Obituaries

Jan, 2021
FAC

Sergei Khruschev, of Cranston, R.I.; June 18. He was a retired senior fellow at the Watson Institute, the son of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, and a rocket engineer and computer scientist who developed guidance systems for rockets and cruise missiles. As a rocket engineer and computer scientist in the Soviet Union, he played an active role in developing guidance systems for missiles, including cruise missiles launched from submarines from 1958 to 1968. He then took up writing and lecturing. His areas of expertise included Soviet economic and political reforms, U.S./Soviet relations from 1950 to 1964, and the history of the Soviet space program. In addition, he helped his father write his four-volume memoir in Russian and then translated it into English. He moved to Rhode Island in 1991, shortly after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, to lecture at Brown as a visiting scholar on the Cold War. He remained a senior fellow at the Thomas J. Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a fellow at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He also taught at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. While at the Watson Institute, he taught, lectured extensively around the country, and wrote three books about his father and the Cold War. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1999, though he also maintained his Russian citizenship. He is survived by his wife, Valentina; a son; and a granddaughter. 

Jan, 2021
FAC

Sture K.F. Karlsson, of Charlottesville, Va.; July 17. He received his PhD in engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1958 and after a year as a visiting researcher at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, he joined the Brown faculty in the engineering department. He taught in the area of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. During those years, he was also a visiting professor at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and the National Cheng Kung University in Tainan, Taiwan. During his tenure at Brown, he published numerous research articles and became an active member of the Brown Orienteering Club and the New England Orienteering Club. He is survived by daughter Lynn-Marie Karlsson ’74; a son and daughter-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
FAC

Thomas G. Breslin, of Bristol, R.I., and Delray Beach, Fla.; Mar. 7. He was a urological surgeon with privileges at Rhode Island Hospital, Fatima Hospital, and St. Joseph’s Hospital and successfully ran his private practice, Breslin Urosurgical, for 31 years. He was appointed to the Rhode Island Board of Medical Review and was a clinical instructor at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was one of the first to practice groundbreaking surgical techniques in Rhode Island, including cryosurgery and lithotripsy. He was active in his community as past president of the Bristol Highlands Improvement Association, a member of the Harbor Commission, and fleet surgeon and former board member of the Bristol Yacht Club. He enjoyed numerous Block Island Race weeks, Newport to Bermuda races, and cruising with his family aboard his yacht, the Watch. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Carolyn; five children; 11 grandchildren; and brother, Robert H. Breslin ’50.

Jan, 2021
MD 94

Michael Chalfin ’94 MD, of Newton, Mass.; July 2, of cancer. He completed his residency in psychiatry at Cambridge Hospital, where he then dedicated himself to caring for underserved and traumatized patients for the next 21 years. He served a vital role in the psychiatry department at Cambridge Health Alliance as director of psychopharmacology and he enjoyed being an assistant professor in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School. He was the recipient of the Alfred S. Margulies Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching and he coauthored Formulation and Treatment of Suicidality in Patients with Trauma. He enjoyed morning bike rides and birding. He is survived by his wife, Sharon Jacobs ’89, ’94 MD; a daughter; a son; his mother; and two sisters.

Jan, 2021
MD 89

Jeffrey E. Harb ’89 MD, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Mar. 7, of Ewing sarcoma. He was a physician at Sansum Country Medical Clinic in Solvang, Calif., before entering into private practice. From 1999 to 2011, he cared for the health of Santa Barbara residents before leaving the practice to lend his expertise to the insurance sector. He was an avid golfer who could always be found on the local Santa Barbara fairways devoting his weekends to his quest to make it on the Senior Tour. He is survived by two children, his mother, a sister, a brother, and his former wife, Kristi.

Jan, 2021
MD 08

John N. Bergeron ’80 MD (see ’77).

Related classes:
MD Class of 2008, Class of 1977
Jan, 2021
GS 02

Drew M. Love ’02 AM, of Albany, Ga.; June 6. He received degrees from Paine College (Ga.), where he pledged the Eta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta Univ., and a degree in microbiology-immunology from Alabama State Univ. He also obtained multiple certifications from the American Society for Quality. He worked with biotechnology manufacturers, such as Abbott Laboratories, Amgen, Biogen Idec, Cardinal Health, and Wyeth, to maintain quality standards. In 2014, he joined the Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research as a compliance officer. In 2016, he joined Ernst & Young as part of the advisory risk transformation practice and served as manager in quality and compliance. He provided consultancy to clients across the U.S. and around the world. He is survived by two brothers, two aunts, three uncles, and several cousins.

Jan, 2021
GS 01

H. Jack Feibelman ’01 AM, of Cranston, R.I., formerly of New York City; June 19. Having immigrated to the U.S. at the age of 15, he graduated from Chillicothe Business School in Missouri and moved to New York City, where he eventually secured a job as a clerk at Coro Jewelry. He advanced to bookkeeper and was reassigned to Providence. While working at Coro, he obtained a business administration degree from Northeastern University and rose to credit manager, assistant comptroller, and finally director of product development. In 1966, he formed Feibelman & Krack, which represented select jewelry manufacturers to the wholesale market. Separately, in 1967, Jack formed A&H Manufacturing Company to manufacture and market his revolutionary concept of hanging display cards for earrings. He was a longtime member and officer of Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths Association and belonged to the Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association. He was a member of Temple Beth-El and Temple Sinai and volunteered on the Endowment Committee of the Jewish Alliance. He served on Miriam Hospital’s board of governors, its finance committee, and the Miriam Foundation Board of Trustees. In 2014, he was honored as Miriam Hospital Person of the Year. He enjoyed traveling and playing bridge. He is survived by a daughter, Barbara Feibelman ’73; a son-in-law; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren, including Marcy Feibelman ’04; and two great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
91

Lena P. Dame ’91 AM, of Brentwood, Calif.; July 17. During her career, she traveled the world serving as an English teacher and school librarian and published a book before settling in California to be near her grandchildren. She was known by all for her remarkable energy, dedication to family, and willingness to help others. She is survived by three children, six grandchildren, and four siblings.

Jan, 2021
GS 90

Nancy E. Olsen Ross ’90 AM, of Kingston, R.I.; June 14, from mesothelioma. After graduating high school, she hitchhiked around Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, and remained in Norway as a nanny for a while. She graduated from Marietta College in 1962 and served two years in the Peace Corps in Thailand. She married and then worked at America’s first Job Corps Center for two years teaching high school dropouts in Kentucky. She returned to Rhode Island in 1968 and raised a family in Kingston, with the exception of living one year in Indonesia from 1982 to 1983. Throughout her adult life, she taught reading and English. She received two English as a Second Language (ESL) master’s degrees,  one from Rhode Island College and a second from Brown. Nancy worked 26 years in South Kingstown’s public school system. In her free time, she volunteered with South Providence Neighborhood Ministries and spent four summers in a girl’s orphanage in Romania. She is survived by her husband, Neil; three children; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
GS 75

Peter H. Laurie ’75 PhD (see ’65).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1975, Class of 1965
Jan, 2021
GS 75

John C. Drake ’75 AM, of Niagara Falls, N.Y.; Jan. 25, 2020. He was the executive director at Center City Neighborhood Redevelopment Corporation in Niagara Falls and was also an adjunct professor at Niagara County Community College. When he was not helping his community or teaching, John enjoyed rowing, running marathons with his wife, and reading. He was also a passionate Boston Bruins fan and is survived by his wife, Estelle; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
GS 73

Edward D. Kleinbard ’73 AM (see ’73).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1973, Class of 1973
Jan, 2021
GS 72

Carl DeSimone ’72 AM, of Providence; June 13, after a brief illness. He taught for a short time in Switzerland. After returning to Providence with his family in the late 1970s, Carl worked in the family business, New England Egg Service, until he resumed teaching in the Providence School System. He taught history and English at Classical High School until his retirement. Carl was also an actor and singer and performed with numerous local theatre and music groups, including the Rhode Island Civic Chorale & Orchestra. His favorite role was Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof. In recent years he was a soloist at Saint Mary’s Church in Cranston. He was active in his community and with many organizations, including World Wildlife Fund, Narcotics Anonymous and LGBTQ equality. He also continued to teach at Hamilton House, an adult learning exchange in Providence, and several senior centers. He is survived by two daughters and a brother.

Jan, 2021
71

Enrique Sauer ’71 PhD, of Orlando, Fla.; July 26, of pneumonia as a result of COVID-19. He became a citizen of the United States and started his career as a scientist in the aerospace industry. In 1980, he moved to Orlando after taking a position at Martin Marietta, from which he retired in 2008. He is survived by his wife, Vera; two sons and their spouses; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Jan, 2021
69

Patricia Tanis Sydney ’69 MAT, of Newtown, Pa.; July 31. She produced her own works of art and taught at Mount Ida Junior College (Mass.), Bucks County Community College (Pa.), and Philadelphia Community College. Additionally, she worked as a curator for the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa. In 1998, she coauthored The Philadelphia Ten: A Women’s Artist Group, 1917-1945. She served on the board of the Youth Orchestra of Bucks County and enjoyed playing tennis, traveling with her family, and attending classical music concerts. She is survived by her husband, A. David Sydney ’68; three daughters, including Sarah Sydney ’00; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
GS 69

Burton N. Kendall ’69 PhD, of San Francisco; June 22, from complications of ALS. After graduating, he began teaching at UC Santa Barbara. He left teaching in 1973, having learned a trade through his physics research, and was hired by Systems Control, Inc., a fledgling computer company. He later worked at Measurex and then moved on to Octel Communications. He was a cofounder of LifeMasters (originally HiLife) in South San Francisco, which used cutting edge computer tech to manage the health of patients with chronic illnesses. He joined SnapTrack in 2000 as they were being acquired by Qualcomm and spent the rest of his career at Qualcomm, working on location technology for cell phones. He retired from Qualcomm in 2015. He volunteered with the Exploratorium, was a docent at the California Academy of Sciences, and enjoyed leading walking tours with City Guides. He also traveled extensively. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three children and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
GS 67

Gerard H. Martineau ’67 ScM, of Falmouth, Mass.; June 26, one day short of his 83rd birthday. He was a physics instructor at Portsmouth Abbey School in Portsmouth, R.I., for eight years. He later worked at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and for the United States Air Force radar site PAVE PAWS Cape Cod. Finally, he worked at the Naval Undersea Systems Center in Newport, R.I., retiring after more than 20 years. He was an avid supporter of the arts and frequently attended classical music concerts both in Boston and Cape Cod. He is survived by two sisters-in-law, a niece, and a nephew.

