, environment, health, and safety concerns. He provided expert advice on electromagnetic field issues to the general public and media and was a proud member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He worked to raise funds for various international Catholic organizations, churches, and schools. He also enjoyed woodworking, gardening, and reading, especially books about World War II by Samuel Eliot Morison. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
60

James M. Bower ’60, of Providence; Oct. 16. He was an educator for more than 50 years, including a year at Colegio Franklin Delano Roosevelt, The American School of Lima, Peru. For several years he served as head of charter schools throughout Massachusetts and for 15 years was headmaster of Dedham Country Day School. His career concluded with a 15-year involvement with The San Miguel School in Providence, where he taught English and geography, was director of admissions, and coached baseball and chess. He served on the boards of both the Genesis Center and Hamilton House in Providence, and Family Service of Rhode Island. He enjoyed spending summers at his house in Maine with family and friends, sailing, and playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother, Richard ’56, and nieces Amy Bower ’81, Sally Maenner ’84, and Emily Maenner ’16.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Ann Erpenbeck Bottelli ’60 of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Summit and Newark, N.J.; Aug. 21. She was an accounting director at Prudential Insurance in Newark. She traveled widely for Prudential sharing accounting principles with regulators and industry colleagues. She also worked independently as a graphic designer developing her own business as a practicing artist and calligrapher while raising a family in Summit. She was a longtime volunteer with the Junior League of Summit and served on the board of directors for the New Jersey Center for the Visual Arts. She enjoyed playing tennis and trail walking. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a daughter; three sons; and two daughters-in-law.
 

 

Mar, 2019
59

James Teixeira ’59, of Riverside, R.I.; Nov. 20, after a brief illness. He taught Spanish and Portuguese at Middletown High School, R.I. He traveled extensively, collected coins, stamps, postcards, and antiques, and enjoyed the theater. He is survived by his wife, Maria; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; seven nieces; and a nephew.  

 

Mar, 2019
59

Aaron Seidman ’59, of Brookline, Mass.; July 3. He had a career as a software developer, trainer, and web designer, with a great interest in art. He created his works in a wide variety of media, experimenting with new techniques. He was involved in community affairs and is survived by his wife, Ruth Kertzer Seidman ’60; sons Daniel ’88 and Joshua ’90; two daughters-in-law, including Jocelyn Guyer ’90; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; brother-in-law David Kertzer ’69; sister-in-law Susan Kertzer ’70; nephew Seth Kertzer ’98; niece Molly Kertzer ’95; and cousins Pam Gerrol ’87, Elizabeth Braswell ’93, and Ari Johnson ’04.

 

Mar, 2019
59

Orrin M. Colley ’59, of Duxbury, Mass.; Dec. 4. He owned and operated C.H. Marsh insurance agency in Marshfield, Mass. He was an avid golfer and New England sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Helen; three daughters; six grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Mar, 2019
59

John F. Bennett ’59, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Nov. 16. He was president of Adobe Building Center prior to starting his own business in 1981, Color-Rite Building Supply, which sold to Rinker Building Materials in 1995. He was on the board of the Construction Association of South Florida for 32 years in addition to several other boards. He was instrumental in the creation of the Construction Executives Assoc. He is survived by four children, seven grandchildren, and six siblings.
 

Mar, 2019
58

John P. Hopkins ’58, of Goshen, N.H.; Nov. 13. After teaching at Northeastern Univ. and at a private school in Great Barrington, Mass., he moved to Goshen in 1964 and taught English at Stevens High School in Claremont, N.H. In 1972 he changed career paths and opened a plumbing and heating business. He was also a volunteer firefighter for more than 50 years, a selectman, a school board member, and a budget committee member. He is survived by six children, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Mar, 2019
57

Richard D. Thomson ’57, of Nantucket, Mass.; Nov. 22. He worked in advertising, specializing in marketing, and was known for his work with Procter & Gamble, General Mills, Ford, Unilever, Marlboro, Coca-Cola, and Oscar Mayer. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by his wife, Marilyn; three sons, including Peter ’89; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Mar, 2019
57

Leonard S. Ridley ’57, of Springville, Utah, formerly of Fairhaven, Mass.; Oct. 18. After earning a master’s degree at Boston University’s School of Social Work, he was employed in child protective services and the Rodman Job Corps Center in New Bedford, Mass. In 1968 he established a residence in Connecticut and initially worked as executive secretary on a special governor’s committee assisting in the development of a multi-faceted children’s service department. Subsequently, he worked as a psychiatric social worker at an experimental child guidance center in Hartford’s inner city. He concluded his career as a supervisor at a Connecticut psychiatric hospital for adolescents in Meriden, Conn., in 1992. He enjoyed painting, writing, and blogging poetry. He is survived by his wife, Janet; four sons; five grandchildren; and several stepchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
57

Lois Kaufman ’57, of Fullerton, Calif.; Nov. 22, of squamous cell sarcoma. She was a retired teacher and homemaker. She is survived by her husband, K. Richard Kaufman ’57; two sons; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
56

Arnold H. Kritz ’56, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Apr. 16. After receiving his PhD in physics from Yale, he spent several years in the research industry before joining the faculty of Hunter College in 1969, where he later served as chair of the department of physics. He was recruited to the department of physics at Lehigh Univ. and served as its chair from 1991 to 1998. At the same time, he led his own research program at Lehigh on nuclear fusion. He also led large multi-institutional collaborations that included research centers across the world. For many years he was a visiting research fellow at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and held several visiting appointments at major laboratories in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Denmark, and Germany. He served on the International Advisory Committee for the Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory in China and for four years he worked at the U.S. Department of Energy in charge of the modeling and simulation branch of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. He was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society and published numerous articles and wrote two books, including Introduction to Problem Solving. In 2005 a two-day Symposium on The Future of Integrated Modeling was held in celebration of his 70th birthday. He was an active member of the Jewish communities in which he lived and was a board member of the Jewish Federation. He volunteered with the Boy Scouts of America and enjoyed hiking, camping, skiing, traveling, gardening, and playing duplicate bridge. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons, including Barry ’84 ScM; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Mar, 2019
56

Thomas E. Hazlehurst ’56, of Wakefield, R.I.; Nov. 17. He was president and CEO of Potter Hazlehurst, an advertising public relations firm in East Greenwich, R.I. He was an avid sailor, having served in the U.S. Navy, was president of the Narragansett Bay Yachting Assoc., founding secretary of Save the Bay, commodore of the East Greenwich Yacht Club, a trustee and fleet captain of the New York Yacht Club, fleet captain of Cruising Club of America, chairman of the Newport to Bermuda Race, and a member of the Rhode Island State Yachting Committee. He was a finalist for selection in sailing in the 1956 Olympics. He was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame and the Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Hall of Fame. He is survived by three daughters, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
55

David V. Yale ’55, of Wallingford, Conn.; Oct. 31. He worked at Pratt & Whitney before moving to Prudential Insurance in sales and lastly to Nationwide Insurance in claims management, where he remained until his retirement. At Brown he played varsity football and was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
55

Alice Emmert Ward ’55, of Wellesley, Mass.; Oct. 29. She worked for many years as a chemist at Dow Chemical in Midland, Mich., and at Ciba Labs in Summit, N.J. She later taught in the computer labs in local schools, including Wellesley Middle School. She was a Girl Scout leader, Boy Scout den mother, soccer coach, and longtime supporter of Wellesley youth athletic programs. Following retirement, she was active with the Wellesley Council on Aging. She enjoyed spending summers at Big Island Pond in Derry, N.H., with family and friends. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
55

Henry Juncker III ’55, of Gloucester, Mass.; Oct. 11. He taught in the Marblehead Public School system for more than 50 years. He was an active member of the Annisquam Village Church, where he served as a clerk, Sunday School teacher, and choir member. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he was also a longtime member of the Chorus North Shore. He is survived by his wife, Judith Lamb Juncker ’58; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

 

Mar, 2019
56

Walter J. Weber Jr. ’56, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Oct. 18, after a brief illness. He joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 1963 as a professor in the departments of civil and chemical engineering. He was internationally known for his contributions to the field of environmental science and engineering, in particular the development of new and advanced technologies for treatment of water and wastewater and for water pollution control. He was the recipient of numerous awards and honors during his tenure at the Univ. of Michigan. He was named a Diplomat in the American Academy of Environmental Engineers in 1975, elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 1985, and named the Gordon M. Fair and Earnest Boyce Distinguished University Professor of Environmental and Ecological Sciences and Engineering in 1994. The International Science Index recognized him as the fifteenth most highly cited and quoted scientist in the world, seventh in the United States. He authored or coauthored more than 200 technical publications and mentored many engineering students and PhD students. He was a member of many professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Water Works Assoc., Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control, and the Water Pollution Control Federation. He was a devoted Michigan football fan who served on the University of Michigan Athletic Advisory Board. He enjoyed traveling, yard work, and the Jersey Shore. He is survived by Iva Corbett; four daughters; six grandchildren; and a brother.

