Obituaries

Nov, 2020
81

Autophagy, or “self-eating,” is the way cells clean and recycle themselves, keeping us healthy. Biomedical scientist Beth Levine ’81 discovered the mammalian autophagy gene beclin 1, now the most studied of such proteins. She went on to study autophagy’s role in suppressing cancer, viruses, and neurogenerative diseases. “I think what was most critical to my success was my willingness to follow my scientific intuition and curiosity and pursue questions that I thought were important,” she told the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


As part of Levine’s mission to bring together scientists from diverse countries and disciplines to link fundamental biology to human health, she created the Gordon Conference on Autophagy in Stress, Development, and Disease in 2003, which still continues. A colleague remembers her as “an amazing scientist…and a true understated supporter of female scientists.”


After earning a medical degree from Weill Medical College of Cornell University, followed by an internal medicine residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Levine was a postdoctoral fellow in infectious diseases and virology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, rising to director of virology research at Columbia University. She was recruited to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 2004 and eventually became director of its Center for Autophagy Research and holder of the Charles Cameron Sprague Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science. The university remembers her as “an elegant, driven, and focused researcher who demanded the best from herself and the more than 50 graduate students and postdoctoral researchers she mentored.”


Levine was a founding associate editor of Autophagy and an editorial board member of Cell, which honored her as “an exemplary role model for women in science and medicine, and a caring physician with a lifelong dedication to easing human suffering.” Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2013, she won awards and honors including the Phyllis T. Bodel Award from Yale and the Barcroft Medal from Queen’s University in Belfast, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation’s 2014 Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award. 


Levine passed away of cancer in Dallas on June 15. She is survived by her husband Milton Packer, a cardiologist and former professor and chair of the department of clinical sciences at UT Southwestern; a daughter; and a son.

Nov, 2020
50

World War II U.S. Navy veteran V. Donald Russo ’50 had a distinguished and multifaceted career as a lawyer that included five years working tirelessly to help fellow veterans who had been affected by the toxic defoliant Agent Orange. 


After his military service, Russo attended Brown, St. John’s University School of Law, and NYU Graduate School of Law, then worked as a negligence trial attorney, eventually retiring with more than 60 years of experience at Allstate Insurance Company. He lectured at the Columbian Lawyers Association of Manhattan and the Civil Court of the City of New York, taught real estate law at Marymount Manhattan College, and developed a multitude of continuing legal education programs and training manuals.


A highlight of his career came in 1979, when he joined a consortium of plaintiffs’ lawyers from Long Island who undertook the prominent Agent Orange case, one of the largest product liability litigations in American legal history. For years he traveled to listen to interrogations and take depositions. His wife Christine Russo remembers when he returned from one such trip, exhausted, he told her: “When you listen to these fellas tell you about their illnesses, you forget about being sleepy and just keep going.” 


That was the hallmark of his approach to his work, she says: “He would prepare until he knew every fact of the case and it was hard to beat him.” 


The case was settled in 1984 and the Vietnam veterans were awarded medical and financial assistance. Russo was honored with an Award of Gratitude from the Veterans of Foreign Wars; his papers are part of the Brown Vietnam Veterans Archives.


Among other professional honors, in 1997 Russo was the recipient of the Individual Service Award from Allstate for his hard work, loyalty, and dedication to excellence in legal work. In his private life, he was an avid reader and enjoyed playing golf and working outdoors at his home in Northport, Long Island, as well as traveling with Christine and spending time at a family lake house in Vermont. He passed away on May 28. Survivors include a brother-in-law, a sister, two nephews, and a niece.  

Nov, 2020
45

Vernon Alden ’45, whose life spanned WWII military service and successful careers in both higher education and financial services, as well as a remarkable record of giving, is remembered first for his enthusiasm and warmth. 


“Everyone loved meeting my dad because he was so curious about life and so interested in everyone. His face would light up and he’d yell your name because he was so excited to see you,” remembers daughter Anne Alden ’78. 


After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from both Brown and Harvard business schools, Alden started in the Northwestern University admissions department. In 1960, while associate dean of Harvard Business School, he was asked to be president of Ohio University, serving from 1962 to 1969 and doubling faculty and student enrollment during his tenure. “I came to Ohio University in 1966 because of a diversity initiative he started,” recalls President Emeritus Roderick J. McDavis. “He started the Honors College, the Fellows program…and was responsible for the Black Studies Institute.” 


“His vision for what could be was motivating and his courage for attempting and achieving big things was inspiring,” remarked President Emeritus Robert Glidden during Alden’s virtual memorial service. “And his joy of life was contagious.” 


Alden later served as chair of the Boston Company and its major subsidiary, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company. By the end of the 1970s, he had helped grow a local firm into an international organization and the 15th largest U.S. investment management company.


Outside of his professional life, Alden became deeply involved in Japanese-American relations through groups including the Japan Society of Boston and the National Organization of Japan-American Societies. He was an advocate for the arts and a life trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Museum of Science, and the Children’s Museum. A devoted philanthropist, he established endowed funds at Brown, Ohio University, Ohio Wesleyan University, MIT, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and Northfield Mount Hermon School. A trustee and member of the Brown Corporation Board of Fellows, he was also a staunch supporter of the Brown cross country and track and field programs, endowing the track and field coaching chair, funding the Alden indoor track facility and the Alden Award, sponsoring the annual Alden Invitational, and becoming a founding director of the Brown University Sports Foundation.


He held honorary degrees from 13 universities, including Brown.


Alden passed away on June 22 from complications of pneumonia. He is survived by four children, including daughter Anne Alden ’78 and sons James ’81 and David ’87; and eight grandchildren. 

Nov, 2020
58

Diane Demirjian Markarian ’58, of Bethesda, Md.; July 2. She taught elementary school in Warwick, R.I., and in Anne Arundel County, Md., and later held various professional roles with Old Colony Bank, Mass. She served as chair of the Hopedale School Committee, Mass., and was a longstanding member and officer of the Portsmouth Garden Club, R.I. She enjoyed antiques, playing bridge, tennis, dancing, skiing, gardening, crocheting, knitting, sewing, solving crossword puzzles, and cooking. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Shant Markarian ’54; a daughter, Kris Markarian ’84; two sons; two grandchildren; three sisters, including Virginia Demirjian Dadourian ’59; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
66

George H. Connell Jr. ’66, of Atlanta; Apr. 13, from complications of a stroke. He graduated from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1969 and began working as a United States attorney. He was a partner at Long Weinberg Ansley & Wheeler before establishing his own private firm, where he successfully practiced for more than 40 years. He retired from the legal firm of Dennis, Corry, Porter & Smith. He was a member of the Georgia Bar Association, Sigma Chi Fraternity, and the Capital City Club. An accomplished tennis player, he was a former member of Brown’s varsity tennis team. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; four children; five grandchildren; and a sister. 

 

Nov, 2020
65

Stephen R. Bond ’65, of London, England; May 29, following complications from heart surgery. He received his law degree from Columbia University and was senior counsel in the London office of Covington & Burling, specializing in international commercial arbitration. Previously, he was cohead of the international arbitration practice group at White & Case LLP. He held several leadership positions with the International Chamber of Commerce, as well as positions with the United States Department of State, including as counselor for legal affairs in the United States mission to the United Nations in Geneva. He received numerous accolades, including recognition as one of the 20 most highly regarded individuals for commercial arbitration by Who’s Who Legal, and the U.S. State Department’s distinguished honors award. He is survived by his wife, Bruna; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and two nieces.

Nov, 2020
64

Jo-Anne Palumbo Vaughn ’64, of Parkville, Md.; Apr. 9, after a long illness. She spent several years teaching French and Italian in high schools in Westerly, R.I., and Hyattsville, Md., then lived and worked with her husband, who was a Foreign Service Officer, in Indonesia, Germany, Bolivia, and Singapore. She earned her master’s in education and counseling from Boston University and became a State Department Family Liaison Officer, providing family and marriage counseling to American families living overseas. On her return to the U.S., she continued to work for the State Department as a crisis management trainer, traveling to embassies in Africa, South America, and Europe. She spent 2002-2004 as a program officer for a Catholic mission in Citi Soleil, Port au Prince, Haiti, providing meals and education to children in need. She retired in 2004 and volunteered at her local community center, held gourmet cooking classes, and sailed and traveled extensively with her husband. She was also an adjunct ESL professor at Chesapeake College. She is survived by her husband, Tony; three daughters and their spouses; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
63

Dayton T. Carr ’63, of New York City; Apr. 7. He established the Venture Capital Fund of America Group (VCFA Group) in 1982 and is credited as being the founder of the secondary private equity industry. He was captain of the sailing team at Brown and was an accomplished competitive racer in a variety of boats throughout his sailing career. He was a champion and ambassador for the causes he supported, which included the U.S. Sailing and U.S. Olympic Sailing Program. He served on the board of directors of the National Sailing Hall of Fame for many years and was involved in various organizations, including Sail Newport, Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island, Herreshoff Marine Museum, the Preservation Society of Newport County, Redwood Library and Athenaeum, and ChildFund International.

Nov, 2020
62

Philip M. Reed ’62, of Litchfield, N.H.; May 24, of cancer. He worked for Travelers Insurance Company across the Northeast in senior management and commercial lines insurance. He later owned his own agency in Manchester, N.H. He served on various boards, including the Litchfield School Board, the Advisory Council of the Independent Services Network, and as president of the Pastoral Counseling Services in Manchester. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2020
60

Daniel G. Wayne ’60, of Riverside, R.I.; June 10, of Parkinson’s disease. An early job entailed test-driving cars for Rolls Royce in New York. This was followed by positions in marketing for Royal Crown Cola, Irvin Industries (in the parachute division), Haskon Corporation, Auto Placement Center, and Comsearch on the East Coast, as well as European Auto Parts in northern California. He enjoyed tinkering with cars, being part of the pit crew for his racing friends, riding his motorcycle, painting model airplanes, and building sculptures and stained glass. He also enjoyed watching Jeopardy! and was often the winner of the in-person version played during his time at the Scandinavian Home Assisted Living Community. He is survived by his wife, Vera Samak Wayne ’65; daughter JC Wayne ’88 and her partner; daughter Halley Townsend Wayne Lavenstein ’92 and her spouse; and two grandsons.

Nov, 2020
60

Charles E. Houriet ’60, of Flemington, N.J.; May 17. He was a retired stockbroker. He was a Mason, a longtime member of the New York Athletic Club, and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by a brother and several nephews.

Nov, 2020
60

Lawrence W. Hegarty ’60, of Weatogue, Conn.; Apr. 7. He served in the U.S. Navy for three years after attending officer candidate school. His career spanned many areas in sales and sales management, including selling safety products for a Chicago-based firm that named him salesman of the year. He was an avid sailor and owned sailboats throughout his life. He is survived by a son and his spouse, two grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and his former wife, Constance Hegarty.

Nov, 2020
60

Cheryl Snider Conron ’60, of Worcester, Mass.; May 2. She worked in alumni affairs at Worcester Polytechnic Institute for many years. She was an avid reader, especially in history. She was a skilled carpenter and furniture refinisher and enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, John ’61; daughter Maura Conron ’84 and her spouse; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren, including Kolya Shields ’24; two step-grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2020
60

Robert B. Carlin ’60, of Marblehead, Mass.; Apr. 15, of cancer. A Swampscott High School four-year, three-sport varsity athlete, he continued both his football and baseball careers at Brown, earning many accolades including captain of the football team in 1959. He spent time playing football for the semi-pro Providence Steamrollers and baseball for the Cape Cod League, then served in the U.S. Army, where he was also fortunate to play football. Upon discharge, he worked for 45 years in the insurance business. He enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Lissa; three daughters; two sons-in-laws; seven grandchildren; and a sister. 

