Obituaries

Jun, 2024
MD 93
‘Galen Had Time for Everybody’
Remembering a physician who crossed all types of barriers
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Archival black and white image of Galen Henderson tying a bowtie.
Jun, 2024
47
Father of Sperm Banking
Jerome K. Sherman ’47 developed the technique that helped make the artificial insemination industry boom decades later.
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Archival black and white image of Jerome Sherman
Related classes:
Class of 1947, Class of 1991
Jun, 2024
FAC

Georges Peter, of Brookline, Mass.; Jan. 11. He joined the Brown faculty in 1972 and retired after 34 years with the title of emeritus professor. During his career at Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children’s Hospital, he established the board-certified division of pediatric diseases. He authored or coauthored more than 150 publications. His focus was committed to the prevention of pediatric infectious diseases through immunizations. He was an active member of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), serving on the Committee on Infectious Diseases for 13 years. He edited five editions of the AAP’s Red Book (Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases). He served on three federal committees: the Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines, the National Vaccine Advisory Committee, and the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. He was a member of the World Health Organization’s Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization and he was a president of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. An elected member of the Society of Pediatric Research, the American Pediatric Society, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, he was also a member of the board of directors of the American Committee for the American Memorial Hospital in Reims, France. He was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Distinguished Physician Award of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, the AAP Award for Lifetime Contribution to Infectious Diseases Education, and a special recognition award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Devoted to Harvard athletics, he managed the Harvard Stadium scoreboard for 29 years. In 2022 he received the President’s Special Award from the Harvard Club of Boston. He was a lifetime fan of the Boston Red Sox and he enjoyed sailing in the Lightning Class, in which he competed for more than 60 years, winning numerous regattas and sailing in national and international championships. He was a member of the Annisquam Yacht Club, Boston Harvard Club, Rhode Island Harvard Club, University Club, Niantic Bay Yacht Club, and Longwood Cricket Club. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn McClintock Peter ’76 MAT; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
FAC

Richard D. Frary, of Barrington, R.I.; Oct.16. He matriculated at Amherst College and Boston University School of Medicine and completed his residency at Boston City Hospital before joining the U.S. Navy and being assigned to the Naval Hospital in St. Albans, N.Y. Upon discharge he opened an internal medicine and cardiology office in Rhode Island. He retired in 1994. He was a member of the American Medical Association and served several years on the Council of the Rhode Island Medical Society. He was a past president of the Bristol County Medical Society and a past president of the RI Chapter of the American Society of Internal Medicine. He also served on the boards of the RI Lung Association and the RI Chapter of the American Heart Association. He was an early faculty member of Brown’s medical school. In addition, he was a long term member of the Barrington Yacht Club and served several years on the Barrington Harbor Commission. He is survived by his wife, Joan, and three sons.

Jun, 2024
FAC

Timothy M. Empkie, of Providence, R.I.; Dec. 30. He had a distinguished career in medicine. He spent two years in the National Health Service Corps and spent a decade coordinating health programs in Central Europe and the Balkans. He joined the Department of Family Medicine in 1984 and later was director of predoctoral education and coordinated medical student exchanges between Brown and German universities in Rostock and Tübingen until 1993. He then was an assistant dean in the Warren Alpert Medical School and from 2002 to 2016 was an advisor to PLME students. In addition to teaching, he was a community activist who led efforts to stopconstruction of a stadium on park land in Providence and supported LGBTQ+ rights. Always a basketball fan, he served as faculty liaison for the men’s basketball program from 2017 until the time of his passing. He is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
MD 76

Louise S. Kiessling Fair ’76 MD, of Wakefield, R.I.; Oct. 12, of congestive heart failure. She was a developmental and behavioral pediatrician. She served from 1984 to 2000, and 2001 to 2003, as pediatrician-in-chief at Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket, R.I., where she was also founder and director of the hospital’s Neurodevelopmental Center. She earned a master’s degree from Cornell University in psychology and counseling and worked as a psychologist and social worker in New York state’s public school system before attending and graduating from Brown’s medical school. She retired in 2003 but continued to serve in multiple leadership roles with the Washington County Coalition for Children, helping to provide continuing education and training to local pediatricians and mental health providers in Rhode Island’s South County community. She enjoyed reading, music, gardening, and travel. She is survived by two stepdaughters. 

Jun, 2024
GS 00

Gabriel G. Hudson ’00 MFA, of Burlington, Iowa; Nov. 23. 

Jun, 2024
GS 95

Lois McPherson Beach ’95 AM, of Westerly, R.I.; Dec. 31. She began teaching in 1965 in Stonington, Conn., before starting a family. While raising her family, she taught nursery school and was a camp director for the Camp Fire Girls. She was a skilled seamstress and opened the Pin Cushion fabric store in Westerly. Later, after selling the store, she worked at Mystic Planetarium as a tour guide but, in 1988, returned to teaching in the Westerly school system as an English as a Second Language teacher. She joined a teacher outreach program and traveled to China, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and England. She retired in 2011 and continued to knit, quilt, and travel. She is survived by four children, six grandchildren, and six siblings. 

Jun, 2024
GS 90

Edward G. Gray ’90 AM, ’96 PhD, of Tallahassee, Fla.; Dec. 22, of a heart attack while mountain biking. He spent his career teaching at Florida State University, rising to the rank of full professor and department chair. He published four books of American history and was coeditor of the Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution. At the time of his death he had begun writing two more books. He enjoyed sports, attended Pilates classes, and taught himself the banjo. He is survived by his wife, Stacey Rutledge ’92 MAT; a daughter; a son; his parents; two brothers; his mother and father-in-law; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and 10 nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 86

Silvia J. Dasilva ’86 AM, of Bristol, R.I.; Nov. 14. She graduated from Rhode Island College with a degree in secondary education with a major in Portuguese. She continued her post graduate studies at Brown, obtaining her master’s degree in Brazilian Studies, and taught Portuguese at Rhode Island College. She was involved in several Portuguese organizations and was a member of the American Association of Speakers of Spanish and Portuguese. She is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law and four grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
GS 85

Thomas E. Leary ’85 PhD, of Youngstown, Ohio; Oct. 29. While obtaining his doctorate at Brown, he was curator of Slater Mill in Pawtucket. Upon graduation, he settled in Buffalo, N.Y., and was director of interpretation for the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. While there, he coordinated a survey of Buffalo industry, along with the National Park Service’s Historical American Engineering Record, and he and his wife wrote a history of Bethlehem Steel’s Lackawanna plant. They also organized exhibits documenting the area’s industries titled “Made in Buffalo.” In 1988, the couple formed Industrial Research Associates, a consulting firm doing mitigation and other research for government and private agencies, including the Youngstown Museum of Industry and Labor. In 1999 he was hired by Youngstown State University as a history professor. He taught American architectural and industrial history and trained students in the art of public history documentation and museum practices. He retired from teaching in 2021 but continued to work at the museum until his death. He is survived by his wife,
Elizabeth Sholes.

Jun, 2024
GS 77

Gordon J. Fine ’77 AM, of San Francisco; Nov. 3, of cancer. He graduated from George Washington University Law School and had a 30-year legal career. He was active in the American Decorative Arts Forum and enjoyed collecting antiques. He is survived by three brothers and sisters-in-law, and seven nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 76

Paul B. Jenison ’76 AM, of Redding, Conn.; Dec. 10. He went on to earn his MBA at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and had a career as a financial consultant. He was executive director of UBS Investment Banking and senior managing director of Jenison Financial LLC. He is survived by three children. 

Jun, 2024
GS 75

Christine J. Lees Jonientz ’75 AM, of Hamden, Conn.; Nov. 7. She worked as a consumer banker and was a master gardener. She is survived by her son and daughter-in-law, a brother, and her former husband, Frank Jonientz.

Jun, 2024
GS 73

Neal A. Sondergaard ’73 ScM, ’77 PhD, of Severna Park, Md.; Jan 12. He worked as a scientist for the Naval Research Lab, earning accolades for his research. Upon retirement he worked as a consultant for Syntek Technologies. He was a member of Sigma Xi, the American Society of Naval Engineers, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He loved traveling, watching the Baltimore Ravens, and tinkering in his workshop. He is survived by his wife, Sally Olver Sondergaard ’76; two children; two grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jun, 2024
GS 73

Menasche M. Nass ’73 ScM, ’75 PhD, of Santa Monica, Calif.; Oct. 28. After graduating from Stanford Law School in 1982, he worked as a tax attorney at DeCastro West, where he eventually became a partner. He was still practicing law at the time of his death. He enjoyed following current events, spending time with his family, swimming, traveling, and playing golf. He is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, and three grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
GS 73

Madeleine I. Boucher ’73 PhD, of Melrose, Mass., formerly of Stamford, Conn.; Dec. 17. She was an assistant professor at St. Anselm College (N.H.) until 1974, when she joined the faculty at Fordham University as assistant professor. She retired from Fordham as full professor in 1998. She was a Women’s Studies in Religion Associate at the Harvard Divinity School from 1983 to 1984. She published The Mysterious Parable: A Literary Study in 1977 and The Parables in 1981. She was also an accomplished artist, painter, and sculptor. She studied at the Yale School of Art and Parsons School of Design. She enjoyed traveling, especially to England, France, Italy, and Israel. She is survived by two sisters and nine nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 71

John E. Rowe ’71 PhD, of Cary, N.C.; Dec. 8. Prior to matriculating at Brown, he taught at Clark Atlanta College and then worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. After graduating, he began working at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey and became department head in 1980. In 1983 he joined the physics department at the University of Florida, coleading a newly formed program in microelectronics and material physics. After two years he returned to Bell Labs, where he worked until 1996. He then accepted a position at the Army Research Office (ARO) in North Carolina and became an adjunct professor of physics at NC State. In 2004 he left ARO and became founding deputy director of the Institute for Advanced Materials at UNC-Chapel Hill. After three and a half years at UNC he returned to the physics department at NC State as a research professor. He was the recipient of several awards and distinctions, including being selected as a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Vacuum Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2011 he received the Albert Nerken Award from the American Vacuum Society for his research on synchrotrons, a type of circular particle accelerator. He was an active member of Apex United Methodist Church and enjoyed fishing, watching football, and Jeopardy!. He is survived by his wife, Susie; three children; and five grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
GS 71

George A. Kent ’71 PhD, of Cambridge, Mass.; Nov. 16, from complications of dementia. He had a 30-year career in the U.S. Navy, beginning with submarines, then transitioned to research and development of submarine systems. He retired to Cambridge in 1995. He worked at Towers Perrin in Boston and became a pension actuary. He tutored math and science at Cambridge Rindge and Latin School and was an ordained Elder in the Presbyterian Church. He played tuba in the Cambridge Community Band and enjoyed singing in church choirs. He is survived by his wife, Mary Louise; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother. 

Jun, 2024
GS 69

Deborah Kapstein Bronitsky ’69 MAT, of Little Compton, R.I., formerly of Newton, Mass.; Nov. 17. Upon graduating, she began teaching fifth grade in the Barrington (R.I.) school system and later taught English and social studies at Meadowbrook Junior High School in Newton. She retired from teaching in 2006 after serving as a permanent substitute teacher at Newton North High School. She worked to improve public education through the parent-teacher associations at her children’s schools. She was devoted to her family and boasted an encyclopedic knowledge of jazz music and sports. She is survived by her husband, Leonard; a daughter; a son; two brothers; and two nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 69

Joseph F. Baugher ’69 PhD, of Chicago; Nov. 12, of kidney failure and cancer. While at Brown working towards his PhD, he met his future wife, Judith Robinson, the physics department secretary. He graduated and did a one-year fellowship to Sheffield, England, sending for her. Upon returning to the U.S., they married and he began teaching physics at the University of Chicago. He went on to work at Lucent Technology and the Illinois Institute of Art. A fan of science fiction and astronomy, he published On Civilized Stars: The Search for Intelligent Life in Outer Space and The Space Age Solar System. He also enjoyed walking and biking along Lake Michigan. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter; grandson; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 68

Kenneth R. Alvar ’68 ScM, ’71 PhD, of Middleton, Wisc., formerly of Los Alamos, N. Mex.; Dec. 26. He met his future wife while still a physics graduate student at Brown. They were married while each continued their graduate educations. He held various postdoctoral positions that brought the couple to San Diego, Minneapolis, and finally to Los Alamos. They retired to Middleton, where they enjoyed exploring the national and state parks. He enjoyed canoeing, fishing, and taking photographs of wildflowers and the flowers in the garden his wife grew before her passing. He is survived by two sisters and brothers-in-law. 