Mar, 2019
54

Vieri Guy Volterra ’54, of Boston; Nov. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and graduating from Boston Univ. School of Law, he started an independent law practice in New Bedford, Mass., where he went from criminal defense attorney to public defender, assistant district attorney, and finally counsel to the mayor. For the next 27 years he was a Massachusetts judge in the Taunton District Court first, and then for 20 years with the Massachusetts Superior Court. After retiring from the court, he joined his brother’s law partnership and set up an independent neutral mediation practice. In 2009 he left the practice and joined Senior Partners for Justice/Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Massachusetts Bar Assoc. to represent indigent civil litigants in family law disputes. He was vitally engaged in issues of oppression and conflict in the U.S. and internationally. In 2002 he received the Law and Justice Award from the Commission for Social Justice, Sons of Italy in America, and in 2012 he received the Victor J. Garo Public Service Award from the B.U. School of Law. He enjoyed reading and is survived by his wife, Melanie; two children; a grandson; a brother, Max ’57; a sister-in-law; a niece and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
54

Barbara Hobart Mitten ’54, of Paradise Valley, Ariz.; Oct. 6. She was a homemaker and in charge of local junior tennis tournaments. She volunteered at the Maricopa County Courthouse and served on several boards, including the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation. She enjoyed being active and did aerobics as well as playing tennis and golf. She is survived by three children, two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Mar, 2019
53

Winthrop V. Wilbur Jr. ’53, of Yarmouth Port, Mass.; Oct. 20. He owned and operated Airport Motors and Central Cape Dodge in Hyannis for more than 40 years. He represented New England for the National Lincoln-Mercury Dealer Council and the Dodge Division President’s Council and was also past president of the New England Lincoln-Mercury Dealer Assoc. and the New England Dodge Dealer Assoc. He was past commodore of the Hyannis Yacht Club, past president of Oyster Harbors Club and former chairman of the Town of Barnstable Finance Committee. He was a 65-year member and former treasurer of the Federated Church of Hyannis and a 50-year member and past master of the Howard Lodge AF&AM in South Yarmouth. He enjoyed sailing and competing in the Cruising Class Racing Division of the Hyannis Yacht Club and cruising the Bahamas and East Coast with his family. He retired in 1998 and began traveling with his wife throughout the U.S., Mexico, and Canada in their motorhome. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters; son David ’77; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

 

Mar, 2019
53

Carl O. Rodin ’53, of Portage, Ind.; Nov. 18. He was an attorney in private practice for more than 45 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, a charter president of the Portage Jaycees, and a member of Portage First United Methodist Church and the Portage VFW. He is survived by a son and his wife, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Mar, 2019
53

James H. Carey ’53, of Manchester, Vt.; Oct. 23. He began his career with Chase Manhattan Bank in 1955 before moving to First Empire Bank New York in 1968. He rejoined Chase as an executive vice president in global corporate banking from 1976 to 1987, managing the bank’s finance and marketing activities for major clients worldwide. Following his time at Chase, he held senior positions at GFTA Services Corp. and Briarcliff Financial Associates, later joining Berkshire Bank as president, CEO, and founding director from 1989 to 1992. From 1993 to 1995 he served as CEO and treasurer of National Capital Benefit Corp. He retired in 2014 as director of Air Transport Services Group. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and served on several boards, including The Midland Co., The Cowen Group, the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, and the American Museum of Fly Fishing. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; daughter Jane Carey Weaver ’79; three sons, including George ’84 and David ’90, ’91 ScM; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and seven grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
52

Samuel W. Keavy ’52 of Barnstable, Mass.; Nov. 4. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from Brown, he had a career as an IBM manager. During retirement he pursued his love of antiques as an antique dealer and appraiser. He enjoyed traveling, baseball, poker, and crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Jean; four children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Martha Brinton Mermier ’51, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Nov. 14, of Parkinson’s disease. She tutored children and adults in reading while her own children were young, then returned to school to obtain a master’s degree in social work. She spent most of her career as a psychiatric social worker working with severely mentally ill patients at Ypsilanti Regional Psychiatric Hospital, retiring in 1989. In 1993 she published Coping with Severe Mental Illness; Families Speak Out. She enjoyed traveling all over the world and climbed Mont Blanc in Europe, hiked the 100-mile Tour de Mont Blanc, trekked in Nepal in her 60s, and hiked the Milford Track in New Zealand. She also enjoyed opera and attending performances at the Santa Fe Opera in New Mexico, Michigan Opera Theater, and the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, two granddaughters, a brother, and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
51

William R. Maloney ’51, of Charlotte, N.C.; Nov. 13. He had a 34-year military career in the U.S. Marine Corps. He served with distinction on assignments in Korea, Vietnam, Okinawa, the Mediterranean, and Hawaii; taught at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis; served as a commanding general; and was deputy chief of staff for Manpower for the Marine Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C. He received numerous citations, awards, and medals for his service and retired in 1985 with the rank of lieutenant general. After retiring from the Marine Corps, he worked for the National Soft Drink Assoc. (now the American Beverage Assoc.) until 1998. During his tenure, he was appointed vice president of operations and president of InterBev, at the time one of the largest trade shows representing the beverage industry. He also continued his dedication to the military through volunteer commitments. He enjoyed reading and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Philbrick W. Dodge ’51, of North Sandwich, N.H.; Oct. 29. He worked for the Ford Motor Co. for 17 years before purchasing White’s Garage, a Ford dealership in West Ossipee, N.H. In addition to White’s Garage, he built White Mountain Subaru in West Ossipee, then relocated it to Conway, N.H. He served on the vestry of St. Andrew’s Church and enjoyed singing and playing hymns on the piano. He also enjoyed swimming, hiking, running, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Frank Bednarczyk ’51, of Lewiston, Me., formerly of Warminster, Pa.; Oct. 21. He was a mechanical engineer for manufacturing company SKF in Philadelphia and in 1974 moved to Lewiston to work for Philips Elmet Corp. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran and a member of the Polish National Alliance. He is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a sister.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Graham D. Andrews ’51, of Newtown Square, Pa.; Oct. 26. For many years he was a financial advisor for Merrill Lynch in Philadelphia and Wayne, Pa. He was active in politics and served as commissioner of the Fourth Ward of Radnor Township. He was an elder, trustee and deacon at various times at Wayne Presbyterian Church and was active on several boards, including St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children and the Delaware County Medical Society Public Health Fund. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a proud Philadelphia Flyers season ticket holder and enjoyed spending time on the water with family. He is survived by his wife, Jean; three daughters, including Margaret Andrews Rosecky ’86; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a brother; a niece and two nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
50

Lea Guyer Gordon ’50, of Litchfield, Conn.; Sept. 19. She was employed for more than 30 years as a researcher, reporter, and editor at Newsweek and Time magazines and Time Life Books. She later worked at Meriwether Press and Macmillan Publishers as a nonfiction editor and then as a senior freelance editor at Reader’s Digest. In retirement, after taking courses in appraising antiques and decorative arts, she began working as a self-employed fine arts appraiser and became a member of the Appraisers Association of America.

 

Mar, 2019
50

Peter G. Fradley ’50, of New Paltz, N.Y., formerly of Westport, Mass., and Barrington, R.I.; Oct. 23, after a short illness. He was a retired editorial writer for the Providence Journal specializing in civil rights, health, and education. He also wrote an outdoor column for the ProJo’s Sunday Leisure magazine. In 1982 he was the first prize recipient for editorial writing awarded by the New England Associated Press News Executives Assoc. While at Brown, he wrote for the Brown Daily Herald and was a member of Phi Delta Theta. From 1976 to 1980 he was a member of the BAM board of editors. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he is survived by his wife, Joan; two daughters; son Kenneth ’76; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

Mar, 2019
50

Clifford J. Colville Jr. ’50, of Scarborough, Me.; Nov. 21. He worked briefly in banking, then was hired in 1952 as director of admissions for Nasson College in Springvale, Me. He held that position for 12 years and as a side business opened an Arthur Murray Dance studio. In the mid-1960s he changed careers and worked as a financial consultant and stockbroker with Clayton Securities of Portland. He retired in 1996. A longtime member of the North Parish Congregational Church in Sanford, he sang in the choir for 40 years and served as a deacon, a trustee, and on several church committees. He was past president of the Sanford Rotary and the Sanford-Springvale YMCA. He is survived by a son, two grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
49

Carl R. Ostroff ’49, of Canton, Mass.; Oct. 28. He was the former president of Abrams Bros., Inc, a carpet distributor in Natick, Mass. An avid Boston Red Sox fan, he passed away peacefully minutes after watching the Red Sox win the 2018 World Series. He also enjoyed traveling and his friendships with his Pi Lambda Phi fraternity brothers. He is survived by two sons, including Michael ’76; two daughters-in-law, including Joanne Topol ’77; and four grandchildren, including Alexander Ostroff ’14.