Nov, 2020
56

Joanne Dean Keane ’56, of Stamford, Conn.; May 15. She had a 35-year career working for the Department of Education for the Town of Stratford, Lord Chamberlain Elderly Care, and the Westinghouse Corporation. An accomplished artist and art historian, she enjoyed painting, sketching, and visiting museums and galleries around the world. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Nov, 2020
56

Ronald E. Foster ’56, of Princeton, N.H.; Apr. 13. After serving in the U.S. Army, he began a 30-year banking career with Bankers Trust Company (now Deutsche Bank) in New York City. He retired in 1989. At Brown he was a member of the baseball and basketball teams and Lambda Chi Alpha. He enjoyed reading, playing golf, traveling and was a fan of the New York Yankees and Giants. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandsons; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Nov, 2020
56

Joseph Focarino ’56, of New York City; Apr. 21, of lung cancer. Before retiring, he was the editor of books and catalogs for the Frick Collection in New York City. He had a lifelong interest in the arts and frequently visited the theater, art museums, the opera, and ballet. He is survived by a sister, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece and nephew.

Nov, 2020
55

Cornelius J. Sullivan ’55, of Concord, Mass.; May 22, after a long illness. He worked for Honeywell and later Raytheon as a human resources manager. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was an active member of Holy Family Parish, where he served as a Eucharistic minister and choir member. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; three daughters and their spouses; a son; and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
54

Louis H. Pastore Jr. ’54, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. He had a long career as an insurance broker in Providence and Hartford, Conn. He also served as state senator and held a commissioner appointment in the business regulation department. He enjoyed playing golf and was a longtime member of Metacomet Country Club in East Providence. He also enjoyed spending summers with family at Bonnet Shores in Narragansett. He is survived by his wife, Elaine Richard Pastore ’58 AM; four children, including daughter Chaela Pastore ’89; seven grandchildren, including Michael Pastore ’13; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
54

Vincent M. Love ’54, of New York City; Apr. 16. He was vice president of the Mayflower Hotel in New York City. In retirement he volunteered as a research docent at the South Street Seaport Museum. He enjoyed sailing, opera, and attending productions at the Met. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his brother Arthur ’56; a sister-in-law; a niece; and four nephews, including Andrew M. Love Jr. ’87.

Nov, 2020
54

Charles I. Judkins Jr. ’54, of Albuquerque, formerly of Maryland, Massachusetts, and Connecticut; June 26. He was known as “Red” to his family and friends because of his fiery red hair. He was a choir singer all of his life, most recently at Sandia Presbyterian Church. He entered Brown on a Navy ROTC scholarship and played varsity football and basketball, then proudly served during the Korean War. He earned an MBA from Columbia Business School in 1958, was hired by IBM and sold large-frame computers in the New York City area. In 1961, he was recruited to work at Travelers Research Center in Hartford, Conn. In 1967, he and two partners started Geomet, a technical service company in Washington, D.C., and the family lived in Potomac, Md., until 1985, when Geomet was purchased and he partially retired. He then traveled the world with his wife, Nancy, played golf, and enjoyed his summer cottage in Bethany Beach, Del., with family and friends. They moved permanently to Albuquerque in 2003 to take part in the lives of their two grandsons. In 2019, he and Nancy attended their 65th reunion, where they were both honored to serve as Marshals at the 2019 Brown Commencement. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Kaufman Judkins ’54; three children, including son Peter ’84; a daughter-in-law; two grandsons; a brother, Richard Judkins ’59; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
92

Serena Simmons Connelly ’92, of Dallas; Apr. 22. She earned a master’s in social work from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1995 and set out to change the world. She served HIV/AIDS patients in Dallas, then worked with the city’s refugee community and torture survivors. When an agency serving those survivors faced closure, she was instrumental in establishing the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, which is now in its 20th year serving immigrant survivors of human rights abuses. She later joined the Harold Simmons Foundation, where she worked to help those in the greatest need. She also served on boards including the Texas Women’s Foundation, the Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation, and the North Texas Regional Board of USA for UNICEF. She was named 2001 Social Worker of the Year by the National Association of Social Workers Texas Chapter and a Distinguished Alumna by the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014. She is survived by her husband, Tom; two children; her mother; a stepmother; three sisters; a stepsister; a stepbrother; as well as many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Nov, 2020
92

Glenn J. Barquet ’92, of Miami; May 2, from complications of COVID-19. He was a cardiologist at Mercy Hospital in Miami and had a private practice in South Miami. He graduated from the University of Florida College of Medicine and was board certified by the American Board of Cardiovascular Disease. He was not treating patients with COVID-19 at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife, Somaly.

Nov, 2020
90

Kristen Keado Lackner ’90, of Dallas; May 13. She was general manager of Overseas Motors in Dallas for 20 years. She also participated in Bible Study Fellowship and taught young children. She is survived by her husband, Randy ’89; a daughter; two sisters; a niece and a nephew.

Related classes:
Class of 1990, Class of 1989
Nov, 2020
86

Amy McCoy Mastin ’86, of Leadville, Colo; Apr. 17, of liver disease. Always an athlete, she ran her first marathon and bicycled from Vancouver to San Diego in 1981. She competed in basketball, cross country, and eventually rowing at Brown, then coached crew for four years at Northeastern. She climbed half of Colorado’s 14ers and ran many marathons and other races, including Pikes Peak, Mosquito Pass, and Steamboat. She chaired Summit Recycling Project, which led to the formation of Cloud City Conservation Center in Leadville. She could always be found cleaning a roadside, tending race aid-stations, and recycling at events. She was proud to help long-term renters and worked hard to assist with housing for those in need. She is survived by her husband, Kevin, and two daughters.

Nov, 2020
85

Lydia L. English ’85, of Randolph Center, Vt.; May 28. After a 20-year banking career in Chicago and in St. Thomas, USVI, she attended Brown as a RUE student, then earned her PhD from Yale University in 1991. She retired in 2009 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, where she had headed a fellowship program designed to increase the number of professors of color by identifying talented undergraduates interested in pursuing a PhD in the humanities. She is survived by her wife Patricia Menchini; a son; two stepsons and their spouses; and three step-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
83

Robert Stanley ’83, of Suffield, Conn.; Apr. 20, of cancer. He began working at G. Fox in Hartford, then accepted a position at Suffield Academy, his former school, where he taught for 13 years and held various positions including varsity hockey coach and dean of students. For three years he was director of Camp Rising Sun, a camp for children with cancer, while pursuing his master’s at Yale Divinity School. From 2000 to 2020, he was president of the American Secondary Schools for International Students and Teachers. He was recognized in 2015 with an award from the Institute of International Education. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two daughters; his mother; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 84

Chan-Jin Park ’84 ScM, of Weston, Mass.; May 8, after a brief illness. He was the president of Massachusetts Engineering Group for 30 years. He is survived by his wife, Hee-Young, and two sons.

Nov, 2020
GS 84

Joseph T. Keeley ’84 PhD, of Lynchburg, Va.; May 13. He worked for most of his career as a plasma physicist with a focus on fuel cells and nuclear energy. He was the author of numerous scientific publications and held several patents. He worked as a research scientist in Troy, Mich., and Woburn, Mass., in the early years of his career. He eventually settled in Lynchburg, where he worked as a research chemist for McDermott International Ltd., and a research engineer for BWX Technologies. He was a senior technical specialist with Babcock and Wilcox nuclear operations. At the time of his death he was working as a consultant with BWX Technologies and was an adjunct professor at Lynchburg College in the chemistry department. He is survived by his mother, two sisters, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 82

Barbara L. Nason ’82 MAT, of Northampton, Mass., formerly of Springfield, Mass., and Simsbury, Conn.; May 7, from a fall. She had a long career with Disability Management Services in Springfield. She wrote poetry, painted watercolors, sang in church choirs, knitted, and did needlepoint. She also enjoyed camping, kayaking, swimming, and hiking. She is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
GS 80

Stephen G. Warfel ’80 AM, of New Cumberland, Pa.; May 14, after a four-year battle with gastric junction cancer. Before retiring as senior curator of archaeology at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, he conducted excavations at a variety of Native American and colonial period habitation sites. He enjoyed teaching archaeology to college-aged students at sites such as Ephrata Cloister, Fort Augusta, the Joseph Priestley House, and Eckley Miners’ Village. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; two brothers; and 15 nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 79

Carla Mathes Woodward ’79 AM, of Providence; May 18, after a long illness. Her professional career included service at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Wellesley College, and RISD. She sang for many years in the choir at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Providence and is survived by a daughter, two sisters, and nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 79

Joan Millman ’79 AM, of Cambridge, Mass.; Apr. 4. She studied under John Gardner at the Bread Loaf literary conference and enjoyed two fellowships at New York’s Yaddo artists colony. Her stories appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review and the Carolina Quarterly and her collection entitled The Effigy won the University of Missouri Press’s prestigious Breakthrough Prize in short fiction in 1989. For many years she contributed articles to the Boston Globe, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette and the MetroWest Daily News, as well as travelogues for numerous newspapers and magazines. In addition to her writing, she taught English composition and creative writing at Emerson College and Framingham State and Salem State universities. She is survived by four children and their spouses, nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 73

Gerald A. Greenberger ’72 AM, ’73 PhD, of Short Hills, N.J.; Apr. 3, from COVID-19. He taught French history at The College of William & Mary for several years before earning his JD from Yale Law School. He then had a 36-year career practicing law. He is survived by his wife, Debby; a daughter; a son; two brothers; two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
GS 72

George F. Aubin ’72 PhD, of Worcester, Mass.; Apr. 23. After graduating from Brown, he continued his post-doctoral studies at MIT, Bowdoin College, and Middlebury College. He retired in 2006 from Assumption College, where he taught French, Linguistics, and American Indian Studies for more than 43 years. He attended many Algonquian conferences in the U.S. and Canada, researched Native American languages, and published several articles and dictionaries throughout his career. While at Assumption, he was chair of the French department and served on many committees. Music was another great passion and he played piano in several local bands and at campus events with his son. He is survived by eight children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; nine siblings; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 71

Ronald S. LeFever ’71 ScM (see ’70).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1971, Class of 1970
Nov, 2020
GS 70

Virginia J. Dunmire ’70 MAT, of Prairie Village, Kans.; Apr. 23, of cancer. She taught history and later became the admissions director at Chatham Hall Boarding School for Girls in Chatham, Va. She enrolled in the University of Virginia School of Law and earned her JD degree in 1979. She was the first female editor of the Virginia Law Weekly. She joined the law firm of Spencer Fane Britt & Brown in Kansas City, eventually moving on to the legal department of Commerce Bank. She is survived by two brothers, a sister-in-law, and many nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 66

Theodore B. Wiehe Jr. ’66 MAT, of Cleveland, Ohio; Apr. 11. He taught for 32 years at Shaker Heights High School and was instrumental in forming their men’s and women’s soccer teams. He was known for creating innovative classes at the school and riding his red bicycle to work. He also enjoyed running. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; two sons; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2020
GS 66

James Dalager ’66 MAT, of Thief River Falls, Minn.; June 4. He was a math and science teacher at Augustana Academy (S. Dak.), Camrose Lutheran College (Alberta, Canada), and Northland Community College in Thief River Falls. He retired in 1992 and spent a year in Bratislava, Slovakia, teaching math in English. He was active in organizations including Zion Lutheran Church’s choir, the Cancer Society, and the Pennington County Historical Society, and tutored math at Cornerstone Academy. He farmed part-time beginning in 1965. He enjoyed family history, square dancing, stamp collecting, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Phyllis; five children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Nov, 2020
GS 65

Bobby Z. Workman ’65 MAT, of Murray, Ky.; Apr. 3, after battling Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. He taught math and chemistry in Indiana before earning his master’s degree and entering the paper industry. He worked at Mead Paper (N.C.), then at Bowater (S.C.), and retired in 1998 from Weyerhaeuser (Wash.). He was a member of Epsilon-Lambda Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha.