Jun, 2024
GS 62

Jack R. Leibowitz ’62 PhD, of Santa Fe, N. Mex.; Nov. 4. After college and before receiving his PhD from Brown, he worked for six years in government and industrial laboratories. He later became a physics professor at the University of Maryland, published widely on experimental and theoretical condensed matter physics research, and was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He was also elected a Fellow of the Washington Academy of Sciences. In retirement, he painted and authored Hidden Harmony: The Connected Worlds of Physics and Art. He was an early member of the Santa Fe Alliance for Science, made up primarily of retired scientists dedicated to introducing young students to scientific exploration. He is survived by his wife, Ariel; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; a brother; and six nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2024
GS 62

Donald B. Gibson ’62 PhD, of Princeton, N.J.; Nov. 18. He was an assistant professor at Wayne State University before joining the faculty at UConn as an associate professor of African American literature. He retired from teaching at Rutgers in 2001. During the late 1960s and early 1970s he published several articles, including Twentieth-Century Interpretations of Modern Black Poets in 1972. In 1970, he was awarded a study grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and a research grant by the American Council of Learned Societies. He also accepted an appointment to the editorial board of the Langston Hughes Society, and in 1974 he was on the editorial board of the Black American Literature Forum. He edited two books: Five Black Writers: Essays on Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Hughes and LeRoi Jones and Black and White: Stories of American Life, which was a collection of short stories for which he wrote the introduction. Other writings included Is there a Black Literary Tradition? (1971), Ralph Ellison and James Baldwin (1971), and The Good Black Poet and the Good Gray Poet (1971). He enjoyed singing, cooking, wood carving, and playing tennis, which he did into his 80s. In retirement, he traveled to Senegal and South Africa and lectured at local universities. His final years were spent in both Princeton, New Jersey, and Isle La Motte, Vermont, with his partner, Linda Fitch, who survives him. He is also survived by two sons, three grandchildren, and his former wife, JoAnne Gibson. 

Jun, 2024
GS 56

Robert W. Simpson ’56 ScM, of Hillsborough, N.J.; Dec. 25. He completed his PhD in microbiology and virology at Rutgers University and worked as a research virologist at Public Health Research Institute in New York City. In 1968, he returned to Rutgers as professor and director of virology at Waksman Institute of Microbiology. He was a member of the New Jersey State Commission on Cancer Research and served as a scientific reviewer for various NIH Study sections. He was an active volunteer in the community, serving with the Hillsborough Rescue Squad as a member and crew chief, the American Red Cross as a first aid/CPR instructor and board member, a member and chairman of the Hillsborough Environmental Commission, and first president of Friends of Hillsborough. He was an accomplished pianist and enjoyed attending concerts. He completed home improvement projects, acquiring new skills and creating a beautiful landscape that surrounded the swimming pool he personally built for his family. He is survived by four children and their spouses, six grandchildren, and a brother. 

Jun, 2024
GS 54

E. Lowell Swarts ’54 PhD, of Verona, Pa.; Feb. 19.  He was employed with Alfred University, General Electric Co., and PPG Industries, from which he retired in 1994 after 35 years in their glass technology laboratories. He was a member of the American Ceramic Society, the American Chemical Society, the International Commission on Glass, the Pittsburgh Oratorio, and the Funeral Consumers Alliance of Western Pennsylvania. He enjoyed traveling, photography, and the fine arts of Pittsburgh. He is survived by his wife, Rachel; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister; and three nephews. 

Jun, 2024
GS 50

Herbert E. Francis Jr. ’50 AM, of Huntsville, Ala.; Feb. 2, at 100 years of age. After serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps, he graduated from the University of Wisconsin and Brown and taught at Penn State, the University of Tennessee, and Northern Illinois State. From 1958 to 1966, he taught English literature at Emory University. He then helped to establish the humanities program at the University of Alabama. He retired after 20 years to focus on his writing but during his tenure he was the recipient of three Fulbright fellowships; one to Oxford University and two to teach at the Universidad National de Cuyo in Mendoza, Argentina. While teaching in Mendoza, he made a point of buying a newspaper each day from one particular street kid named Carlos Roberto Francis and a powerful bond developed, leading to the adoption of Carlos as his son. He purchased an apartment in Madrid, Spain, and spent many summers there writing. He volunteered translating works of Argentinean authors living in exile in Spain and won several awards for his own writings. He was a member of the Huntsville Literary Association and is survived by his son, Carlos, Carlos’s children and grandchildren in Argentina, a brother, and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
22

Trevor L. Labuda ’22, of Falls Church, Va.; Nov. 3. He and his twin brother, Evan, were known in the diving community as the Stanford Twins before Trevor matriculated at Brown. Trevor became a member of the Brown diving team, setting school records and winning athlete of the week titles. Always willing to help others, he served as an EMT and volunteered with Camp Kesem for four years as a counselor, unit leader, and recruitment coordinator. After moving to Falls Church for his first job as a human resources associate at Capital One, he joined the local volunteer fire department. He always sought out opportunities to volunteer and help others. He is survived by his parents, four siblings, and his grandparents. 

Jun, 2024
09

Michael A. Vargas ’09, of San Benito, Tex.; Jan. 4. After Brown he continued to the University of Missouri–St. Louis, where he earned a master’s degree in educational leadership. His commitment to community and public service was evident during his tenure as a Congressional intern under the mentorship of former Congressman Solomon Ortiz of South Texas. In addition, he furthered his experience by interning with the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute in Washington, D.C. His federal career reached its culmination as he assumed the role of Congressional Affairs Assistant for the Presidential Classroom Program. In this capacity, he was instrumental in organizing and facilitating student visits to federal agencies and Capitol Hill and shared his knowledge about domestic and foreign policy with the students, family, and friends who visited. He went on to be selected by Teach for America, becoming an educational ambassador committed to uplifting impoverished communities such as St. Louis, where he taught in the Hazelwood School District. Returning to San Benito, he embarked on a distinguished career in public service, serving as an elected trustee on the San Benito CISD School Board. At the time, he was their youngest board president at the age of 31. As president, he implemented groundbreaking policies, including the creation of the district’s Dr. Raul Garza, Jr. STEAM Academy and Early College Academy. He played key roles in various campaigns and was a member of the Texas Association of School Boards’ Legislative Committee, working toward positive changes in state education policies. Additionally, he served as the executive secretary of the Mexican American School Board Association, which awarded him the Héroes de MASBA award for the district’s five consecutive years of MASBA membership. He later became the assistant director of public affairs with the City of Pharr and cofounded School Board Leaders for Safe Schools. He is survived by his partner, Mario Cortez; his mother; two brothers; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2024
97

Alicia Brooke Gomez ’97, of New York City; Nov. 22. In 2001, she began working with her mother, Mariette Himes Gomez, helping to expand the clientele at her mother’s interior design firm. Eventually she established her own firm, Brooke Gomez Design, and over the course of her career collaborated with high-profile celebrities, including Michael J. Fox, Sigourney Weaver, and Bethenny Frankel. She frequently appeared on Bravo’s reality show Bethenny Ever After. Her style and talent promoted her to be a sought after professional in the industry. She was a marathon runner and enjoyed kickboxing. She is survived by her mother and brother.

 

Jun, 2024
97

Wallace G. Earle ’97, of Somerset, Mass.; Dec. 14, of cancer. He graduated from Roger Williams University School of Law in 2003 and worked for several years as a counselor serving youth in need at Life Resources. This experience led him to represent the underserved community in juvenile and family court. While working full-time, attending college, and raising his own family, he devoted his time to coaching softball, basketball, and baseball for his children and grandchildren in leagues in Fall River and Somerset. He was an avid Boston sports teams fan and enjoyed listening to music and reading, especially Shakespeare; he also had an intense interest in politics. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, two sisters, and a brother. 

Jun, 2024
96

Hannah K. Edgerly ’96, of Providence, R.I., formerly of Massachusetts; Nov. 8, after a long illness. She worked at Rites and Reason Theatre and at Louis Restaurant and was active in the local spoken word poetry gatherings. In the 2000s she moved to the Berkshires and acted at the Lavender Door in Stockbridge, Mass., as well as with local poetry groups. She tutored students at Berkshire Community College and worked in a local bookstore. She returned to Providence in 2015 and continued her writing, which led to her becoming a 2018 finalist in an online writing competition sponsored by the Ireland Writing Retreat. She traveled to Ireland to participate in their workshops. She enjoyed playing Dungeons & Dragons remotely with groups of friends in the Berkshires. She is survived by her parents, Elizabeth and David Edgerly ’64, and a sister.

Jun, 2024
95

Zachary Wald ’95, of Piedmont, Calif.; Dec. 13, of cancer. He earned a master’s degree from Berkeley in city and regional planning and spent the majority of his career working for the City Council of Oakland. He was the original author of the Oakland Pedestrian Master Plan. He is survived by his wife, Eliza Sorensen ’96; three children, including Spencer ’28; and extended family. 

Jun, 2024
92

Helene Pliner Myers ’92, of Sarasota, Fla.; Jan 10. She was the president of T.W. Rounds travel and former president of the League of Women Voters. She was passionate about the arts and served as a board member of the Asolo Theater and a treasurer of the Sarasota Fine Arts Society. She was a member of Temple Beth El, Providence, as well as Temple Emanu El, Sarasota. She is survived by her husband, C. William; two sons, including Dr. Thomas R. Myers ’81; a daughter-in-law; and two granddaughters.

Jun, 2024
92

Christina Monson ’92, of Nashua N.H.; Nov. 19, of metastatic breast cancer. She spent her junior year abroad in Nepal, which began a lifelong passion for the country and Tibetan Buddhism. After working in Chicago for Equity Office Properties for several years, she returned to Nepal to work for World Learning as the assistant director of its Experiment in International Learning program. She was eventually promoted to associate dean for East Asian Academic Studies for World Learning. She became proficient in spoken and written Tibetan and Nepali, and was a translator for Buddhist teachers who traveled throughout Europe and the United States. In 2017, she was certified as a business coach by the Ivey Business School in Hong Kong. She later founded Monson Coaching and Translations LLC. Her lifelong passion for the lineage and teachings of the Tibetan Buddhist Sera Khandro (1892-1940) led her to translating and writing A Dakini’s Counsel, a book of translations of Sera Khandro’s teachings. She was active with the Asia Foundation and was an avid skier, formerly competing as a member of Brown’s ski team. 

Jun, 2024
90

Suzanne M. Lynch ’90, of New York City; Jul. 14, of cancer. She lived in Paris for 10 years after graduating from Brown and worked in journalism and in public relations. After returning to the U.S., she worked as an interpreter for the United Nations and the New York family court system. She was a Francophile at heart and enjoyed traveling and exploring new places with her daughter; the outdoors, where she completed a 17k elevation trail; and literature and writing. She is survived by her daughter; her mother; two sisters, including Michele Matzinger ’92; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Jun, 2024
88

Eve Harrison ’88, of Woodbridge, Conn.; Dec. 19, from breast cancer. She earned a master’s in social work from Columbia University School of Social Work in 1992 and worked for more than 20 years in Milford, Conn. She is survived by her husband, Marc; two sons; her father and stepmother; three siblings, including sister Julie Harrison ’85; and nieces and nephews. 

 

Jun, 2024
87

Royce T. Johnson ’87, of Oakland, Calif.; Dec. 30. He was a procurement and sourcing manager for VeriSign, Inc. In addition to enjoying his position at VeriSign, he also liked to travel around the world and spend time with family and friends. He is survived by his husband, Marcus James Dawson; his mother; a sister; and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
84

Maureen Mulligan ’84, of Watertown, Mass; Dec. 25, after six months battling pancreatic cancer. While at Brown, she exceled at field hockey and majored in women’s studies. She was a passionate advocate for equality, justice, and the rule of law throughout her life and career. After Brown, she attended Boston College Law School and subsequently practiced law in both Boston and San Francisco prior to becoming a trial lawyer and an equity partner in private practice at Peabody & Arnold in Boston. She was later appointed to the Massachusetts Superior Court. At the time of her death, she was an associate justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court. From 2019 to 2023, she served as chair of the American Bar Association Commission on Women in the Profession and also on the advisory committee of the American Bar Association Diversity and Inclusion Center. She was the founding chair of the Boston Bar Association Women’s Advancement Forum and served a four-year term on the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers. She enjoyed international travels with her husband Carlos Fernandez ’82, who survives her. She is also survived by her son, her parents, a sister and brother-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, and many extended family members. 

Jun, 2024
84

James F. Mihaley ’84, of Venice, Calif.; Feb. 1. He was a writer, speaker, and environmental activist. He is survived by his parents, a sister, a brother, a niece, and two nephews.

Jun, 2024
80

Col. Derek “Moondog” Donovan ’80, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 11, of esophageal cancer.  He joined the U.S. Marine Corps in 1981 and following his commissioning as a 2nd Lieutenant, he attended the Basic School at Marine Corps Base Quantico and subsequently attended flight school at Naval Air Station Whiting Field, earning his wings as a naval aviator in 1983. Designated a Huey helicopter pilot, his initial squadron was the North Carolina based Gunrunners, where he received his call sign Moondog. His career included deployments and affiliations with the Gunrunners, Golden Eagles, Blue Knights, Warriors, Ugly Angels, and Black Knights. He flew more than 3,500 flight hours, visited more than 70 countries, lived aboard U.S. naval vessels for more than four years of his life, and was qualified in eight different military occupational specialties. His assignments included being selected as aide-de-camp to the Secretary of the Navy and the commanding officer of the Marine Corps Air Facility at Marine Corp Air Facility Quantico, Virginia. His last assignment before retiring was with the Presidential Commission for the Care of America’s Returning Wounded Warriors.  Donovan also had a stint working in the nonprofit world for Fisher House Foundation. As a volunteer, he worked as an elected official, interviewed prospective students for Brown, and gave driving lessons to local youth. He was a member of the Order of the Kentucky Colonels, an ordained nondenominational minister (via the internet), and a life member of several veterans service organizations. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; his mother; a sister; and two brothers. 