 

Mar, 2019
49

Helvi Olen Moyer ’49, of South Windsor, Conn.; Nov. 11. She retired from The Travelers Insurance Co. in South Windsor in 1983 as assistant manager. She is survived by her husband, Robert A. Moyer ’50; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
49

Richard A. Dodge ’49, of Gloucester, Mass.; Sept. 6, after a brief illness. After obtaining a law degree from Boston Univ., he owned and operated his own firm, working with multinational companies for more than 40 years. He was a World War II U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and enjoyed sailing. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
48

Morton Y. Paige ’48, of Providence; Nov. 29. He was an insurance executive with United Life and Chubb Life for many years, and was a partner in Young Paige Insurance Agency of Pawtucket. He was active in many Jewish organizations, including Temple Torat Yisrael, Temple Emanu-El, Touro Fraternal Association, Jewish War Veterans, and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He is survived by two children; two grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews, including Robert E. Levin ’75, ’78 MD.

 

Mar, 2019
48

John J. Murphy Jr. ’48, of Topsham, Me., formerly of Stamford, Conn.; Sept. 5, 2017. He worked for General Electric. Following the death of his wife in 1963, he moved to Stamford and pursued a successful career as a marketing executive. He retired to Topsham in 2004. He was a U.S. Army veteran, a community volunteer, and he enjoyed jazz music. He is survived by eight daughters; 19 grandchildren, including Timothy Berger ’99; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
48

Jane A. Hodnett ’48, of Providence; Sept. 15. She taught school in Providence for 39 years. She enjoyed sewing and playing golf and bridge. She is survived by a sister, Barbara Hodnett ’52; a brother-in-law; and seven nieces and nephews, including Robert J. Hay Jr. ’75, Michael Hay ’78, Margaret Hay ’81, and Catherine Hay ’15.

 

Mar, 2019
48

William T. Bluhm ’48, of Rochester, N.Y.; Nov. 16. After receiving his master’s and PhD, he taught at Brown for four years, then joined the faculty of the Univ. of Rochester in the department of political science, where he remained for more than 30 years. He was the author of numerous articles and several books dealing with political philosophy and ethics. During World War II he served in the U.S Army and was awarded the Bronze Star. He enjoyed bird watching, reading mysteries, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; three children; seven grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Mar, 2019
47

Sybil Tanenbaum Zeftel ’47, of Wilmington, Del.; Dec. 5. She was a high school math teacher in Wilmington for many years. She was active in community and political life, serving in leadership roles in the National Council of Jewish Women, League of Women Voters, and Jewish Family Service. In retirement she volunteered with supportive services for domestic violence victims and the homeless and served on the board of Sojourners’ Place. She enjoyed playing bridge, solving crossword puzzles, the opera, and travel. She is survived by three children, including Mona Zeftel ’74 and Peter ’78; six grandchildren; sisters Leslie Puner ’48 and Lynne Switzky ’64; and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
47

John H. Fooks ’47, of Canonsburg, Pa.; Nov. 30. He was employed at Westinghouse Electric Corp. for 46 years and served as vice president and director of productivity and quality control. He was a member of Delta Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Rosalie; four children; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
47

Irving A. Berstein ’47, of Indian River Shores, Fla.; Oct. 26. He was the founder, chairman, and CEO of Hygeia Sciences Inc. Hygeia developed and sold First Response brand over-the-counter pregnancy tests and ovulation predictor tests. Hygeia was then acquired by Tambrands, Inc., maker of Tampax brand products. Previously he served as CEO of Controls for Radiation, and later he was on the founding team that led research development at Harvard-MIT health sciences and technology division. He was a member of the Young Presidents’ Organization, the World Presidents’ Organization, and the Chief Executives Organization. He enjoyed playing tennis and is survived by his wife, Sue; two sons and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
44

Miriam Jolley Spencer ’44, of Harrisville, R.I.; Oct. 20. After graduating with a chemistry degree, she went to work with Union Carbide in Oak Ridge, Tenn. She worked on the Manhattan Project and aided in the development of the atomic bomb as one of the girls of the atomic city. She continued her education at Wellesley College and traveled extensively before returning to Harrisville, where she married and began a family. She was active in her church and a member of the American Chemical Society, the former American Society for X-Ray and Electron Diffraction, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She enjoyed researching family history and is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, and two great-granddaughters.
 

 

Mar, 2019
44

Irma Copes Rusk ’44, of Waterbury, Conn., formerly of New York City; Nov. 14. She worked at Pratt & Whitney in Hartford, Conn., prior to joining IBM, where she spent most of her career, including three years in its Paris office. She retired in 1988. While at Brown, she was editor of the freshman handbook and a member of Sigma Xi and Phi Beta Kappa. She volunteered with God’s Love We Deliver and as a mathematics tutor in the New York public schools. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, two sisters, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
44

John L. Merriam ’44, of Warwick, R.I.; Oct. 31. After serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II, he became a manufacturer representative handling textile machinery and boiler room equipment. He enjoyed sailing and is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
43

Malcolm R. Lovell Jr. ’43, of Washington, D.C.; Oct. 26. After graduating from Harvard Business School, he served as an industrial relations executive for Ford Motor Co. and American Motors Co. He later directed state employment programs for Michigan Gov. George Romney and served as Assistant Secretary of Labor for Manpower under President Nixon. He was president of the Rubber Manufacturers Assoc. in 1981 when President Reagan asked him to be a member of the transition team for the Department of Labor, which led to him becoming Under Secretary of Labor Administration. He was also a guest scholar at the Brookings Institute and a distinguished visiting professor at George Washington Univ., and served as president of the Natural Rubber Shippers Assoc. and the National Planning Assoc., as well as chair of the Tire Industry Safety Council. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy with an intelligence group in China and received a Secretary of the Navy Letter of Citation and the Hung Hua decoration from the Nationalist Chinese Government. He is survived by his wife, Celia; four daughters; and 11 grandchildren, including Rebecca Tilson ’07.

 

Jan, 2019
66
Tom Eastler ’66
He showed anyone, anywhere, how to racewalk
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Photo of Tom Eastler ’66 in a red/black plaid coat
Jan, 2019
FAC

Philip J. Davis, of Providence; Mar. 14. He worked for the federal government at the national Bureau of Standards in Washington, D.C., before joining the Brown faculty in the division of applied mathematics in 1963. His work in numerical analysis and approximation theory includes many research papers and technical books. His books, The Mathematical Experience and Descartes’ Dream, written jointly with Reuben Hersh, explored questions in the philosophy of mathematics and the role of mathematics in society. The Mathematical Experience received the American Book Award for 1983. A unique blend of biography and autobiography appeared in his work Mathematical Encounters of the Second Kind, and his book The Education of a Mathematician embraced both biography and educational philosophy. In addition to his mathematical writings, he also wrote several other books including Thomas Grey: Philosopher Cat and Ancient Loons. In 1956 he received a Guggenheim Award and in 1963 he was the recipient of the Chauvenet Prize from the Mathematical Association of America. In 1997 he was a doctoral lecturer for Roskilde University in Denmark and was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa. He enjoyed music, art, and traveling. He is survived by four children, including Joseph ’82; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2019
1

Deborah M. Cherry ’95 AM, of Cumberland, R.I.; Aug. 20 of ALS. She worked for Royal Caribbean Cruise Line International in the late 1980s on The Song of America as a children’s activity director. She later worked for the city of Cranston as a teacher for 18 years before founding her own preschool in Cumberland, Cherry Blossom Journey School. She is survived by her husband, Kenneth; four children; two sisters; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019
GS 84

J. Cody Harper van Heerden ’84 AM, of Northeast Harbor, Me.; Sept. 12, of ALS. After receiving a master’s degree in geology from Brown, she moved to Walpole, Me., to focus on sediment chemistry at the Univ. of Maine’s Darling Marine Center. She received a second master’s degree in oceanography and worked at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences in Boothbay, Me., and for the Department of Environmental Protection as an environmental and regulation specialist. In 1988 she moved to Northeast Harbor and taught math, developed curriculums, coached soccer and basketball, and served on the board of The Bay School in Blue Hill, Me. She served on many boards, including the Acadia Wildlife Foundation, and was an active trustee of the College of the Atlantic, where she obtained her third master’s degree in human ecology with a focus on institutional economics. She also co-owned Artemis Gallery in Northeast Harbor. She is survived by her husband, Christiaan; two daughters; a brother; and a niece.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 76

Robert A. Seelinger ’76 AM, of Fulton, Mo.; Sept. 22, of pancreatic cancer. He taught Latin and classics at Westminster College. From 1999 to 2005 he served as dean of the faculty and vice president of the college. He is survived by his wife, Cathy; a son; a sister; and three nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 68

Alexander P. Reisbord ’68 MAT, of Alameda, Calif.; Sept. 10. In the early 1960s he joined the Peace Corps and went to Kenya, where he trained mathematics teachers at Kenyatta University in Nairobi. After returning to the U.S., he taught at Narbonne High School in Harbor City, Calif. He ran three marathons, completed two California AIDSRides, and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; five children; and five grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 67

Patricia Malafrone Caizzi ’67 MAT, of Bristol, R.I.; Aug. 4, after a long illness. She was a retired English teacher. In retirement she enjoyed reading, traveling, and playing duplicate bridge. She is survived by her husband, Frank; two daughters, including Carolyn Caizzi ’02; a son; four grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 63

Susan T. Hamamoto ’63 ScM, of San Carlos, Calif.; July 24. She taught English in Germany. She moved to California in the 1970s and worked as a researcher in various labs at UC Berkeley until her retirement in 2011. An avid runner and hiker, she finished the Honolulu Marathon, climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro, did yoga at Machu Picchu and was an active member of the Orinda Hiking Club. She also studied Ikebana at the Buddhist Church of Oakland. She enjoyed cooking and gardening. She is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 62

Calvert Magruder ’62 AM, of Cambridge, Mass.; July 21, of congestive heart failure while in hospice care. In the early 1950s he was employed as an analyst with the CIA. After receiving his degree from Brown, he taught American and European history at the Fessenden School in Newton, Mass. He also taught at Maumee Valley Country Day School in Ohio and at the Sewickley Academy in Pennsylvania before returning to Cambridge. He enjoyed singing and was a member of the Christ Church Cambridge choir for 30 years. He is survived by a brother and several cousins.
 