Nov, 2020
GS 65

John M. Howard ’65 MAT (see ’59).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1965, Class of 1959
Nov, 2020
GS 64

Nathaniel A. Friedman ’64 PhD, of Albany, N.Y.; May 2, from complications of COVID. After appointments at the University of New Mexico, Westfield College, and the University of London, he settled into a tenure-track position at SUNY Albany in 1968. He wrote An Introduction to Ergodic Theory (1970), one of the early textbooks on the topic, and helped lay a foundation in ergodic theory and dynamical systems that continues to have a broad influence on many areas of mathematics to this day. In 1992, he started the international, interdisciplinary Art and Mathematics Conference, which convened annually in Albany. In 1998 he founded the International Society for the Arts, Mathematics, and Architecture to further interdisciplinary education in these fields, with international conferences in the U.S. and Europe. His newsletter HYPERSEEING became a quarterly magazine covering a lively mix of art/math articles, news, reviews of books and exhibits, even cartoons. He retired as full professor in 2000. He enjoyed sculpting and ballroom dancing. He is survived by six cousins.

Nov, 2020
GS 92

William T. Moynihan ’62 PhD, of Storrs, Conn.; Mar. 28. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduating from St. Bonaventure University, he was employed as a journalist. In 1955 he began his teaching career at Connecticut’s Killingly High School, where he gained the nickname “Wild Bill.” At the same time, he began working toward his Brown PhD, while also teaching summer school classes at UConn. In 1961, he was hired as an English professor at UConn and in 1967, he was elected chair of the English department and served as department head for 20 years. He authored a book on the poetry of Dylan Thomas, and co-authored several writing textbooks. He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to teach in Bergen, Norway, in 1969, then taught in Paris, France, and London on academic exchanges, all while leading the department. After stepping down as department head, he began a second career as a playwright in the 1980s, writing more than nine plays, including More Than a Man, about Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L’Ouverture, which was a finalist in both the CBS/Chicago Theater Project playwriting competition and the Sergel Drama Prize from the University of Chicago Court Theater competition in 1985. He is survived by seven children and their spouses, and 19 grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 57

David P. Rein ’57 AM, of Webster, N.Y.; June 1. His teaching career began at West Morris High School (N.J.). In subsequent years he taught at the University of Liberia on a one-year Fulbright-Hays grant, at Bucknell University, Bloomsburg State College, the School for International Training, and Capital Community College. He taught students from more than 50 countries. As a freelancer, he wrote and edited ESL and English for professionals materials for Oxford University Press and Regents Publishing Company. He was a lifelong learner, accomplished classical pianist, and international traveler. He is survived by his sister and brother-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 55

Edgar C. Smith Jr. ’55 PhD, of Chevy Chase, Md.; May 20. He worked for IBM, where his initial assignment was working with major research universities in the western United States to set up mainframe computers on their campuses. He went on to have a long and successful career with the company, living in various cities and countries. After retiring, he spent 12 years in Carmel, Calif., where he enjoyed researching and writing about California’s history. He also served as a docent in the Monterey Maritime Museum. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 54

Robin L. Curtis ’54 PhD, of Brookings, Ore.; May 9. He began his career as a postdoctoral Fellow at NYU and was subsequently invited to join the faculty of the New Jersey College of Medicine. He and his family moved to Wisconsin, where he worked as a professor and research neuroscientist at Marquette University School of Medicine and then the Medical College of Wisconsin. He won many research grants and received multiple awards for his outstanding teaching. When he retired, he and his wife moved to southwest Oregon. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He is survived by his wife, Sheila; two children; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 49

Marjorie Schaefer Freeman ’49 ScM, of Jersey Village, Tex.; Apr. 30. She was a research assistant at Texas A&M in the 1950s. After raising her children, she taught math and physics at South Texas Junior College, which later became the University of Houston Downtown and named her an associate professor of applied mathematical sciences. She was a longtime board member and officer of the Weather Research Center and the Weather Museum of Houston, and a member of the American Mathematics Association and the American Meteorological Society. In later years she raised Chesapeake Bay retrievers. She served as president and secretary of the South Texas Obedience Club and was a member of the board of the Southwestern Tracking Association of Metropolitan Houston. She is survived by six children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
01

Elizabeth K. Reilly ’01 of Mountain View, Calif., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Apr. 27, after a long illness. She was a senior managing engineer for the Exponent Company in Menlo Park, Calif., for the past 10 years. She served on the American Gas Association’s Transmission Pipeline Operations Committee and was a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. She is survived by her husband, Philip Stephanou; her parents; a sister and brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
80

Wendy Schornstein Good ’80, of New Orleans; May 24, after a battle with glioblastoma brain cancer. After Brown, she went on to Tulane Law School, where she was a member of Order of the Coif and Tulane Law Review. After clerking at the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, she joined Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel in the estate and trust practice, remaining there until 1988. After Hurricane Katrina, she began photographing and documenting various aspects of street, burial, and musician culture and ritual. This included David Peters Montana, Big Chief of the Washitaw Nation Mardi Gras Indian Tribe, as well as local musicians, including Kermit Ruffins and his “We Partyin’ Traditional Style!” album. She served as an executive board member for Jewish Family Service of Greater New Orleans and of Temple Sinai, where she cocreated and led Sabbath of the Soul. She was a longtime supporter of local artists and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Prior to her death she had trained to be a medical advocate for victims of domestic violence with the New Orleans Family Justice Center. She is survived by her husband, Julian; two daughters and sons-in-laws; her parents; two sisters and their families.

Nov, 2020
76

Helen Eustis Ederer ’76, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Mar. 29. She was a real estate broker and enjoyed traveling the world, teaching the Transcendental Meditation technique, and competitive open water swimming. She is survived by her husband, David; a sister; and two brothers.

Nov, 2020
74

P. Kevin Walther ’74, of Flowery Branch, Ga.; Apr. 20. After receiving his law degree from Indiana University, he specialized in residential and commercial real estate law in the Atlanta area from 1979 until his death. He enjoyed cooking for and hosting family gatherings, gardening, and walking on the beach. He is survived by his wife, Kimberly; a daughter; his stepmother; two grandchildren; and six siblings.

Nov, 2020
73

Katherine J. Moore ’73, of Joshua Tree, Calif., formerly of Purchase, N.Y.; June 3. After Brown, she went on to study law at Rutgers University, where she was an editor of the Law Review. She joined the firm of Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy in New York City in 1978 and became a partner. She enjoyed and was a supporter of the arts. She also enjoyed reading and traveling. She is survived by a sister, two brothers, two nieces, and a great nephew.

Nov, 2020
73

Peter J. Durfee ’73, of Marshfield, Mass.; June 5, from prostate cancer. He earned a master’s in accounting from Northeastern, then worked at Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. in Boston and as a partner in Durfee & Root. He retired as director of finance for the Beacon Mutual Insurance Company in Warwick, R.I. As a young boy he worked beside his grandparents, father, and brothers at Durfee Hardware Store in Cranston, R.I. and, at the time of his passing, was a co-owner and behind-the-scenes financial consultant. He also served as treasurer of Trinity Episcopal Church, coached a boys’ travel basketball team, and volunteered at the Scituate Art Festival. A lover of sports, he completed ten marathons, including three Boston marathons and three Mount Washington road races, and enjoyed playing golf (he was proud of his hole in one at the Pawtucket Country Club). He is survived by his wife, Sheila; a son and daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; two brothers, including David Durfee ’80, ’87 ScM, ’92 PhD; three sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and 11 nieces and nephews, including Kevin Durfee ’11 and Kyle Durfee ’14.

Nov, 2020
72

Carol Ann Marble Thatcher ’72, of Toronto, Canada; June 9. She worked in the electronic publishing field, including positions at Quicklaw, InfoGlobe, and Infomart, then held management positions at CGI and the Ontario Ministry of Health. She volunteered for Out of the Cold, sang with the Toronto Classical Singers, and enjoyed gardening, traveling, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Adrian; a sister and brother-in-law; two brothers and sisters-in-law; and nine nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
70

Ronald S. LeFever ’70, ’71 ScM, of Easton, Pa.; May 28, from complications of prostate cancer. His landmark MIT thesis in 1982 on myoelectrical signaling was lauded internationally and went on to be a cornerstone in research in this area. He was a professor in his early years and later made his mark in the communications technology world with his work in defense contracting and cellular location services. He also worked for the Harris Corporation in the 1980s. He enjoyed problem solving and fixing anything broken. He is survived by his wife, Linda Brad; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-laws; five stepchildren; 13 grandchildren; and his former wife, Catherine LeFever.

Related classes:
Class of 1970, GS Class of 1971
Nov, 2020
69

Margaret Dworkin Northrop ’69, of Barrington, R.I.; June 4, of Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating from Brown, where she was a class president, and the Loyola University School of Law in Chicago, she practiced labor law, first in Chicago and later for the United Nations at its New York City headquarters. In some of the intervening years, she worked as a magistrate in the Connecticut court system. She was fluent in French, which she mastered as an American Field Service exchange student in Paris. She enjoyed traveling, socializing, and spending time by the ocean. She is survived by her husband, Tom; three sons; three grandchildren; and a brother, Peter Dworkin ’74.

Related classes:
Class of 1969, Class of 1974
Nov, 2020
68

William H. White II ’68, of Washington, D.C.; May 19. He held many titles, including property manager, stock market investor/consultant, researcher, engineer, thespian director, and U.S. Army veteran. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and a sister.

Nov, 2020
67

James D. Willey ’67, of Burlington, Mass., formerly of Ridgewood and Franklin Lakes, N.J.; Apr. 12. He began working at Procter & Gamble, eventually settling in Ridgewood and Franklin Lakes, where he owned several businesses. He was an active member of the First Presbyterian Church in Ridgewood and taught Sunday school, worked with the youth groups, and served as an usher. Upon retiring, he moved to Burlington. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; five grandchildren; two brothers; a sister-in-law; and four nephews.

Nov, 2020
66

Gerard T. Lynch ’66, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Avon, Conn.; Apr. 20. After receiving a law degree from Fordham University School of Law and serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he began a career in investment management at the Hartford Insurance Group. He moved to St. Paul Companies in St. Paul, Minnesota, then returned to Hartford in 1984 to start New England Asset Management, from which he retired in 2014. He enjoyed sports, traveling, and spending time at the beach. He is survived by his wife, Evy; daughter Allison Lynch Longfield ’98 and her spouse Ryan Longfield ’00; sons Coley ’95 and Brendan ’92 and their spouses; 13 grandchildren; two sisters-in-law, including Phyllis Gushae Lynch ’55; and several nieces and nephews, including Mary Bergen Hoag ’82, Susan C. Lynch ’82, Jennifer Lynch Seemar ’87, Suzanne M. Lynch ’90, and Robert K. Lynch ’90.

Nov, 2020
59

J. Stewart McLaughlin ’59, of Bay Shore, N.Y.; Apr. 8. He earned a law degree from Cornell University Law School in 1962 and worked for two years as an attorney at MONY Life Insurance Company in New York City. During that time, he obtained a Master of Laws from New York University in taxation. In 1964, he returned to Bay Shore and established a general law practice that he operated for more than 50 years. He was also the attorney for the Kismet Fire District from 1973 until 2012 and for the Village of Ocean Beach for nine years. He served on boards for Southside Hospital, the New York State Hospital Trustees, and the Healthcare Association of New York State, gaining experience that led to a second era of his career, in which he was appointed Receiver for Brunswick Hospital Center, Inc. Over the past 19 years, his role developed and changed as the receivership came to an end. He is survived by his wife, Laura; a daughter; a granddaughter; and several cousins, nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
59

John M. Howard ’59, ’65 MAT, of Bradenton, Fla.; May 19, of cancer. He taught English, coached hockey, and directed the glee club at Blake School in Minneapolis. He then served as camp director at YMCA Camp Warren in Eveleth, Minn., for 10 years before returning to the school environment at Breck School (Minn.). In 1987, he moved to Bradenton and began a 15-year career as headmaster of Saint Stephen’s Episcopal School. He enjoyed playing the piano, cruising to Alaska and the Caribbean, and vacationing in the North Carolina mountains. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; a daughter; a son; and two brothers.