Jun, 2024
77

Diane S. Panizza ’77, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Jan 9. She spent 42 years in laboratory healthcare with Women and Infants Hospital. She enjoyed going to the beach, being on a boat, and camping with her family. She loved animals and traveling with her sister, and visited zoos at each of her destinations. She is survived by a sister and a brother. 

 

Jun, 2024
75

Weldon D. Rogers ’75, of Atlanta; Jan. 29. He had a passion for tennis during the 1960s, a time when it was primarily a whites-only sport. He was instrumental in the integration of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association as a youth, playing in tennis tournaments up and down the East Coast. He was active in the struggle for civil rights. He played tennis at Brown and after graduating became a tennis coach in Atlanta. He continued playing competitively on national circuits, and in 1977, he and his partner won the men’s doubles title at the 60th National Championship tournament held by the American Tennis Association. He is survived by his wife, Vicki; a sister; a brother; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
75

Steven Michael Lewis ’75, of Lyme, Conn.; Jan. 9, of cancer. He loved literature and wrote for the Brown Daily Herald while in college. He worked in senior level stock broker positions for more than two decades at both Morgan Stanley and E.F. Hutton. He was active in Democratic Party politics, serving on the Lyme Democratic Town Party Committee, as well as being offered a position in the Koch mayoral administration. He is survived by his wife, Denise; two brothers; and his nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2024
74

Cornelius E. Kiely IV ’74, of Barrington, R.I.; Feb. 3. He was a former ranger for the Cape Cod National Seashore and more recently was director of institutional advancement at St. Luke’s School. He served on the Bristol 4th of July Committee and was a Eucharistic minister at St. Mary’s in Bristol. In addition, he helped lead a local suicide survivors support group and was a proud member of Alcoholics Anonymous for 26 years, where he offered mentorship and support for those suffering addiction in their lives. While at Brown, he was president of the Sigma Chi fraternity and a member of the men’s football team. He is survived by his wife, Laurie; two sons, including Stuart ’00; two daughters-in-law; and two sisters.

Jun, 2024
74

Judith Finkelstein Kashtan ’74, of Minneapolis; Nov. 28, as the result of a sudden brain hemorrhage. She was a psychiatrist and advocate for women as leaders in the profession. She served as past president of the Minnesota Psychiatric Society and was a member of the board of trustees of the American Psychiatric Association. She is survived by her husband, Clifford; three children, including Aaron ’05; her father; three siblings and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024

Mark J. Candon ’74, of Rutland, Vt.; Nov. 28. He worked as a freelance reporter at the Rutland Herald, a substitute teacher at Rutland High School, and a two-term state legislator in Montpelier. He was named Legislator of the Year in 1983. With a great interest in local politics, he was a Republican candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives for Vermont in 1998. For the last 28 years, he worked as an investment executive at Moors & Cabot in Rutland. He was a lifelong member of Proctor-Pittsford Country Club. He enjoyed skiing, hunting, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Debbie; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; four siblings; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
73

Daniel J. Cooper ’73, of Chappaqua, N.Y.; Dec. 21. After Brown he graduated from Harvard University and Columbia Law School. He had a distinguished legal career including clerking for Judge Jack Weinstein prior to private practice and finally as a jury consultant. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; two daughters and sons-in-law; four grandchildren; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law. 

Jun, 2024
73

Leonard W. Erickson ’73, of Providence, R.I.; Jan 10. For more than 40 years, he was a senior mail clerk in Brown’s biomedical stockroom. He retired in 2021. During his time at Brown, he was a team organizer and member of the Brown “Bio Hazards” intramural softball team. 

Jun, 2024
72

Margot Blum Schevill ’72, ’81 AM, of Berkeley, Calif.; Jan. 17. She was an opera singer in San Francisco during the 1950s and 1960s. In the 1980s, she transitioned to anthropology focused on curating exhibitions. She is survived by children and grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1972, GS Class of 1981
Jun, 2024
72

John L. Delany ’72, of Inverness, Ill.; Dec. 22, of cancer. He earned a PhD from Yale and remained an avid learner throughout his life. He began his career as a professor at the University of Minnesota before holding positions at Fallon McElligott (Minn.), Bank of New York (Del.), and Sears and Arthur Andersen (Ill.). In 2003, he formed his own strategic consulting firm, Giraffe LLC, but considered his most fulfilling work leading strategic development at the nonprofit organization Marklund, where he spent his last 12 years helping make everyday life possible for individuals with profound disabilities. He is survived by his wife, Terry; a daughter; a son; and three sisters.

Jun, 2024
71

Henry H. Whitehouse III ’71, of Victoria, Tex.; Nov. 4, from cardiac complications due to amyloidosis. He was an ob-gyn at Victoria Women’s Clinic for 33 years. He served in several leadership positions in the Victoria medical community and represented the Victoria Goliad Jackson County Medical Society as a regional delegate to the Texas Medical Association for many years. After diagnosis and treatment of an ocular melanoma, he began a second career and became credentialed as a hospice and palliative care physician. He worked with Hospice of South Texas and was instrumental in the development of Dornberg Center hospice facility in Victoria. He enjoyed biking and in 2018 biked across the country. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; two sisters and brothers-in-law; and several cousins, nieces, and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
71

Jill Cranna Preotle ’71, of Boston; Nov. 1, of pancreatic cancer. She obtained a law degree from New York University but turned down a job at a New York City law firm to raise her family. Later, she was a partner at Preotle & Smith. In 1997, she relocated to Boston and taught English as a Second Language at the Boston Public Library. She passed the universal bar exam so that she could perform pro-bono legal services for the underserved in Boston. She spent time investing in early-stage start-ups, with a particular passion for mentoring women entrepreneurs. She was an investor, active advisor, and often a board member with numerous start-ups. She is survived by her husband, John; three children; six grandchildren; her mother; and three siblings.

Jun, 2024
71

Anthony J. Evangelista ’71, of Concord Township, Ohio; Nov. 2, of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. He graduated from Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine and established a veterinary practice, Lake Animal Hospital, in Painesville, Ohio, that he operated for more than 40 years. He dedicated his spare time to fundraising and improving the athletic facilities at Riverside High School. He was an award-winning home brewer and certified beer judge. He enjoyed growing dahlias and creating new varieties through hybridization. He was also an avid birdwatcher, fly-fisherman, and fan of Cleveland sports teams and the Ohio State Buckeyes. He was a member of the Painesville YMCA. He is survived by his wife, Jacqueline; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; two granddaughters; two sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2024
70

Barbara R. Marzetta ’70, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Dec. 1, of metastatic breast cancer. She was a policy administrator and deputy director of the Office of Science and Technology at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. She is survived by her mother, two sisters, a brother, and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
70

Martha Schroeder Lewis ’70, of Pittsboro, N.C.; Dec. 26, of metastatic colon cancer. She earned a master’s in library science at UNC Chapel Hill and a master’s and PhD in psychology at Northwestern. Each of her careers spanned more than 20 years. She worked at the University of South Carolina Law Library and was a clinical psychologist in community mental health centers, at veterans hospitals, and in private practice. She volunteered at animal rescue centers and rescued several cats. She is survived by her husband, Charles; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
70

Helena “Bubbe” Formal Lehrer ’70, of Ventnor City, N.J., formerly of Philadelphia; Dec. 2, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s. She spent her professional career educating Jewish children at Akiba Hebrew Academy, now Jack M. Barrack Hebrew Academy. During her 30-year tenure at JBHA, she filled many roles. She was a substitute teacher, then taught chemistry and biology before becoming an administrator, with positions that included department head, vice principal, and principal. Her passion was connecting with each of the students, their parents, and the extended JBHA community. She is survived by sons Joshua ’91 and Michael ’93 and their spouses; three grandchildren; and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2024
70

Susan A. Doucette ’70, of Danvers, Mass.; Jan. 19. She is survived by three sisters, a brother-in-law, and three nephews. 

Jun, 2024
69

Joanne Funger Marden ’69, of Montrose, Colo., formerly of Andover, Mass.; Dec. 2. She earned her CPA license and served on the Andover Town Finance Committee for 39 years and was an active leader in the Andover community. She enjoyed boating, especially around the Newburyport and Boston areas. In 2017, she moved to Montrose and was involved in such local groups as Newcomers and Neighbors and the Women’s Giving Club. She is survived by two daughters, including Elysa Marden ’90; two sons-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and nieces and nephews. 

 

Jun, 2024
68

C. Craig Hedberg ’68, of Sun City Center, Fla.; Nov. 21. He began a career in urban planning and transportation systems in Portland, Me., later working in the Washington, D.C., area before founding Integrated Transportation Systems, which he operated for more than 30 years. He chaired traffic studies for the Montgomery County Chamber and the Bethesda Chamber. He enjoyed travel adventures, especially to Scotland, the Netherlands, and Alaska. He is survived by two sisters and two nephews. 

Jun, 2024
68

Gregory W. DiMartino ’68, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Nov. 27. He is survived by two sons, three grandchildren, and a sister. 

Jun, 2024
68

Michael S. A. Boyer ’68, of Providence, R.I.; Dec. 28. He was founder and president of Cascade Designs in Providence before retiring. An avid skier, he dedicated 50 years of his life to volunteer service with the National Ski Patrol (NSP) and spent more than 35 years with the Tuesday night crew at Blue Hills in Canton, Mass. He is credited with saving three lives during his time with NSP. He was a passionate craftsman, prolific creator, and woodworker, and he loved restoring old houses. He enjoyed spending time at the beach, photography, and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; four sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
67

Peter C. Rutan ’67, of Eatontown, N.J.; Dec. 14, of metastatic prostate cancer. He was a neuropsychologist and cognitive therapist. He maintained a private practice in Red Bank, N.J., for 30 years. Previously, as a school psychologist, he was a member of child study teams in various schools in Monmouth County, N.J. He was a member of the American Psychological Association, National Academy of Neuropsychology, and Reitan Society, where he was a member of the Reitan Knights of the Round Table. He enjoyed sailing along the Atlantic coastline, hiking, mountain climbing, camping, and reading. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
66

Robert J. Kudless ’66, of Califon, N.J.; Jan. 6, from chronic myeloid leukemia. He was a retired special education teacher. After Brown he served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. In 1978, he married and settled in New Jersey. He enjoyed solving the New York Times crossword puzzle, traveling, and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Claire; a daughter and her partner; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
66

Michael Spencer Bassis ’66, of Springfield, Va.; Jan. 9. He had a long and successful career in higher education that encompassed roles as professor, dean, and ultimately retiring as president of Westminster College in 2012. During the course of his career, he spent time helping small liberal arts colleges and universities redefine themselves. He enjoyed many passions throughout his lifetime, including baseball, sailing, art, travel, and being a member of Brown’s lacrosse team. He enjoyed collecting art and in retirement, began painting and creating works of his own. He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Mary; four children, including Christina Bassis ’96; eight grandchildren; and two sisters. 

Jun, 2024
65

David W. Sanderson ’65, of Waterford, Me., formerly of Newburyport, Mass.; Nov. 10, as a result of a logging accident. In Newburyport he was engaged in the management of the New England Trail Riders Association but his career also included work in the world of marketing, cofounding an early software start-up, and as an Oracle database developer. He retired in the early 2000s to Waterford. He was a musician and played the banjo, fiddle, and guitar. He was a self-taught welder, carpenter, mechanic, and stonemason who enjoyed working on the house his ancestors built in the 1860s. He also enjoyed historical research related to the Waterford and surrounding areas and published in journals, newspapers, and magazines. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a brother and sister-in-law; a niece; and a nephews. 