Jan, 2021
GS 65

M. Gene Taylor ’65 ScM, ’68 PhD, of Kingston, Pa.; June 6, after a lengthy battle with Parkinson’s disease and COVID-19. He was long employed as a physics professor at Bloomsburg University (Pa.) and was previously a physics professor at the American University in Cairo and Wilkes University (Pa.). He held a pilot’s license and was a member of the Civil Air Patrol. He avidly followed the stock market and enjoyed traveling with his family around the world, especially to Egypt. He also enjoyed Ohio State University football, NASCAR, skeet shooting, tinkering with his cars and computers, and following the weather. He is survived by his wife, Wagiha Abdel-Gawad Taylor ’62 AM; three daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
GS 63

Donald P. Wei ’63 ScM, of Monroeville, Pa.; Aug. 1. He worked as a senior systems analyst at Westinghouse Research and Development for 36 years. Donald was an avid reader and Steelers fan and enjoyed cooking, gardening, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Yuling Li Wei; three sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
GS 63

Neil B. Tame ’63 MAT, of Standish, Me.; June 5. Prior to attending Brown, he taught two years at Limington Academy (Me.), one year at Greely Jr. High (Me.), and after his army service, six years at Monmouth Academy (Me.). After Brown, he was a Shell Merit Fellow at Cornell University and attended Michigan State University. ln 1965 he became the head of the math department at the new Oxford Hills High School and for several years was curriculum coordinator for math throughout the school district, helping teachers and students with innovative math programs. He conducted many workshops and conferences throughout the state and was one of the founders of PiCone Math League. He was proud of his math teams as Oxford Hills was very dominant in competitive math competitions in Maine and New England. He was a member of the Association of Teachers of Math in Maine and the first secretary for the Maine Association of Math Leagues. He was awarded the Maine Presidential Award in 1983; the meeting at the White House with the president was one of the highlights of his life. Oxford Hills Chamber of Commerce named him citizen of the year in 1985. ln retirement he volunteered in schools with fun after-school math sessions. He enjoyed landscaping and winters in Florida. He is survived by his wife, Martha; three daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
GS 63

Gilbert H. Smith ’63 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Bethesda; July 6, of pancreatic cancer. He joined the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute as a fellow in the viral biology branch in 1965 and became senior investigator in the laboratory of biology in 1970. He most recently served as senior investigator in the basic research laboratory and head of the mammary stem cell biology section. In 2005, he received the National Institutes of Health Merit award. Gil was also a two-time nominee for the E.B. Wilson Medal, the highest award from the American Society for Cell Biology, and in 2008 was a finalist for the Nobel Prize for medicine. He retired June 30, 2020, and was named an NIH Scientist Emeritus. Gil is considered a pioneer in the biology of mammary/breast cancer and stem cells involved in mammary development and cancer. He lectured across the globe and authored 180 research publications while serving on several editorial boards and as scientific advisor for the Childhood Brain Tumor Foundation. While at NCI, he devoted his time serving as a mentor to hundreds of junior scientists around the world. He received the NCI Mentor Merit Award in 2003 and the NCI Outstanding Mentor Award in 2019. In addition to his brilliant scientific career, Gil was a well-respected soccer coach and youth soccer advocate in Northern Virginia, and one of several authors of the original McLean Youth Soccer bylaws. He was also a staff coach for the Virginia Olympic Development Program at the district and state levels from 1983-1990. He is survived by five children, eight grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Jan, 2021
GS 57

Harry Agahigian ’57 PhD, of Milford, Conn.; Aug. 6. He worked for decades as a chemist, founding Baron Consulting Company in Milford in 1967, from which he retired in 2020. He was an avid golfer and is survived by his wife, Connie; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
17

Blaire Velarde Johnston ’17, of Los Angeles, formerly of Little Rock, Ark.; Aug. 13. After college Blair pursued her passion of working in Hollywood. She worked in the story department at Amblin Partners, the production company led by Steven Spielberg, until shortly before her death. She enjoyed improv comedy, writing, and dancing. She is survived by her mother, a sister, and two nieces.

Jan, 2021
Writing Toward Redemption
The longtime BAM editor was tough, tender, and always looking through all the words to find that transcendent story.
Read More
Image of Norman Boucher
Jan, 2021
96

Paul R. Rudd ’96, of New York City; Apr. 28. He created a successful stock trading program which led to the founding of the company Adaptive Analytics. Paul was deeply involved in building the infrastructure for a progressive political movement. Previously a member of Democracy Alliance and on the board of Brave New Films, Paul most recently served on the board of directors for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and was board vice chair for the Roosevelt Institute. He is survived by his partner, Denis Desjardins ’95; a daughter; his mother; his father and stepmother; a sister and brother-in-law; and brother and sister-in-law. 

Jan, 2021
90

Deborah Goldberg ’90, of Los Altos, Calif.; Feb. 11, 2020, from advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. She was a regulatory compliance attorney and patient advocate and was involved in Colontown, the Colon Cancer Alliance, and the WunderGlo Foundation. She is survived by her husband, Daniel Zimmermann ’90; a daughter; two sons; her father; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
86

Richard H. Rapuano ’86, of Ruxton, Md.; June 23, of cardiac arrest. He spent 17 years as a product manager at Black & Decker, moving from developing and launching the cordless product line for DeWalt, to managing key channel relationships with Home Depot and Lowe's, to finally becoming a key executive running the global supply chain. He later moved on to Under Armour, running planning, distribution, and other key logistics. He enjoyed home renovation projects, traveling, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; two daughters; a son; his mother, Catherine Durand-Viel Rapuano ’57; three brothers, including Christopher ’82 and David ’90; and several nieces and nephews, including Daniel Rapuano ’17.

Jan, 2021
85

Kenneth J. Goldman ’85, of Los Altos, Calif.; Aug. 21, after battling appendiceal cancer for nearly a year. He taught computer science at Washington University in St. Louis for 18 years and then relocated to California to join Google in 2008. His last position at Google was as principal software engineer and technical lead of the Google Accessibility Unit, which develops software to help people who have physical and cognitive disabilities use computers and devices, as well as accomplish everyday tasks. Ken was an accomplished cellist and pianist and enjoyed playing board games. He is survived by his wife, Sally Goldwasser Goldman ’85; three children; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; his parents; a sister; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
84

Joseph Novi ’84, of Toledo, Ohio; July 12. He entered obstetrics and gynecology at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pa. His tenure as chief of the department of OBGYN at Geisinger prepared him for a fellowship in the subspecialty of urogynecology at the University of Pennsylvania. At the time, there were less than 50 board-certified urogynecologists in the world, solidifying Joe as a pioneer in his field. He trained and mentored several residents, increasing the availability and quality of care for many more patients and their families. He went on numerous surgical mission trips to Africa, where he treated women in Eritrea, Mali, and the Central African Republic. He is survived by his wife, Traci; four children; a granddaughter; two sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
84

Peter A. Lynn ’84, of Garden City, N.Y.; June 5. His entire career was within the New York financial services sector, focused on computer programming and engineering. He helped pioneer the crossing network platform for large-volume stock trading. He enjoyed reading, biking, sailing, and attending his daughter’s crew regattas. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a daughter; his father; a brother and sister-in-law; and two nieces.

Jan, 2021
84

Adam Bianchini ’84, of Lake Worth, Fla.; Aug. 15, from COVID-19. Often called “Dr. B,” he was known for his passion for his faith and family and for his desire to bring hope and healing to those suffering from addiction. He was a respected physician and a nationally renowned speaker at medical, business, and Christian conferences. He is survived by his wife, Jenell; his mother; three sons; two daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
82

Carol Rouslin Brooklyn ’82, of Cranston, R.I.; July 9. She was a commercial real estate agent and involved in her community. She served as president of Brown’s Resumed Education Alumni Association, vice chairman of the City of Cranston Charter Review Commission, former president of Volunteers in Rhode Island Schools, former president of the Cranston League of Women Voters, member of the Rhode Island School Board Association, former member of Temple Sinai, where she served as vice president, a member of the Cranston School Committee for 12 years, and a member of the Rhode Island Attorney General’s Domestic Violence Task Force. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by her husband, Edwin; four children, including son John R. Brooklyn ’89 MD; and six grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
81

Adam E. Max ’81, of New York City and Telluride, Colo., July 27, of bile duct cancer. At the time of his passing he was chairman of the board of the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). He also served as president of the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation and was a trustee of St. Ann’s Warehouse, the Bank Street College of Education, and the Telluride Foundation. In 1986, he joined the Jordan Company, a private equity firm, where he led investments in firms and mentored and fostered the next generation of leaders. A BAM patron for more than 30 years, he joined the board in 2003, becoming co-vice chair in 2008 and chairman in 2017. He was instrumental in BAM’s growth through the construction and opening of two new program spaces, BAM Fisher and BAM Strong. He is survived by his wife, Diane L. Max; three children, including Jonah ’18; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
80

Frederick J. Brian ’80, of Fort Pierce, Fla.; Feb. 7. He spent his career working with his childhood friend Bob Picerne at Picerne Real Estate Group. He traveled the world and enjoyed boating, fishing, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Leslie; his father Joseph ’47; two sisters, including Wynne Brian ’81; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
79

Heather Ohlin ’79, of Elgin, Ill.; June 23. Over the course of her career, she worked in management positions at Ohlin Consulting, Sears Holdings Corp., Manugistics, and Pacific Import/Export. She is survived by her sister, Janet McCandless ’70; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

Jan, 2021
77

John N. Bergeron ’77, ’80 MD, of Westerly, R.I.; July 30. He was a doctor who cared for the underserved at Wood River Health Services for 37 years. He enjoyed construction and carpentry, renovating the family home and engineering creative solutions that rivaled those of experts. Driven by a commitment to family, he connected with his French-Canadian roots by becoming fluent in French and immersing himself in European culture with frequent travels with friends and family. An avid cyclist, he participated in weekly community rides, walks, and bike tours across the country. He is survived by his wife, Joanne; two sons and daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; 10 siblings and their spouses; and several nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1977, MD Class of 1980
Jan, 2021
73

Raymond A. Tiernan ’73, of Chevy Chase, Md.; June 28, of prostate cancer. After graduating from Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law, he worked on the legal staff of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. He served three years as senior attorney in the securities division and then joined the Washington, D.C., firm Gaillor Elias & Matz. In 1981 he became a partner of the firm, which later became Elias, Matz, Tiernan & Herrick. During his 40-year career, Ray was instrumental in building the firm into one of the leading community banking firms in the United States. Under his direction, the firm consolidated in 2013 to become Silver, Freedman, Taff & Tiernan, where Ray served until his death. He served on the board of trustees of the Washington School for Girls and is survived by his wife, Linda; four children, including John ’12 and Michael ’18; two sons-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
73

Edward D. Kleinbard ’73, ’73 AM, of Pasadena, Calif.; June 28, of cancer. After graduating from Yale Law School in 1976, he moved into corporate law, rising to a partnership at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton. In 2007, he moved to the public sector as chief of staff to the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, then joined the faculty at University of Southern California’s Gould School of Law in 2009. He was a fellow of the Century Foundation and named Tax Person of the Year in 2016 by Tax Analysts. He was regularly quoted on tax and fiscal policy issues by major newspapers, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg News, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal. His academic work focused on government taxation and fiscal policy. Along with numerous journal articles and opinion pieces, he published We
Are Better Than This: How Government Should Spend Our Money
in 2015 and his forthcoming book, What’s Luck Got To Do With It, is scheduled for publication in early 2021. He is survived by his wife, Norma; his mother; a son and daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a sister and brother-in-law Kris Heinzelman ’73, ’73 AM; and a brother and sister-in-law.

Related classes:
Class of 1973, GS Class of 1973
Jan, 2021
72

Paul M. Rosenberg ’72, of Shelburne, Vt.; July 10, of cancer. He earned a law degree at the University of Cincinnati in 1978. There he began his career as counsel to academic medical centers during an era of recurrent changes in nonprofit healthcare. In the interim years, Paul led legal departments and mentored colleagues at research hospitals, including the University of Cincinnati, the University of Rochester, Johns Hopkins University, Duke University, and the University of Florida. His final professional engagement was counsel to ValueOptions in Norfolk, Va. He retired to Vermont in 2013 and became active in Everybody Wins! Vermont, which pairs adult reading mentors/buddies with students throughout the state. In addition to mentoring students and chairing the organization’s board, he was an enthusiastic participant in its annual fundraising “Race to the Top” of Mt. Mansfield. He is survived by his wife, Megs; two daughters; and a brother and sister-in-law.

Jan, 2021
72

Carol Braun Pasternack ’72, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Feb., after an eight-year battle with brain cancer. She joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin for a few years before becoming a faculty member of the English department at UC Santa Barbara, from which she retired in 2013. During her last two years at UCSB she served as dean of summer sessions. While in the English department, Carol chaired the medieval studies program and mentored countless students. She took great pride in her students, some of whom remained close friends decades later. She enjoyed cooking, hiking, swimming, and skiing. She is survived by her husband, Kenneth Pasternack ’71, and a daughter.

Jan, 2021
71

Marc L. Jacobs ’71, of Newton, Pa.; July 9, suffering a heart attack while bicycling. He was a bio-engineer and former member of the Brown lacrosse team. He is survived by his wife, Sandy; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepson; two grandchildren; his mother, and a sister.