Nov, 2020
58

Thomas M. Wilson III ’58, of Baltimore; Apr. 24. After serving two years in the U.S. Army in Germany, he married and moved to Baltimore, where he worked in sales for Mid-Eastern Box Company. He earned his JD from the University of Maryland School of Law in 1971 and in 1974 established the State of Maryland’s Antitrust Division, which he headed for five years. He successfully defended before the U.S. Supreme Court on antitrust and commerce-clause constitutional issues. In 1979 he joined Tydings & Rosenberg, where he developed and chaired the firm’s antitrust practice. He lectured and published in the U.S. and abroad on antitrust and trade regulations issues, as well as testifying before Congress. A former fellow of the American Bar Foundation, he was selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America every year from 2007 and was named “Lawyer of the Year” in Baltimore for his antitrust litigation practice by the same publication in 2014. He retired from Tydings Law in 2017. He enjoyed traveling and attending the opera and was a fan of the Baltimore Orioles and Ravens. He is survived by three children and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
58

W. Scott Roberts ’58, of Scituate, Mass.; June 1. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, he attended Brown, where he was treasurer of Phi Gamma Delta. After graduation, he joined the Gillette Company as a sales representative in New York City. Over the next 40 years he held many positions there, was recognized with numerous industry awards, and retired as corporate vice president of trade relations in 1999. He volunteered for the town of Scituate, chairing the town advisory committee and helping preserve conservation land. He was a Bruins, Pats, and Sox fan and especially enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Pat; three children, including son Scott Roberts ’88; nine grandchildren; and 17 nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1958, Class of 1988
Nov, 2020
58

David B. Peterson ’58, of Melbourne, Fla.; Apr. 18. While at Brown, he enrolled in the ROTC program, then entered the U.S. Marine Corp and was discharged with the rank of captain. He spent most of his career working for the RCA Corp., assisting with the space tracking program. He was a member of a Unitarian Universalist congregation and participated on many committees. He enjoyed solving Sudoku and crossword puzzles and reading two newspapers a day. He is survived by a brother and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
58

Donald C. Dowling ’58, of Boynton Beach, Fla.; Apr. 12. He was a lawyer whose criminal and civil career spanned 52 years and three countries. In 1961, he became a field research associate of the American Bar Foundation, studying law and procedures concerning the commitment and discharge of the mentally ill. He then moved to Chicago and entered private practice, specializing in trial work, until accepting an appointment as the National Defender Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School. A position with the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation to work on aspects of the Portuguese penal code in Lisbon followed. After returning to the U.S., he worked at GTE International in New York City, then practiced for 33 years as chief trial attorney and head of the Capital Division in the office of the Public Defender in Palm Beach County, Florida. He started his own civil and criminal practice and then later became a partner at Spinner, Dittman, Federspiel & Dowling. He is survived by his wife, Andree Marie-Therese; three children and their spouses, including Luc Dowling ’98; five grandchildren; a sister; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews. 

Related classes:
Class of 1958, Class of 1998
Nov, 2020
58

Robert R. Cole ’58, of Westwood, Mass., formerly of Darien, Conn.; June 11. He started his career at Citibank in 1961 and moved to MacKay Shields in 1966, where he was a partner for 22 years. In 1988, he cofounded White Oak Capital Management and ran the business for the remainder of his career. He was a member of several golf and country clubs and an avid tennis and paddle tennis player. He enjoyed traveling and spending summers in Little Compton, R.I., with his family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

Nov, 2020
57

James McCurrach Jr. ’57, of San Francisco; Apr. 9, after a long illness. He had a varied career that began as vice president at Bankers Trust in New York. He owned and operated a restaurant in New York City during the late 1970s and later was a player and teacher of squash until he settled in San Francisco in the early 1990s and began teaching. He spent the last 25 years of his life enjoying the Bay Area, dining out, attending the theater, and reading and writing. He is survived by two sons

Nov, 2020
56

Nevann Winslow Smith ’56, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Feb. 13. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, eight grandchildren, and a sister.

Nov, 2020
56

Charles W. Merritt Jr. ’56, of Boonton, N.J.; June 1, after a brief illness. While at Brown he was captain of the men’s basketball team and a member of the football and golf teams and was named to Brown’s 100th Basketball All-Decade Team. After serving in the U.S. Army, he took over the operations of the family business, Merritt Mounting & Finishing in New York. He was a member of Rockaway River Country Club, where he was a multiple time club golf champion. He also enjoyed playing cards and spending many hours watching his children and grandchildren participate in activities. He is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Wesley A. Merritt ’85 and daughter Elizabeth H. Merritt ’89; 18 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
54

Armando E. Batastini Jr. ’54, of Providence; Apr. 11. He worked as a student support specialist for the Providence School Department for 36 years. He also worked as a supervisor and director for the Kennedy Recreation Center at the Providence Recreation Department for 25 years. He was named to the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Children and Youth for his work in education. Additionally, he served as State Representative from the Elmhurst/Mount Pleasant and North Providence areas from 1976 until 1992. He was awarded the Hubert Humphrey Public Service Award for his work on the Senior Citizen Bill of Rights legislation. Throughout his life he was involved in all aspects of his community, particularly through sports, having founded the Elmhurst Little League and coached the St. Pius Catholic youth sports basketball team for 61 years. He was inducted into both the New England Basketball Hall of Fame and the Sons of Italy Hall of Fame, and in 2019 the Armand Batastini Recreation Center in Providence was named in his honor. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Mary; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
53

William Whitehouse ’53, of New London, N.H.; Apr. 25. In addition to a business assignment in Lima, Peru, he and his family lived in several Eastern U.S. states. From 1978 to 1994, he owned and operated the Hollow Inn & Motel in Barre, Vt., receiving the Vermont Innkeeper of the Year Award. In 1994, he moved to Grantham, N.H., where he established and operated Eastman All Seasons Real Estate until retiring to New London in 2006. He is survived by four children and their spouses and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
53

Steven van Westendorp ’53, of Raleigh, N.C.; Apr. 30. He retired as captain from the U.S. Navy in 1976 and moved to Raleigh in 1978. He taught at Sanderson High School and retired from teaching in 1991. He then spent ten years working with Bev’s Fine Art. He was a member of Saint Michael’s Episcopal Church in Raleigh and served in multiple leadership positions. He enjoyed traveling with his wife. He is survived by a son and a niece.

Nov, 2020
53

Fred R. Riveglia ’53, of Chester, N.J.; Apr. 13. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II as a paratrooper and group member of the Office of Strategic Services, operating behind enemy lines in Italy and France. He was awarded a Bronze Star and received a Congressional Gold Medal. Upon returning home, he studied mechanical engineering at Brown and worked for the Pratt & Whitney division of United Technologies for 30 years. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, two brothers, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
53

C. Jane Hallet Kirstel ’53, of Altamont, N.Y.; Apr. 13. She was a retired teacher. She volunteered at Landis Arboretum as an art therapist at the Capital District Psychiatric Center in Albany and later became a full-time therapist at Ellis Hospital in Schenectady, where she worked for many years. She was also an accomplished woodworker. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by two step-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
53

Theodore S. Jadick ’53, of Paramus, N.J.; May 10. He had a long career in sales working at Cannon Mills Company and later as an independent sales rep, retiring in 2015. He was a founding member of Presbyterian Church at High Mountain and served in several governance positions over the years. A sports enthusiast, he was a three-year varsity Brown baseball player and later in life was a participant of his local men’s summer softball league and competitive tennis and paddle tennis teams. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and enjoyed spending time with family during the summers in Nantucket. He is survived by four children, 10 grandchildren, and a sister, Carol Jadick Hanson ’58.

Related classes:
Class of 1953, Class of 1958
Nov, 2020
53

E. Jane Hovey ’53, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 21. She worked for the telephone company for 33 years as a service representative and business office supervisor and later was responsible for the department’s budget. She was involved in church activities, including being parish treasurer at the Church of the Ascension in Cranston from 1946 until 2008. She was a member of the Cranston Historical Society and the Rhode Island Historical Society.

Nov, 2020
52

Leo Vine ’52, of Bridgeport, Conn.; Apr. 23, of Parkinson’s disease. Upon graduating from Harvard Law School in 1955, he entered the U.S. Army and later was an attorney in Shelton, Conn., where he practiced law for more than 45 years. He served in leadership roles and was a member of many boards. He is survived by his wife, Doris Kreiger Vine ’54; four children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1954
Nov, 2020
52

Clinton J. Pearson ’52, of Bristol, R.I.; Apr. 4. He graduated from Brown as part of the Navy ROTC and served as a midshipman and officer. In 1956, he founded and was chairman of both the Pearson Yacht Company and Bristol Yachts, birthing the fiberglass boat industry in Southern New England. He built more than 20,000 boats during his career. He was honored as the Chief Marshal of the Bristol Fourth of July Celebration in 1961. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren, including Charles T. Enright ’08; four great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 2008
Nov, 2020
52

James M. Mather ’52, of Akron, Ohio; Apr. 18. He was a salesman for Dave Towell Cadillac for more than 35 years and an avid car collector. He supported conservation efforts of public lands, parks, and gardens and for 50 years was a consistent blood donor. He is survived by his wife, Rosaline; two daughters, including Melissa Mather ’85; a granddaughter; and a brother.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1985
Nov, 2020
52

Lawrence Kaufman ’52, of Owings Mills, Md.; May 10, of cancer. After graduating from Yale University School of Law, he clerked for the chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals and then joined the Baltimore firm of Cable, McDaniel, Bowie & Bond, where he worked in tax and estate planning, eventually becoming a partner. The firm merged with McGuire, Woods, Battle & Boothe in 1992, and he retired a few years later but continued to practice law on his own until he was 80. He was past president of the Jewish Big Brother League and mentored and helped to raise a Little Brother. He was active in the Baltimore Exchange Club and the Child Abuse Center of Baltimore. In retirement, he spent a decade volunteering with Meals on Wheels and Pets on Wheels. He is survived by three sons, including Mark A. Kaufman ’87; six grandchildren, including Lucy M. Kaufman ’22; and a sister.

Nov, 2020
52

Roderick H. Brown ’52, of Unionville, Conn.; May 21. He was a teacher and assistant headmaster at Mooreland Hill School in Kensington, Conn., for many years. Following his teaching career, he formed his own construction business. He served in the U.S. Army in the Occupation Forces in Japan and was a member of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church and the New Britain Rotary Club. He was a member of the board of directors for the Art League of New Britain and the New Britain Museum of American Art and was active with art projects at the Hospital for Special Care. He enjoyed spending summers with family at his Clinton, Conn., beach house, playing bridge, creating family Christmas cards, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; four children and their spouses, including son Vance Brown ’85; four stepdaughters; 17 grandchildren; and two nieces.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1985
Nov, 2020
52

H. Bradford Benson ’52, of Southbury, Conn., formerly of Glastonbury, Conn.; May 7. In addition to ROTC at Brown, he was active in student government as class vice president and was a member of the Glee Club and Delta Tau Delta. He served two years as an ensign in the U.S. Navy, then moved to New York City, where he worked in banking while attending NYU School of Business. In 1956 he moved to Hartford, Conn., and began his career as an investment broker with Putnam and Company, which later became Advest, Inc. He became a comanager of the Hartford office in 1966 and general partner in 1972, retiring as a senior vice president in 2004. He was active in the Congregational Church and was president of the Brown Club of Hartford. In 1966, he moved to Glastonbury and served on the board of trustees for the First Church of Christ for 25 years. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and spending time at the family retreat on Lake Norman, N.C. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses; a son, B. Brooks Benson ’79 and his spouse; four grandchildren; a sister; three sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1979
Nov, 2020
51

Henry Pelletier ’51, of Wappingers Falls, N.Y.; May 17. After serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps and graduating from Brown, he began a career in international sales, first at W.R. Grace and then at R.J. Reynolds Metals. Wanting to remain stateside, he accepted a position at Smith Kline & French. Finally, he worked as a buyer for IBM from 1966 until his retirement in 1987. He enjoyed spending summers with family at his home on Cape Cod. He is survived by his wife, Marita; three children; seven grandchildren; and six nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2020
51

Priscilla Loring Griffin ’51, of Melvin Village, N.H., formerly of Reading, Mass.; June 5. Upon graduation, she worked at Draper Labs. In 1970, she began working for her mother at Roger A. Reed, a wax manufacturing company in Reading. She would later own and operate the company until her retirement in 1987. She was a member and past president of the Reading League of Women Voters and  a member of the Ipswich League of Women’s Voters, and she served on the Governor’s Council and board of directors for Mass Bank. She enjoyed gardening and playing tennis. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, a daughter-in-law, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
51