Jun, 2024
65

Terence P. Lukens ’65, of Bellevue, Wash.; Jan. 1, of brain cancer. He had a career as a lawyer, a public official, and a mediator. During the time between his two academic institutions, he served four years as an Air Force procurement officer. After graduating from Rutgers Law School, he and his family headed to Seattle, where he worked at the law firm of Kar Tuttle Campbell. He went on to work with the Bellevue Planning Commission, followed by the City Council, and finally to the office of the Bellevue Mayor. In 1999, he was appointed to King County Superior Court. Known for his intellect, wit, and dedication to public service, he attempted a run for the State Supreme Court in 2004, but returned to 12 years as a private mediator before retiring. In his retirement, he enjoyed spending time with his family, volunteering in the community, reading, cheering for the Mariners, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ann Pierson Lukens ’68; three children; four grandchildren; and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2024
61

William K. Engeman ’61, of Lancaster, Ohio; Dec. 21. He started his lifelong love of
rowing under the legendary coach Charlie Butt Sr. during high school and was the stroke of the Cinderella Crew at Brown, which led to the creation of Brown’s varsity crew and his later induction into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame. He graduated from University of Virginia’s School of Law and had a distinguished legal career with the Cincinnati law firm of Taft, Stettinius & Hollister in the labor and employment department. He retired in 2001. With an unending love of rowing, he was instrumental in the founding of high school and college rowing programs, including the University of Cincinnati rowing team he cofounded in 1981; the creation of the Cincinnati Regatta that was later called the Collegiate National Rowing Championships, held at Harsha Lake from 1982 to 1996; the construction of the world class racing center at East Fork State Park and the indoor training facility at Sawyer Point; and the development of many boat houses. In retirement, he and his wife traveled extensively and most often to international rowing regattas. He mentored and coached athletes and sponsored a young team of rowers from Iraq who came to train in the U.S. and became lifelong friends. In 2010 he was recognized as U.S. Rowing Man of the Year. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law. 

Jun, 2024
65

William M. Jackson ’65, of Cataumet, Mass.; Oct. 27. He went on to earn a PhD in physical chemistry from UMass Amherst and a successful career in biotechnology followed. He became the founding CEO of Repligen Corp. In retirement, and interested in promoting business development, he was involved with Regional Technology Development Corporation of Cape Cod. He enjoyed retirement on Cape Cod in the home he built, sailing Buzzard’s Bay, woodworking, and serving as an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Falmouth. He is survived by his wife, Jane Benedict Jackson ’66; a son, a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
64

Peter A. Willens ’64, of Indian Wells, Calif.; Oct. 22. After Brown he attended SUNY Upstate Medical University. He completed a rotating surgical internship at USC Medical Center and had partially completed a surgical residency at Montefiore Medical Center (N.Y.) when he suffered a severe injury to his right shoulder while skiing in Europe. His right arm was initially completely paralyzed, but he was able to regain some function and strength of the arm after one year. However, he had to give up his aspirations of becoming a surgeon and switched to diagnostic radiology, completing a three-year residency at Montefiore Medical Center. He became an expert in the burgeoning field of interventional radiology and practiced medicine in Southern California for nearly 50 years. He enjoyed reading, traveling the world, and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Vita; three children; and five grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
64

Clifton V. Rice ’64, of South Dartmouth, Mass.; Dec. 20, from complications of Alzheimer’s. After graduation, he went on a motorcycle tour of Europe. Upon his return to the U.S., he married and began working in advertising in New York City. He then joined the U.S. Army, completed training, and was commissioned as an Infantry officer and, after additional training as an Information Officer, was posted to Seoul, Korea. Returning to the U.S. he enrolled at Boston University Graduate School of Communications and while there worked at the campus radio station, WBUR, developing news programming. After graduating from BU he and his wife lived in Cambridge and then settled in Lincoln, Mass., where he took a job at Houghton Mifflin Company in their New Media Department. He was promoted to head of the department and then made a vice president in charge of developing software products. He left Houghton Mifflin in 1985 and went to work for Cullinet Software Company, producing informational and educational videos for software customers. In 1990 he was recruited by Fidelity Investments to create an independent media company within Fidelity. Fidelity Images was created and grew under his management. He retired from Fidelity in 2007 and moved to South Dartmouth, where he volunteered at the New Bedford Whaling Museum providing tours. He also became involved with the Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust and served as president from 2011 to 2017. He helped both organizations improve their public communications. He enjoyed hiking, biking, sailing, and singing in Sharing a New Song choir group and the New Bedford Choral Society. He is survived by his wife, Margaret-Ann “Mickie” Parker Rice ’64; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a sister-in-law; and two brothers. 

Jun, 2024
64

Gerald G. Naylor ’64, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Nov. 3, of lung cancer. After Brown he went to dental school at Georgetown University. He joined the public health service during the Vietnam War, serving merchant marines in both Cincinnati and Staten Island. He then completed his dental training in periodontics at the University of Michigan. Upon graduating, he opened a dental practice in Ann Arbor, serving the community for 40 years until he retired in 2011. He was well read and particularly enjoyed reading about American history and the Civil War and discussing politics and economics. He was also passionate about gardening and spent time researching plants for his extensive garden that included a variety of orchid species. He enjoyed hosting garden parties with his friends. He was president of the Ann Arbor Dean Fund Committee, where he oversaw the selection and plantings of trees throughout Ann Arbor. He was an avid supporter of the arts and a member of the University Musical Society. He was also an activist for LGBTQ and feminist rights in the 1970s and 1980s. He is survived by his partner, William Garvey; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and five nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2024
64

Livia Votolato Giroux ’64, of Rye, N.H., formerly of Warwick, R.I.; Nov. 23. She was an educator and administrator in the West Warwick school system for most of her professional career. She is survived by two sisters, including Adela B. Carter ’69; a brother-in-law; and many nieces and nephews, including Stephen D. Carter ’00 and Emily Livia Carter ’04.

Jun, 2024
64

Robert Falb ’64, of Arlington, Va.; Jul. 29, 2023. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; two daughters, including Deborah Falb ’87; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jun, 2024
62

John N. Flint ’62, of Highland Park, N.J., formerly of Evanston, Ill.; Nov. 24, from lung cancer. After graduating from Brown, he married, started a family, and moved to Evanston to attend Northwestern for his master’s in sociology and a minor in military history. He was a vocal anti-war advocate during the Vietnam War and led teach-ins. After graduation, he remained in Evanston working as an engineering liaison at Signode stainless steel piping company, then as a marketing manager. In 1976, after separating from his wife, he relocated to Chicago, where he refurbished rooms for the Art Institute and found work building architectural models for major Chicago firms. He moved to New Jersey in 1983, married again, and eventually built his own small business doing home renovation and designing kitchen remodels. Throughout his life he enjoyed playing hockey, tennis, baseball, volleyball, basketball, handball, fencing, racquetball and, later on, pickleball. He had many hobbies, including drawing, woodworking, photography, travel, cooking, listening to classical music, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. He designed, built, and refinished furniture and collected art and antiques. He is survived by his wife, Lynne; three children; five grandchildren, a great-grandson; and a sister.

Jun, 2024
60

Richard A. Young ’60, of Greenwich, Conn.; Nov. 27. He graduated from the University of Virginia Law School and became the managing partner at Martin Clearwater & Bell. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and he enjoyed photography, tennis, and cars. He is survived by his wife, Carol; four children; and eight grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
59

Wayne A. Perkins ’59, of Milton, Mass.; Dec. 1. He was an ob-gyn in Norwood, Mass., for more than 30 years and former president of Norwood Hospital medical staff. During his career he volunteered in Haiti and created a cervical cancer screening program. He was a longtime member of the Oyster Harbors Club and enjoyed reading, classical music, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by four children, nine grandchildren, and two sisters.

Jun, 2024
59

James K. McCormick ’59, of Aiken, S.C., formerly of Nashua, N.H.; Oct. 29. He was a developmental representative for Hamamatsu Photonics of Japan, working with the leading physics laboratories in the U.S. and often designing specialized products for them. He contributed to the community and global projects of Rotary International and was a member of Unitarian Universalist Church. He was the founder and chair of the Nashua Chapter of The Boys & Girls Club of America. In addition to climbing all 48 of the 4,000 Footers of New Hampshire, he was a guide for the Appalachian Mountain Club. He enjoyed spending time with his wife on Lake Winnipesaukee, sailing, and hiking. He is survived by his daughter, a grandson, and a brother and sister-in-law.

Jun, 2024
58

Ann Kimball Heinrichs ’58, of Middletown, N.Y.; Nov. 14. After graduating, she went on an eight-month tour of Europe. Once stateside, she became a software engineer and worked for American Airlines, Sikorsky Aircraft, and finally IBM. She volunteered with her local church and sang in the choir. She enjoyed visiting the New York Botanical Gardens and had a love for cats. She was a proud 40-year member of AA. She is survived by her stepdaughter and husband and two grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
57

William R. Rivelli ’57, of New York City; Jan. 16, from Covid and kidney disease. He had a passion for photography since he was 12 and after graduating from Brown honed his skills as an assistant to Life Magazine photographer Nina Leen. After his training with Nina Leen, he assisted several prominent photographers before opening his own studio in 1963 with a focus on corporate and industrial photography. His assignments took him around the world. He was an active board member of the American Society of Media Photographers, lectured to chapters around the country, and created a correspondence template to improve the business relationships between clients and independent photographers. During his 50-year photography career, he pursued projects that included images documenting the five-year renovation of the United Nations building and a commissioned portfolio of black and white art prints depicting the resilience of Citibank employees post 9/11. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
57

Richard A. Ionata ’57, of Vancouver, Wash.; Sept. 13. He is survived by his wife, Mary.

Jun, 2024
57

Shirley DeLyne Forssell ’57, of Savannah, Ga., formerly of McLean, Va.; Mar. 3, 2023. She was a retired school teacher. She is survived by her husband, Robert; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jun, 2024
57

Stephen J. Aronoff ’57, of White Plains, N.Y.; Dec. 21. After graduating, he joined the family business, Lady Lynne Lingerie, and remained there throughout his career. He wrote poetry and was a member of the Poetry Caravan for several years. He played tennis, appreciated good films, enjoyed jazz and opera music, and especially enjoyed spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Anita; three children; 12 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
56

Lewis A. Schaffer ’56, of Delray Beach, Fla., formerly of Ridgefield, Conn., and Armonk, N.Y.; Jan. 19. He was a retired pediatrician. For 37 years he practiced in Armonk. He was an avid cyclist and enjoyed reading. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; two sons, including Michael ’83; and six grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
56

Edward V. Randall Jr. ’56, of Pittsburgh; Jan. 27. He was the president and CEO of PNC Bank, Pittsburgh, chairman of the PNC Bank Foundation, director of the Federal Reserve Board of Cleveland/Pittsburgh branch, and a director emeritus and founding chairman of the Pittsburgh Partnership for Neighborhood Development. He was a U.S. Marine Corp veteran of the Korean War. He is survived by his wife, Sally Shaw Randall ’56; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
56

George A. Otto ’56, of Park Ridge, N.J.; Jan. 2. He was a member of the ROTC at Brown and upon graduation served in the U.S. Air Force, attaining the rank of lieutenant. He was bilingual in English and Spanish and worked at the Insurance Office of America in New York and Lima, Peru, for many years. The last 20 years of his career he worked as a sales executive and regional manager at Mineria Pan Americana and Construccion Pan-Americana, Latin America’s leading construction and mining publications. He was an avid beekeeper and took pleasure in sharing his honey with others. He enjoyed spending time outdoors, reading, sailing, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, five grandchildren, a sister and brother-in-law, and two nieces. 

Jun, 2024
56

Richard B. Nashel ’56, of Ridgewood, N.J.; Dec. 22. After Brown he graduated from Columbia Law School and NYU. He worked for the IRS in New York City, at the Newark law firm of Pitney, Hardin Kipp & Szuch for several years, and then joined his father’s law firm Nashel & Nashel. He practiced until his passing. He enjoyed music and considered himself an audiophile and wine connoisseur. He also enjoyed watching sports, especially college football and the New York Yankees. He had been a member of Brown’s men’s baseball team. He also bird hunted in Montana, was an avid gardener, and enjoyed fly-fishing. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; six grandchildren; and brother David ’60.

Jun, 2024
56

Herman Freese ’56, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Boston; Nov. 25. He was a district manager for New England Telephone in Boston. He enjoyed going to Fenway Park with his family, playing poker with his friends, and cruising with his daughters before retiring to Florida. He is survived by two daughters, a sister and brother-in-law, a niece, and three nephews. 

Jun, 2024
56

Denny N. Bearce ’56, of Birmingham, Ala.; Jan. 1. After graduation he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and upon discharge, returned to school for a master’s degree in geology at the former Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy. He worked at Mobil Oil Corp. for a few years before returning to school to earn a PhD at the University of Tennessee. He then taught at Eastern Kentucky University for a year before moving to Birmingham to teach geology at Birmingham Southern College for seven years. He was offered the opportunity to start the geology department at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, from which he retired in 1997 after 25 years. He enjoyed hunting, fishing, woodworking, and volunteer work with church groups, including Community Ministries at Highlands Methodist Church, Habitat for Humanity, and Carpenters Hands Ministries. He traveled for mission work to Paraguay, where he installed community water wells and traveled with the youth of Highland Methodist Church for the Appalachian Service Project each summer for seven years. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a son; and three grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
55

Robert C. Sullivan ’55, of Chappaqua, N.Y.; Dec. 21. After service in the Army, he earned a law degree from George Washington University Law School and had a career as a patent attorney at Union Carbide and Stauffer Chemical Company. He later earned an MBA from Pace University School of Business and served the remainder of his career as vice president and Global Chief Intellectual Property Counsel at Colgate-Palmolive Company. He volunteered as a Community Emergency Response Team member, was a member of the New Castle Board of Assessment Review and the Rotary Club of Chappaqua, and was a parishioner of the Church of St. John and St. Mary for more than 60 years. His many hobbies and interests included coin collecting, wine tasting, book binding, darkroom photography, auto repair, furniture making, gardening, and hiking. He also enjoyed spending time with family and friends at his beach cottage in Charlestown, R.I. He is survived by his wife, Leanora Torres Sullivan ’53; three children and their spouses, including son Robert ’82 and daughter-in-law Christina Kan Sullivan ’84; and eight grandchildren, including Michelle Sullivan ’15. 