Jan, 2021
71

Robert G. Driscoll ’71, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Aug. 19, after a brief illness. After graduating from the University of Maine School of Law, he worked in private practice for many years before taking on the position of town administrator for Portsmouth from 1990-2011. He also served as town solicitor and served on the Town Council. He remained active through the community, serving on the board of directors for the Portsmouth Free Public Library, R.I. League of Cities and Towns, and the Police Officers Standards Board. For several years, Bob also enjoyed sharing his knowledge and experience as a professor of business law at Salve Regina University. He is survived by his partner, Susan Barrett; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Jan, 2021
70

Paul A. Souza ’70, of Belleair, Fla., formerly of Maryland; June 23. He retired in 2016 as president and CEO of the Werres Corporation in Frederick, Md. He was an avid tennis player and golfer and at Brown was a member of the men’s hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Peggy, and three sons.

Jan, 2021
70

Mark Soifer ’70, of Somers Point, N.J.; June 19. After Brown, he continued his education, earning his law degree from Penn State Dickinson School of Law. Mark also served in the U.S. Army Reserves. After that service, he began a distinguished legal career serving as a law clerk and later worked with the law firm Horn, Weinstein & Kaplan, where he went on to become a partner. In 2007, he became a partner at the law firm of Cooper Levenson in Atlantic City, where he worked until his passing. He was past president of the Bay Atlantic Symphony Board of Trustees. He additionally served, for more than 30 years, as the “Commissioner-for-Life” of the Atlantic City Fantasy Baseball League and on the Pop Lloyd Committee board. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021
70

Peter N. Barnes-Brown ’70, of Needham, Mass.; July 6, of cancer. He was a social worker for three years before becoming a business lawyer, the career that he stayed with until his death. He started his own firm, Morse Barnes-Brown & Pendleton, in 1993. He is survived by his wife, Susan; two daughters; two sisters; and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
66

Kenneth R. Neal ’66, of Mystic, Conn.; July 4. After graduating from Brown, where he was a member of the football, hockey, and lacrosse teams, he received his law degree from Boston College. He was a trial attorney, became a partner and practiced for 30 years at Danaher, Lagnese & Neal. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; two sons-in-law; and eight grandchildren, including Emma B. Healy ’21.

Jan, 2021
65

Jane Todd Lynch ’65, of Atlanta; Aug. 13, of corticobasal degeneration. She received her medical degree from the School of Medicine at Tulane University and after completing her pediatric residency and fellowship at Emory University in Atlanta, her career as a pediatric cardiologist took her to Phoenix and then back to Atlanta. She was certified by the American Board of Pediatrics and the sub-board for Pediatric Cardiology, was a fellow of both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Cardiology, and was a member of the American Heart Association and the American Society of Echocardiography. She published several times and authored a chapter in the 1994 book Embryology for Surgeons, presented at medical conferences, and her research appeared in several medical journals, including the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology and the Journal of Pediatrics. As a lifelong learner, Jane received a master of public health degree from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta in 2007. In Arizona, Jane was on the faculty of the Phoenix Hospital affiliated pediatrics program and was a clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Arizona. She served on the Maricopa County Pediatric Society as the secretary and then president of that organization, served on the board of directors of the American Heart Association, and served on the executive committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Arizona Chapter. In Georgia, Jane was a professor in the department of pediatrics at the Emory University School of Medicine, and also held a clinical appointment as a pediatric cardiologist at the Emory Clinic and then at the Sibley Heart Center in Atlanta. She retired in 2016 and is survived by her husband, Wendell; two sons, including James Todd ’98; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
65

Raymond P. LeBeau ’65, of Sterling, Va.; Aug. 2, from pneumonia and complications of Alzheimer’s. He worked for 41 years at the David W. Taylor Naval Ship Research and Development Center in Carderock, Md. During his career he led or contributed to numerous projects, ranging from the design of landing craft to cutting-edge programs in logistics and supply and maintenance, as well as serving as an equal employment opportunity counselor. He completed his professional career in 2006 as the F/A-18 Technical Assessment Lead at the Carderock Division of the Naval Surface Warfare Center. At Brown, he was a member of both the football and lacrosse teams. In Sterling, he was actively involved in the community and enjoyed coaching for 20 years. In 1986, the Sterling Youth Soccer honored his enduring commitment with its Award of Excellence, both for his work on the field and in building the organization. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two sons; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
65

Peter H. Laurie ’65, ’75 PhD, of Gilsum, N.H.; Sept. 13, 2019. He was awarded an Arnold Traveling Fellowship for 1965-66, allowing him to visit Italy and Greece and continue work on a new version of Homer’s Odyssey. He spent a year (1967-68) at the Center for Advanced Medieval Studies in Poitiers, France, studying romance languages, literature, and music. His formal studies concluded with his PhD in comparative literature. He enjoyed teaching and always found opportunities to share his vast knowledge of the classical arts as a Fulbright lecturer in American Letters at the University of Bologna, Italy; as a visiting professor of American literature and culture at the University of Bilkent in Ankara, Turkey; and as a writing teacher at Santa Rosa Junior College, Keene State College, and Franklin Pierce University. He addressed writing symposiums in Europe and America, wrote articles in cultural journalism, and published both original poems and translations of foreign language poets. In 1986, Peter gave a five-lecture series on American classicism at Dartmouth College. He enjoyed building furniture, cooking, playing the piano, and composing. He is survived by his wife, Johanna; a daughter; a son; five grandchildren; a brother and three half siblings.

Related classes:
Class of 1965, GS Class of 1975
Jan, 2021
64

Jonathan Small ’64, of New York City; July 25. He was a partner in the law firm of Debevoise & Plimpton and served for a number of years as executive director of the Nonprofit Coordinating Committee of New York. He is survived by his wife, Cornelia; two daughters; and four grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
64

E. Andy Kiley ’64, of Rochester, N.Y.; Mar. 2, after a brief illness. He graduated from Syracuse University College of Law and practiced law for more than 30 years. He enjoyed singing, beginning as a teenage folk singer at various venues during summers on Cape Cod. While at Brown, he sang with the Bruinaires. He was a member of the Rochester Oratorio Society and he sang in China during the 2008 Summer Olympics. At the time of his death he was a member of the choir at St. Thomas’s Episcopal Church in Rochester. He is survived by his wife, Judith Montgomery Kiley ’64; two daughters; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and brother-in-law John Montgomery ’67.

Jan, 2021
64

William M. Merrill ’64, of Elkins, W. Va.; July 5, of cancer. Working with his father on the dairy farm, he gained satisfaction from working with heavy equipment and went on to become an expert equipment operator in the fields of trucking, quarry operations, excavation, and road systems. He worked throughout the New England states as well as in Alaska and West Virginia prior to retiring. He was an avid sports fan and enjoyed gardening, reading newspapers, and solving crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; three sons; two daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; two great-grandsons; a sister and brother-in-law.

Jan, 2021
64

James M.C. Brines ’64, of East Falmouth, Mass.; July 3. He taught English, literature, and communications at the Community College of Rhode Island for many years before retiring. During his professional career, Jim also served on the Taunton School Committee and in the vestry of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Taunton. Previously, he taught high school English as a second language in Germany. Following his time in Germany, he embarked on a motorcycle tour of Europe. This experience fueled his life-long passion for world travel and appreciation for art, architecture, diverse peoples and cultures, and his desire to take copious photographs. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. An avid Boston sports fan, he also enjoyed skiing and all nature had to offer. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, a grandson, a sister, a brother, and former wife, Constance Bidwell Brines ’67.

Jan, 2021
63

Leepo Cheng Yu ’63, of Bethesda; April 28, of cancer. Dr. Yu was born Cheng Lee-Po in Shanghai. She worked for 36 years at NIH’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases before retiring in 2009 as a section chief in the laboratory of muscle biology. Her research included collaboration with a team of international scientists specializing in the study of molecular-level muscle structure with the use of synchrotron X-ray diffraction. She also acted and sang in traditional Chinese operas at cultural centers and auditoriums in the United States and China and was a member of the Biophysical Society. She is survived by her husband, Victor; son Albert ’92; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
63

Robert J. Ripich ’63, of Canton, Ohio and Key Largo, Fla; June 24. After obtaining his DDS in 1968, he joined the family dental practice in Canton and practiced for more than 50 years, retiring in 2019. He served in the U.S. Army as a major in the medical corp during the Vietnam War and was a member of several dental organizations, including the American Dental Association and the Ohio Dental Society. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
63

Devereaux F. McClatchey Jr. ’63, of Atlanta; July 11 from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. After Brown, he attended Duke University Law School and became a partner with Fuller, Dodd, Driver and McClatchey. He was known as Dev and was an accomplished pianist with a wide following. He was the scion of a long established and politically prominent Atlanta family. He grew up in Ansley Park, which included McClatchey Park, named for his grandfather Devereaux McClatchey, secretary of the Georgia Senate. Devereaux is survived by his wife, Peggy; a son; three grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
62

Barry E. Miller ’62, of Bernville, Pa.; Aug. 1. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked in urban economic development and affordable housing programs in Philadelphia and Reading. In the late 1970s he founded the Barry E. Miller Company, consulting with national trade associations to help small business owners more fully understand their financial statements to help them make better business decisions. He volunteered with numerous programs and organizations, including his church’s food bank, Meals on Wheels, an urgent care center in Strausstown, various library and zoning hearing boards, and a program in which he mentored underprivileged young people. He enjoyed hiking in the Blue Mountains and taking road trips throughout the United States and Canada with his family. He is survived by his wife, Karen; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021
61

Kurt M. Luedtke ’61, of Birmingham, Mich.; Aug. 9. After Brown, he entered the University of Michigan Law School, but the burgeoning civil rights movement drew him to the South to witness and write several pieces on a freelance basis. He then enrolled in Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and became an intern at the Miami Herald. He joined the Detroit Free Press in 1965 as a general assignment reporter, where he helped create Action Line, a reader interactive feature that filled one-quarter of the front page for 14 years beginning with its debut in 1966. He became an assistant city editor by the time the city’s 1967 civil disturbance broke out and his piece “The Forty-Three Who Died” was part of a package that won the Detroit Free Press a Pulitzer Prize in 1968. He became the newsroom manager after that, and by June 1970 he was running the newsroom with the title of assistant to the executive editor. In 1973, he was made executive editor at the age of 33. Luedtke left the newspaper in 1978 looking to write screenplays, something he knew nothing about. Within days of leaving Los Angeles because of not finding work, he pitched a novel he had thought about writing over the years to Orion Pictures that ultimately became Absence of  Malice, starring Paul Newman and Sally Field. Luedkte was nominated for an original screenplay Academy Award for the 1981 film. The film was partially shot in the Miami Herald newsroom where Luedtke had worked. He followed with a screenplay of Out of Africa, which won seven Oscars in 1986, including best picture and best adapted screenplay for Luedtke. There were numerous other screenwriting jobs that followed before he slowed down. Luedtke was often called upon to talk about free speech. He even did so while accepting a William Rogers Award at Brown in 1987. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor.