 

Jan, 2019
GS 61

James K. Whitney ’61 MAT, of Minneapolis; Aug. 10. He had a long career as an educator and coach in the Hopkins school district and was a World War II veteran. He is survived by three children; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 61

Antonio R. Centore ’61 MAT, of Johnston, R.I.; Sept. 8. He was a history teacher and guidance counselor at Cranston East High School and football coach at Johnston High School until his retirement in 2010. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by three children and three grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 60

Laird C. Addis Jr. ’60 AM, of Iowa City, Iowa; July 30, after a short illness. He taught in the University of Iowa department of philosophy from 1964 to 2004. He was a Fulbright Scholar at the State University of Groningen in the Netherlands during the 1970-1971 academic year. He served on several doctoral committees in philosophy and in music. He published many books, including Of Mind and Music. In retirement, he continued to teach in the University of Iowa Senior College. He was a double bass player and performed with the Cedar Rapids Symphony and for nearly three decades with the Quad City Symphony. He was a founding member of the Iowa City Community String Orchestra in 1980. He enjoyed opera, reading, playing golf, and traveling, especially to European countries. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; two daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; two sisters; a brother; six nieces; and a nephew.

 

Jan, 2019
GS 58

John R. Billings ’58 AM, of Stevens Point, Wisc.; Aug. 16, from Parkinson’s disease. He was a professor of philosophy and religious studies at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point for 31 years. Trained as a fencer, he coached and advised the UWSP fencing club in the late 1960s, as well as being the soccer club advisor. He enjoyed playing bagpipes and started the Wisconsin Kilties, a bagpipe and drum band, at UWSP. He was proud that the Kilties performed at numerous parades and won second place at the Highland Games in 1972. He served as president of the local Rotary Club and studied to become a minister in the Presbyterian Church, where he served on several committees and was an interim pastor at Abbotsford Church. He is survived by his wife, Victoria; four children and their spouses; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a brother; and his former wife, Evelyn Schaffer.

 

Jan, 2019
03

Lee J. Golini ’03, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Sept. 3. He continued on after Brown to obtain graduate degrees in both business administration and law from Washington University in St. Louis before opening his law practice in the Jamestown, R.I., area. He was an avid chef, host, and fisherman. He is survived by girlfriend Leah McCue; his parents; and countless brothers and members of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, with which he was profoundly involved.

 

Jan, 2019
83

Russell D. Leblang ’83, of Swampscott, Mass.; Aug. 25, after a year-long battle with hepatic angiosarcoma. He founded Landay, Leblang & Stern law firm, where he built a successful practice in international trade finance, traveling widely, including twice a year to South America. He was an avid marathoner and is survived by his wife, Deahn L. Berrini ’83; son Alexander ’12; a daughter; his mother; two brothers; and nine nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
81

Laura R. Clower ’81, of Grinnell, Iowa, formerly of Boston; July 29. She worked as a speech pathologist in the Boston area for 14 years. In 1999 she moved to California and taught private piano lessons. She also played bagpipes with the Cameron Highlanders of San Diego. She was active in a Grinnell local poetry group and the Grinnell Oratorio Society. She is survived by a son; her mother; brother Robert P. Clower III ’83; a sister-in-law; and two nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
76

Kenneth L. Stein ’76, of Chicago; July 18, from metastatic brain cancer. An outstanding diver at Brown and captain of the 1976 swim team, he competed in the NCAA Swimming and Diving Championship in 1976. After Brown he became a plastic surgeon in Chicago, holding board certifications in plastic and reconstructive surgery and in otolaryngology. He traveled annually with Hearts in Motion, a mission group that provided free surgery to treat craniofacial anomalies to Central Americans in need. He was a member of numerous medical societies, including the American College of Surgeons, the American Medical Assoc., the Chicago Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, the Midwestern Association of Plastic Surgeons, and the Latin American Society of Plastic Surgeons. He enjoyed entertaining and sang with the Rockin’ Docs Band for more than 30 years. He is survived by his three sons; four sisters; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and 11 nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019
76

Gail R. O’Day ’76, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Sept. 22. She was the dean and professor of New Testament and Preaching at Wake Forest University School of Divinity. She began teaching at Hamilton College in 1982 as an instructor in the religion department. From there she served at Eden Theological Seminary and Emory University’s Candler School of Theology prior to joining Wake Forest. Over the course of her career she wrote numerous New Testament reference works and articles and co-authored Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary: A Guide. She was general editor of the international Journal of Biblical Literature and on the editorial board of The New Interpreter’s Bible. In 2014 she became a member of the 4,000 Footers Club, for hiking all 48 mountains above 4,000 feet in New Hampshire. She was an articulate advocate for theological education and is survived by her husband, Thomas Frank; her mother, Sally Wilcox O’Day ’53; four sisters; a niece and a nephew.

 

Jan, 2019
76

Kevin N. Anderson ’76, of Washington, D.C.; May 23, of kidney disease. He spent 10 years as a business reporter and editor at USA Today covering health issues until leaving in 1992 to be communications director for the Alliance for Health Reform. In 1993 he joined the White House Office of Communications, where he served as a chief health policy spokesperson during the rollout of the President’s Health Reform Plan. He later joined his wife in co-founding a corporate and government communications consultancy, where he consulted on health management and policy. Throughout his life he advocated for social justice issues; his most recent cause was sanctuary for refugees, which led to him joining the Good Neighbors Capitol Hill Refugee Resettlement Project. He sang in the Capitol Hill United Methodist Church choir and was an avid fan of the Washington Nationals baseball team. He is survived by his wife, Carol, and a brother.
 

 

Jan, 2019
75

Mark R. Gordon ’75, of Purchase, N.Y.; June 14, of brain cancer. He worked in the financial services industry and was an executive vice president at AllianceBernstein L.P. An accomplished bridge player, he won two U.S. national championships and a world championship. He is survived by his wife, Patricia Caughy-Gordon ’75; son Bernard ’07; two daughters; three grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Jan, 2019
73

Robert C. Thunell ’73, of Columbia, S.C.; July 30. He was a professor of geology and marine science at the Univ. of South Carolina. In addition to teaching, mentoring graduate students, and publishing extensive research on the impact of climate change on oceans and marine ecosystems, he served in many administrative capacities at USC. He was the recipient of several awards and elected a fellow of the Geological Society of America, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2016 he was honored with a Distinguished Achievement Award from URI. A former member of the Brown lacrosse team, he is survived by his wife, Maureen McConaghy ’74; three sons, including Thomas ’10; and two sisters.

 

Jan, 2019
72

Frederick L. McElroy ’72, of Bloomington, Ind.; July 11. He was professor emeritus of Indiana Univ. He was appointed assistant professor in 1987, promoted to associate professor in 1993, and named director of graduate studies in the new department of African American and African Diaspora Studies in 1999. He created, developed, supplied, and taught nine graduate and undergraduate classes in African American literature at Indiana Univ. over the course of his career. He is survived by his wife, Galelyn; daughter Ada McElroy-Tally ’05; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three sisters; and two brothers.

 

Jan, 2019
72

James R. Lecky ’72, of Falls Church, Va.; Aug. 3. He worked for the federal government for 31 years and was a consultant for Centra Technology for eight years. He was a member of Phi Kappa Phi and active at Knox Presbyterian Church, where he served as an elder, teacher, and occasional preacher. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a sister; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
71

Carl C. Chan ’71, of Monterey, Calif.; Sept. 2. He served in the U.S. Air Force as a science and administrative officer from 1971 to 1984. After receiving a master's in library science, he moved to Monterey and pursued a career as a librarian at the Aiso Library of the Defense Language Institute until his retirement. He was past president of the Chinese-American Librarians Assoc., vice president of the Salinas Chapter of the Chinese Americans Citizens Alliance, treasurer of the Monterey Bay Lion Dance Team, and served on the vestry of St. James Episcopal Church, where he also sang in the choir. He is survived by his brother Russell ’68.