Jun, 2024
55

G. Raymond Fox ’55, of Pensacola, Fla.; Nov. 16. He had a distinguished 30-year career in the U.S. Navy, where he served as a flight instructor, test pilot, and maintenance officer with assignments in Egypt and Israel. He served in Vietnam and was later named Commanding Officer of the Naval Air Rework Facility in Pensacola. He retired in 1986 with the rank of captain and two Distinguished Flying Crosses. He began a second career doing consulting work that supported the Federal Aviation Administration and retired for a second time in 2011 as COO of Subsystem Technologies. He volunteered at both the National Naval Aviation Museum and the T.T. Wentworth Jr. Florida State Museum and was a member of the Rotary Club. He enjoyed reading, skiing, building model ships, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by four children, four grandchildren, and a nephew.

Jun, 2024
55

Charles J. Deignan ’55, of Falmouth, Mass., formerly of New Jersey; Dec. 1. After one year attending Brown, he joined the U.S. Marine Corp. and returned to Brown to complete his degree. He worked in New York City as a sales rep for Liberty Mutual before having a long career in the health and beauty aids industry, where he worked as the assistant national sales manager of Clairol, Inc.; national sales manager of Gillette; and vice president of sales and marketing at Hudson Pharmaceuticals Inc. He retired in 2000 as senior vice president of sales of I.V.C. Industries, Inc., and moved to Falmouth. In retirement he continued to do consulting for various start-up companies until fully retiring in 2014. With a quick wit and dry sense of humor, he started the Marine Corps Birthday Celebration at the Quarterdeck restaurant in Falmouth telling jokes and roasting members, an event that continued for 14 years. He enjoyed hosting annual clam bakes, shuffleboard tournaments, and BBQs for family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Anna; two daughters and sons-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and nine grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
55

Daniel Chu ’55, of Red Hook, N.Y.; Nov. 28, after a long illness. He was an associate editor and writer for People, Newsweek, and Time before retiring in 1991. He was a U.S. Army veteran who enjoyed reading and sailing. He is survived by two nieces and a nephew. 

Jun, 2024
55

Judith Jackson Carroll ’55, of St. Albans, Vt.; Dec. 3. She was a registered nurse. During her time at Brown, she was a member of the Chattertocks. She was also a member of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in St. Albans and enjoyed singing in its choir. She sailed, skied, ice skated, and enjoyed reading and baking. She is survived by five children, 13 grandchildren, a great-granddaughter, and several nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
54

Chester A. Kisiel ’54, of Warsaw, Poland; Oct. 6. He taught at Staten Island College (CUNY) and at international schools, and has written, collaborated, and translated books in sociology, economics, philosophy, Jewish studies, religion, and art. He is survived by his wife, Krystyna; and a son. 

Jun, 2024
54

Emilio D. Iannuccillo Jr. ’54, of Bristol, R.I.; Dec. 2. He was a lawyer who practiced for more than 60 years in Rhode Island. He served as Bristol probate judge and Bristol town solicitor. He was an original drafting member of the Rhode Island Bar Association Real Estate Standards Committee. He enjoyed camping, gardening, politics, and operating a ham radio. He is survived by his wife, Vicki; two daughters; a granddaughter; and stepchildren and step-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
54

Emanuel Gerard ’54, of New York City; Nov. 5, from cancer. After graduating from Harvard Business School, he was an independent consultant for many companies, including Warner Communications, Atari, and Gerard Klauer Mattison. He was a consistent contributor to Brown and enjoyed being an occasional guest lecturer in Prof. Hazeltine’s Engin 9 class helping to advise young people. He also enjoyed music. He is survived by his wife, Skippy; four children and their spouses, including daughter Nikki Nesci ’93 and her husband Justin Nesci ’91; and 10 grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
53

Howard M. Weiss ’53, of Boca Raton, Fla.; Jan. 24. He received his medical degree and residency training in obstetrics and gynecology from Downstate Medical Center. He had a private practice for 25 years before retiring to Florida in the mid 1980s. He enjoyed playing bridge, tennis, and golf. He also enjoyed reading and classical music and was a fan of the New York Giants. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; daughters Heidi DeChatellus ’82 and Patricia Jacobs ’83; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
53

Joan Carmody Theve ’53, of Block Island, formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Jan. 12. She worked as a long term substitute English teacher and later as a real estate agent. She enjoyed spending time at the beach, reading, and traveling. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, five grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
54

Roy E. Gainsburg ’54, of Rochester, N.Y.; Dec. 9. He earned a law degree from Harvard Law School, then worked for 30 years at the Wall Street law firm Szold & Brandwen, ultimately becoming a senior partner specializing in publishing and literary law. He represented the publishing company St. Martin’s Press, Macmillan Ltd., and the estate of J.R.R. Tolkien, as well as numerous labor-union interests. In 1987, he was named president of St. Martin’s Press, where he worked until 2009, serving as an administrative vice president in his final decade at the company. He also served on the board of directors for The Partnership to End Homelessness in New York City from 1997 to 2006, cochairing the board from 2001 to 2004. He was a baseball fan and enjoyed reading, especially historical biographies, and listening to classical music. He was dedicated to Brown and was a lifelong donor. In 1996, he established the Gainsburg Family Scholarship, which provides tuition for a new Brown undergraduate every four years. He also established an arrangement for the Brown University Library to become the official archive for St. Martin’s Press. He is survived by daughters Julie Gainsburg ’82 and Jeannie Gainsburg ’85; two grandchildren; and a sister.

Jun, 2024
52

Roger H. Cloutman ’52, of Springfield, Mass.; Dec. 16. He worked for Monsanto Chemical Company in Springfield. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and he enjoyed playing bridge. He is survived by three children, a granddaughter, a sister, nieces, and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
51

Elizabeth Brownlee Sherk ’51, of Prairie Village, Kans.; Dec. 17, of cancer. After moving to Kansas in 1963 with her family, she attended the Kansas City Art Institute and studied ceramics. She showed her creations in the Plaza Art Fair for 13 years. She also knitted, sewed, and did needlepoint. She enjoyed cooking and baking and while her children were young would make fresh bread daily. She volunteered at Children’s Mercy Hospital for many years. She is survived by her husband, John; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Jun, 2024
51

Marie McCarthy Sexton ’51, of Williamsburg,Va.; Nov. 4. She is survived by three sons and two grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
51

John R. Hooton ’51, of Punta Gorda, Fla., formerly of Pa.; Oct. 21. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, he began working in the insurance industry. Later, he became a certified financial planner for Hefren-Tillotson. He was a volunteer with Montour Trail Council, where he was instrumental in transforming abandoned railroads into bike trails. He enjoyed being a leader for Boy Scout bike trips, reading, attending jazz concerts, and playing tennis. He is survived by three children, four grandchildren, and a sister. 

Jun, 2024
51

Thomas D. Fenley ’51, of Perkasie, Pa.; Dec. 4. He enlisted in the Navy and served during World War II. Following the war, he matriculated at Brown and learned that in addition to building race cars, he enjoyed racing them, and a racing career began. After graduation, he moved to Augusta and worked at DuPont building the Savannah River nuclear site, while continuing to race, including at Daytona. He transferred to the New Jersey DuPont facility and continued to race in New England. He left DuPont to join a start-up, then followed that job with a position at Moore Products Company (Pa.) as a research and design engineer. He stopped racing and began farming. In 1966, he moved to Perkasie, left Moore Products, raised cattle, and became an entrepreneur. In retirement he sailed the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays and developed and patented a unique way to control motors and generators. He also enjoyed traveling the country with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Anne; six children and their spouses; and 13 grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
50

William A. Pollard ’50, of Essex, Conn., formerly of Providence, R.I.; Dec. 22, his 96th birthday. He began his career in the insurance industry. He worked at the Reliance Insurance Companies for 25 years, where he became chairman and CEO. He was a past director of the Provident Mutual Life Insurance Company and the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society, emeritus Brown Corporation member, trustee of the Princeton Theological Seminary, and president of the National Recreation Foundation. At age 54 he retired and became more involved with Brown, serving terms on the President’s Council on Athletics and on the board of directors of the Brown University Sports Foundation, and he was an active member of the Brown Football Association. For decades he attended Brown football games in his raccoon coat, cheering. He was particularly proud to help direct funds towards outdoor athletic school facilities for youth programs in Providence. He enjoyed summers gardening, playing golf, and sailing on the Chesapeake and winters in Colorado, where he skied into his eighties. He traveled the world and consistently read about business and global issues in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. He was a member of numerous clubs. He is survived by four daughters, including Wendy Bodell ’81, Judith Danforth ’77 and her husband Murray Danforth III ’77, and Edith Tower ’85 and her husband Caleb Tower ’85; eight grandchildren, including Merebea Danforth ’06, Ben Kurtz ’08, William Kurtz ’08, and Julia Metzger ’13; and eight great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
50

Tien Chi Chen ’50, of San Jose, Calif.; Oct. 6. In 1956 he joined IBM and played a pivotal role in the development of supercomputers and computer architecture, which led him to earn multiple outstanding contribution awards. In 1979, he became a visiting professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) in the department of electronics. He assumed the additional position of Head of United College in 1980 and retired for the first time in 1992. He returned to CUHK in 1997 and continued to teach until his second retirement in 2014. CUHK bestowed on him the title of Honorary Fellow of the University in 2003 and he was also a Life Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering. An avid lover of Chinese food and wine, he and his wife coauthored Everything You Want to Know About Chinese Cooking. He is survived by his wife, Pearl Kong Chen; a daughter and son-in-law; two grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
49

Wendell G. Harris ’49, of Cumberland, R.I.; Jan 1. During World War II, he was enrolled in the Navy V-5 flight training program. After graduating from Brown, he was commissioned as a 2nd Lt. in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves and served as a 1st Lt. during the Korean War. He was active with the Boy Scouts of America in Providence and for a number of years was on the staff at the Yawgoog Scout Reservation in Rockville, R.I. He had achieved the honor of Eagle Scout in August 1943 and received the Daughters of the American Revolution Medal. While at Yawgoog, he learned to sail, and it became a lifelong passion with adventures that included years sailing on Lake Winnipesaukee and as a longtime member of Sail Newport. In 1970, he and his wife, Gail, founded Creative Rewards, a promotional, recognition, and awards company. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He is survived by his wife, Gail; three daughters; two granddaughters; and three great grandsons. 

Jun, 2024
49

Alan S. Flink ’49, of Providence, R.I.; Jan. 4. He received his Juris Doctor from Boston University School of Law, where he was a member of the Law Review. He was admitted to both the Rhode Island and Massachusetts bar associations and began his legal career with Letts Quinn & Licht, and later became a partner and legal ethicist with the law firm of Edwards & Angell. He was a director of Common Cause of Rhode Island beginning in 1999 and the 2021 recipient of Common Cause’s John Gardner Fellow. He was active in community activities, including the Jewish Federation of Rhode Island, United Way, and Rhode Island Supreme Court Ethics Reform Commission, a former director of both Planned Parenthood of Rhode Island and Justice Assistance, and former president of John Hope Settlement House. He also served as president of the Rhode Island Bar Association (1991-1992) was a commissioner on the Rhode Island Judicial Nominating Commission (1995-1999) and editor-in-chief of the Rhode Island Bar Journal (1971-1973). He frequently expressed views in letters to the editor and op-ed pieces published by the Providence Journal. He was a World War II Navy veteran. He is survived by three sons, two daughters-in-law, six grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2024
47

Anna Templeton-Cotill ’47, of Middletown, R.I.; Nov. 28. She was involved in the World Federalist Movement in the late 1940s, working in Paris. She returned to the U.S. in 1998. A lifelong sailor, she was secretary to the International Tempest Class Association and traveled to regattas worldwide. She is survived by two sons and their spouses, six grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
47

Benjamin Gitlow ’47, of Bethesda; Dec. 6. He worked at United Technologies Corp., United Rubber, Sikorsky Aircraft, and Combustion Engineering before retiring in 1981. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed woodworking, reading, tennis, and playing the piano. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter; and two granddaughters. 