Jan, 2021
62

Jane Goodwin Ferrigno ’62, of Great Falls, Va.; Aug. 14. She worked as a geologist at the Smithsonian Institution prior to working with the US Geological Survey, spending nearly 50 years studying Landsat imagery, and authoring and editing many works published within the field of glaciology. The Ferrigno Glacier in Antarctica is named in honor of her extensive contributions to glacial research. She was an avid explorer and visited more than 40 countries. She was active in the Great Falls United Methodist Church and enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren on intergenerational adventures, sailing, camping, solving puzzles, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Jim; three children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

Jan, 2021
62

Dennis C. Erinakes ’62, of Murphy, Tex.; July 29, from COVID-19. He was an engineering geologist and vice president of one of the largest water boards in Texas, as well as an avid goose hunter and fisherman. Dennis was the youngest commercial pilot on the East Coast when he earned his credentials in 1956 and spotted swordfish off the coast for fishermen. He was an Eagle Scout and first warden at the area summer camp. He is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
62

James S. Dietz ’62, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of San Diego; Feb. 13, 2020. He started a career as a high school teacher but found his true calling in real estate sales and redevelopment, and then in small business and entrepreneurship. In 1975, he moved his family to San Diego and developed some businesses, including Baja Frame, Art Leasing, Cinemania, and Jim Dietz Vintage Posters, an internet-based poster store. In retirement he continued to serve as a movie poster appraiser and consultant for museums and collectors. He enjoyed jazz, poetry, art, travel, movies, sailing, dancing, and telling stories. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; two stepdaughters; two sisters; and three nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
61

John S. Hsia ’61, of Columbus, Ohio; July 27, from complications of a stroke. His distinguished academic career in the department of mathematics at Ohio State University spanned 35 years. He supervised the dissertation research of doctoral students. His research was focused on Number Theory and much of his research work, which is published in more than 50 papers in internationally recognized journals of mathematics, was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Security Agency. In addition to his own research, he edited volumes of conference proceedings and served on the editorial boards of leading journals in his field. He is survived by his wife, Lynette; two daughters and their spouses; a granddaughter; two step-grandchildren; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
61

Bruce E. Fowles ’61, of Washington, Me.; June 23. He was a biology professor at Colby College from 1967 to 2003. He enjoyed fishing and running and is survived by his wife, Rosemary; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
61

David D. Clapp ’61, of Boothbay Harbor, Me.; July 27. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he was a Chinese linguist, trained at the Monterey Army Language School. After being discharged, he served as president of the Wakefield Corporation, a family business in Massachusetts that manufactured sintered metal machine parts. Throughout his life he contributed to many organizations and sat on several boards, including the Brown Club of New Hampshire. An avid sailor with a captain’s license from the U.S. Coast Guard, David’s happiest moments were on the water along the coast of Maine. He is survived by his wife, Linda; three daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
60

Jon J. Sullivan ’60, of Annapolis; June 3. He was the owner of Fahrney’s Pens in Washington, D.C. He is survived by a daughter, a son, two grandchildren; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
60

John R. Pflug Jr. ’60, of Crozet, Va.; July 2. He was a developer of commercial properties in northern Virginia. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Lynch Pflug ’61; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
60

Sheila Boberg Delhagen ’60, of Emmaus, Pa.; Aug. 26. She is survived by two sons, including Jack Delhagen ’87, ’92 MD; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
60

Anne Lusk Colter ’60, of Bonita Springs, Fla.; July 10. She traveled in her motor home for 20 years working in the National Park visitor centers in Yellowstone, Mount Rushmore, and the Everglades. She was a volunteer paramedic, educator, docent, and a lover of geology and the natural world. She is survived by a daughter.

Jan, 2021
60

Robert Casey ’60, of Stonington, Conn.; Apr. 13, 2019. He worked at Bankers Trust for a year and then served until 1964 in the U.S. Navy, rising to the rank of lieutenant. His service included being on the USS Notable during the Cuban Missile Crisis. After the Navy, he attended Rutgers as an MBA graduate student and passed the CPA exam in 1965. He worked as a CPA for Lybrand in Hartford, Conn., and then in San Francisco until 1970, when he moved to work as vice president and controller for National Life in Montpelier, Vt. In 1978, he moved to Connecticut Mutual Life in Hartford, where he attained the position of senior vice president and remained there until retiring in 1994. He was an active member of the communities in which he lived, including editing the Good Times Dispatch in Kent, Conn., in the 1950s and later serving with many boards, churches, and clubs. He is survived by his companion, Neeljte Udo; two sons and their spouses; a stepson; three grandsons; a niece; five nephews; and his former wife, Pamela Lewis.

Jan, 2021
55
Stephen Elrich image


Stephen R. Ehrlich ’55 established several scholarships, providing a foundation of support that continues to make Brown financially feasible for numerous students.

After graduating from Brown and NYU Business School, Stephen became a successful corporate bond trader. He was a partner at Mabon, Nugent & Co. in 1966 and became CEO in 1972. During his tenure, Mabon became one of the largest securities firms in equity capital. He retired in 1992 and formed private financial investment and consulting businesses in New Jersey and Florida.

He strongly believed in the value of higher education and served as a member of the Brown Board of Trustees of the Corporation from 1979 to 1984 and from 1986 to 1992. He and his wife, Mary Ann, were involved with Brown’s first named fund, the Stephen R. Ehrlich 1955 National Scholarship, and served as cochairs of the National Scholarship Program for eight years. Over the following years, they created scholarships including the Stephen R. Ehrlich Family Medical Scholarship, the Stephen R. Ehrlich Fellowship Fund, and the Stephen R. Ehrlich Brown Annual Fund. The Ehrlichs actively engaged with their scholarship students by hosting dinners and attending functions each year. “What started as an awkward dinner with two strangers freshman year grew into an incredible lifelong friendship. Stephen and Mary Ann Ehrlich have been there for me through many chapters of my life,” says Louella Hill ’03, who met Ehrlich through the National Scholars Program at Brown. Roxanne Vrees ’98, ’03 MD, a Stephen Ehrlich National Scholars Program recipient, says: “I still remember our first dinner at Hemenway’s my freshman year and the many other special moments I have shared with Stephen and Mary Ann over the 26 years of our wonderful relationship.” 

Stephen received numerous awards, most notably the H. Anthony Ittleson ’60 Award in 2000 and the Brown Bear Award in 2002. And both he and Mary Ann were honored in 2014 with the Artemis Joukowsky Award for their dedication and commitment to the Warren Alpert Medical School. Stephen also served on the boards of the Newark Museum, New Jersey Historical Society, New Jersey Building Authority, and the Rutgers Business Board of Advisors.

Upon retirement, he split his time between Palm Beach, Fla., and Short Hills, N.J., so that he could remain close with his children and grandchildren. He was an avid sports fan of the Yankees and Knicks and enjoyed playing golf and watching classic movies.

Both Mary Ann and Stephen contracted COVID-19 and were hospitalized. Stephen passed away on Aug. 6 from the virus, the day after Mary Ann was released from the hospital. In addition to his wife, he is survived by daughter Lisa Ehrlich Pearlman ’85; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren. The Stephen R. Ehrlich Memorial Research Fund has been established at Brown to support pulmonary and COVID-related research.

Jan, 2021
59

Ernest A. LeBlanc ’59, of Pocasset, Mass., formerly of Needham, Mass.; June 3, of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and upon discharge, he attended Brown. Later he received his master’s from the University of Lowell. He had an engineering career that included work at Hazeltine and RCA Aerospace Division (later merging with GE and then Lockheed Martin). He was proud of all the systems and radar design projects he worked on or acted as team leader for, including ballistic missile early warning systems, lunar landing modules, and many other designs of national importance. Ernie often played accordion with his trio during the summers at the Captain Linnell House in Orleans, Mass., and for many years, he was a member of the South Shore Neptunes Diving Club, both for recreational diving and to support civil defense for search and rescue/recovery missions. In retirement, he had leadership roles in several organizations and volunteered at Otis Air National Guard Base proofreading maintenance logs on the helicopters. He received numerous service awards over the years for his efforts. He is survived by his wife, Marie; three children; and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021
58

Charles Paley ’58, of Providence; July 25. He survived COVID-19 pneumonia only to succumb to a wound infection acquired during his recovery. He served in the Army National Guard while employed in retail management positions by W.T. Grant. Later in life, after earning a master’s in social work from Hunter College, he joined the psychiatry department at Metropolitan Hospital. He completed Hunter’s post-master’s program in individual therapy and started a part-time private practice, which he operated until 2007. He enjoyed being a member of The Remsenburg Association and the Greek Orthodox Church of the Hamptons, and despite Parkinson’s progression, he enjoyed grandchildren visits and wearing his 50th Reunion Brown cap. He is survived by his wife, Ann-Marie; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
58

Michael F. Larratt ’58, of Winter Park, Fla.; July 18, 2019, of complications of Parkinson’s. He is survived by his wife, Eileen Kleemeyer-Larratt; four sons and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
58

Ronald J. Darling ’58, of Tampa, Fla.; June 26. He obtained his Doctor of Medicine at Marquette University School of Medicine and served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1963 through 1971 with the 452nd General Hospital. After completing his residency in otolaryngology with the Wood Veterans Administration Center and with the Marquette University School of Medicine Affiliated Hospitals, he practiced full-time at the Veterans Administration and held the position of instructor of surgery at the Marquette University School of Medicine. In 1968, he opened his ENT practice at Moreland Ear Nose and Throat Group in Waukesha and continued to practice until he had a stroke in 2012. He enjoyed making people happy by telling bad jokes and silly limericks. He is survived by his wife, Jane; three children, including son Fritz ’97; seven grandchildren; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
58

Barbara Whipple Chaplin ’58, of Portland, Ore., formerly of Madison, Conn.; Nov. 26, 2019, after a short illness. She was an English teacher and traveled extensively before settling in Connecticut, where she spent countless hours as a volunteer and supporter of local Madison public school programs, recreational and sports team organizations, and church and charitable organizations. After raising her sons, she earned her master’s degree in psychology and served as a volunteer for numerous years in rehabilitation hospital service programs. In 1994, she moved to Oregon and was a volunteer at Metropolitan Family Service. She is survived by four sons and their spouses, nine grandchildren, and a brother, Raymond Chaplin ’63.

Jan, 2021
57

Patricia Goodwin ’57, of Canton, Ohio; July 11. She moved with the Navy while working as a probation officer, guidance counselor, and teacher before taking time off to raise her children. She then settled in Canton and worked in real estate. She enjoyed poetry and gardening. She is survived by her four grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
57

James N. Corrigan ’57, of Washington, D.C.; June 15. After moving to Washington in 1960, he served as a staff assistant to Senator Claiborne Pell. In 1966, Jim began his 40-year career with the Riggs National Bank, where he was vice president for private banking. He was a member of the Chevy Chase Club and the Metropolitan Club, where he served two separate terms as a member of the Board of Governors and Chairman of the Athletic Committee. Until his death, Jim was an avid squash player and proud of his 2018 Super Legends Championship titles in both hardball and softball. At Brown he was a member of the track and field teams and particularly enjoyed long distance running. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; five children; eight grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
57

Norman T. Brust ’57, of Bridgewater, Mass.; Sept. 3. He received his master’s in electrical engineering from Northeastern University in 1967 and continued in the engineering field working for such prominent companies as EG&G, RCA, and General Dynamics. His interests shifted to sales and marketing, and in 1988 he started his own consulting firm helping small businesses and entrepreneurs with marketing and corporate strategy. He moved to Bridgewater in 2001, where he continued consulting and was actively involved in supporting small businesses, including involvement with the WPI Venture Forum, Southern New England Entrepreneurs Forum (SNEEF), and the BSU Entrepreneur in Residence program. He was involved with local and regional Porsche clubs, including a term as president of the Northeast Region of the Porsche Club of America. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Janet Biehn Brust ’58; a daughter and son-in-law; three sons; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; a sister; a niece; and a nephew.

Jan, 2021
56

Walter M. Westcote ’56, of Lexington, Ky.; June 15. After serving in the U.S. Army, he worked as a pension actuary. He was a Civil War expert and book collector, as well as the author of the book American Civil War Era: A Critical Bibliography. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; four daughters; nine grandchildren; and one great-grandson.

Jan, 2021
56

Robert P. Knauff ’56, of Old Lyme, Conn.; July 2, after a short illness. He had a 20-year career as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Coast Guard, serving as a marine inspector in many areas of the country. Subsequently, he spent 23 years as the financial manager and corporate secretary for the Fishers Island Ferry District. Occasionally, he would captain a tour boat on the Connecticut River or at Mystic Seaport. He was an active community volunteer and a lifetime member of the Old Lyme Volunteer Ambulance Association, serving as president, secretary and treasurer, as well as an EMT. He also served on the Board of Finance for the Town of Old Lyme, and during many holiday seasons, Phil could be seen as Santa at the Silver Skate Christmas Shop in Niantic. He is survived by his wife, Constance; three children and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
55

Shirley Morse Richmond ’55, of Wayne, Pa.; Aug. 14. After earning a master’s degree in library science from Villanova University, she worked as a library clerk for Upper Merion Middle School for many years. She was a member of Valley Forge Presbyterian Church, serving as the church’s librarian, president and treasurer of the Church and Synagogue Library Association, a member of the John Howland Society, and a volunteer for the Veterans Hospital. She collected stamps and enjoyed bowling, camping in the family RV, and traveling all over the world. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, nine granddaughters, seven great-grandchildren, and a stepsister.