David M. Curry ’51, of Verona, Pa.; Mar. 30. During his time at Brown he was captain of the rowing club that evolved into a varsity program. After graduating, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he served in Korea and was discharged with the rank of captain. Upon returning to Pennsylvania, he worked at the advertising firm of Ketchum, McLeod & Grove as an account executive. In 1968, he graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. After a short tenure in private practice, he worked at the U.S. Attorney’s office, retiring in the 1990s. He was a deacon of Shadyside Presbyterian Church, an active board member for Family Resources, and a supporter of Three Rivers Rowing Association, where he was instrumental in the creation of its adaptive rowing program for the blind. He is survived by his wife, Natalie; a daughter; three sons; and 10 grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
50

George F. Tubley ’50, of Lansdowne, Va.; Apr. 7. After Brown, he served for 30 years as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
50

Burton C. Staugaard ’50, of Madbury, N.H.; June 7. His career took him to the universities of Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vanderbilt, and the University of New Haven, where he taught for 21 years culminating in the title of professor emeritus. After retiring, he designed and built his own home in Madbury. He was a man of deep faith and community commitment whose volunteer work included church projects, Habitat for Humanity, and volunteer firefighting. He enjoyed photography, camping, stamp and coin collecting, and rebuilding Volkswagens. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Helen; two daughters, including Betsy Staugaard ’83; two sons, including Peter Staugaard ’81; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and eight grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
50

Anne Crane Ryan ’50, of Basking Ridge, N.J., formerly of Bay Head, N.J.; Apr. 3. She joined the Bernards Township Library in 1966 and during her 19 years there, she served as a director and was instrumental in the building of the new library in 1974. For 50 years she enjoyed playing bridge. She was active in the Seaweeders Garden Club, Bay Head Yacht Club, and Bay Head Improvement Association, and was founding director of the Sea Girt Library, where she served for 17 years. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, including Susan Ryan Chiarulli ’75 and Michael Chiarulli ’75.

Nov, 2020
50

Jacqueline Stocker Kent ’50, of Carlsbad, Calif.; Mar. 6. As the wife of a Navy captain, she moved often and enjoyed the role of hostess for Navy social events. In the late 1980s the couple moved to Carlsbad, California, where they resided for more than 30 years. She and her twin sister enjoyed making ceramics, a hobby that they turned into a ceramic tile company, Riviera Designs. She volunteered with Meals on Wheels and was an active member of the San Dieguito United Methodist Church. She also enjoyed reading history and biography books, writing poetry, and traveling, including trips to Europe and touring in RVs around California. She is survived by three sons and their spouses, three grandsons, two sisters, a brother, a sister-in-law, a brother-in-law, and a niece and nine nephews.

Nov, 2020
49

John T. Townsend ’49, of Newton, Mass.; Apr. 22. After Brown, he studied theology at Wycliffe College and was ordained to priesthood in the Episcopal Church. He entered Harvard Divinity School and earned a doctorate in 1959. Following two years of parish work, he taught at the Philadelphia Divinity School. During his teaching years he also studied at Ulpan Etzion and Hebrew Union College, both in Jerusalem. He retired in 1994. He published numerous papers and was a contributing member of the Christian Scholars Group on Christian-Jewish Relations, serving one year as its chairperson.

Nov, 2020
49

Lilliam Barlowski Runyon ’49, of Marietta, Ga.; May 10. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, and a great-grandson. 

Nov, 2020
49

Joanne McKeever ’49, of Milford, Conn.; May 26. After Brown, she enrolled at Boston College Law School, where she met and married her husband. They traveled extensively in Europe after college and once had an audience with Pope Pius VII at the Vatican. She taught Sunday School in Milford, was well read, and was a member of the board of directors of Milford Mental Health. She enjoyed many types of music, including opera, classical, and heavy metal. She is survived by three children, four grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece.

Nov, 2020
49

Muriel Broadbent Jones ’49, of Mansfield, Mass., formerly of Attleboro Falls; May 10. Her husband was president and owner of Lyons Advertising in Attleboro Falls, where she worked part-time. During the 1960s she was a substitute teacher at North Attleboro High School. She became an accomplished sailor on their 37-foot sloop Dauntless, sailing along the coast of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maine. In 1983, she helped prepare Dauntless for an ocean yacht race from Marion to Bermuda, and then sailed the boat back from Bermuda. She was a longtime member of Angle Tree Garden Club and the North Attleboro Historical Society. She enjoyed gardening and travel and is survived by her husband Phillip ’48 and a son.

Related classes:
Class of 1949, Class of 1948
Nov, 2020
49

Shirley Whipple Hinds ’49, of Oconomowoc, Wisc.; June 6. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She had a passion for history and conservation and helped to secure the preservation of many of Oconomowoc’s original landmarks and buildings, most notably the 1886 Oconomowoc City Hall. Following her husband’s death, she went back to working outside the home after 40 years, first as the bookkeeper for the Waukesha County Red Cross and then as the innkeeper for the Inn at Pine Terrace, finally retiring at the age of 80. She continued her work with the Oconomowoc Historical Society and Museum as a member of the board of directors, as well as volunteering for many committees and projects for the American Association of University Women and the Heritage Trails (Oconomowoc) chapter of The Questors, an international organization dedicated to historical preservation and restoration. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by five children and their spouses, 10 grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and 15 nieces and nephews, including Richard Whipple ’77.

Related classes:
Class of 1949, Class of 1977
Nov, 2020
49

Joan McWeeney Geary ’49, of Jamaica Plain, Mass.; Apr. 25. She taught in the Pawtucket (R.I.) school system. She was also a remedial reading volunteer at St. Pius School in Providence and a volunteer for Meals on Wheels. She enjoyed playing bridge, solving word searches, and playing bingo. She is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
49

Elizabeth Stone Ellis ’49, of Manchester, Conn.; May 4. Her husband bought two weekly newspapers and in 1967 she went to work in their circulation departments. The two merged into the daily Journal Inquirer a year later and she became the publication’s assistant publisher in 1970. She rose to publisher in 1973, overseeing the newspaper’s expansion in a time when the industry was mostly run by men. The New England Newspaper and Press Association honored her in 2000 with its prestigious Yankee Quill Award in recognition of her contributions to both journalism and the communities the Journal Inquirer covers. The newspaper also won the association’s Newspaper of the Year award under her leadership in 1987. She is survived by her husband, Neil ’48; two daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1949, Class of 1948
Nov, 2020
49

Paul C. Abramson ’49, of Teaneck, N.J.; Apr. 23. Upon his honorable discharge from the U.S. Army, he became president of the United Travel Agency in Manhattan, which he helmed for most of his adult life. During his lifetime he went on innumerable cruises and became an expert on the cruise industry and an icon in the luxury travel business. He was active with many travel organizations and a board member emeritus and vice chair Masonic brother. He retired from the travel business in his 80s, but never stopped his quest for new experiences. He continued to commute from Teaneck to Manhattan for activity-filled days, including visiting museums. He is survived by daughter Nancy Abramson ’81 and her spouse; son Richard ’84; and two grandsons, including Jesse Hertz ’13.

Nov, 2020
48

Alden C. Goodnow Jr. ’48, of Danvers, Mass.; May 21. He attended Brown but interrupted his studies to serve in the U.S. Navy during World War II. After returning from the war, he completed his baccalaureate studies and went on to earn an MBA from Harvard Business School. He married in 1951 and began his career in Manhattan at Shell Oil. He then returned to Danvers, where he established Goodnow Real Estate & Insurance Agency, which he owned and operated for more than 50 years. He was a member of Danvers Rotary Club, president of Danvers Historical Society, and a trustee, church moderator, and choir member of Maple Street Congregational Church, forming a barbershop quartet with some of the other choir members. He was an avid Red Sox fan and proud to be the “Hats off for Heroes” honoree at Fenway Park in September 2018 for his service in World War II. He enjoyed building model trains and built and collected many ship models over the years. He is survived by his wife, Lois Booth Goodnow ’50; three daughters; six grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; a sister-in-law; and a niece. 

Related classes:
Class of 1948, Class of 1950
Nov, 2020
48

Albert Feldman ’48, of Henderson, Nev.; July 7. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law and two grandsons.

Nov, 2020
48

Ruth J. Itschner Cooper ’48 of Northampton, Mass.; May 10. After Brown she went on to earn a master’s degree in music from Colorado College. Her career in singing and teaching voice lasted more than 60 years. She began her career in New York City, where she met and married John Cooper, an aspiring composer and pianist. Together they traveled to India and taught at the Calcutta School of Music. Eventually they returned to the U.S. and lived and worked in New York and California before settling in Massachusetts. She enjoyed learning languages, particularly German, French, and Italian. She also enjoyed writing poetry, playing card games, birds and wildflowers. She is survived by her husband; a daughter; and two grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
47

Stanley E. Sugarman ’47, of Baltimore; May 7, of cancer. He was a retired landlord and real estate business owner. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from Brown, he moved to Washington, D.C., and began teaching science at John Philip Sousa Junior High School. He married and settled in Baltimore and became a co-partner of Homewood Realty for many decades. Disturbed by the fact that African American soldiers who returned from fighting in the Korean War were being denied housing, he provided high-quality and affordable housing to low-income people in Baltimore. He was twice the president of the Property Owners Association and taught landlords about the principles of providing high-quality property management. He eventually had two real estate firms, Homewood Realty and Sugarcorn Realty, and managed a portfolio of 500 rental units. He was an avid cyclist and a member of the Baltimore Cycle Club. He is survived by his partner, Phyllis Posner; a daughter; and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
46

Alfred M. Buff ’46, of New York City; July 4. As a World War II Army Air Corps veteran, he spent more than 40 years as an engineer with New York State and was involved with building the New York State Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows. Later he worked with the department of health as a supervisory sanitation engineer regulating hospitals and nursing homes, and concluded his career as an environmental engineer with the department of conservation. He volunteered with organizations involved in the Hudson River and enjoyed skiing and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Lenore; daughter
Carolyn Buff ’84; a son; and a grandson.

Related classes:
Class of 1946, Class of 1984
Nov, 2020
46

Herbert “Skip” Barlow Jr. ’46, of Annapolis, formerly of Providence and Barrington, R.I.; June 2. After graduating from Brown as an ensign in the Navy, he toured the Pacific in 1945 on a troop transport. He then served in the Naval Reserve for 23 years, retiring as a lieutenant commander. After active duty, he attended Catholic University Law School in Washington, D.C., and worked in the U.S. Patent Office and the Navy Department. Upon graduating from law school, he returned to Rhode Island and joined his father’s patent law firm, now known as Barlow, Josephs & Holmes, Ltd. He was active in the intellectual property section of the American Bar Association and chaired the trademark committee. He was an avid sailor, a member of Brown’s sailing team, and competed in 18 Newport-Bermuda races, navigating once to first place overall. He and his wife cruised the Caribbean and Florida Keys. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
45

Banice M. Webber ’45, of New York City, formerly of Providence; May 27, from complications related to Parkinson’s disease. He graduated from Tufts Medical School and was sent to Korea in 1952 as an Army surgeon. He went on to become a radiation oncologist and founded Radiation Oncology Associates in Providence. He was a fellow in the department of radiation oncology at Tufts New England Medical Center, an attending radiation oncologist at Rhode Island Hospital, and a member of the Brown medical school faculty. He was a clinical associate professor emeritus of radiation medicine at Brown and an associate professor of radiation oncology at Tufts University School of Medicine. His medical career included positions as president of New England Cancer Society and as a trustee of Miriam Hospital and Home and Hospice Care of Rhode Island. He published numerous medical papers and articles, retired in 2003, and then tutored 4th- and 5th-grade children at the Paul Cuffee School. A lifelong sailing enthusiast, he also enjoyed photography, music, and traveling. He is survived by two daughters, their spouses, and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
45

Margaret Sullivan Palmer ’45, of Newport, R.I.; Apr. 18. She was an English teacher at Rogers High School for more than 35 years. An avid reader, she was a member of The Preservation Society of Newport County, Newport Historical Society, Newport Art Museum, and Friends of the Waterfront. In retirement she volunteered delivering Meals on Wheels. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, seven grandchildren, and nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
44

Norman N. Nutman ’44, of Oradell, N.J.; Apr. 8. After receiving a DDS from the NYU School of Dentistry, surgery training at the University of Pennsylvania, and serving in the U.S. Navy, Norman moved to Teaneck, N.J., where he established an oral surgery practice. He was head of the Bergen Oral Surgery Group and on the staff of Hackensack Hospital. He retired in 1989. He was a board member and president of Delta Dental of New Jersey, serving the last two years as its acting chief executive officer. He enjoyed traveling and is survived by his wife, Norma; a daughter; son Tom ’74; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1944, Class of 1974
Sep, 2020
FAC
Joy and Determination
Women’s gymnastics coach Jackie Court led the team through many victories.
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Jackie Court image by Stew Milne
Sep, 2020
FAC

Donald R. Maxson, of Barrington, R.I.; Feb. 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1944, worked at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for three years, and graduated with a PhD in physics in 1954 from the University of Illinois. He worked at Princeton before joining the Brown faculty as an assistant professor. He worked for 35 years until his retirement in 1994. At that time, he was the only experimental nuclear physics professor on staff at Brown. He enjoyed summering in Wellfleet, Mass., where he sailed his 17-foot Explorer, the first and only sailboat he ever owned. In addition to sailing, he enjoyed reading and listening to Mozart. He is survived by his companion, Nancy Carlson; a stepdaughter; a stepson; four step-grandchildren; and two step-great-grandchildren.  