Jun, 2024
47

Richard B. Edgar ’47, of Redmond, Wash.; Jan. 11. He retired from Aerospace after 30 years and from the Navy Reserves after 39 years of service. He is survived by two sons, including Tom ’87; five grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
47

Irene Margolis Backalenick ’47, of Westport, Conn.; Dec. 16. After graduation, she moved to New York City and worked as an editor and writer for various publishers and magazines. In 1947, she married, moved to Boston, and started a family. After several years her husband accepted a position in New York and they moved to Westport. In Westport she wrote for the local newspaper, the Westport Town Crier, covering the Circuit Court, and eventually expanded her writing to include features and articles for the Bridgeport Post, the Westport News and the New York Times. She was awarded a prestigious publisher’s award from the New York Times for outstanding feature writing. While raising four children, she returned to college and earned a master’s degree in education from the University of Bridgeport. In her 60s, she went on to get a PhD in theater history from the City College of New York and became a full-time theater critic writing reviews for Connecticut papers, TheaterWeek, and Backstage magazine. In 1990, she was one of the founders of the Connecticut Critics Circle. She was also a member of the Outer Critics Circle. After a distinguished 30-year career as a critic, she retired in the early 2000s and became a published poet and playwright. Throughout her life she continued to learn. She enrolled one summer at Oxford University to study theater. She studied Spanish and traveled to Mexico. She was interested in art and cultures and enjoyed traveling to England, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Israel, Russia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, the Caribbean, Egypt, and France. She was active in the League of Women Voters and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by three children, including son Paul ’72, and three grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
46

Charles A. Sleicher Jr. ’46, of Seattle; Jan. 23. He was professor emeritus of chemical engineering, University of Washington, and a cofounder of Washington’s winery Associated Vintners. He entered the NROTC program at Brown and underwent submarine training with the U.S. Navy. He obtained a master’s in chemical engineering from M.I.T. in 1950 and a PhD from the University of Michigan in 1955. After marrying and moving to California, he worked for Shell Oil (1955-1959) and started a family. He studied fluid mechanics at the University of Cambridge (UK) for a year and in 1960 joined the chemical engineering department at the University of Washington, where he served as chair from 1980 until retiring in 1991. He was active in a play readers group and monthly wine-tasting. He had varied interests from designing and building a log cabin, to teaching himself how to play the banjo. He enjoyed reading and traveling and became an award-winning photographer, leading photo safaris to Tanzania into his 90s. He is survived by daughter Gretchen Sleicher ’79; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and brother Harry ’48. 

Jun, 2024
44

Elizabeth Pretzer Rail ’44, of Centennial, Colo.; Jan. 27, at the age of 101. After receiving a master’s in science from Columbia, she was offered a position with the Illinois Geological Survey and taught geology at the University of Illinois. She married and started a family while working towards her PhD at the University of Illinois. Her husband’s job took them to Texas in 1951 and to Calgary, Alberta, in 1967, but she managed to do geological teaching and consulting while raising four children. She published in the American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, and after her children were grown, she returned to teaching geology at a junior college and working in the petroleum industry. In 1975, they were transferred to Houston and she worked full-time in the geology industry and was active at the Unitarian Church. They retired to Colorado in 1983 and enjoyed an active lifestyle. She was instrumental in starting a science day camp at Dinosaur Ridge and continued as a docent well into her 90s. She was a board member and president (1997-1999) of the Friends of Dinosaur Ridge. She moved to Holly Creek retirement community in 2013 and enjoyed the outdoors. She was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in her 80s. She is survived by four children, five grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2024
44

W. Edgar Jessup Jr. ’44, of Palm Springs, Calif.; Jan. 3, at the age of 101. He was a successful attorney in a Beverly Hills law firm. As a young man, he joined the Navy and accompanied President Roosevelt to the Yalta conference. After graduating law school with honors at USC, he became a founding partner of Ervin, Cohen & Jessup. He retired in 2018. In his free time, he was an avid sailboat racer, and he took pride in introducing his sons to the sport under the flag of the California Yacht Club. He is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, a brother, and a number of nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2024
66

John C. Westfall ’66, of Burke, Va.; Feb. 25, 2023, of a stroke. He was a member of the Navy ROTC and also earned an MBA from New Hampshire College. Following his 20 years of military service as a naval flight officer, he and his family settled in Virginia. During his civilian career he was corporate manager and senior analyst at Systems Technology and Research Corporation and cofounded Age Care Systems Inc. His last executive position was at Starbucks. One of his great pleasures in the late ’80s and early ’90s was his monthly lunch with John Stabb ’66, Joe Tarantolo ’65, and Suzanne Mays Richardson ’66. They never missed a month from 1987 to 1993. He was grateful for the kidney transplant he received at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2019. He is survived by his wife, Katie; three daughters; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
FAC

Jack Wands, of Providence; Jul. 19. He was the Jeffrey and Kimberly Greenberg-Artemis and Martha Joukowsky Professor in Gastroenterology and professor of medical science at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He founded and developed the Rhode Island Hospital/Brown University Liver Research Center. His clinical interests included acute and chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and gastrointestinal malignancies, particularly hepatocellular carcinoma and alcohol-induced liver disease and subsequent complications. He was an internationally renowned physician/scientist who had received numerous awards, including two N.I.H. merit awards. He was the recipient of 204 U.S. and international patents related to investigative work in hepatology, published more than 400 peer-reviewed manuscripts, and contributed to 56 textbooks. He is survived by two children, two grandchildren, and two brothers. 

Apr, 2024
FAC

Bernard K. Waldrop, of Providence; Jul. 27. He taught at Brown for 40 years and retired as the Brooke Russell Astor Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature in 2011. In addition to publishing his poetry, he was a translator whose work earned him the rank of Chevalier of Arts and Letters from the French Government. He cofounded Burning Deck literary press and was a cofounder of Wastepaper Theater, which produced original works. He was the recipient of the National Book Award in Poetry in 2009 for his trilogy Transcendental Studies. He is survived by his wife, Rosmarie, and six nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2024
GS 97

James F. Davis ’97 AM, of Bristol, R.I; Sept. 9. He taught English and history at Bristol High School, St. Andrew’s School, and Bristol-Warren Regional, and was an adjunct faculty member at Roger Williams University. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; a daughter; a granddaughter; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2024
GS 84

Michael L. Carlebach ’84 AM, ’88 PhD, of Asheville, N.C.; Aug. 22. He was a staff photographer for the Miami Herald and The Village Post and a freelancer contributing to the Miami Herald’s Tropic magazine, Time, and the New York Times before he began teaching photography at the University of Miami in 1978 and continued until 2005 when he retired as professor emeritus. While at the University of Miami, he directed the American Studies program and chaired the Department of Art History. During his tenure he won the Wilson Hicks Conference Award, the freshman teaching award, the excellence in teaching award, and a provost’s award for scholarly activity. He authored nine books, including American Photojournalism Comes of Age, a historical account of the photographs and photojournalists who shaped American news in the early 20th century. Having lost four siblings to cystic fibrosis, which he had himself, he made time each year to photograph the children at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital’s Ventilation Assisted Children’s Center sleepaway camp. He donated images from his personal archives to the University of Miami Libraries’ Special Collections. He is survived by his wife, Margot; two sons; a brother; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
GS 79

David G. Hall ’79 PhD, of Ballwin, Mo.; Jun. 20, of metastatic prostate cancer. For more than 40 years he worked in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries in St. Louis, Mo. He also worked for a time as an administrative officer for the physics department at Washington University in St. Louis. He enjoyed woodworking, playing golf, and solving crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Denee, and four children.

Apr, 2024
GS 77

Kathleen Bragdon-Brown ’77 AM, ’81 PhD, of Williamsburg, Va.; Jun. 29. Following adjunct appointments at MIT and George Washington University, she joined the faculty at the College of William & Mary in 1990 and subsequently chaired the department of anthropology from 2010 to 2015. She was a scholar of the history and culture of Indigenous peoples in New England and a leading expert on the written form of Algonquian languages in the region. Her published works include Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650, which won the American Society for Ethnohistory’s Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Prize for best book of the year; Native People of Southern New England, 1650-1775; The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast; and Native Writings in Massachusetts. She enjoyed decorating, gardening, and reading crime novels. She is survived by her husband, Marley R. Brown III ’69, ’87 PhD; a son; and two brothers. 

Apr, 2024
GS 71

Alden Mosshammer ’71 PhD, of Escondido, Calif.; Jul. 31. He is survived by his wife, Mary; four stepsons; and two sisters. 

Apr, 2024
GS 69

Martin J. Grourke ’69 PhD, of Lansdale, Pa.; Jul. 13. He spent his entire career working at Rohm & Haas and was an adjunct member of LaSalle University’s faculty for more than 30 years. He was a devoted family man, an avid tennis player, enjoyed music, and stayed active in his parish community. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children and their spouses; and 11 grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
GS 67

David L. Vitiello ’67 ScM, of Somerville, Mass.; Sept. 16, of multiple myeloma. He worked at Raytheon in the missiles system division and Los Alamos, N.Mex., and retired from Digital Equipment Corporation in Maynard, Mass. At age 50, he earned his registered nurse degree. He enjoyed traveling, especially to Jamaica. He is survived by his wife, Iris; a sister and brother-in-law; and a niece. 

Apr, 2024
GS 67

Elizabeth Odoroff ’67 MAT, of Pittsburgh; Sept. 19. She taught English at Taylor Allderdice High School from 1967 to 1971 and taught composition part-time at the University of Pittsburgh from the mid-1970s until her retirement in 2007. She enjoyed reading and was one of the founders of the Children’s Library of Pittsburgh. She is survived by her husband, David, and three children. 

Apr, 2024
GS 66

Carol I. Thompson ’66 AM, of Portsmouth, Va.; Jul. 12. She was a genealogist and worked part-time at the New Jersey State Archives helping clients trace their family roots. She was a former president of Monmouth County Genealogy Society. She enjoyed reading, cooking, and participating in literature discussions and writing groups. She is survived by her husband, Harold L. York ’64, ’69 PhD; two sons and daughters-in-law; and
four grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
GS 66

Byung C. Eu ’66 PhD, of Montreal, Canada; Aug. 25. He was a professor at McGill University from 1967 to 2001, retiring with emeritus status. His research was in the areas of molecular scattering theory, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, fluid dynamics, and irreversible thermodynamics. He authored and/or coauthored several research articles and was honored to present a lecture at the 32nd International Symposium on Rarefied Gas Dynamics in Seoul, Korea. He is survived by his wife, Hui Young; two children and their spouses; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers. 

Apr, 2024
GS 66

Fran DuRocher ’66 ScM, of Dunfries, Va.; Aug. 5. After Brown, she graduated from the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1970. She worked at the Guthrie Clinic (Pa.) and Group Health Association (Washington, D.C.) before opening an internal medicine practice in Fairfax, Va. The practice closed in 2004. She is survived by a sister and many nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
GS 66

William S. Cain ’66 ScM, ’68 PhD, of La Mesa, Calif., formerly of New York City; Jun. 20. He was emeritus professor of surgery (otolaryngology) at UC San Diego, which he  joined after many years at the John B. Pierce Laboratory and Yale University, where he had been professor of environmental health and psychology. He studied how humans perceive odorants and irritants, how they interact, and how they affect health, which led to extensive work on indoor air quality and consulting work for corporations. He evaluated ENT patients with smell impairment. The CCCRC smell test he helped develop was used to assess loss of smell with Covid-19. A former head of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS), he spent a sabbatical at the Monell Chemical Senses Center and later served on its external advisory board. He collaborated with scientists from the U.S., U.K., Australia, Denmark, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Israel. During his career, he mentored postdoctoral fellows from the U.S., Sweden, Argentina, the Netherlands, and Korea in his Chemosensory Perception Laboratory. He was a former president of the New York Academy of Sciences. He’s survived by his wife, Claire, and her three children; a daughter; a son; and four grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
GS 63

Bettina Havens Letcher ’63 AM, of Kingston, R.I.; Jul. 16. She was an ESL teacher, taught creative writing to prison inmates, wrote poetry, and was coeditor of the Northeast Journal. She was involved in South Providence ministries and enjoyed exploring hiking trails locally and around the world. She is survived by her husband, Stephen ’64 PhD; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and a brother.

Apr, 2024
GS 61

Lawrence E. Wright ’61 ScM, of Williamstown, Mass.; Jul. 20. He worked at Sprague Electric before moving to Williams College, where he was the director of the computer center and lecturer in computer science. He retired in 2000 as associate professor of computer science and department chair at Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts. He was active in his community and served on several committees, including the Conservation Commission, the Rotary Club, Friends of the Milne Library, and the Williamstown Historical Museum, and he was a 30-year member of the Zoning Board of Appeals. He enjoyed solving puzzles, gardening, reading, canoeing, and playing squash. He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter; a son; and a brother-in-law.

Apr, 2024
GS 54

Gary M.G. Boone ’54 AM, of Presque Isle, Me.; Aug. 1. He was professor of geology at Syracuse during the academic year and spent summers as a research geologist with the Maine Geological Survey (1961 to 1989). In 1985 he became one of three editors of the Bedrock Geologic Map of Maine, still in existence. He was a senior fellow of the Geological Society of America. He was among the pioneer geologists of northern Maine to be honored posthumously at the fall meeting of the New England Intercollegiate Geological Conference. He is survived by his wife, Alice; a daughter; a son; six grandsons; four great-grandchildren; and a brother. 