Jan, 2021
55

William  P. Hinckley ’55, of Highlands Ranch, Colo.; Aug. 11. He was a coach and teacher at St. Peter’s School in Peekskill, N.Y. After marrying, he moved to New Jersey and joined his father-in-law’s independent insurance agency, R.H. Aaronson & Son. Bill purchased the agency in 1974 and sold it when he retired in 1994. While there, he was president of South Jersey and Long Beach Island wood carving clubs. In 1995, he retired to Colorado, where he enjoyed fishing and a cabin in the mountains while continuing to hone his wood carving skills. At the age of 80 he began to write books. He wrote and published three novels and one memoir, as well as contributed to a column on birds. Bill was an avid angler and enjoyed fishing. He is survived by his wife, Sue; a daughter; and two granddaughters.

Jan, 2021
55

Barry D. Coletti ’55, of Duxbury, Mass.; May 31. As a principal of Coletti Brothers Architects in Quincy, Mass., Barry was responsible for the design of nationally and internationally recognized buildings. He enjoyed assisting local homeowners with the design of historically accurate renovations and additions with meticulously hand-drawn and lettered plans and renderings. He was an avid outdoorsman and an accomplished dog trainer, competing in and judging AKC retriever field trials from Maine to North Carolina. He also liked to cook and was known to be a practical joker. He is survived by his wife, Ginny; three sons; four daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; three stepchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
54

Gail Erickson Woods ’54, of Fort Collins, Colo.; Aug. 8. She worked as a program coordinator with the YWCA in Salem and Portland, Ore., and returned to the East Coast as the assistant director of the New Haven (Conn.) YWCA. In 1970, she was involved with the International Friends Program, welcoming international students to the U.S. In 1978, in Fort Collins, she was involved in volunteer work that led the city to hire her as the volunteer program coordinator. She successfully wrote a grant to establish Senior Alternatives in Transportation (SAINT), in which volunteer drivers help older adults get around. She and her husband moved to Taiwan in 1984 for a year-long Fulbright Fellowship and Gail continued her volunteer work with the Taipei YWCA. In addition to her work welcoming students from around the world, she also supported the homeless at New Bridges and the Homelessness Prevention Initiative (now Neighbor to Neighbor), and older adults through the Foundation on Aging for Larimer County. She is survived by three children and their spouses, six grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Jan, 2021
54

Paul E. Wittreich ’54, of Franklin, Pa.; Aug. 12. As a member of Brown’s NROTC, he was commissioned an ensign upon graduation. After military service, he worked for 14 years as a research bench chemist for Merck & Co. in Rahway, N.J. In 1969, he left the labs to become a medical associate in the MSD International Division of Merck & Co.; two of his six years there were spent in Europe. In 1975, he was promoted to associate director of Merck’s International Animal Health Products Division. He retired in 1986. Paul was a marathon runner during his 50s, completing 13 marathons. In addition, he hiked the Long Trail in Vermont, completing it in 1973, and completed the Appalachian Trail in 1989 after 47 hikes over 19 years. In the early 1990s he biked across the U.S. and continued to bike every summer in various organized bike tours. He took numerous art classes, allowing him the opportunity to show his work in one-man shows. He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a stepson, seven grand-children, a great-grandson, and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
54

Lynn Campbell Morris ’54, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; June 20, of heart failure. She taught intermediate and high school in Hicksville, N.Y., and later at Stony Brook University, where she served as foreign student advisor and dean for foreign students before retiring in 1998. Lynn worked with students and scholars from 90 countries. She expanded her PhD dissertation to publish Chaucer Source and Analogue Criticism, a computerized index of 200 years of Chaucerian scholarship. A master gardener, she also enjoyed the Kalamazoo Symphony, Viking culture, traveling, and playing bridge and Scrabble. She is survived by her husband, Greg; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
54

Peter H. Mohrfeld ’54, of Black Mountain, N.C.; Aug. 25. He spent most of his career with the Gillette Company working in Boston, New Orleans, Italy, Spain, and Mexico. He served in the U.S. Army and was happiest on the water enjoying sailing and fishing. He is survived by two daughters.

Jan, 2021
54

Elizabeth Kelly Dudley ’54, of Chaska, Minn., formerly of Minneapolis and Fripp Island, S.C.; Nov. 18, 2019, of a stroke. She was active in the Welcome Wagon organization and was a hospital volunteer. After moving to Fripp Island, she stayed active playing golf and bridge. She also enjoyed traveling. She is survived by her husband, Dana ’54; a daughter and son-in-law; and three grandsons.

Jan, 2021
53

Lincoln H. King ’53, of Carthage, Tex.; Aug. 16. He served three years in the U.S. Army in Korea, where he was assigned to the Counter Intelligence Corps. In 1953, he was hired by the Hughes Aircraft Co. in Tucson. He was later transferred by Hughes to Anaheim, Calif. Switching careers, in 1970, he and his family moved to Maine, where he began teaching. One year later, they moved to Dallas and he was hired as the history teacher in the Gary Independent School District and taught there for more than 30 years. He and his students began the Loblolly Project, a history study of Gary and Panola County, Tex. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, and four nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
52

Louise O’Donnell McGraw ’52, of Westfield, Mass.; Aug. 24. She worked for Travelers as an actuarial accountant before leaving to raise a family. She was active in her community and very involved with local multiple sclerosis support groups, having battled the disease herself for more than 50 years without losing her positive attitude. She enjoyed knitting, traveling, and playing bridge. She is survived by a daughter; son Kyle McGraw ’90 and his husband; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; two great-grandsons; and a sister, Kathleen O’Donnell Cummings ’54.

Jan, 2021
52

Scribner Harlan ’52, of Warren, Mich.; Aug. 11. He worked for Chrysler for more than 30 years and was an active member at St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; a son; and many nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
52

Harold T. Hall Jr. ’52, of North Eastham, Mass.; Sept. 8. He worked with General Electric Manufacturing Engineering and Quality Assurance for 30 years before retiring to Cape Cod in 1983. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a volunteer in his community and enjoyed fixing things. He spent many winters in Florida, where he volunteered at the National Navy UDT Seal Museum and is featured in the World War II film about the first UDT Navy Seals. In 2016 he was interviewed by the History Channel and can be seen in the documentary The History of the Navy Seals. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Jan, 2021
51

Thomas H. Williamson ’51, of Squantum, Mass.; July 13, after a short illness. He was employed as an underwriter for Liberty Mutual. He eventually left a managerial position to work as an independent consultant to small agencies. He served in leadership roles in the American Legion, the Sea Explorers, and in many positions in the First Church of Squantum, including singing in the choir. He was a U.S. Army World War II veteran and is survived by a son.

Jan, 2021
51

Marjorie Servis Russell ’51, of Romulus, N.Y.; July 29. She was a retired elementary school teacher, having taught in California, Connecticut, and New York. She is survived by five children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
51

Eleanor DeBlasio Oddo ’51, of Warwick, R.I.; June 27. She taught kindergarten at the Webster Avenue Elementary School in Providence, and later married and raised four children. She watched her children and grandchildren play many sports and was an avid Red Sox and Providence College basketball fan. She was also actively involved in alumni events for both Classical High School and Brown. After her husband Vincent passed in 1979, she was employed at Ross-Simons in Warwick, where she worked for 25 years. She is survived by three children, eight grandchildren, and a sister-in-law.

Jan, 2021
51

Theodore Lobsenz ’51, of Round Rock, Tex.; Nov. 16, 2019. After his graduation from law school, he served in the United States Air Force. A career in commercial real estate followed. In addition to serving at the Barnert Temple of Franklin Lakes, N.J., in a variety of capacities, he also did repairs and built almost anything the temple required. He enjoyed gardening, current events, and playing duplicate bridge. He is survived by his wife, Janet; three children, including son Jim Lobsenz ’87, and their spouses; and seven grandchildren, including Josh Lobsenz ’24.

Jan, 2021
51

E. Eugene Jemail ’51, of Santa Rosa, Calif.; Aug. 17. After Brown, he entered Yale Law School and from there entered the Army and was commissioned at Fort Benning, Ga., where he became a qualified parachute jumper. After moving to California, he began parachuting again in his 60s. Gene served six years in the Army. Fluent in German, he served several years with the Judge Advocate General’s office in Salzburg, Austria. He left the Army in 1958 and was hired by Procter & Gamble in Cincinnati, where he worked in finance and accounting. His last two positions were as manager of profit and cash flow forecasting and international financial analysis, which included supervising employees in 35 countries. He retired after 27 years. He was treasurer of the board of trustees of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and a division manager for the United Way, and he cochaired a three-year fundraising campaign for Brown. Once in California, he became CEO of Luther Burbank Center in Santa Rosa. He retired a second time in 1995 and signed up to crew on a small sailboat at age 66. That was followed by a two-and-a-half year assignment with the Peace Corps. In 1998, he married and traveled with his wife to 150 world destinations. He climbed Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania when he was 72. He enjoyed classical music and the opera, and reading Civil War histories. He was a member of Psi Upsilon and is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; a sister; and Betty’s children and grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
50

Gordon E. Noble ’50, of Tiburon, Calif.; Apr. 5. He was a self-made man who achieved great success in the insurance business. Over the 40 years he spent in Tiburon, he enjoyed being a part of the community and spent time supporting local businesses. He is survived by his wife, Ingrid; three sons and their spouses; three stepdaughters; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
50

Joseph Kenney Jr. ’50, of Pittsburgh; Aug. 5, just 11 days shy of his 100th birthday. After Brown, he earned an MBA from the University of Missouri and spent much of his career as an engineering manager at Westinghouse Electric Astro-Nuclear Laboratory before going into business for himself as the owner of Miller Safety, a supplier of safety equipment. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
50

Bruce E. Hamlett ’50, of Brighton, Mich.; July 6. Following graduation, Bruce joined BIF Industries in Providence and shortly thereafter received a promotion to be manager of their Pittsburgh office. In 1961, he moved his family to Murray Hill, N.J., after being named BIF’s Northeast Regional Manager. From 1966-1970, he was vice president and marketing manager for The Hays Corporation in Michigan City, Ind., before starting his own business, Hamlett Engineering Sales Company, in Farmington Hills, Mich. His son Randy joined him in the business in 1988 and Bruce retired in 1991. In 2015, Bruce was honored at The Michigan Water Environment Association’s annual meeting with a career achievement recognition for his contribution to the industry. In 2016, the three family members, his son and granddaughter, were recognized nationally by the Water Environment Federation as a “Legacy Family” in the water environment industry. He was a U.S. Marine Corp World War II veteran and enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Diana; four children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
50

Roy Fidler ’50 of San Rafael, Calif.; July 9. He worked for the New York Times in various capacities before starting his own advertising agency. During the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Army and was an editor of his division’s newspaper. In the early 1980s he moved to the Bay Area and continued working in advertising as a direct marketing consultant. In retirement he volunteered as a consumer advocate with the district attorney office and gave architectural tours of the Frank Lloyd Wright designed Marin County Civic Center. He was a longtime member of Servas, an international hosting organization started after World War II to promote meetings of people from different countries. He enjoyed hosting the members of Servas that visited his home, as well as traveling. He is survived by his wife, Carole and son, Matthew Fidler ’84.