 

Jan, 2019
60

Frederic M. Alper ’60, of Boston; Aug. 9, after a long illness. He was president and later chairman of Morris Alper, Inc., one of the largest food brokerage companies in the country, founded by his grandfather. Before his tenure at Morris Alper, he worked in the supermarket business in Latin America. After retiring from Morris Alper at age 55, he became a professor of entrepreneurial studies at Babson College. He was active in Brown affairs, beginning as an alumni interviewer in 1986 and progressively moved into service roles in support of his class fundraising; he was also a 1995 Class Marshal, a Swearer Center volunteer, and performed a wide range of services as a Trustee and member of the Brown Corporation from 1995 to 2001. Most recently he was a member of the President’s Leadership Council assigned to an ad-hoc committee of the Brown Corporation, where he produced the Alper Report, which led to the establishment of a need-blind admission policy at Brown. The Alper Family National Scholarship that was originally started by the late David Alper ’30 continued with the commitment of Fred and his brother Daniel ’63 to provide financial aid to students. Over the course of his career he sat on several boards, was a generous donor to multiple political and charitable causes, and was the recipient of numerous recognitions. He enjoyed classical music and played tennis. He is survived by his wife, Donna; two sons, including Jeremy ’95; two daughters-in-law; a stepdaughter; four grandchildren; a sister; two brothers, including Daniel ’63; and several nieces and nephews, including Robin Candler ’97, McKaile Alper ’95 and Ty Alper ’95. 

Jan, 2019
70

Raymond S. Kagels ’70, of Wakefield, R.I. Aug. 26, of hepatic cell carcinoma. He worked in the insurance industry, beginning as a claims adjuster with Royal Globe Insurance Co. in Providence, then as a chartered property and casualty underwriter at Galaher Settlements Co. out of Boston, retiring as a claims adjuster from Preferred Mutual of New York. He was active in his local community and enjoyed skiing, playing golf, traveling, and walking Narragansett Town Beach. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; three siblings and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
69

Stephen A. Wiener ’69, of West Hartford, Conn.; July 24. Following Brown, he obtained an MBA from Bryant College in 1975 and his Juris Doctorate from UConn Law School in 1979. He practiced law in Connecticut and Massachusetts until his retirement in 2012. He was a member of the Brown men’s soccer team and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame. He enjoyed spending time with his family and is survived by his wife, Susan; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; and his mother.

 

Jan, 2019
68

Richard S. Sugarman ’68, of Niantic, Conn.; Aug. 11, of a heart attack. After obtaining a master’s of social work from UConn, he was program director of the adolescent unit at Elmwood Psychiatric Hospital in Portland, Conn., then worked with emotionally disturbed teenagers at the Children’s Center in Hamden, Conn., before opening a private practice in New London in 1978. He lectured and was a former board member of the East Lyme Youth Services Assoc. and was a member of the Jabberwocks. He enjoyed sailing his catamaran, Ocean Gypsy. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a daughter; a sister; a brother-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
68

David Schorr ’68, of New York City; June 16, of complications of a double aortic dissection suffered while on sabbatical in Bologna, Italy. He taught printmaking, graphic design, book design, typography, calligraphy, and drawing at Wesleyan from 1971 until his death. He often played opera to his students as they worked or read poetry to them. He enjoyed working with writers on illustrated book projects, including providing the illustrations for No Witnesses and Parallel Lives. His book illustrations often accompanied book reviews in the New York Times, Poetry Magazine, and The New Republic. He was a Fulbright Scholar three times: in 1975 to Italy; and in 1998 and 2001 to India. He often returned to India, where he was an adjunct professor at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, teaching graphic design to Indian students during Wesleyan’s winter break. He was also a fellow at the Tamarind Institute in Albuquerque, working with master printers. His drawings, prints, and painting have been shown in New York at the Mary Ryan Gallery and more recently at the Ryan Lee Gallery. He has also had solo shows in Chicago, Milan, Rome, Naples, Paris, Athens, Toronto, Montreal, Mumbai, New Delhi, Ahmedabad and Copenhagen. His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Fogg Museum of Harvard Univ., The New York Public Library, The Israel Museum in Jerusalem and The Museum of Modern Art. He is survived by a sister-in-law and a niece and nephew.

 

Jan, 2019
61

Janice Kollet Gorton ’61, of Warwick, R.I.; Sept. 19. She was the owner and president of PeKo Creations and past president of Warwick Figure Skaters. She is survived a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; two sisters-in-law, including Arlene Gorton ’52; and ten nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019
61

Ernest R. DelMonico ’61, of New Haven, Conn.; Aug. 29. He joined Second National Bank of New Haven after college and rose to the level of vice president, but rather than a career in banking, he chose to become an entrepreneur and started growing and selling multiple computer banking companies, including Bankputer Inc. and Financial Interactive Systems. He also developed commercial and residential real estate properties in New Haven. In 2001, following the death of his father, he took control of the family hat business, DelMonico Hatter, and grew it to be one of the top selling hat businesses in the United States. He won numerous industry awards, including National Hat Retailer of the Year in 2007, and was recognized by Business New Haven as Small Businessperson of the Year in 2008. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and he enjoyed traveling, biking, playing tennis, the theater, and classical music. He is survived by his wife, Janet; three children, including son Bruce ’91; six grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Jan, 2019
60

Francis C. Spicola ’60, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Aug. 3. He was a mechanical engineer who began his career at Pratt-Whitney before starting a 40-year career at the U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport. He enjoyed cooking, photography, and traveling the world. He is survived by five children and four grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
60

Linda Woodworth Keado ’60, of Dallas, formerly of Troy, N.Y.; Aug. 1. She taught social studies and was also a school librarian at Lisha Kill Middle School in Colonie, N.Y. She later was a volunteer tutor and mentor at Stults Road Elementary School in Dallas. She was involved in her local church and enjoyed playing tennis. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019
60

Stephen A Kanter ’60, of Pasadena, Calif.; Sept. 5. After serving with the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps, he practiced medicine, specializing in diagnostic radiology with expertise in angiography and interventional radiology. He practiced for more than 40 years in academic, private practice, health maintenance, and finally more than 20 years with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. He had a strong commitment to nonprofit organizations and served on many boards, including Coleman Chamber Music Assoc., the Historical Society of Southern California, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Pacific Asia Museum, and the Pasadena Conservatory of Music. He is survived by a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
60

Edward A. Forrest ’60, of Hilton Head Island, S.C., formerly of West Hempstead, N.Y.; Sept. 5, following complications of surgery. Before retiring in 2001 and moving to Hilton Head, he worked as a stockbroker and was a member of the Professional Ski Instructors of America, instructing disabled skiers at Windham Mountain in the Catskill Mountains. He was active in South Carolina community activities and enjoyed traveling and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and four nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
59

Margo Aramian Ragan ’59, of Doylestown, Pa.; July 31. She was a homemaker and community volunteer. She enjoyed time spent on both coasts with her children and grandchildren. She is survived by her husband, Thomas; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019
57

Charles R. Meader ’57, of Grantham, N.H., formerly of Norwell and Hingham, Mass.; Sept. 22. After serving as a general medical officer in Vietnam, for which he earned a Bronze Star, he moved to Norwell and worked in the South Shore Medical Center. Later he moved to Hingham and began a private medical practice, which he maintained for many years. He eventually moved his practice to Nashua, N.H., and after retiring from clinical practice, moved to Concord, N.H., where he was a medical consultant in the Social Security Disability Determination Services office of the State Department of Education. He retired from that position and moved to Grantham. He was the author/creator of DiagnosisPro, a computer diagnostic tool. He sold the program, but continued to contribute information to the company operating it for several years. He is survived by his wife, Marthe; five children; two stepchildren; eight grandchildren; two sisters; and his former wife, Roberta Kelly Meader.  

 

Jan, 2019
57

Richard Marcus ’57, of Pittsburgh; Aug. 9. After obtaining a Juris Doctorate from the Univ. of Pittsburgh, he pursued a business career and for 46 years operated General Materials Terminals on the Ohio River, which was begun by his father. During the 1970s he became an adjunct professor at the Univ. of Pittsburgh in the Administration of Justice Department. He is survived by daughter, Susan Jacobson ’82; son, Joel ’85; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019
57

Robert A. Freeman ’57, of Keene, N.H.; Oct. 15. He taught English at Dennis-Yarmouth High School on Cape Cod and later at Northfield Mount Hermon School in Mass. In 1969 he completed his theological studies at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Mass., and served as rector in churches in Newport, Vt., and Lee and East Hampton, Mass. He retired as rector at St. John Episcopal Church in Walpole, N.H. He enjoyed designing gardens and landscapes, collecting model trains and reading. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and a daughter.