Apr, 2024
07

Vincent M. Paulino ’07, of Litchfield Park, Ariz.; Aug. 21. He attended American University Medical School after Brown and became a medical researcher and educator. He enjoyed snowboarding, scuba diving, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Laura; his parents; a niece; and two nephews. 

Apr, 2024
98

Haakon T. Donnelly ’98, of Dallas; Jul. 15. After Brown, he graduated from SMU Dedman School of Law. He practiced law in Dallas as a partner with Bellinger Suberg for two decades focusing on commercial litigation, employment, and insurance defense matters. He was recognized as a Texas Super Lawyer Rising Star. While at Brown, he was a four-year letterman on the varsity men’s crew team, winning the 1995 collegiate national championship. He also rowed with the U.S. National Team as part of its Olympic Development Program. He is survived by his partner, Kristi Madden; his mother; two brothers; and six nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
97

Itamar Grunstein ’97, of Bend, Ore.; Jul. 17. After Brown he went to Stanford for medical school and became an emergency room doctor at USC in Los Angeles. He was a first-line physician in Los Angeles during the early Covid-19 pandemic and due to that experience he was inspired to found Company 730, a mental health and wellness company based in Oregon. Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. 

Apr, 2024
91

Greg J. Patrick ’91, of Akron, Ohio; Jan. 22. At Brown he was a four-year starter on the football team and served as team captain in 1990. He went on to play six years of professional football with the Detroit Lions, the Calgary Stampeders, and Hamilton Tiger-Cats, and was a two-time CFL Defensive Player of the Week. Following his career in professional football, he went into business in 1996 with positions at Morgan Stanley and Dean Witter. He was managing partner of G&G Holdings and later became the chief marketing officer for American Green, Inc. In 2002, he began his football coaching career at Valley Christian H.S. He coached and served as a defensive coordinator at several high schools in Phoenix before coaching at Texas A&M University and University of Arizona. He was also a special teams coordinator and linebackers coach for the Virginia Armada. He last coached as an assistant defensive line coach for the New Orleans Breakers in the USFL. In addition to football, he enjoyed golfing with his teammates and Delta Tau Delta fraternity brothers and traveling. He was a member of the National Football Coaches Association. He is survived by a son, his parents, a brother, an aunt and uncle, and many cousins.

Apr, 2024
87

Amanda M. McGovern ’87, of Coral Gables, Fla.; Apr. 22, of cancer. She graduated from the University of Miami Law School and for 15 years worked as a trial lawyer at Kenny Nachwalter in both federal and state court in commercial litigation and securities arbitration. The following eight years she was a litigation partner at Rivero Mestre in Coral Gables and litigated multiple high-stakes trials and business matters, domestically and internationally, including representing the proclaimed Bitcoin creator. The Daily Business Review recognized her as its 2022 Attorney of the Year. She is survived by three children, her parents, four siblings and their spouses, and nine nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2024
84

Kathleen Bouthillier ’84, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 2. She worked in vocational education for the state of Rhode Island before retiring. She enjoyed reading and knitting. She is survived by three stepchildren, seven grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and five nephews.

Apr, 2024
81

Stephen Presser ’81, of Red Hook, N.Y.; Mar. 26, of pancreatic cancer. He earned a law degree in 1984 from Harvard University. He joined Cohen, Weiss & Simon, LLP in 1987 and spent 11 years representing unions, with a particular focus on the North American airline and steel industries. In 1997, he joined KPS Special Situations Fund to advise on airline and other industry restructuring. There, and later at his own firm, Athena Advisory Group LLC, he represented the Airline Pilots Association and the broader airline labor force. He and his team developed a new financing strategy to compensate unionized pilots and other employees when airlines filed for bankruptcy. For the past 18 years, he worked as a founding partner at Monomoy Capital Partners, a market private equity firm specializing in manufacturing and consumer businesses.He is survived by his wife, Diane;
a daughter; son Michael ’14; his mother; a sister; and a brother. 

Apr, 2024
81

Robert P. Kindler ’81, of Harrisburg, Pa.; Sept. 9, after a brief illness. The Kindler family started several successful businesses, including the West Shore Health Club in 1968 and a restaurant in 1979. Upon graduating from Brown, he became the general manager of his family’s restaurant and banquet facility, the Jolly Bull, for 10 years. Following that, he partnered with his brother to manage the family’s health club, West Shore Health Club, and they subsequently opened several independent fitness centers that eventually were converted to Planet Fitness franchises. He enjoyed playing golf and watching TV, especially sports, and was an avid New York Yankees and Las Vegas Raiders fan. He is survived by his wife, Ann; seven children and their spouses; three grandchildren; two brothers; and a sister-in-law.

Apr, 2024
80

Namsun Jack ’80, of San Marino, Calif.; Sept. 7. After Brown she attended Washington University School of Law in St. Louis and received her JD in 1983. She moved to Los Angeles and worked as a commercial litigation attorney for more than 10 years, including at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP. She settled in San Marino, where she lived for more than 25 years. She was a devoted sports fan, especially tennis and cross-country running, and spent many years cheering on her children around the country as they competed in their respective sports. While at Brown she was a member of the women’s tennis team and continued to be a supporter. After the practice of law, she directed her attention to educational, community, and nonprofit service activities, including being a board member and other executive roles for the Southern California Tennis Association, Brown University Sports Foundation Parents Leadership Council, San Marino National Little League, National Charity League of San Marino, Crowell Library Foundation, and Lacy Park Tennis Foundation. She is survived by her husband, J. Michael; daughter Devon Jack ’20; a son; a sister and brother-in-law; two brothers and sisters-in-law; a niece; and five nephews. 

Apr, 2024
78

Donald Gomes ’78, of New Bedford, Mass.; Aug. 6, after a long illness. He was employed as a compliance officer for the city of New Bedford until his retirement. He was active in his community and a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by four children, five grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a brother-in-law, and many nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
75

Eugene W. Gafkin ’75, of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Apr. 8. He traveled and worked as a tour guide for luxury travel companies before settling in Hawaii. He moved to Brazil in 1988 but relocated to Paris in 1996, then back to Brazil in 2011. He is survived by his sister and brother-in-law, brother and sister-in-law, an aunt, a niece, two nephews, and cousins.

Apr, 2024
75

Marcella J. Driscoll ’75, of Framingham, Mass.; Aug. 22. 

Apr, 2024
74

Joyce L. Walker ’74, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Jul. 31. She was employed in the hospitality industry for many years until her retirement. She traveled across Europe with a good friend and enjoyed exploring new countries. She also traveled to Oregon many times to visit family and discovered Powell’s Books. She would return home with a suitcase full of books. She was known for her chocolate chip cookies and for enjoying cooking for friends, finding yard sale deals, and surprising friends and family with gifts. She is survived by three siblings and six nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
74

Karen Jakubowski ’74, of New York City; Jun. 16. She went on to earn her MBA from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and at the time of her death was working as a media marketing executive at PHD Marketing. She volunteered with FedCap Inc. She was an avid reader and enjoyed completing the New York Times crossword and Spelling Bee puzzles. She is survived by a sister and two nephews. 

Apr, 2024
74

Nellie L. Bailey Drinkard ’74, of Knoxville, Tenn.; Aug. 25. She is survived by her husband, Stanley; three children; a granddaughter; a sister; and three brothers, including Harold Bailey Jr. ’70. 

Apr, 2024
73

Julien W. Grant ’73, of Kissimmee, Fla., formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Aug. 23. He was the executive director of the nonprofit Amboy Neighborhood Center for more than 35 years. He enjoyed sports, especially football, baseball, basketball, tennis, and golf. He attended the U.S. Open Tennis Championships frequently and was a fan of Tiger Woods. He enjoyed playing pool, backgammon, chess, and poker. He was an avid traveler and returned to St. Thomas frequently for family reunions and Carnival. He is survived by his wife, Kathie Rones ’77, ’80 MD; four children; 16 grandchildren; and 22 great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
71

Dean R. Hoag ’71, of Saint Louis, Mo.; Jul. 15. While attending Brown, he spent time playing in the Cape Cod Baseball League, but when a career as a professional baseball player was not an option  he enrolled in law school, and upon graduation he joined the Circuit Attorney’s Office in Saint Louis. In 1982, he joined the U.S. Attorney’s Office, where he served as an assistant U.S. attorney for 40 years, primarily in the Organized Crime and Drug Task Force Unit. During his federal career, on occasion he was asked by the Department of Justice to prosecute high-profile state-court murder cases. The most notable of such cases was State v. Edward Post, involving the bathtub drowning of a New Orleans woman by her husband during a weekend trip to Saint Louis. In his retirement, he was appointed by the Missouri Attorney General’s Office to a specially created Cold Case Unit where he helped solve and prosecute murder cases that had gone unsolved for decades. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; a son; and three siblings. 

Apr, 2024
GS 78

Thomas J. Connors ’71, ’78 AM, of Montreal, Canada; Sept. 9, after a brief illness. Tom spent his career as an archivist. He held positions at Yale and the University of Vermont prior to being named assistant archivist of the AFL-CIO Archives in Washington, D.C. In 1991, he received a grant to educate Pakistani archivists and records managers. In 1993, he was named archivist for the National Public Broadcasting Archives at the University of Maryland, where he managed the archives associated with public broadcasting in the U.S., including National Public Radio. In 2008, he was named George Washington University’s Labor Archivist for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. He retired in 2018. He was a member of the Society of American Archivists and published numerous articles and presented papers on labor and government archives in the U.S. and worldwide. He is survived by his wife, Michelle Dolbec; three sisters; two brothers; and many nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
GS Class of 1978, Class of 1971
Apr, 2024
70

Daniel E. Stein ’70, of Canton, Mass.; Jul. 24, of Lewy body dementia. He worked as a software developer for the Royal Bank of Canada, then cofounded Novinsoft, a Canadian software company still in operation today. He was a lifelong folk dancer. He performed with his Israeli dance troupe for Canadian prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. He was a central part of the Vermont folk dance community, leading Israeli dancing at Ohavi Zedek Synagogue for more than 20 years. He also taught international, Scottish country, and English country dance, as well as being active in contra and square dancing. He enjoyed hiking, skiing, and bicycling. He is survived by his wife, Portia; two children; a grandchild; three siblings; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
70

Robert L. Hurst ’70, of Chatham, N.H.; Jul. 22. He worked as a finish carpenter for 38 years before retiring. He was a member of the Rosicrucian Order for 50 years and enjoyed tending to his produce garden. He is survived by his wife, Cheryl, and a daughter. 

Apr, 2024
69

Michael W. Ailes ’69, of Mattapoisett, Mass.; Jul. 2. He earned an MBA from Boston University and was a serial entrepreneur, IT consultant, and seventh grade math teacher. He is survived by his wife, Melinda; two daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
68

David R. Trower ’68, of New York City; Jul. 3. He was head of The Allen-Stevenson School for 32 years until his retirement in Jul. 2022. He is survived by his wife, Carol, and daughter Emily Trower-Young ’06.

Apr, 2024
68

Charles P. Minifie ’68, of Rehoboth Beach, Del.; Jul. 2 of cancer. After Brown he earned a master’s from the University of Southern California and then pursued  a career in the insurance industry in the Hartford, Conn., area. Minifie was a lifelong learner and enjoyed reading, especially history, science, and science fiction. He and his wife of 55 years visited dozens of American and Canadian national parks and all 50 state capitals. He gave back to his community by donating blood his entire adult life and in more recent years by providing transportation for seniors with poor eyesight, poor mobility, and other health issues. He is survived by his wife, Debbie; two children and their spouses; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
67

Alice Swartzman Englander ’67, of Pacific Grove, Calif.; Sept. 8. 

Apr, 2024
67

Ann Whitney Cleaves ’67, of San Pedro, Calif.; Jul., 7, 2022. She was an award winning cartoonist. Her work appeared in the Palisadian Post, Random Lengths News, and La Prensa San Diego. Her cartoons have also appeared in The Washington Post, the Pasadena Star-News, and the Temple Daily Telegram. She began cartooning as a Peace Corps volunteer in Liberia. Then as a volunteer in Fiji she illustrated school books for the Fiji Ministry of Education. She worked at her studio at Angels Gate Cultural Center for more than 15 years as a full-time cartoonist. She was a member of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists. She is survived by her husband, Courtland ’65.

Apr, 2024
66

Barbara Hanscom Gagnon ’66, of Colfax, Calif.; Jun. 11. She spent many years working for the state of California while raising a family, eventually heading the Employment Training Panel in San Mateo. She enjoyed entertaining, cooking, gardening, painting, and hiking the Sierra foothills. She is survived by her husband, John Gagnon ’66; two sons; two daughters-in-law; four granddaughters; four step-children; and three step-grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
65

Nancy Kilpatrick Adelman ’65, of Silver Spring, Md.; Aug. 11. She was an elementary school teacher but spent most of her career working in educational policy research for school systems. Prior to retirement she was a senior research associate with SRI International. She enjoyed reading, playing games, birds, and all things Harry Potter. She is survived by two sons and two granddaughters. 