Jan, 2021
50

Howard M. Farrow ’50, of Lebanon, N.H.; June 26. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, where he saw action in the Battle of the Bulge and Normandy. He was honorably discharged and awarded the Good Conduct Medal and the Victory Medal. After Brown he worked at Tidewater Oil Corp, then National Research Corp. In 1965 he started his own engineering firm, Excalibur Corp. in Waltham, Mass. He relocated to New Hampshire in 1990 and worked as a consultant using his engineering and business experience. In addition, he partnered with his only son, who survives him, and opened an ice cream parlor on Cape Cod.

Jan, 2021
50

John J. Durnin Jr. ’50, of North Kingstown, R.I.; July 9. He was an employee of Amica Mutual Insurance for 39 years until his retirement in 1989. He was a World War II veteran and an avid golfer. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and two granddaughters.

Jan, 2021
49

Irene A. Wilkinson ’49, of Charlotte, N.C.; Aug. of COVID-19. She was a retired librarian. She is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
49

Donald M. Nolan ’49, of Mansfield, Conn.; Aug. 4. He attended RISD prior to joining the U.S. Army during World War II. After discharge, he attended and graduated from Brown and was hired by the American Screw Company in Providence. He moved to its Willimantic, Conn., division in 1949. In 1963 he started his own company, Stick Screw Manufacturing, and was its president until he sold the business in 1987. He was a founding member of the Mansfield Lion’s Club, a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and a volunteer for the Mansfield Senior Center and Committee on Aging. He enjoyed playing golf and traveling with his wife in the U.S. and in Europe. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, four grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandson.

Jan, 2021
49

Walter Lada ’49, of Cranston, R.I.; Aug. 9. After serving during World War II, he graduated from Brown and had a successful career as a mechanical engineer at Grinnell Corporation in Providence. He retired and cofounded Corner and Lada Company in Cranston, where they designed and fabricated pipe support systems for power plants worldwide. He was a generous supporter and volunteer for the Hope Alzheimer’s Center in Cranston. He is survived by a daughter; son, Walter ’76; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
49

Sybil Finch Gilbert ’49, of La Grange Park, Ill.; Mar. 4. She is survived by her husband, John; three children; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
49

Leroy D. Aaronson ’49, of Providence; Oct. 14, 2019. He graduated from Albany Medical College in 1952, and following an internship at Rhode Island Hospital he spent three years serving as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force. He retired with the rank of captain. Upon his return to the U.S., he completed a residency in dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He began practicing in Rhode Island in 1959 and was affiliated as a board certified dermatologist at Kent County Memorial Hospital. He was appointed clinical assistant in dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1961, was an assistant in dermatology at Harvard Medical School in 1962, and received an honorary degree from Harvard Medical School for his work there. He retired in 1998. He enjoyed nature and animals and in 1980, while speaking at a medical conference in Kenya, he went on a safari and was able to observe wild animals up close in their natural habitat. In 1984, he bought a second home in Chatham, Mass., where he and his family enjoyed the outdoors, walks on the beach, and life in a small seaside town. He is survived by two daughters; two sons-in-law, including John Lawless ’91 PhD; and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021
48

Thelma Andrews Spriggs ’48, of Norton, Mass.; Mar. 6, of complications from Alzheimer’s. She earned a master’s degree from Northeastern University and taught for the U.S. Army in Germany after World War II. Upon her return to the United States, she taught math at Attleboro High School (Mass.). She enjoyed traveling, gardening, music, and theatre. She is survived by a daughter and a brother.

Jan, 2021
48

Barbara Brightman Northrop ’48, of Barrington, R.I.; Aug. 8. She balanced the books for several companies, including her daughter’s graphic design business. She enjoyed singing, playing the piano, solving crossword puzzles, and traveling. She is survived by a daughter, a son, and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
48

Shirley Walling Mayhew ’48, of West Tisbury, Mass.; Aug. 21. She served on the West Tisbury School Board, was the children’s librarian in the Music Street Library for a year, volunteered at the Martha’s Vineyard Museum and the West Tisbury Library, was active in the NAACP and civil rights movement in the 1960s, and served a year as Sunday School superintendent in the West Tisbury Congregational Church. Having left Brown before completing her degree, while her children were still young, she returned to college in 1963 and after two years earned her bachelor’s degree. From that experience she published Seasons of a Vineyard Pond: A Journal in 1973. From 1966 to 1986 she taught junior high language arts at the Edgartown School. Along the way she also completed a master’s degree, writing a thesis on the age group she was teaching. She began traveling in 1968 and by 2004 had visited 14 states and 25 foreign countries, and she had taken 11 trips to six Caribbean islands. She made repeat visits to a tiny mountain village in Peru, where she became a benefactor, raising money each year for the village school. She also taught herself photography and began dabbling in watercolor painting in her 80s, selling some of her paintings at artisan fairs. Beginning in 1992 and continuing through her last week of life at 94, Shirley published numerous essays and photographs in many island and off-island publications. In 2014 she self-published a memoir, Looking Back: My Long Life on Martha’s Vineyard, which was highlighted in the January/February ’15 BAM article, “Island Life.” She had appeared another time in BAM in the January/February ’09 BAM article “A Pembroke Romance.” She later self-published four additional books. She is survived by two daughters, including Deborah Mayhew ’73; son John Mayhew III ’71; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
48

John F. Crowley ’48, of Greenville, R.I.; July 28. He served in the U.S. Navy prior to attending Brown. After graduation, he was hired by IBM and worked there for 40 years. He is survived by three sons and a grandson.

Jan, 2021
46

Howard F. Greenhalgh ’46, of Providence; Sept. 3. He worked as an administrator for the Rhode Island Board of Elections for 34 years before retiring in 1986. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and he enjoyed playing golf and ice hockey, which he continued into his 70s. He is survived by two daughters and sons-in-laws, four grandchildren, three sisters, and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
45

Roger W. Frost ’45, of Worcester, Mass.; June 16. He worked his way through Brown, interrupting his studies to serve as a Naval officer during World War II. When the war ended, he married, settled in Worcester, and raised seven children. He became the third-generation owner of Frost Stamp Works, renaming it Frost Manufacturing Corp. and growing it from a small rubber stamp shop to a full-service sign and stamp business. He was an avid fisherman. A proud and enthusiastic Rotarian, Roger was a 70-year member of the Worcester Rotary Club, a Paul Harris Fellow, and past club president and district governor. Following his wife’s passing, he became a member of The Briarwood Community in Worcester, where he was known as “The Mayor of Briarwood.” He was a tireless advocate for the organization and for what he called senior empowerment. He pushed his fellow residents to get involved and stay active, including founding the Briarwood Broadcasting Company, a cable television station operated 12 hours a day, seven days a week by a committee of dedicated residents. He is survived by two daughters, four sons, two daughters-in-law, two sons-in-law, 13 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren. 

Jan, 2021
44

David A.E. Wood ’44, of Silver Spring, Md.; Aug. 4. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he joined his father’s sales agency that sold equipment for water treatment and filtration and wastewater systems. He subsequently joined BIF (Builders Iron Foundry) in 1955 after his father’s death, where he was a sales engineer. He retired after 40 years. He was active in a number of industry groups, including the American Water Works Association. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

Jan, 2021
43

Roberta Daley Mueller ’43, of South Kingstown, R.I., formerly of Bloomington, Ind.; May 23. She worked in the Lighthouse Bookstore in Rye, N.Y., while raising her children. After moving to Bloomington, she earned a master’s in library science at Indiana University and later worked for the Monroe County Library system for more than 20 years and taught in the School of Library Sciences at Indiana Univ. In retirement, she volunteered with the Ellettsville Library and the Red Cross, where she managed charitable book sales. After the death of her husband, she moved to Rhode Island and volunteered with the Washington County Coalition for Children and South County Hospital. She enjoyed traveling, including African safaris and trips up the Amazon River and to the Galapagos Islands. She is survived by two sons, including Stephen S. Mueller ’69 and their spouses; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
44

Gordon B. Graham ’44, of Randolph, Vt.; Aug. 1. He was an engineer and worked on the Polaris Missile and the F4U Corsair Plane. He was instrumental in the founding of the electrical engineering program at Vermont Agricultural and Technical Institute (now VTC), where he also ran the Radio Club. During the 1960s he was active in the Randolph Players Group. He always enjoyed working on all types of projects, especially those involving woodworking, automobiles, and painting. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn; a daughter and son-in-law; three sons and daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
43

Robert C. Judd ’43, of Glen Ellyn, Ill.; July 9. After graduating and serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he worked for Sears Roebuck and Company. He retired in 1980. He was active in his community and enjoyed spending time with family in the summers at the Dering Lodge on Green Lake in Wisconsin. He is survived by his wife, June; five children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
40

Leone B. Fagan ’40, of Melrose, Mass., formerly of Newport, R.I.; June 21. After settling in Melrose in 1947 and raising her family, Lee enjoyed working for more than 10 years at the Melrose Public Library in both the archive and catalog departments. She was a member of Community Associates of Melrose and the American Association of University Women, and she was active with the Melrose Historical Society. At the time of her death she was the longest and oldest member of the Melrose Unitarian Universalist Church. She had a passion for genealogy and enjoyed returning to her hometown of Newport for yearly summer vacations. She is survived by four children and their spouses, six grandchildren, and four great-granddaughters.

Nov, 2020
81

Autophagy, or “self-eating,” is the way cells clean and recycle themselves, keeping us healthy. Biomedical scientist Beth Levine ’81 discovered the mammalian autophagy gene beclin 1, now the most studied of such proteins. She went on to study autophagy’s role in suppressing cancer, viruses, and neurogenerative diseases. “I think what was most critical to my success was my willingness to follow my scientific intuition and curiosity and pursue questions that I thought were important,” she told the Journal of Clinical Investigation.


As part of Levine’s mission to bring together scientists from diverse countries and disciplines to link fundamental biology to human health, she created the Gordon Conference on Autophagy in Stress, Development, and Disease in 2003, which still continues. A colleague remembers her as “an amazing scientist…and a true understated supporter of female scientists.”


After earning a medical degree from Weill Medical College of Cornell University, followed by an internal medicine residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, Levine was a postdoctoral fellow in infectious diseases and virology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, rising to director of virology research at Columbia University. She was recruited to University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in 2004 and eventually became director of its Center for Autophagy Research and holder of the Charles Cameron Sprague Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science. The university remembers her as “an elegant, driven, and focused researcher who demanded the best from herself and the more than 50 graduate students and postdoctoral researchers she mentored.”


Levine was a founding associate editor of Autophagy and an editorial board member of Cell, which honored her as “an exemplary role model for women in science and medicine, and a caring physician with a lifelong dedication to easing human suffering.” Elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2013, she won awards and honors including the Phyllis T. Bodel Award from Yale and the Barcroft Medal from Queen’s University in Belfast, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation’s 2014 Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award. 


Levine passed away of cancer in Dallas on June 15. She is survived by her husband Milton Packer, a cardiologist and former professor and chair of the department of clinical sciences at UT Southwestern; a daughter; and a son.

Nov, 2020
50

World War II U.S. Navy veteran V. Donald Russo ’50 had a distinguished and multifaceted career as a lawyer that included five years working tirelessly to help fellow veterans who had been affected by the toxic defoliant Agent Orange. 


After his military service, Russo attended Brown, St. John’s University School of Law, and NYU Graduate School of Law, then worked as a negligence trial attorney, eventually retiring with more than 60 years of experience at Allstate Insurance Company. He lectured at the Columbian Lawyers Association of Manhattan and the Civil Court of the City of New York, taught real estate law at Marymount Manhattan College, and developed a multitude of continuing legal education programs and training manuals.


A highlight of his career came in 1979, when he joined a consortium of plaintiffs’ lawyers from Long Island who undertook the prominent Agent Orange case, one of the largest product liability litigations in American legal history. For years he traveled to listen to interrogations and take depositions. His wife Christine Russo remembers when he returned from one such trip, exhausted, he told her: “When you listen to these fellas tell you about their illnesses, you forget about being sleepy and just keep going.” 