 

Jan, 2019
57

V. Dale Meyer Dermer ’57, of Richmond, Va., formerly of Pittsburgh; Aug. 13. Having left Brown early, she continued working toward her degree while starting a family. She obtained a degree in English literature from the Univ. of Pittsburgh in 1975. She began playing duplicate bridge in the early 1970s and was closing in on becoming a triple life master. Among her many accolades in contract bridge, she won the North American National Women’s Pairs Championship in 1985, for which then Mayor Caliguiri declared April 27, 1985, as Dale Dermer Day in the city of Pittsburgh. She is survived by five children, including son David ’83; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
59

William D. W. Grimes ’59, of Rumney, N.H.; Aug. 10, after a brief illness. He served 31 years in the U.S. Air Force. Before retiring from active duty in September 1990, he commanded several organizations related to special projects and was instrumental in the success of the Big Safari program, which is responsible for the acquisition, modification, and worldwide logistic support of special-purpose weapon systems for the United States Air Force. He re-entered government service in October 1990 as deputy to the assistant to the Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) Commander for Special Projects. He earned major awards and decorations, including the Legion of Merit Air Medal with 14 Oak Leaf Clusters, the Air Force Association 2002 Civilian Senior Manager of the Year, and a “Peace Mate” award from the Royal Australian Air Force. He served as an Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Ad Hoc Member, was inducted into the Big Safari Hall of Honor in San Antonio, Tex., and was named an honorary U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sergeant. He enjoyed traveling to six out of seven continents with his wife, gardening, fishing, hunting, woodworking, jigsaw puzzles, and practical jokes. He is survived by his wife, Judy Darling Grimes ’61; three daughters; four grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2019
56

Raymond R. Cooke ’56, of Raynham, Mass.; Sept. 15. After serving in the U.S. Navy for two years, he was employed as a marine service engineer at Babcock & Wilcox of New York City and as a works engineer at ICI America prior to joining Hart Engineering in East Providence, R.I. After 15 years with Hart as project manager and later vice president of the mechanical division, he moved to Herzog-Hart Corp. in Boston as vice president of construction management, retiring in 1997. He settled in Raynham and was appointed a sewer commissioner, where he helped to establish the Raynham sewer system. He was a member of the town’s Industrial Development Commission. He enjoyed playing golf at his vacation home in Myrtle Beach, S.C. He is survived by three daughters, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
55

Geoffrey H. Spranger ’55, ’67 MAT, of Middletown, R.I.; Aug. 2, following a brief illness. While at Brown he was captain of the sailing team and during summer breaks he was a sailing instructor at Bristol and Barrington Yacht Clubs. Following graduation, he was hired as an English/social studies teacher, sailing coach, and dorm master at St. George’s School in Middletown, where he remained on the faculty until 1971. In 1958 he purchased a Hereshoff Class S-Boat, which he raced for 10 years, winning the class championship in 1968. In 1971 he left teaching to become an associate editor at Sail magazine, where he remained until 1979. He then accepted the position of editor for The Practical Sailor, steering the publication until 1987. In his final working years, he was the salesroom manager at Jamestown Distributors, retiring in 1998. Highlights of his sailing and racing career include being a member of the Newport to Bermuda Race crew in 1964, reporting on racing for the America’s Cup for the Newport Daily News, and acting as copublisher of the America’s Cup Report in 1980 and 1983. His last boat, a custom yacht he spent 10 years building, allowed him and his wife to cruise and race for more than 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1955, GS Class of 1967
Jan, 2019
55

Rose DiTommaso Marcaccio ’55, of North Providence, R.I.; July 28. She was an elementary school teacher in North Providence for many years, where she was honored as Teacher of the Year. An avid gardener, she was a member of the Sundial Garden Club. She enjoyed cooking and entertaining. She is survived by her husband, Edward Marcaccio ’54; two sons, including Edward Jr. ’82; two daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019
55

Sylvia Blackledge Earle Legault ’55, of Somerset, Mass.; Aug. 15, after a brief illness. She began teaching in Rehoboth, Mass., and then in the Fall River (Mass.) public school system. She taught fifth grade at Fowler Elementary School in Fall River for more than 30 years, retiring in 2004. She was a classically trained pianist and gave piano lessons prior to her teaching career. She sold Avon for many years and enjoyed reading, traveling, and watching her grandkids play sports. She is survived by her husband, Ron; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and  her grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
55

Carl M. Albert ’55, of Cathedral City, Calif.; July 28. He and his brothers owned Plainville Wayside Furniture in Plainville, Conn., for 30 years. During winters he volunteered at Haystack Mountain in Vermont as a ski patrolman. After retiring in 1993, he and his wife sailed from the East Coast through Panama to the West Coast and settled in California, where Carl taught computer classes for the past 18 years and volunteered at the Indian Wells Tennis tournament. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed traveling, skiing, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three children; and five grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
54

John A. Wallace ’54, of Warwick, R.I.; Sept. 16. He attended Brown through ROTC and upon graduation became a naval officer and went to flight school in Pensacola, Fla. Following his naval career, he started Copters Unlimited, Inc., at T.F. Green Airport. He later began a second career as an engineer with General Dynamics. He served as president of the Warwick Boys & Girls Club and was a former member of the Jaycees and past vice president of the Rhode Island Pilots Assoc. He was also a member of the American Helicopter Society and enjoyed reading and playing cribbage. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter and son and their spouses; two grandsons; two great-grandchildren; and a sister-in-law.

 

Jan, 2019
54

Norman E. Langdon ’54, of Newcastle, Me.; July 29, of pancreatic cancer. He worked as a real estate developer in New Hampshire and Maine before being employed at Damariscotta Hardware in Damariscotta, Me. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and many nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019
53

Brenda Balze Feleppa ’53 of Madison, Conn.; Oct. 4. She was a homemaker and active in the local community. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
53

Maureen Wolkoff Durwood ’53, of Kansas City, Mo.; Aug. 8. She had exceptional fundraising skills and was appointed to Brandeis University National Women’s Committee, where she was national vice president, regional president and a member of the board of directors. She went on to represent Menorah Medical Center Auxiliary, Planned Parenthood, National Council of Jewish Women and the Legal Aid Society by becoming a member of their boards of directors. Her love of the performing arts and passion for the opera led her to The Lyric Opera Circle, where she became president and chairman. She was listed in Who’s Who in American Women, Who’s Who in the Midwest, and Who’s Who in World Jewry. She enjoyed traveling with her husband all over the world. She would read extensively about each new location and eventually became a travel consultant to friends and clients. She is survived by her husband, Richard Durwood ’51; three children and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
53

Fanny E. Bojar ’53, of Cranston, R.I.; July 12. She worked at New England Telephone Co. for more than 30 years. She was an artist and member of the Wickford and East Greenwich Art Clubs, as well as a member of Temple Am David. She is survived by nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2019
52

J. Gordon Schontzler ’52, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Sept. 3, of Alzheimer’s disease. He was an electrical engineer who worked at Bell Labs (N.J.) and Raytheon (Mass.) before moving to California and working for Varian Associates. He traveled the globe setting up marketing for high-tech equipment. In Santa Cruz he worked for Plantronics and became founding president of Manning Environmental and Beta Technology and, later, was president of Nova Controls. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and in the 1980s pursued his dreams by sailing up the East Coast, across the Atlantic Ocean to England and throughout Europe and the Mediterranean to the Caribbean. He enjoyed hiking, skiing, and traveling, especially to France, South America, and China. He is survived by his wife, Lessie; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
52

Charles R. Standish ’52, of Bloomfield, N.Y.; Oct. 3. He served in the U.S. Navy Reserve as an aerial photographer, was captain of Brown’s track team, and worked in the family business, Bristol Springs Equipment Corp. The family grew grapes, harvested vineyards, and sold tractors and farm supplies. When not working, he enjoyed bowling, fishing, and playing cards. He is survived by three children; four grandchildren; and a brother.
 

 

Jan, 2019
52

Townsend R. Morey Jr. ’52, of Longboat Key, Fla.; July 31. He was the retired president of Townsend R. Morey Agency, an insurance company in Albany, where he spent 25 years in the insurance brokerage business before merging with Alexander & Alexander. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Navy. He was an accomplished offshore and America’s Cup trials competitive sailboat racer and also enjoyed flying, for which he held an active private pilot license for more than 65 years. He is survived by three sons and six grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
52

John Grainger ’52, of Southbury, Conn.; July 16, of congestive heart failure. He had a career as an advertising executive in New York City, holding various positions at the firms of Ted Bates & Company, J. Walter Thompson, and Fones and Mann, retiring in 1997. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and member of the Brown University Club of New York and Bedford Hills Community Church, where he sang in the choir for 30 years. He is survived by a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; three stepchildren and their spouses; and 11 step-grandchildren.

Jan, 2019
52

George E. Deane ’52, of St. Augustine, Fla; Aug. 9. Most of his career was spent at SUNY, where he was a professor of psychology—also serving as department chairman—and director of graduate studies. His research was published in many journals, including the Journal of Experimental Psychology, Psychophysiology, and Physiology & Behavior. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of several professional organizations, including the American Psychological Assoc., the American Association of University Professors, the Society for Psychophysiological Research, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Doris; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; and four great-grandsons.

 

Jan, 2019
52

David W. Claire ’52, of Richmond, R.I.; Aug. 9. He was the owner and principal of David Claire and Company, a marketing and communications consultancy, from 1959 to 2005, as well as being a consultant for the Small Business Association of Rhode Island. He was a faculty member of Bryant College Graduate School of Business from 1963 to 1974 and an associate professor at Johnson & Wales Univ. from 1988 to 1999. From 1953 to 1956, he served as a lieutenant JG in the U.S. Navy in the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington, D.C. He enjoyed freelance and short story writing, sailing, and playing tennis. He was a former member of Brown’s varsity lacrosse team. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn Foley Claire ’52; two sons; and a grandson.