Sep, 2020
FAC

Charles C.J. Carpenter Jr., of Falmouth, Me., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Mar. 19. After graduating from Princeton and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he worked at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, in India, at Johns Hopkins and at Case Western Reserve University Hospital in Cleveland. In 1986 he joined the Brown faculty as a professor of medicine and chief physician at Miriam Hospital. He served as director of the Brown University International Health Institute and the Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research. He introduced a program to care for Rhode Island state prisoners with HIV, worked with colleagues in India and the Philippines to reduce the spread of HIV, and chaired a treatment subcommittee to evaluate the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, which took him to several countries in Africa. He retired in 2015. He was president of the Association of American Physicians, chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and co-editor of seven editions of Cecil Essentials of Medicine. He was the recipient of numerous honors, including Brown’s Rosenberger Medal, the 2007 Robert H. Williams Distinguished Chair of Medicine Award from the Association of Professors of Medicine, and the International Antiviral Society–USA Lifetime of Leadership Award in 2012; in 1998, he received the Order of the Sacred Treasure from the Emperor of Japan for his contributions to the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program. He enjoyed fishing, tennis, biking with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three sons; seven grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
GS 84

Elizabeth Bowen Chase ’84 AM, of Belfast, Me.; Feb. 5. She taught French at Colby College for two years and directed their Colby-in-Dijon semester abroad program. She left to work at Fleet Bank and returned to Colby in 1998, where she administered financial aid for 11 years. She had a deep interest in Zen Buddhism and attended retreats at Zen Mountain Monastery (N.Y.). She also enjoyed playing the organ and rowing with the Come Boating crews on Penobscot Bay. She was a member of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. She is survived by her husband, John; a brother and sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
GS 82

Robert C. DeBlois ’82 AM, of Seekonk, Mass.; Jan. 31. After completing his degree at UNH, he began teaching English at Bishop Keough High School in Pawtucket, R.I. and working at Upward Bound, a college prep program for first generation college students. He developed a relationship with Ted Sizer, founder of the Coalition of Essential Schools and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, and created programs to serve urban kids at risk of dropping out of school. In 1984 he founded SPIRIT, from which grew two schools, Blackstone Academy and UCAP. He served on many local boards and received numerous recognitions including the National Caring Award, the 2000 Rhode Island Middle School Principal of the Year, The Martin Luther King, Jr., Hall of Fame Award, and the 2018 Murray Family Prize. He was a lifelong activist, writer, and student of history and politics. Before his accident (he broke his neck diving into a river, leaving him a quadriplegic), he enjoyed hiking and skiing in the White Mountains, and watching his children develop the same appreciation for skiing, hiking, and nature that he had. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three brothers; three sisters-in-law, including Paula Pillsbury DeBlois ’89; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
GS 72

Robert T. Glassey ’72 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 15, of pancreatic cancer. He joined the math department at Indiana University in 1972 and remained for the next 37 years, a mainstay of the group in partial differential equations (PDE), rising to full professor.  He enjoyed music and could be found playing in chamber ensembles with his children. He also liked to read and bike. He is survived by his wife, Betsy, a daughter and a son.  

Sep, 2020
GS 71

Mary Margaret Hamill ’71 MAT, of Lakeway, Tex., formerly of Boothwyn and Media, Pa.; Mar. 6. She taught at Penncrest High School in Media for 42 years. Proud of her Irish heritage, she traveled to Ireland to find her family, whom she grew close to over many decades of visits. She is survived by a sister and two brothers.

Sep, 2020
GS 71

Patricia M. Euart ’71 AM, ’75 PhD, of Cranston, R.I.; Jan. 30. She taught at Rhode Island College and the Community College of Rhode Island. She published numerous articles, some in the Providence Journal, and a book of poetry. She enjoyed riding her horse and painting. She is survived by a sister.

Sep, 2020
GS 65

John L. Mothershead III ’65 MAT, of Pasa-dena, Calif.; Mar. 1. He taught at Chadwick School, Flintridge Prep, and several Pasadena-area schools prior to joining San Marino’s Southwestern Academy, where he taught and served as dean of students for 45 years. He was president of the Rotary Club of San Marino, California, and involved with the effort to eradicate the polio virus by traveling with the Rotary teams for national inoculation days. He is survived by his wife, Therese, and a son.

Sep, 2020
GS 62

Stephen D. Shatkin ’62 MAT, of Brookline, Mass.; Feb. 8. He was a retired professor at Suffolk University and co-owner of Camp Samoset in Lake Casco, Me. He is survived by many cousins.

Sep, 2020
GS 62

Patricia Reid Eldredge ’62 AM, of St. Paul, Minn.; Jan. 24, from advanced Parkinson’s disease. She was an adjunct professor of both English and graduate liberal studies at Hamline University for 14 years. Before moving to St. Paul, she taught at Earlham College, Michigan State University, Lansing Community College, and Barrington College. Her scholarly articles linking Jungian and post-Freudian psychoanalytic approaches to literature appear in edited volumes and scholarly journals. In retirement, she wrote a mystery novel, The Shadow of Strangers, which her husband intends to publish. She is survived by her husband, Sears; two brothers and sisters-in-law; three nieces; and a nephew.  

Sep, 2020
GS 60

Atle Gjelsvik ’60 ScM, ’62 PhD, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Mar. 13. He was professor emeritus of civil engineering at Columbia, recipient of three Excellent Teacher Awards, and author of scientific journal articles and The Theory of Thin-walled Bars. He worked in ship building and the design of offshore structures, including semi-submersible oil drilling rigs, developing solutions to various problems associated with oil drilling. His research interests included buckling of arches, stability of elasto-plastic columns, design of light gauge beams, minimum-weight design on continuous beams, bone remodeling, plastic design, and suspension bridge cables. His collaborations with the College of Physicians and Surgeons at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center led to advances in the field of orthopedics and joint replacement. He is survived by his wife, Carol Canner Gjelsvik ’59; daughter Annie Gjelsvik ’91, ’03 PhD; a son; and niece Elizabeth Canner ’91. 

Sep, 2020
GS 60

Tomas Feininger ’60 ScM, ’64 PhD, of Quebec, Canada; Nov. 26. An eminent geologist, he first worked in Ecuador, where he founded the department of geology at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional (National Polytechnic School). In 1978 he relocated to Quebec City to become a researcher at the department of geology and geological engineering of Université Laval. He went on to work as a geologist in the department of global physics for the Geological Survey of Canada before returning to teaching as an adjunct professor at Université Laval. At the same time, he initiated and participated in the geological mapping of territories in South and North America, notably in Quebec, and published numerous articles in specialized scientific publications. He served as president of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec from 1993 to 1998. He is survived by his wife, Johanne; three daughters; and six grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
GS 57

Paul A. Tessier ’57 ScM, of Mechanic Falls, Me.; Mar. 26. He served in the U.S. Navy and later transferred to the U.S. Air Force and was a flight surgeon. He operated his own urology office and taught biology. He was a member and treasurer of the Lewiston-Auburn Kennel Club. He is survived by his wife, Karen.

Sep, 2020
GS 53

Maxwell M. Mozell ’53 ScM, ’56 PhD (see ’51).

Sep, 2020
09

Fiona Heckscher ’09, of Washington, D.C.; Feb. 18, after a fall while rock climbing. For the past five years she was an attorney with the U.S. House of Representatives’ Office of the Legislative Counsel, which helps members of Congress write legislation. She earned her law degree from Yale in 2014. She is survived by her parents.

Sep, 2020
07

Elliot B. Quick ’07, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Feb. 19, after a fall. He was a dramaturg and taught theater history and playwriting at the Maggie Flanigan School of Acting and SUNY Purchase.  After Brown, he received his MFA in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from the Yale School of Drama, where he was the resident dramaturg and associate artistic director for the 2011 Yale Summer Cabaret Shakespeare Festival and the associate artistic director the Yale Cabaret’s 43rd season. He has worked as a literary assistant at Playwrights Horizons and a literary associate at the Yale Rep and was a founding member of the theater company, Piehole. He is survived by his mother, his sister, and many friends.

Sep, 2020
93

John C. Kelleher III ’93 ’07 MD, of Los Angeles; Jan. 26, of brain cancer. At the time of his diagnosis he was completing training at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles. He was a perpetual student. After graduating from Brown, he studied in Nagoya, Japan, and later returned to Brown to study medicine, completing his residency in psychiatry at UCLA. He previously studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City and was a talented cellist and pianist. He is survived by his husband, Greg Okin; a daughter; his parents; three siblings and their spouses; his grandmother; and seven nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1993, MD Class of 2007
Sep, 2020
90

Joel A. Firehammer  ’90, ’99 PhD, of Chestnut Hill, Mass.; Feb. 4. After several years in New York City, he moved to Massachusetts and was director of software engineering at TriNetX, Inc., in Cambridge. He excelled at collaboration in the software design process and relished the excitement of new start-up projects, most notably during his years at DataSynapse throughout the 2000s. He enjoyed cooking and entertaining, cycling, skiing, and spending time on Cape Cod. He is survived by his wife, Elisabeth Preis ’01; three children; his parents; and three brothers and sisters-in-law.

Related classes:
Class of 1990, GS Class of 1999
Sep, 2020
87

John Blassingame Jr. ’87, of New Haven, Conn.; Mar. 21. He taught at Kaplan preparing students for the LSAT test and tutoring college-bound students for the SAT exams. He is survived by his mother, a sister, and aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Sep, 2020
82

Cary M. Hammer ’82, of San Francisco; Jan. 15, after a prolonged illness. He was a computer games consultant and contractor working at Atari, then director of programming at Scholastic Software in New York. After moving to San Francisco he founded his own company, Unexpected Development, focusing on handheld games for Nintendo Game Boy and Sega Game Gear. He enjoyed playing poker, especially Texas hold’em, and entered the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas several times. He was a master-level prankster and enjoyed any opportunity to upturn the conventional. He is survived by his partner, Suzanne Scott; two sons; and his former wife, Nadine Browning.