That was the hallmark of his approach to his work, she says: “He would prepare until he knew every fact of the case and it was hard to beat him.” 


The case was settled in 1984 and the Vietnam veterans were awarded medical and financial assistance. Russo was honored with an Award of Gratitude from the Veterans of Foreign Wars; his papers are part of the Brown Vietnam Veterans Archives.


Among other professional honors, in 1997 Russo was the recipient of the Individual Service Award from Allstate for his hard work, loyalty, and dedication to excellence in legal work. In his private life, he was an avid reader and enjoyed playing golf and working outdoors at his home in Northport, Long Island, as well as traveling with Christine and spending time at a family lake house in Vermont. He passed away on May 28. Survivors include a brother-in-law, a sister, two nephews, and a niece.  

Nov, 2020
45

Vernon Alden ’45, whose life spanned WWII military service and successful careers in both higher education and financial services, as well as a remarkable record of giving, is remembered first for his enthusiasm and warmth. 

 

“Everyone loved meeting my dad because he was so curious about life and so interested in everyone. His face would light up and he’d yell your name because he was so excited to see you,” remembers daughter Anne Alden ’78. 

 

 

After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from both Brown and Harvard business schools, Alden started in the Northwestern University admissions department. In 1960, while associate dean of Harvard Business School, he was asked to be president of Ohio University, serving from 1962 to 1969 and doubling faculty and student enrollment during his tenure. “I came to Ohio University in 1966 because of a diversity initiative he started,” recalls President Emeritus Roderick J. McDavis. “He started the Honors College, the Fellows program…and was responsible for the Black Studies Institute.” 

 

 

“His vision for what could be was motivating and his courage for attempting and achieving big things was inspiring,” remarked President Emeritus Robert Glidden during Alden’s virtual memorial service. “And his joy of life was contagious.” 

 

 

Alden later served as chair of the Boston Company and its major subsidiary, the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company. By the end of the 1970s, he had helped grow a local firm into an international organization and the 15th largest U.S. investment management company.

 

 

Outside of his professional life, Alden became deeply involved in Japanese-American relations through groups including the Japan Society of Boston and the National Organization of Japan-American Societies. He was an advocate for the arts and a life trustee of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Boston Museum of Science, and the Children’s Museum. A devoted philanthropist, he established endowed funds at Brown, Ohio University, Ohio Wesleyan University, MIT, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and Northfield Mount Hermon School. A trustee and member of the Brown Corporation Board of Fellows, he was also a staunch supporter of the Brown cross country and track and field programs, endowing the track and field coaching chair, funding the Alden indoor track facility and the Alden Award, sponsoring the annual Alden Invitational, and becoming a founding director of the Brown University Sports Foundation.

 

 

He held honorary degrees from 13 universities, including Brown.

 

 

Alden passed away on June 22 from complications of pneumonia. He is survived by four children, including daughter Anne Alden ’78 and sons James ’81 and David ’87; and eight grandchildren. 

 

Nov, 2020
58

Diane Demirjian Markarian ’58, of Bethesda, Md.; July 2. She taught elementary school in Warwick, R.I., and in Anne Arundel County, Md., and later held various professional roles with Old Colony Bank, Mass. She served as chair of the Hopedale School Committee, Mass., and was a longstanding member and officer of the Portsmouth Garden Club, R.I. She enjoyed antiques, playing bridge, tennis, dancing, skiing, gardening, crocheting, knitting, sewing, solving crossword puzzles, and cooking. She is survived by her husband, Dr. Shant Markarian ’54; a daughter, Kris Markarian ’84; two sons; two grandchildren; three sisters, including Virginia Demirjian Dadourian ’59; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1958, Class of 1954
Nov, 2020
66

George H. Connell Jr. ’66, of Atlanta; Apr. 13, from complications of a stroke. He graduated from the University of Georgia School of Law in 1969 and began working as a United States attorney. He was a partner at Long Weinberg Ansley & Wheeler before establishing his own private firm, where he successfully practiced for more than 40 years. He retired from the legal firm of Dennis, Corry, Porter & Smith. He was a member of the Georgia Bar Association, Sigma Chi Fraternity, and the Capital City Club. An accomplished tennis player, he was a former member of Brown’s varsity tennis team. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; four children; five grandchildren; and a sister. 

 

Nov, 2020
65

Stephen R. Bond ’65, of London, England; May 29, following complications from heart surgery. He received his law degree from Columbia University and was senior counsel in the London office of Covington & Burling, specializing in international commercial arbitration. Previously, he was cohead of the international arbitration practice group at White & Case LLP. He held several leadership positions with the International Chamber of Commerce, as well as positions with the United States Department of State, including as counselor for legal affairs in the United States mission to the United Nations in Geneva. He received numerous accolades, including recognition as one of the 20 most highly regarded individuals for commercial arbitration by Who’s Who Legal, and the U.S. State Department’s distinguished honors award. He is survived by his wife, Bruna; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and two nieces.

Nov, 2020
64

Jo-Anne Palumbo Vaughn ’64, of Parkville, Md.; Apr. 9, after a long illness. She spent several years teaching French and Italian in high schools in Westerly, R.I., and Hyattsville, Md., then lived and worked with her husband, who was a Foreign Service Officer, in Indonesia, Germany, Bolivia, and Singapore. She earned her master’s in education and counseling from Boston University and became a State Department Family Liaison Officer, providing family and marriage counseling to American families living overseas. On her return to the U.S., she continued to work for the State Department as a crisis management trainer, traveling to embassies in Africa, South America, and Europe. She spent 2002-2004 as a program officer for a Catholic mission in Citi Soleil, Port au Prince, Haiti, providing meals and education to children in need. She retired in 2004 and volunteered at her local community center, held gourmet cooking classes, and sailed and traveled extensively with her husband. She was also an adjunct ESL professor at Chesapeake College. She is survived by her husband, Tony; three daughters and their spouses; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
63

Dayton T. Carr ’63, of New York City; Apr. 7. He established the Venture Capital Fund of America Group (VCFA Group) in 1982 and is credited as being the founder of the secondary private equity industry. He was captain of the sailing team at Brown and was an accomplished competitive racer in a variety of boats throughout his sailing career. He was a champion and ambassador for the causes he supported, which included the U.S. Sailing and U.S. Olympic Sailing Program. He served on the board of directors of the National Sailing Hall of Fame for many years and was involved in various organizations, including Sail Newport, Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island, Herreshoff Marine Museum, the Preservation Society of Newport County, Redwood Library and Athenaeum, and ChildFund International.

Nov, 2020
62

Philip M. Reed ’62, of Litchfield, N.H.; May 24, of cancer. He worked for Travelers Insurance Company across the Northeast in senior management and commercial lines insurance. He later owned his own agency in Manchester, N.H. He served on various boards, including the Litchfield School Board, the Advisory Council of the Independent Services Network, and as president of the Pastoral Counseling Services in Manchester. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2020
60

Daniel G. Wayne ’60, of Riverside, R.I.; June 10, of Parkinson’s disease. An early job entailed test-driving cars for Rolls Royce in New York. This was followed by positions in marketing for Royal Crown Cola, Irvin Industries (in the parachute division), Haskon Corporation, Auto Placement Center, and Comsearch on the East Coast, as well as European Auto Parts in northern California. He enjoyed tinkering with cars, being part of the pit crew for his racing friends, riding his motorcycle, painting model airplanes, and building sculptures and stained glass. He also enjoyed watching Jeopardy! and was often the winner of the in-person version played during his time at the Scandinavian Home Assisted Living Community. He is survived by his wife, Vera Samak Wayne ’65; daughter JC Wayne ’88 and her partner; daughter Halley Townsend Wayne Lavenstein ’92 and her spouse; and two grandsons.

Nov, 2020
60

Charles E. Houriet ’60, of Flemington, N.J.; May 17. He was a retired stockbroker. He was a Mason, a longtime member of the New York Athletic Club, and a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by a brother and several nephews.

Nov, 2020
60

Lawrence W. Hegarty ’60, of Weatogue, Conn.; Apr. 7. He served in the U.S. Navy for three years after attending officer candidate school. His career spanned many areas in sales and sales management, including selling safety products for a Chicago-based firm that named him salesman of the year. He was an avid sailor and owned sailboats throughout his life. He is survived by a son and his spouse, two grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and his former wife, Constance Hegarty.

Nov, 2020
60

Cheryl Snider Conron ’60, of Worcester, Mass.; May 2. She worked in alumni affairs at Worcester Polytechnic Institute for many years. She was an avid reader, especially in history. She was a skilled carpenter and furniture refinisher and enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, John ’61; daughter Maura Conron ’84 and her spouse; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren, including Kolya Shields ’24; two step-grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2020
60

Robert B. Carlin ’60, of Marblehead, Mass.; Apr. 15, of cancer. A Swampscott High School four-year, three-sport varsity athlete, he continued both his football and baseball careers at Brown, earning many accolades including captain of the football team in 1959. He spent time playing football for the semi-pro Providence Steamrollers and baseball for the Cape Cod League, then served in the U.S. Army, where he was also fortunate to play football. Upon discharge, he worked for 45 years in the insurance business. He enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Lissa; three daughters; two sons-in-laws; seven grandchildren; and a sister. 

Nov, 2020
56

Joanne Dean Keane ’56, of Stamford, Conn.; May 15. She had a 35-year career working for the Department of Education for the Town of Stratford, Lord Chamberlain Elderly Care, and the Westinghouse Corporation. An accomplished artist and art historian, she enjoyed painting, sketching, and visiting museums and galleries around the world. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Nov, 2020
56

Ronald E. Foster ’56, of Princeton, N.H.; Apr. 13. After serving in the U.S. Army, he began a 30-year banking career with Bankers Trust Company (now Deutsche Bank) in New York City. He retired in 1989. At Brown he was a member of the baseball and basketball teams and Lambda Chi Alpha. He enjoyed reading, playing golf, traveling and was a fan of the New York Yankees and Giants. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandsons; a brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Nov, 2020
56

Joseph Focarino ’56, of New York City; Apr. 21, of lung cancer. Before retiring, he was the editor of books and catalogs for the Frick Collection in New York City. He had a lifelong interest in the arts and frequently visited the theater, art museums, the opera, and ballet. He is survived by a sister, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece and nephew.

Nov, 2020
55

Cornelius J. Sullivan ’55, of Concord, Mass.; May 22, after a long illness. He worked for Honeywell and later Raytheon as a human resources manager. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was an active member of Holy Family Parish, where he served as a Eucharistic minister and choir member. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; three daughters and their spouses; a son; and four grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
54

Louis H. Pastore Jr. ’54, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. He had a long career as an insurance broker in Providence and Hartford, Conn. He also served as state senator and held a commissioner appointment in the business regulation department. He enjoyed playing golf and was a longtime member of Metacomet Country Club in East Providence. He also enjoyed spending summers with family at Bonnet Shores in Narragansett. He is survived by his wife, Elaine Richard Pastore ’58 AM; four children, including daughter Chaela Pastore ’89; seven grandchildren, including Michael Pastore ’13; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
54

Vincent M. Love ’54, of New York City; Apr. 16. He was vice president of the Mayflower Hotel in New York City. In retirement he volunteered as a research docent at the South Street Seaport Museum. He enjoyed sailing, opera, and attending productions at the Met. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his brother Arthur ’56; a sister-in-law; a niece; and four nephews, including Andrew M. Love Jr. ’87.