 

Jan, 2019
49

William J. Falk ’49, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 7. A notable track and field coach, he began full-time teaching and coaching in 1952 at Attleboro (Mass.) High School. Within three years his track team won a state crown. In 1956, he joined the faculty of Hope High School in Providence, also teaching and coaching track, and piloted Blue Wave teams to six successful seasons. He was both head and assistant coach of track at URI for 18 years, during which time he won five New England Coach of the Year awards while coaching five All-Americans, five IC4A titlists, and 20 New England champions. In 1960, together with Brown University trainer Jack McKinnon, he founded M-F Athletics, marketing molded heel protectors. His “athletic heel” was not confined to track and field athletes, but for a time was also used by members of the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Colts, and Boston Celtics. He attended the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome to observe Olympic activities in his field of coaching, but also to ensure that the device was available to all who wanted it, eventually supplying several countries with the M-F Athletic Heel. He started M-F Track & Field catalog in 1968, which grew to become a leader in its field. His son now runs the company. During his career, he received numerous coaching awards, including induction into the URI Athletic Hall of Fame and the Rhode Island Track Coaches Hall of Fame. He is survived by a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2019
52

James A. Chronley ’52, of Irvine, Calif.; July 31. He earned an MBA from Pepperdine Univ. and worked as an executive for ARCO, Marriott, and Burger Chef, retiring in 1994 as senior vice president of the Taco Bell Corp. He was a U.S. Army veteran and volunteered with numerous organizations, including the Boy Scouts of America, the Knights of Columbus, and International Executive Service Corps. He enjoyed photography, reading, and singing. He is survived by his wife, Monique; six children; 15 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
51

David R. Tillinghast ’51, of New York City; Aug. 15. He was in private practice, then made partner at the law firm of Hughes Hubbard & Reed. He joined Chadbourne & Park as partner from 1990 to 1999, and from 1999 until his retirement in 2014 he was partner and then Of Counsel at Baker & McKenzie. He taught international tax law at NYU School of Law and delivered lectures at conferences all over the world. In 1996, the NYU School of Law, with Baker & McKenzie, established the annual David R. Tillinghast Lecture on International Taxation. He was formerly International Tax Counsel of the U.S. Treasury Department, chairman of the Permanent Scientific Committee of the International Fiscal Assoc., consultant to the United Nations Centre on Transnational Corporations, and author of numerous articles and books, including Tax Aspects of International Transactions. He enjoyed traveling, telling jokes, solving puzzles, and was enthusiastic about sports, as a participant and later as an observer. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; a daughter; a son-in-law; a stepson; and a grandson.

 

Jan, 2019
51

Linda Wilson Grubin ’51, of Chatham, N.Y.; Sept. 2. She worked for a Pfizer product testing laboratory until 1959. In the mid-1960s, she became an elementary school teacher in the New York public school system for 20 years. She retired in 1988. She is survived by three daughters and five grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
50

John K. Stepita ’50, of Marston Mills, Mass.; formerly of Bedford, N.Y.; Oct. 4. He was an administrator at the former Dorr-Oliver Company in Stamford, Conn. He retired to Massachusetts in 1991. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by three children and their spouses and two grandsons.

 

Jan, 2019
50

Glenn W. Rickenbacher ’50 of Bigfork, Mont.; June 17. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, then attended Brown, where he ran varsity cross-country. After graduating, he worked as a real estate agent and then was an account manager at Del Monte Foods before retiring. He enjoyed skiing, hiking, playing golf, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Alene; 11 children; 27 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; a sister and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
50

William J. Osborn ’50, of Atkinson, N.H.; Aug. 1. He was a psychologist and director of mental health clinics in Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. He later opened a private practice in Hampden, Mass.,  and with the assistance of his wife, established the Osborn Mental Health Clinic in West Springfield, Mass., and then in Agawam, Mass. The Osborn Day School for special needs students developed in association with the Osborn Mental Health Clinic. During that time, he wrote an advice column in the local town newspaper. After retiring and moving to Florida, he received his Florida psychologist’s license and joined the Englewood Mental Health Clinic, where he practiced as a family counselor. He enjoyed writing and was director of the Florida Suncoast Writers Guild. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Salley MacArtney Osborn ’52; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; and two great-granddaughters.
 

 

Jan, 2019
50

Joseph P. Marancik ’50, of Casper, Wyo., formerly of Hamilton, N.Y.; Oct. 3. He was a retired engineer. He worked for a variety of companies designing mechanical systems. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy as a pilot. He enjoyed both Alpine and Nordic skiing into his 80s, mountain biking, tennis, fly-fishing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; a daughter; two sons; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
50

Peter H. John ’50, of Cranston, R.I.; July 27. He received a Master of Divinity degree from Union Theological Seminary in New York City and attended the Harvard Divinity School. He was the former interim pastor of the Armenian Euphrates Evangelical Church in Providence. He served in churches in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New Mexico. Following retirement from active ministry, he was the obituary editor at the Providence Journal for 10 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and member of the North American Paul Tillich Society. He is survived by his wife, Rosemarie; a daughter; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.
 

 

Jan, 2019
50

Henry J. Arnold ’50, of Glen Ridge, N.J.; Aug. 28. After serving as an officer in the U.S. Navy, he joined New Jersey Bell (now Verizon) and worked as an executive in the telecommunications industry for 36 years. Active in community affairs, Henry was honored with the Episcopal Diocesan Hegg Lifetime Achievement Award for service to his church and diocese. He was also an active volunteer with the Boy Scouts of America, Mobile Meals, the American Red Cross, and library organizations. He enjoyed sailing, reading, and spending time with his family. He was the son of the late Dr. Samuel T. Arnold ’13, ’14 AM, ’16 PhD, first provost of Brown, having served as professor and dean of the University. He is survived by his wife, Priscilla; three sons and a daughter and their spouses; and four grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
49

Theodore A. Hagios ’49, of Flemington, N.J.; Sept. 3. He was retired from the New Jersey Department of Transportation in the office of land acquisition. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a son and brother, Fritz ’54.

 

Jan, 2019
49

Evelyn Pierson Gotschall ’49, of Sarasota, Fla.; Aug. 1. She received her master’s from UCLA and taught in the Santa Monica private school system. A former director of the Laguna Beach Art Association, she exhibited her work at Laguna Art Museum and in Southern California businesses. She also published several books of her poetry. She was active in the healing arts movement in Southern California and was certified as a practitioner of alternative medicine. She retired in 1990, moving to Florida. She is survived by longtime friend John Milligan; a daughter; a sister; and brother, Walter Pierson ’53.

 

Jan, 2019
49

George S. Doolittle ’49, of New London, N.H., formerly of Floral Park, N.Y.; Oct. 6. After receiving a master’s from Columbia Univ., he taught for one year at Glasgow High School in Montana, followed by 29 years at Sewanahaka High School in Floral Park. In both 1958 and 1961 he participated in the New York State Regents television project teaching English on channel 11. He was a professor of English, adjunct faculty at Nassau Community College from 1964 to 1983; and an associate professor of English, adjunct faculty at Adelphi Univ. from 1974 to 1976. In addition to teaching, he was the director of the Ruth M. Knight Summer Theater Workshop from 1962 to 1983. He retired from teaching in 1983, moved to New London and was active in the community volunteering with Meals on Wheels and as chairman of the board of trustees of the Tracy Memorial Library. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, a prisoner of war, and the recipient of the Purple Heart. He is survived by four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

 

Jan, 2019
49

Lawrence M. Bugbee ’49, of Gardnerville, Nev., formerly of Fair Oaks, Calif.; Aug. 25. He was a retired pediatrician. During his career he held many positions at Mercy San Juan Hospital, including chief of staff, chairman, vice chairman, and secretary of the department of pediatrics. He was actively involved with St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Carmichael for more than 35 years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed writing and woodworking. He is survived by four children; 13 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
49

Warren Averill ’49 of Amherst, Mass.; Aug. 8. He continued his education at UMass Amherst, where he obtained a master’s and doctorate degrees in food science and analytical chemistry. In 1951 he was appointed assistant professor in agricultural and biological chemistry at the Univ. of New Hampshire. He later worked as a research chemist for Perkin-Elmer in Norwalk, Conn. He was a U.S. Army Air Forces veteran of World War II and a member of the American Chemical Society and the Institute of Food Technologists. He enjoyed fishing, sailing, clamming, woodworking, gardening, and traveling. He is survived by six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jan, 2019
48

Robert M. Siff ’48, of Palm Beach, Fla., formerly of Worcester, Mass.; Sept. 11, from Alzheimer’s disease. After completing his freshman year, he enlisted in the U.S. Army, where he helped liberate two concentration camps. Fluent in German and Yiddish, he also served as an interpreter for the military and earned a Bronze Star. After the war he completed his studies at Brown and went on to become president and CEO of B-W Footwear, Ambassador Shoe, and BWA International. He was also president and director of the Two/Ten National Foundation, the shoe industry’s philanthropic organization, and served as director of the Mechanics Bank of Worcester. Active in Brown affairs, he was secretary, vice president, and president of the Brown University Club of Worcester County and worked as a University fundraiser. He served on the board of directors of the Jewish Federation of Central Massachusetts, the EcoTarium museum of science and nature, Clark University’s Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and Worcester Jewish Healthcare Center, as well as being past director of the Worcester Area Association for Retarded Citizens. In addition, he worked for the Massachusetts Association for the Blind and has served on various fundraising committees for charitable, religious, and educational institutions. He was the recipient of the Two/Ten Footwear Foundation T. Kenyon Holly Memorial Award and the Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute’s Angels in Adoption Award, and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts honored him by dedicating the Robert M. Siff State Square in Webster, Mass. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; son Larry ’84; daughter Karen Siff Exkorn ’82; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren, including Emily Siff ’19, Andrew Siff ’21, and Matthew Siff ’21.
 