Sep, 2020
81

Stephen J. DeBlois ’81, of Ballston Spa, N.Y., formerly of Narragansett, R.I; Feb. 25. He was vice president of DeBlois Oil Company for many years and most recently worked as a senior territory sales manager for Citgo Petroleum in the Upstate New York region. He was a family man who enjoyed coaching or spectating at his children’s sporting events, hiking through the mountains of upstate New York, white water rafting, skiing, and playing golf. At Brown he was a member of the hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Diane; his father; four children; three siblings and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
75

Lawrence J. Solin ’75, ’78 MD, of Haverford, Pa.; Mar. 3. He was emeritus professor and clinician educator in radiation oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He was listed on several Best Doctors in America lists and served on the faculty senate, retiring in 2008. He served on the staff at Jefferson Frankford Hospital, Mercer Medical Center, Germantown Hospital and Medical Center, and was a voluntary faculty member at Thomas Jefferson University. He later joined the staff at Einstein Medical Center, where he served as department chair in radiation oncology. He was a major contributor to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network, helping to define the standards of care for breast cancer. His work was published in several scientific journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. He was an active leader in the National Cancer Institute Cooperative National Groups and a longtime grantee of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is survived by his wife, Leslie Belasco Solin ’80; two daughters, including Jennifer Bensimon ’09; and a granddaughter.

Related classes:
Class of 1975, MD Class of 1978
Sep, 2020
74

Deborah L. Homsher ’74, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Mar. 16. She won a Wallace Stegner writing fellowship at Stanford University and followed with an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Iowa. She was employed as an adjunct English professor at Ithaca College and during that time, raised a family and published From Blood to Verdict, Women and Guns, and The Rising ShoreRoanoke. In 1995 she was hired as managing editor of publications in Cornell’s Southeast Asia Program, a position she held for 19 years. After developed an enthusiasm for rowing a single shell that lasted for years, and also enjoyed hiking, biking, and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Hugh Egan ’74; two sons, including Kevin Egan ’03; a sister; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
72

James M. L. Williams ’72, of Lewiston, Me., formerly of Princeton, N.J.; Feb. 7, of sudden cardiac arrest. He spent most of his career in the wine business, first in Germany and later in New York and New Jersey. He retired in 2007 as technical services specialist of the Princeton University Library. He was also an avid birder and bird photographer, a 40-year member of New Jersey Audubon Society, and joined the Stanton Bird Club on moving to Lewistown in 2007. He traveled extensively in his birding adventures and enjoyed bowling and playing Scrabble. He is survived by a sister and cousins.

Sep, 2020
72

Daniel M. Babcock ’72, of Yorktown Va.; Dec. 29, after a courageous battle with ALS. After Brown, he graduated from the Dental College of Georgia and established an orthodontic practice in 1978 that continued for 41 years. In recognition of his geology major at Brown he became an environmental conservationist. He was also a self-taught beekeeper, carpenter, and chicken and oyster farmer. He enjoyed skiing, sailing, fishing, crabbing, and traveling. He and his wife visited more than 50 countries and all seven continents. He is survived by his wife, Pearl; two daughters and sons-in-law; a son; and three grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
71

Robert J. Donahue ’71, of Norwood, Mass.; Feb. 15. He taught at Norwood High School for two years before enrolling at Suffolk University Law School. He joined his father’s law practice and together they formed Donahue & Donahue in Norwood. He was on the board of directors at Norwood Bank, a founding member and board member of The Friends of St. Nick, and was active in the Friends of Norwood Hockey and the Norwood Gridiron Club. He also enjoyed playing golf and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; a son; three grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; brother Charles ’65 and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
69

Stephen Strocker ’69, of Tarzana, Calif.; Dec. 21.

Sep, 2020
69

Dante E. Boffi Jr. ’69, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 29. After earning an MBA from URI, he became a leader in mental health innovations for the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals. He culminated his career at the Rhode Island Department of Administration and was a member of the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; two children; four grandchildren; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
67

William E. Donnelly ’67, of Lansdowne, Va.; Feb. 25, of pancreatic cancer. He earned a law degree from Georgetown Law School and practiced in both the private sector and local government sector. His specialty was land use law. He enjoyed fly-fishing in the Shenandoah, woodworking, and carving. He is survived by his wife, Denise; two sons; and five grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
66

Allan Eberhart ’66, of Grass Valley, Calif.; Mar. 12, of pancreatic cancer. He was a longtime environmental activist in the Northern California foothills. He served for decades on Sierra Club conservation and legislative committees and participated for the Sierra Club in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. He began and led local environmental organizations, including the collaborative Foothills Water Network. He mentored many of the next generation of environmental activists and in later years was devoted to saving the Bear River from additional dams. He was also a master carpenter who specialized in renovating historic homes in Nevada City and Grass Valley. He is survived by his wife, Alison; a sister; and two nephews.

Sep, 2020
65

Victor J. Field ’65, of Ludlow, Mass.; Jan. 25. He worked as a hospital administrator and then was a founding partner of Keystone Commons, an assisted living facility in Ludlow. He enjoyed traveling to Italy and Ireland and was a New York Giants and Boston Red Sox fan. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses, six grandchildren, and a sister.

Sep, 2020
64

Eric T. Helland ’64, of Divide, Colo.; Jan. 30. In 1967 he graduated from the University of Missouri, Kansas City College of Dentistry. In 1968 he received a Presidential Commission from the Navy and worked as a dentist aboard the USS John F. Kennedy. He moved to Colorado in 1970 and established his dental practice. During 42 years in practice he received many recognitions, including Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry in 1981 and Fellow of Pierre Fauchard Academy in 1990. He served on the board of Delta Dental of Colorado and assisted in the formation of the Intermountain Dental Society, where he was president for 20 years. He ran several times in the Pikes Peak Marathon and enjoyed being in the mountains, camping, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; five children and their spouses; five grandchildren; a great-grandson; two brothers, including Doug ’67; two sisters-in-law; and a nephew.

Sep, 2020
64

Richard K. Goeltz ’64, of New York City; Mar. 23, of cardiac arrest following surgery. He served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1966 to 1972, attaining the rank of staff sergeant. He worked as a financial executive in New York, Chicago, London, Paris, Miami, and Central America. He joined the Seagram Company in 1970, becoming executive vice president and chief financial officer in 1986. In 1992 he moved to London to become a director and chief financial officer of National Westminster Bank, then returned to New York and joined the American Express Company in 1996 as vice chairman and chief financial officer. He also held several nonexecutive directorships, including Freddie Mac and Delta Air Lines. He was active in numerous philanthropic organizations, including the Opera Orchestra of New York, the London Philharmonic Trust, English Chamber Orchestra and Music Society, and the American Academy of Berlin. Additionally, he was a longtime member of the Metropolitan Opera Club and board member of the London School of Economics. He enjoyed collecting 18th Century Worcester and Meissen porcelain, traveling, attending opera festivals, and reading. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ellen, and several family members.

Sep, 2020
63

David A. Wheatland ’63, of Cumberland, Me.; Feb. 13. After earning his PhD from the University of Maryland, he was a professor of chemistry at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me. for six years. He left to become a research chemist for Scott Paper, then dedicated his time to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mapping the wetlands of New England, as well as volunteering at the greenhouse at the Morrison Center. He was a supporter of the Portland Symphony Orchestra, the Portland Stage Company, and the Portland Museum of Art. He and his wife enjoyed European travel through the Brown Travelers and spent several winters on Sanibel Island, Fla. He also enjoyed reading, bird watching, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Susan; daughter Rebecca Wheatland ’94; son Thomas Wheatland ’91; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren;
and two sisters.

Sep, 2020
63

Dennis R. Redding ’63, of South Yarmouth, Mass.; Jan. 9, of cancer.  He served in the military for 27 years and received the Distinguished Flying Cross, numerous Air Medals, and two Legions of Merit. He was honorably discharged as a colonel in 1989. He was a respected high school football, basketball, and softball official, as well as a college football official. He worked many tournaments and state championship games and volunteered as an umpire for the Cape Cod Senior Softball League for many years. His greatest accomplishment was working as a replay official for the Atlantic Coast Conference, culminating in his selection to officiate the 2017 Cotton Bowl. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four granddaughters; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
63

Paul M. Allen ’63, of Biloxi, Miss.; Mar. 16. He was a gynecologist and obstetrician for more than 30 years and a staff member at Singing River Hospital. He retired in 1998 and joined the staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Biloxi, where he would ultimately serve as chief of the medical staff.  At the end of his career, he served as a surveyor for the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, a position that provided him with an opportunity for travel and to meet new people. He was a glider pilot and was fascinated with foreign languages. He studied Chinese, French, Arabic, and Spanish. He is survived by four sons and their spouses, seven grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and his former wife, Joan Weir Allen.

Sep, 2020
62

Paula Fitzpatrick Budinger ’62, of Monona, Wisc., formerly of Palo Alto, Calif.; Feb. 8. She worked in research labs at Stanford University and the Palo Alto VA Hospital. Years later she earned a degree in interior design at Canada College and  in 1980 moved to the Seattle area, where she worked as a nursing assistant, then an occupational therapy aide at a nursing center for young people with disabilities. She returned to school again and became a medical assistant and worked in several clinics before retiring as a medical transcriptionist in 2007 and moving to Wisconsin. She became an avid quilter and started a blog called Paula B. Quilts. She was a member of the Monona Quilt Group and the Garden Club. She is survived by a daughter, a granddaughter, and a sister.

Sep, 2020
61

Martin Wenick ’61, of Washington, D.C.; May 7, from COVID-19. After Brown he trained as a Foreign Service officer and had a 27-year State Department career that included positions in Washington, D.C., Afghanistan, Czechoslovakia, Italy, and the Soviet Union. From 1970 to 1974 he was stationed in Moscow and became head of the National Conference for Soviet Jewry. After retiring he became executive director of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) until his retirement in 1998. Under his leadership, HIAS resettled tens of thousands of Soviet Jews, brought the final remnants of Syria’s Jewish community safely to the United States, and helped members of the Baha’i faith escape persecution in Iran, among other initiatives. He is survived by his wife, Alice.

Sep, 2020
61

Alice Guillemette Bransfield ’61, of Raleigh, N.C.; Feb. 4. She was an elementary school teacher for 37 years, most of those years spent in New York City and Fairfax (Va.) County schools. She retired from Forest Edge Elementary in Reston, Va., in 2002. She volunteered with the American Heart Association and enjoyed reading and traveling the world. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law.

Sep, 2020
60

Philip H. Tenenbaum ’60, of Rancho Mirage, Calif.; Feb. 26. He was the founder and sole owner of The Chicago Wine Company, which conducted its first fine wine auction in April 1977, making it only the second company (after Heublein) to conduct wine auctions in the U.S. An avid tennis fan and player, he won two tennis tournaments while serving in the U.S. Navy and in later years was tutored by Dennis Ralston. He is survived by his wife, Susan, and brother Robert ’64.

Sep, 2020
60

David Reissig ’60, of Swanton, Vt.; Mar. 30, from COVID-19. He attended Brown for a year before transferring to UVM. He completed training at the Customs Academy in Washington, D.C., became special agent in charge of U.S. Customs in Rouses Point, N.Y., and worked in the Middle East as a U.S. sky marshal. He went on to serve in the Secret Service; one assignment included providing protection for President Ford. In the ’80s, he was assigned as a special agent to represent U.S. Customs on the security detail for the Lake Placid Winter Olympics. He spent time in Key West, Fla., in charge of a drug task force and later served as the U.S. Customs Representative to Canada for the U.S. Consulate in Montreal. At the end of his career, he became supervisor in charge of the special investigators working out of the U.S. Customs offices in New York and Vermont. He retired after 28 years but continued to work part-time for the Defense Department, the FBI, and the U.S. State Department performing background investigations for another 25 years. He enjoyed time with family, fishing, biking, skating, skiing, and playing pickleball. He is survived by his wife, Ione; two daughters; a son; six grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
60

A. Richard Caputo ’60, of Shavertown, Pa.; Mar. 11, after a brief illness. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, he served in the Judge Advocate General’s Department of the U.S. Air Force for three years, then joined a law firm that over time became known as Shea, Shea & Caputo. In 1997 he was nominated to the federal bench by President Clinton and served as a federal district judge on the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania for 22 years. He was a member of various community organizations, a founding director of the Luzerne Foundation, director of the Federal Judges Association, and a member of the Third Circuit Committee on Model Civil Jury Instructions. He enjoyed playing golf and had an interest in cars. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary Shea Caputo ’62; two daughters and their spouses, including Lisa Caputo Morris ’86; son A. Richard Caputo Jr. ’88 and his wife, Laurel Reed Caputo ’88; and seven grandchildren, including Albert R. Caputo III ’18 and Jackson R. Caputo ’21.