Apr, 2024
64

Laurence J. Hoffman ’64, of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., formerly of Washington, D.C.; May 13. He graduated from Boston University Law School in 1967 and started his legal career at the National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C. Within less than a year, he was recruited to join Steptoe & Johnson in their labor practice department. Three years later, he was invited to become the third associate at a new start-up satellite office of the Texas-based firm Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, where he remained until his retirement in 2007. He was active with the Washington Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs and the DC YMCA, where he played basketball most workdays at lunchtime for years. In retirement he enjoyed fishing and playing golf. He was also a self-taught woodworker and enjoyed crafting furniture and toys for family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Michele Levine Hoffman ’64; two sons, including Matthew ’91; a daughter-in-law; and two granddaughters. 

Apr, 2024
63

James H. Hayman ’63, of Portland, Me.; Jun. 15, after a six month battle with glioblastoma. He worked at Young & Rubicam as a creative director before moving to Maine in 2001. At age 65 he began a second career as a novelist and was the author of the Maine-set police procedural series, McCabe and Savage, which sold more than a half million copies and was published worldwide. He was president of the Maine Writers and Publishing Alliance for several years and in addition to enjoying reading and writing he also enjoyed drinking good scotch and supporting his wife’s passion for art. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
75

John G. Berylson ’75, of Wellesley, Mass.; Jul. 4, following a tragic car accident. As a former member of the Brown football team, he remained a staunch supporter of the team throughout his life and was awarded the Andrew J. Joslin ’65 Award and the Bob Hall Award for outstanding contributions to Brown football. After graduation, he received a master’s degree from New York University and spent two years at the accounting firm Peat Marwick. He then attended Harvard Business School, where he met his wife during their first day of class. They were married after their first year of business school and began a family following graduation. He joined Paine Webber, followed by Cowen and Company as an investment banker. He later worked at Advent International prior to founding GCC Investments in 1993. When contacted by a former Paine Webber colleague about an English football club in distress, he was intrigued by the opportunity and, in March 2007, became the primary owner and chairman of the Millwall Football Club. Under his leadership the club was transformed and he established a close bond with those who worked for him. In addition to his responsibilities at Millwall, for the last 21 years he served as chairman and CEO of Chestnut Hill Ventures LLC, a private equity firm. He also served as chairman at American Capital Access Holdings Ltd., and chairman of Manifold Capital Corp. since 2000. He was chairman of the Boston Police Athletic League for nearly a decade during the early 2000s and served as a longtime trustee of the Richard and Susan Smith Family Foundation. He was a generous philanthropist to causes he believed in, including the Brown Sports Foundation and the Brown Football Association. His generosity allowed for the reconstruction of the University’s practice fields, now known as the Berylson Family Fields, which were completed in 2007. He served as the lead donor for the Berylson Family Football Complex, which serves as the home of Brown’s football program and contains state of the art facilities. He regularly served as a lead donor for the annual Brown Football Association Golf Classic. He and his wife have supported many priorities at Brown, including academic programs, research, the library, and financial aid. Phil Estes, former head football coach, remembers him as a selfless family man who was always looking to help others. He was an avid reader with an extensive book collection and he enjoyed skiing in Killington, Vt., playing golf, but especially spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Amy; a son; two daughters and sons-in-law; six grandchildren; a sister; two sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
62

Kenneth H. Walker ’62, of Shelter Island, N.Y.; Jul. 2. After graduating, he began his own architectural business and in 1970 founded WalkerGroup, later becoming WalkerGroup/CNI, which was acquired by WPP Group in 1987. In 1980, he also established WalkerGroup/Designs for product development, licensing, and strategic design services. In 1993, he founded Retail Options, Inc., a retail consultancy. He taught at RISD, Harvard, MIT, and the Architectural Association in London. He received many honors and awards throughout his career. He was elected a fellow of the American Institute of Architects and was a charter member of the Interior Design Hall of Fame and a member of the Young Presidents’ Organization. He also served on the Architectural Design Committee of the Museum of Modern Art and the Advisory Committee of the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum. He was chairman of the board of advisors for the College of Creative Studies in Detroit since 2011. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a brother-in-law; two nephews; and a cousin.

Apr, 2024
62

John R. Snyder ’62, of Indianapolis; Jul. 11. He went on to earn his law degree from the University of Michigan Law School and accepted a position at Ice Miller Donadio & Ryan, later Ice Miller, in Indianapolis. He spent his entire career with the firm and served as a managing partner for a period of years before retiring in 2003. He did legal work for Tony Hulman and for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1977 and later was asked to be on the Speedway board of directors, serving in that capacity until 2019. He also served as general counsel to the Amateur Athletic Union of the United States, Inc., until 1995. In 1992, he served on the board of directors of Marian University, was chair from 1999 to 2004, and was  named chairman emeritus in 2009. He was involved in several school committees, including chairing the steering committee that brought the medical school to Brown’s campus. During his career he also served on the board of directors of the Flanner House of Indianapolis, the Regenstrief Foundation and Regenstrief Institute, the Indiana Academy, and the FBI Citizens’ Academy. He enjoyed running and participated in the Indianapolis Mini-Marathon each May and the Paavo Nurmi Marathon in Wisconsin. He also enjoyed reading, photography, fishing, and auto racing. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer, and his children. 

Apr, 2024
62

Charles B. Keenan Jr. ’62, of Kingsville, Md.; Jul. 1. After Brown, he attended the University of Michigan Law School. He moved to Kingsville in 1965 and began practicing law in Harford County. He practiced law in Bel Air from 1966 until shortly before his passing. He was an active volunteer in the community and with many organizations including Ladew Topiary Gardens, Springboard Community Services, Harford Day School, St. John’s Episcopal Church, and the Close Foundation. He enjoyed traveling the world. He is survived by his partner, Laura T. Spadone; three sons and daughters-in-law, including son John ’94; four grandchildren; a great-grandson; a brother; and his former wife, Carolyn Wilson Keenan. 

Apr, 2024
61

Dennis G. Long ’61, of Ebensburg, Pa.; Aug. 31. He earned his law degree from Duquesne University School of Law and practiced in Ebensburg representing the United Mine Workers of America. He worked briefly as a public defender and assistant district attorney before becoming district attorney in 1975. In 1986, he became a Cambria County common pleas judge and later president judge until his retirement. He enjoyed playing golf and won many Ebensburg Country Club championships. He also was the founder of two golf tournaments that brought lawyers, politicians, and business people together. He was proud of his two holes-in-one. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter; two sons and daughters-in-law; and five grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
61

John S. Hoover ’61, of Chesapeake, Va.; Aug. 3. He was employed with State Farm Insurance and was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife, Kiyoko, and a son. 

Apr, 2024
61

Peter D. Esser ’61, of Smithtown, N.Y.; Jan. 31, 2023. He was a medical physicist at New York Presbyterian Hospital, then chief physicist at the Kreitchman PET Center. He was involved in research and developing improvements in nuclear medicine and PET technology. He received several patents and coauthored numerous research papers. He collaborated in the development of a “phantom” for the testing of PET equipment with Data Spectrum, which is still in use today. He was professor emeritus of clinical radiology in environmental health sciences and special lecturer in the department of radiology and the department of applied physics and applied mathematics at Columbia University. He held one of the National Science Foundation’s presidential internships in nuclear medicine at the Medical Research Center of Brookhaven National Laboratory. He was a past president of the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine and a member of the Nuclear Accreditation Committee of the American College of Radiology. He was an active member of numerous professional societies and was a fellow of the American College of Radiology and a fellow of the American College of Nuclear Medicine. He enjoyed photography. He is survived by his wife, Jean; two sons, including Jeffrey ’92; two daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
60

Barbara Kurlancheek Shaffer ’60, of Kingston, Pa.; Jul. 8. She taught art at elementary schools in West Chester, N.Y., for many years prior to opening her own book shop that she operated for 30 years. In 1979 her sister joined her and the book shop grew to become The Tudor Book Shop and Café. Together they brought in local artists and held author signings with both local and nationally published authors. They curated a selection of gifts, custom imprinted stationery, invitations, and unique author events. She enjoyed knitting, was a gifted ceramicist, and more recently enjoyed weaving at the Jewish Community Center. She is survived by her husband, Charles; a daughter; a son; two grandchildren; two sisters, including Lynn Gonchar ’63; a brother; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law. 

Apr, 2024
60

Elizabeth H. Cranska ’60, of Chestnut Hill, Mass.; Aug. 20. She continued her education at Simmons School of Social Work, earning a master’s degree and then becoming a certified licensed social worker. She was affiliated with Boston hospitals and area clinics and nursing homes in social work and psychotherapy. Her group of Brown friends met regularly for many years and frequently for a long weekend. They continued through Zoom meetings during COVID. She enjoyed traveling and hiking. She is survived by a sister and two nephews. 

Apr, 2024
60

Frank V. Boragine ’60, of Gilbert, Ariz., formerly of Danville, Calif., and Chicago; Jul. 29. He had a successful career at Dun & Bradstreet, which led to a management promotion in Chicago in 1969. He retired in 1981 and he and his family moved to Danville, where he and his wife started J. Boragine & Associates in San Francisco. In 2007, he fully retired and moved to Gilbert. He was a member of the ROTC and Sigma Chi at Brown. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; and six grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
59

Robert M. Nuckols ’59, of Lakewood Ranch, Fla., formerly of Salem, Ohio; Aug. 15. He was an entrepreneur who owned and operated several small businesses in Salem before retiring to Florida. He was a member of several associations, including the Salem Chamber of Commerce. He is survived by three children and their spouses and four grandchildren. 

Apr, 2024
59

Jean Giuliano George ’59, of Narragansett, R.I.; Jul. 4. She worked for the State of Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth & Families for more than 20 years and retired as a court liaison. She served on the West Warwick School Committee and supported the Ocean Tides School and St. Joseph’s Indian School. In retirement, she worked as an advocate helping children and families connect. She was a member of the Brown Club and enjoyed gardening and traveling. She is survived by five children and their spouses, nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a sister. 

Apr, 2024
59

Timothy B.B. Eland ’59, of New York City; Aug. 3, after a long illness. Following time in the U.S. Army, he worked in advertising at Young & Rubicam. Later, he moved to product development and formed his own company, Eland Brookbanks Vector. He had an interest in landscape architecture, and in 1973 he purchased an old dairy farm, where he spent time developing the garden landscape and renovating the barn. He is survived by his wife, Caddie; two daughters, including Nel Ellwein ’92; son-in-law Charles Ellwein ’90; four granddaughters; and two sisters. 

Apr, 2024
58

Warren G. Paul ’58, of Charleston, S.C., formerly of Armonk, N.Y., and Sydney, Australia; Aug. 6. After graduating, he moved to Manhattan, where he worked in banking and met his future wife. After a brief stint in San Francisco working for Blair Television, he and his family relocated to Pennsylvania, where he met and formed a filmmaking company—the Moving & Talking Picture Company of Philadelphia, New York, and Gradyville—with Garrett Brown, who would go on to invent the Steadicam. Warren was the company’s producer and sales rep in the New York office. Afterward he began a more than two-decade career at IBM as an advertising executive. His work with IBM took him around the globe, including a three-year posting in Sydney. He retired to Charleston and was immersed in the beauty and culture of the city, renovating and restoring a historic townhouse, joining historical societies, purchasing a horse, and entertaining friends and family who visited. He is survived by two daughters, including Jennifer Cohen ’86; and five grandsons. 

Apr, 2024
58

John V. Reistrup ’58, of Woodbrige, Va.; May 27. He was a self-employed writer/editor. As a journalist, he served in editorial and management roles for such newspapers as the Washington Post, Toronto Star, New York Post, and Seattle Post-Intelligencer. He was coeditor and webmaster of his Brown class newsletter. He served on the advisory panel of the Fairfax County Council of the Arts, was president of the McLean (Va.) Choral Society, and served as shop steward, unit chairman, and president of the Washington-Baltimore News Guild, by which he was named Guildsman of the Year in 1970. He enjoyed sailing, reading, playing piano, listening to classical music, and was a New York Giants fan. He is survived by three children and seven grandchildren.

Apr, 2024
58

Richard W. Miller ’58, of Wiscasset, Me.; Jul. 4. After Brown, he moved to New York City and had a successful career working in sales at New Yorker magazine. He later started a computer design business located in the Empire State Building. He retired to Maine in the later 1990s. He had traveled to numerous countries and embraced the diversity of the people and their culture. He studied Spanish and spent time in Colombia and Mexico. An athlete, he ran several Boston and New York City marathons and, once he stopped running, was involved with swimming and yoga. He was a member of Psi Upsilon. He is survived by a sister and eight nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2024
57

Richard Nooney ’57, of Wakefield, R.I.; Sept. 3. He was employed at ITT Grinnell Corp. and Nooney Controls Corp. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife, Gail. 

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