 

Jan, 2019
48

Merrill “Mel” Shattuck ’48, of Oakland, Calif.; Sept. 24, of Alzheimer’s disease. After earning a master’s in industrial psychology from the Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, he began a long career in California, mostly as an executive search consultant helping to shape the leadership ranks of early Silicon Valley tech firms, including Digital Equipment Corp. and Varian Associates. He was a U.S. Army World War II veteran, serving in the paratroops. At Brown he was involved with the Glee Club, the Brown Daily Herald, Sock & Buskin, and Lambda Chi Alpha. He earned initiation into Phi Beta Kappa, for which he later served as president, Teaching Excellence chair, and vice president of membership of the Northern California chapter. He enjoyed nature, photography, and his daily newspaper, and was considered a shameless punster until his death. He is survived by daughter, Wendy E. Shattuck ’85; a son-in-law; a granddaughter; and brother, Whitney ’54.

 

Jan, 2019
48

Virgil Marson ’48, of Naples, Fla., formerly of North Hampton, N.H.; Oct. 2. Before attending Brown, where he was captain of the football team, he served in the U.S. Army. During a bombing mission he became a prisoner of war for a year and received the Purple Heart. After graduating, he cofounded The Andover Shop, men’s clothing shops in both Andover, Mass., and Harvard Square in Cambridge, Mass. In the late 1960s he began pilgrimages to the U.K. to work with weavers in Ireland and Scotland’s Shetland Islands to produce tweeds of his own design, eventually becoming known as The Prince of Tweeds.  He dressed presidents and celebrities. An avid theater enthusiast, he would travel to Manhattan to attend Broadway shows and frequent jazz clubs. He is survived by a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; a grandson; two sisters; and companion, Sheila Mahoney.

 

Jan, 2019
47

Henry A. Wilkins ’47, ’49 ScM, of Leesburg, Va.; Aug. 21, of cancer. He was an electrical engineer for Westinghouse Electric Corp .(Md.) and retired in 1994 from Asea Brown Boveri Inc. (Md.) as an account executive. He served in the U.S. Navy during both World War II and the Korean War and was a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the Institute of Radio Engineers, and Phi Gamma Delta. He is survived by four daughters; two sons; 15 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1947, GS Class of 1949
Jan, 2019
47

Wilson J. Remick ’47, of Rochester, N.Y.; Sept. 1. He was employed as an engineer in the General Electric Company’s aerospace division for 35 years. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and Delta Upsilon and is survived by a daughter; a son; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
47

Arthur W. Eade ’47, of North Adams, Mass.; Aug. 25, after a brief illness. He taught math at Hamden High School (Conn.) and later became head of the math department. He co-authored a series of high school math textbooks published as part of the Prentice Hall Modern Mathematics series. After moving to Massachusetts, he taught at Northfield Mt. Hermon for a year and then joined North Adams State College (now Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts) math faculty, where he became an associate professor. During his tenure at MCLA, he helped found the computer science department. He suffered a stroke in 1983 and retired the following year. An avid ham radio operator, he was also a talented photographer, a World War II Navy veteran, and a member of the American Federation of Teachers. He enjoyed jazz and opera music and playing chess. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; a daughter; three sons; a grandson; a niece and two nephews.
 
 

 

Jan, 2019
47

Elliot T. Bugbee Jr. ’47, of Longmont, Colo.; July 29. He worked at Triangle Publications as an advertising sales representative and in 1958 was appointed to the national advertising staff of TV Guide magazine. Possessing a baritone voice, he was in the New York company of Oklahoma! and was a member of Actors Equity and the American Theatre Wing. Additionally, he was a soloist at several New York City churches. He was also a member of the Advertising Club of Greater Boston and the former Lantern Club. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed hiking in New England mountains, canoe trips on northern Maine lakes, and, after retirement in 1988, took pleasure in woodcarving. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
46

Robert P. Davis ’46, of Marblehead, Mass.; Aug. 4. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he worked as the owner and president of Central Chemical Corp. of Salem, Mass. He enjoyed playing golf and duplicate bridge. He is survived by two daughters, including Diana Nielsen ’71; son-in-law Arthur Nielson ’68; three grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.
 

 

Jan, 2019
46

Frances Jenckes Christensen ’46, of Essex Junction, Vt.; Aug. 22. She worked in product development labs before marrying and starting a family. She later continued her education and joined the faculty of the former Pine Ridge School in Williston, Vt. She enjoyed singing in the University of Vermont Choral Union and Essex Junction First Congregational Church Choir. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by four sons and their spouses, and nine grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
45

Robert C. Claflin ’45, of Nashua, N.H., formerly of Kalamazoo, Mich.; Sept. 11. He was a fire protection engineer and consultant for many years. He enjoyed working with Habitat for Humanity and was a founding member and director of the Kalamazoo Scottish Festival. He sang bass in the Congregational Church choir and was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by three children, including son George ’73 and daughter Heather Clayton ’77; daughter-in-law Frances Wentworth ’74; seven grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2019
44

Anne Maven Young ’44, ’48 ScM, of Kingsport, Tenn.; Sept. 14. She was a homemaker and community volunteer. Active in the Girl Scouts of America, she was awarded her 60-year membership pin and was president of the Appalachian Girl Scout Council for six years. She was also an active member of the American Association of University Women and the Friends of the Kingsport Public Library, volunteered with Meals on Wheels, and served as state treasurer for the Tennessee Ornithological Society. She is survived by her husband, Howard ’48 PhD; seven children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1944, GS Class of 1948
Jan, 2019
44

Norton C. Wheeler ’44, of Mystic, Conn.; Sept. 29. He was employed with Davis-Standard machinery company for 60 years, spearheading the company’s first lab in the 1960s and growing it from a small space to a building equipped for customer trials as well as research and development, including his own. In the early 1980s, he patented the DSB screw design, which became the industry’s premier feedscrew and gave Davis-Standard a global technical presence. The DSB continues to be the basis for all Davis-Standard screw designs. In recognition of his contributions in extrusion technology, he was awarded a Fellow of the Society of Plastics Engineers in 1985 and the Bruce C. Maddock Award in 1998, retiring in 1989 but remaining engaged as a consultant until the age of 90. During World War II and the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps and Air Force. He played both clarinet and sax in various jazz bands and was a member of the Mud Clam Five. He was also involved with many local community groups, serving as a trustee of the Mystic & Noank Library and as a volunteer with Meals on Wheels. He is survived by five children; six grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
44

Shirley H. Reeves ’44, of Douglas, Mich.; Aug. 14, after suffering a stroke. She was a retired school teacher and enjoyed traveling.

 

Jan, 2019
41

Frederick G. Barlow ’41, ’47 AM, of Cerro Gordo, Ill.; July 24. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1942 to 1945 and, once discharged, returned to Brown. He began teaching in New Hampshire before being recalled to service during the Korean War. He then moved to Cerro Gordo and taught sixth grade, later moving to seventh grade, and finally retiring as a junior high school principal. He was a member of the Illinois Education Assoc., the Parent Teacher Assoc., and the National Education Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; two children; six grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandchild.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1941, GS Class of 1947
Jan, 2019
39

Mary C. Clarke ’39, of Middletown, R.I.; Aug. 16. A retired technical proofreader for MacLaughlin Research in Middletown, she previously taught at Lenthal and Mumford Schools in Newport. She was a talented pianist and longtime member of the Hillside Baptist Church in Newport. She is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019
38

Dorothy Page Mills Webb ’38, of Laguna Woods, Calif.; Sept. 18. She was a homemaker who enjoyed learning and kept active in local community events. She also enjoyed the boogie board given to her on her 80th birthday, which she rode into her 90s. She is survived by four children and three stepchildren; 23 grandchildren; and 37 great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019
38

John A. Davison ’38, of Bainbridge Island, Wash.; Nov. 15, 2017. He retired from U.S. Rubber Company and taught courses in chemical engineering at UConn. An active leader for many years in the Appalachian Mountain Club, he enjoyed traveling in South America and Europe and was a lifetime member of the American Chemical Society. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a son; and three nieces.

 

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