Sep, 2020
60

Richard D. Brown ’60, of West Lake Hills, Tex.; Mar. 5. Following his time in the U.S. Army, he attended the University of Pittsburgh and received his master’s in public administration. He moved to Austin in 1963 and began a long association with the Texas Municipal League, becoming executive director in 1970. Retiring in 1985, he represented many different clients and was routinely named one of the state’s top lobbyists. He served as alderman, mayor pro tem, and mayor of the City of Rollingwood from 1985 to 1995, and was instrumental in devising a bill to create library districts. He is survived by his wife, Jann; a daughter and her spouse; a son; three grandchildren; a stepdaughter and her spouse; a stepson and his spouse; seven step-grandchildren; two sisters; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
59

Anthony I. Morgan ’59, of Southbury, Conn.; Feb. 15. After graduating, he worked in New York City for 40 years as an advertising and market research executive. He was said to have been part of the team that created the slogan “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.” He also taught graduate seminars in marketing and market research at Manhattan College and was published in multiple professional journals. After retiring, he began writing fiction and at age 70 self-published his first novel, Incident at Heidelberg. It was followed by a second novel, When the Sea Shall Give Up Her Dead, and a book of short stories and essays entitled The Book of Morgan. He went on to join the Heritage Village Writers’ Group, where he served as editor for An Anthology of Heritage Village Writers. He was an avid tennis player and competed into his early 80s. He also enjoyed art and architecture and was a fan of the New York Rangers. He is survived by his wife, Mercedes; a daughter; three sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a brother and a sister-in-law.

Sep, 2020
59

Robert E. Kresko ’59, of St. Louis; Apr. 21, of cancer. After service in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduation from Brown, he entered the real estate business at Bakewell Corp. In 1967, he joined the Trammell Crow Company of Dallas as one of its earliest partners, taking on the responsibility for developments in St. Louis. He assumed the role of managing partner in 1987 and retired in 1990. In retirement, he joined with Peter Krombach and formed Krombach Partners, a real estate company where he continued to work through 2019. He established the Kresko Family Victorian Garden at Missouri Botanical Garden; donated a Chinese Bronze Collection to the St. Louis Art Museum; contributed to the building of the football field at St. Mary’s High School, where he was inducted into the Hall of Fame and given a meritorious service medal; and at Brown established the Kresko Scholarship and the Chapin Newhard Scholarship. He served on several boards over the course of his career and was a Brown trustee emeritus. He is survived by his wife, Dorotha; three children; and four grandchildren.    

Sep, 2020
59

Joel F. DiPaola ’59, of Brookfield, Conn.; Sept. 11, 2019, of pancreatic cancer. He worked at General Electric Company and while there was awarded two patents. His last role was in academia at Danbury Community College’s chemistry department. From 1959 to 1965 he served in the U.S. Army Reserve. He was a longtime soccer referee, a hiker, and a camper. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; brother Lynn ’62; a sister-in-law; a niece and three nephews.

Sep, 2020
59

Joel G. Caslowitz ’59, of Worcester, Mass.; Jan. 4. After serving as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, he joined the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine and was promoted to professor in 1997. He served as associate chief of internal medicine and program director of the internal medicine residency at the Boston VA from 1970 to 2000 and as associate program director for the internal medicine residency at Boston Medical Center from 2000 to 2008. His teaching was recognized with numerous awards, including the 1993 Metcalf Cup and Prize, Boston University’s highest teaching award. He retired in 2014. He enjoyed football, tennis, skiing, and sailing with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three children, including Pamela Caslowitz ’83; four granddaughters; and two sisters, including Rita Michaelson ’50. 

Sep, 2020
58

Jane Horwich Weinberg ’58, of Fair Lawn, N.J.; Mar. 28. She was a teacher in the public school system prior to starting her own SAT tutoring business and helping students reach their college goals over a span of 40 years. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and two grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
58

Martin E. Plaut ’58, of Buffalo, N.Y.; Feb. 17. For four decades he was a professor of medicine at SUNY-University at Buffalo School of Medicine. He taught internal medicine at Buffalo General Hospital and Sisters of Charity Hospital in Buffalo. He was a 50-year member and past president of the Roswell Park Medical Club in Buffalo and a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Disease Society of America. At the time of his death, he was preparing a talk on the novel coronavirus. In addition to scholarly research, he published three novels and The Doctor’s Guide to You and Your Colon. He regularly attended performances at the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and enjoyed visiting art galleries and reading the New York Times. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; two daughters; son Benjamin ’91; two grandchildren; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
58

Fred “Woody” Nordenholz ’58, of WinstonSalem, N.C.; Mar. 7. He began his career at Western Electric and served in various management positions before leaving in 1986 to accept the position of president of the Greater Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce. In retirement, both he and his wife earned master’s of arts degrees in liberal studies at UNC at Greensboro. He enjoyed reading and had a special interest in American history and politics. He also enjoyed cross country skiing at The Home Ranch in Clark, Colo., which was a special place for him, having arranged for a group of children with cancer and their families to spend a week of healing and equine therapy there. He is survived by his wife, Lillian; two daughters; and a son-in-law.

Sep, 2020
58

Peter C. Charron ’58, of Gulfport, Fla.; Feb. 24. He served two years in the U.S. Air Force followed by a computer position with RCA at Cape Canaveral, then went to IBM, where he worked for 28 years. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four children; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Sep, 2020
57

Elizabeth J. Webb ’57, of Naples, Fla.; Oct. 20, 2019.

Sep, 2020
57

Richard M. Quinn ’57, of Indianapolis; Feb. 8, after a battle with lung disease. He was the CEO of INDO Advertising and served on two bank boards in Marion, Indiana, then moved to Indianapolis, where he was the owner of The Beer Company and subsequently founded and was president of Cameron Springs Water Company. He was active in his community and served as president of the Brown Club of Indiana and was on the board of the Indiana Repertory Theatre. He enjoyed sailing and exploring and is survived by his wife, Jean; daughter Heather ’86; two sons, including Richard ’84; three daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
57

James F. Buote ’57, of Costa Mesa, Calif.; Dec. 1. He worked at the Xerox Corp. for 34 years and served in the Korean War. He enjoyed reading and antique cars. He is survived by his wife, Glenda; four daughters; a son; 11 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
56

Ruth Fried Schetman ’56, of Glen Mills, Pa., formerly of Wilmington, Del.; Jan. 29. She assisted in the operations of her husband’s dermatology practice, volunteered at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, and taught reading skills to inner-city children. She enjoyed reading and playing tennis, bridge, and mahjong, but especially spending time at her second home at Rehoboth Beach. She is survived by three sons and their spouses, including Richard ’79 and Bill ’81; and five grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
56

Quentin G. Kraft ’56, of Granville, Ohio; Mar. 24. He had a 36-year teaching career at Denison University in Granville. He retired from Denison in 1997. At age 70 he began writing poetry and titled his collection On Getting Too Damn’d Old: Free Speech Poems for Free Readers. He competed in road races in Ohio including the Columbus Marathon and twice qualified for the Boston Marathon. He enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a son and daughter-in-law; a sister; five sisters and brothers-in-law; nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
56

Robert Ise ’56, of Calabasas, Calif.; Mar. 17, of congestive heart failure. He had a long career working at the Atlantic Richfield Company and later at Lyondell Petrochemical, where he was vice president of marketing. He retired in 1998. He enjoyed gardening and is survived by his wife, Armelle; two daughters; a granddaughter; and brother Richard Ise ’54

Sep, 2020
56

Harry F. DiZoglio ’56, of Johnston, R.I.; Feb. 16. He was a civil engineer for many years and served in the Rhode Island Army National Guard. He is survived by his companion Lucille Waidalowski; a daughter; a son; a grandson; a sister; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

Sep, 2020
56

William A. Cooper ’56, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Wolfeboro, N.H.; Mar. 19, of cancer. He was a member of Brown’s hockey team all four years and went on to be a math teacher and coach hockey, football, and baseball at Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, N.Y. In 1959 he moved to Connecticut to work as an engineer for Southern New England Telephone, but in 1962 he returned to Trinity-Pawling to serve as chair of their math department, head of the Disciplinary Committee, and coach of the varsity hockey, junior varsity baseball, junior varsity football, and intramural tennis teams until his retirement in 1981. Trinity-Pawling inducted him into its Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003. An appointment as an educational consultant based in Avon, Conn., followed. Concurrently, he began working at the Wolfeboro Camp School as a teacher in 1967 and became head of school in 1977. He retired in 2005 and became a trustee. He enjoyed swimming, biking, sailing, tennis, golf, traveling, and cheering on the Boston Red Sox, Boston Bruins, and New England Patriots. He is survived by a daughter and her spouse, two sons and their spouses, six grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, a sister, four nieces and nephews, and his former wife, Joan Cooper.

Sep, 2020
55

Thomas A. Westbrook ’55, of South Windsor, Conn.; Feb. 24. He operated his family’s manufacturing business and invested in real estate. He was an active member of the East Hartford Rotary Club and served as president in 1974. He was also president of the East Hartford Chamber of Commerce in 1974. He enjoyed family vacations, camping, canoeing trips, and playing the piano.

Aug, 2020
55

Arthur Scott Jr. ’55, of Bristol, R.I.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of sociology at Providence College. He retired in 2005. He also worked as a civilian contractor with the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed running, swimming, and proudly watching the New England Patriots, the Boston Red Sox, and PC basketball teams. He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a son-in-law, three grandchildren, a great-grandchild, and a brother.

Aug, 2020
55

Norman G. Orodenker ’55, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 18. He received his JD from Columbia University in 1958 and was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar. He was a senior partner at Tillinghast, Licht, Perkins, Smith, and Cohen; legal counsel at the Department of Employment Security (1960-1962); chief legal counsel for all Rhode Island departments of state government (1969-1972); chief legal counsel at the Registry of Motor Vehicles (1972-1974); and chief legal counsel of the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (1974-1982). He held numerous leadership roles in community, charitable, and religious organizations. He was recognized for his commitment, dedication, and passion involving social change and justice as a recipient of the NCCJ Humanitarian Award in 1999, the Jewish Federation of Rhode Island Joseph W. Ress Community Service Award in 2004, and the Urban League Humanitarian Award in 2004, and received the Martindale-Hubbell rating AV, which is the highest rating given to attorneys. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and two sisters.

Aug, 2020
55

Harold J. Morick ’55, of Lenox, Mass.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of philosophy at the State University of New York at Albany from 1967 to 2000, specializing in analytic philosophy, Wittgenstein, and Freud. He published three books of philosophy and at the time of his death was editing a selection of essays by Sigmund Freud for a volume about Freud as a philosopher. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; four daughters; and a granddaughter.

Aug, 2020
54

Caleb R. Woodhouse ’54, of Little Compton, R.I.; Jan. 28. He had a distinguished career teaching history at both the college and high school level for more than 30 years. He enjoyed singing and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Alesandra; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law.

Aug, 2020
54

Nancy Schmidt Sherman ’54, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Feb. 20. She worked at Manufacturer’s Bank until she began her family. She was cofounder of the Angle Tree Garden Club and served as its president. She was an accomplished artist and enjoyed knitting, needlepoint, and playing tennis. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
54

Edward Rowland ’54, of South Hamilton, Mass.; Mar. 11. After serving in the U.S. Army, he moved to Carbondale, Colo., where he taught at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He moved to Boston a year later to join Estabrook and Company, where he began a career in the investment business that spanned six decades. In 1971, he joined the board of trustees at The Pingree School in Hamilton, later becoming its chair. An avid sailor, he spent many summers on Cape Cod and was a member of the Cruising Club of America, where he served as commodore from 2005 to 2007. He is survived by his wife, Susie; a daughter; a son; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

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