Nov, 2020
54

Charles I. Judkins Jr. ’54, of Albuquerque, formerly of Maryland, Massachusetts, and Connecticut; June 26. He was known as “Red” to his family and friends because of his fiery red hair. He was a choir singer all of his life, most recently at Sandia Presbyterian Church. He entered Brown on a Navy ROTC scholarship and played varsity football and basketball, then proudly served during the Korean War. He earned an MBA from Columbia Business School in 1958, was hired by IBM and sold large-frame computers in the New York City area. In 1961, he was recruited to work at Travelers Research Center in Hartford, Conn. In 1967, he and two partners started Geomet, a technical service company in Washington, D.C., and the family lived in Potomac, Md., until 1985, when Geomet was purchased and he partially retired. He then traveled the world with his wife, Nancy, played golf, and enjoyed his summer cottage in Bethany Beach, Del., with family and friends. They moved permanently to Albuquerque in 2003 to take part in the lives of their two grandsons. In 2019, he and Nancy attended their 65th reunion, where they were both honored to serve as Marshals at the 2019 Brown Commencement. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Kaufman Judkins ’54; three children, including son Peter ’84; a daughter-in-law; two grandsons; a brother, Richard Judkins ’59; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
92

Serena Simmons Connelly ’92, of Dallas; Apr. 22. She earned a master’s in social work from the University of Texas at Arlington in 1995 and set out to change the world. She served HIV/AIDS patients in Dallas, then worked with the city’s refugee community and torture survivors. When an agency serving those survivors faced closure, she was instrumental in establishing the Human Rights Initiative of North Texas, which is now in its 20th year serving immigrant survivors of human rights abuses. She later joined the Harold Simmons Foundation, where she worked to help those in the greatest need. She also served on boards including the Texas Women’s Foundation, the Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation, and the North Texas Regional Board of USA for UNICEF. She was named 2001 Social Worker of the Year by the National Association of Social Workers Texas Chapter and a Distinguished Alumna by the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014. She is survived by her husband, Tom; two children; her mother; a stepmother; three sisters; a stepsister; a stepbrother; as well as many nieces, nephews, and cousins.

Nov, 2020
92

Glenn J. Barquet ’92, of Miami; May 2, from complications of COVID-19. He was a cardiologist at Mercy Hospital in Miami and had a private practice in South Miami. He graduated from the University of Florida College of Medicine and was board certified by the American Board of Cardiovascular Disease. He was not treating patients with COVID-19 at the time of his death. He is survived by his wife, Somaly.

Nov, 2020
90

Kristen Keado Lackner ’90, of Dallas; May 13. She was general manager of Overseas Motors in Dallas for 20 years. She also participated in Bible Study Fellowship and taught young children. She is survived by her husband, Randy ’89; a daughter; two sisters; a niece and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
86

Amy McCoy Mastin ’86, of Leadville, Colo; Apr. 17, of liver disease. Always an athlete, she ran her first marathon and bicycled from Vancouver to San Diego in 1981. She competed in basketball, cross country, and eventually rowing at Brown, then coached crew for four years at Northeastern. She climbed half of Colorado’s 14ers and ran many marathons and other races, including Pikes Peak, Mosquito Pass, and Steamboat. She chaired Summit Recycling Project, which led to the formation of Cloud City Conservation Center in Leadville. She could always be found cleaning a roadside, tending race aid-stations, and recycling at events. She was proud to help long-term renters and worked hard to assist with housing for those in need. She is survived by her husband, Kevin, and two daughters.

Nov, 2020
85

Lydia L. English ’85, of Randolph Center, Vt.; May 28. After a 20-year banking career in Chicago and in St. Thomas, USVI, she attended Brown as a RUE student, then earned her PhD from Yale University in 1991. She retired in 2009 from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, where she had headed a fellowship program designed to increase the number of professors of color by identifying talented undergraduates interested in pursuing a PhD in the humanities. She is survived by her wife Patricia Menchini; a son; two stepsons and their spouses; and three step-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
83

Robert Stanley ’83, of Suffield, Conn.; Apr. 20, of cancer. He began working at G. Fox in Hartford, then accepted a position at Suffield Academy, his former school, where he taught for 13 years and held various positions including varsity hockey coach and dean of students. For three years he was director of Camp Rising Sun, a camp for children with cancer, while pursuing his master’s at Yale Divinity School. From 2000 to 2020, he was president of the American Secondary Schools for International Students and Teachers. He was recognized in 2015 with an award from the Institute of International Education. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two daughters; his mother; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 84

Chan-Jin Park ’84 ScM, of Weston, Mass.; May 8, after a brief illness. He was the president of Massachusetts Engineering Group for 30 years. He is survived by his wife, Hee-Young, and two sons.

Nov, 2020
GS 84

Joseph T. Keeley ’84 PhD, of Lynchburg, Va.; May 13. He worked for most of his career as a plasma physicist with a focus on fuel cells and nuclear energy. He was the author of numerous scientific publications and held several patents. He worked as a research scientist in Troy, Mich., and Woburn, Mass., in the early years of his career. He eventually settled in Lynchburg, where he worked as a research chemist for McDermott International Ltd., and a research engineer for BWX Technologies. He was a senior technical specialist with Babcock and Wilcox nuclear operations. At the time of his death he was working as a consultant with BWX Technologies and was an adjunct professor at Lynchburg College in the chemistry department. He is survived by his mother, two sisters, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 82

Barbara L. Nason ’82 MAT, of Northampton, Mass., formerly of Springfield, Mass., and Simsbury, Conn.; May 7, from a fall. She had a long career with Disability Management Services in Springfield. She wrote poetry, painted watercolors, sang in church choirs, knitted, and did needlepoint. She also enjoyed camping, kayaking, swimming, and hiking. She is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
GS 80

Stephen G. Warfel ’80 AM, of New Cumberland, Pa.; May 14, after a four-year battle with gastric junction cancer. Before retiring as senior curator of archaeology at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, he conducted excavations at a variety of Native American and colonial period habitation sites. He enjoyed teaching archaeology to college-aged students at sites such as Ephrata Cloister, Fort Augusta, the Joseph Priestley House, and Eckley Miners’ Village. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; two brothers; and 15 nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 79

Carla Mathes Woodward ’79 AM, of Providence; May 18, after a long illness. Her professional career included service at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Wellesley College, and RISD. She sang for many years in the choir at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church in Providence and is survived by a daughter, two sisters, and nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 79

Joan Millman ’79 AM, of Cambridge, Mass.; Apr. 4. She studied under John Gardner at the Bread Loaf literary conference and enjoyed two fellowships at New York’s Yaddo artists colony. Her stories appeared in the Virginia Quarterly Review and the Carolina Quarterly and her collection entitled The Effigy won the University of Missouri Press’s prestigious Breakthrough Prize in short fiction in 1989. For many years she contributed articles to the Boston Globe, the Worcester Telegram & Gazette and the MetroWest Daily News, as well as travelogues for numerous newspapers and magazines. In addition to her writing, she taught English composition and creative writing at Emerson College and Framingham State and Salem State universities. She is survived by four children and their spouses, nine grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 73

Gerald A. Greenberger ’72 AM, ’73 PhD, of Short Hills, N.J.; Apr. 3, from COVID-19. He taught French history at The College of William & Mary for several years before earning his JD from Yale Law School. He then had a 36-year career practicing law. He is survived by his wife, Debby; a daughter; a son; two brothers; two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
GS 72

George F. Aubin ’72 PhD, of Worcester, Mass.; Apr. 23. After graduating from Brown, he continued his post-doctoral studies at MIT, Bowdoin College, and Middlebury College. He retired in 2006 from Assumption College, where he taught French, Linguistics, and American Indian Studies for more than 43 years. He attended many Algonquian conferences in the U.S. and Canada, researched Native American languages, and published several articles and dictionaries throughout his career. While at Assumption, he was chair of the French department and served on many committees. Music was another great passion and he played piano in several local bands and at campus events with his son. He is survived by eight children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; nine siblings; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 71

Ronald S. LeFever ’71 ScM (see ’70).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1971, Class of 1970
Nov, 2020
GS 70

Virginia J. Dunmire ’70 MAT, of Prairie Village, Kans.; Apr. 23, of cancer. She taught history and later became the admissions director at Chatham Hall Boarding School for Girls in Chatham, Va. She enrolled in the University of Virginia School of Law and earned her JD degree in 1979. She was the first female editor of the Virginia Law Weekly. She joined the law firm of Spencer Fane Britt & Brown in Kansas City, eventually moving on to the legal department of Commerce Bank. She is survived by two brothers, a sister-in-law, and many nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 66

Theodore B. Wiehe Jr. ’66 MAT, of Cleveland, Ohio; Apr. 11. He taught for 32 years at Shaker Heights High School and was instrumental in forming their men’s and women’s soccer teams. He was known for creating innovative classes at the school and riding his red bicycle to work. He also enjoyed running. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; two sons; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews. 

Nov, 2020
GS 66

James Dalager ’66 MAT, of Thief River Falls, Minn.; June 4. He was a math and science teacher at Augustana Academy (S. Dak.), Camrose Lutheran College (Alberta, Canada), and Northland Community College in Thief River Falls. He retired in 1992 and spent a year in Bratislava, Slovakia, teaching math in English. He was active in organizations including Zion Lutheran Church’s choir, the Cancer Society, and the Pennington County Historical Society, and tutored math at Cornerstone Academy. He farmed part-time beginning in 1965. He enjoyed family history, square dancing, stamp collecting, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Phyllis; five children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Nov, 2020
GS 65

Bobby Z. Workman ’65 MAT, of Murray, Ky.; Apr. 3, after battling Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. He taught math and chemistry in Indiana before earning his master’s degree and entering the paper industry. He worked at Mead Paper (N.C.), then at Bowater (S.C.), and retired in 1998 from Weyerhaeuser (Wash.). He was a member of Epsilon-Lambda Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha.

Nov, 2020
GS 65

John M. Howard ’65 MAT (see ’59).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1965, Class of 1959
Nov, 2020
GS 64

Nathaniel A. Friedman ’64 PhD, of Albany, N.Y.; May 2, from complications of COVID. After appointments at the University of New Mexico, Westfield College, and the University of London, he settled into a tenure-track position at SUNY Albany in 1968. He wrote An Introduction to Ergodic Theory (1970), one of the early textbooks on the topic, and helped lay a foundation in ergodic theory and dynamical systems that continues to have a broad influence on many areas of mathematics to this day. In 1992, he started the international, interdisciplinary Art and Mathematics Conference, which convened annually in Albany. In 1998 he founded the International Society for the Arts, Mathematics, and Architecture to further interdisciplinary education in these fields, with international conferences in the U.S. and Europe. His newsletter HYPERSEEING became a quarterly magazine covering a lively mix of art/math articles, news, reviews of books and exhibits, even cartoons. He retired as full professor in 2000. He enjoyed sculpting and ballroom dancing. He is survived by six cousins.

Nov, 2020
GS 92

William T. Moynihan ’62 PhD, of Storrs, Conn.; Mar. 28. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduating from St. Bonaventure University, he was employed as a journalist. In 1955 he began his teaching career at Connecticut’s Killingly High School, where he gained the nickname “Wild Bill.” At the same time, he began working toward his Brown PhD, while also teaching summer school classes at UConn. In 1961, he was hired as an English professor at UConn and in 1967, he was elected chair of the English department and served as department head for 20 years. He authored a book on the poetry of Dylan Thomas, and co-authored several writing textbooks. He was awarded a Fulbright Fellowship to teach in Bergen, Norway, in 1969, then taught in Paris, France, and London on academic exchanges, all while leading the department. After stepping down as department head, he began a second career as a playwright in the 1980s, writing more than nine plays, including More Than a Man, about Haitian revolutionary Toussaint L’Ouverture, which was a finalist in both the CBS/Chicago Theater Project playwriting competition and the Sergel Drama Prize from the University of Chicago Court Theater competition in 1985. He is survived by seven children and their spouses, and 19 grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 57

David P. Rein ’57 AM, of Webster, N.Y.; June 1. His teaching career began at West Morris High School (N.J.). In subsequent years he taught at the University of Liberia on a one-year Fulbright-Hays grant, at Bucknell University, Bloomsburg State College, the School for International Training, and Capital Community College. He taught students from more than 50 countries. As a freelancer, he wrote and edited ESL and English for professionals materials for Oxford University Press and Regents Publishing Company. He was a lifelong learner, accomplished classical pianist, and international traveler. He is survived by his sister and brother-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
GS 55

Edgar C. Smith Jr. ’55 PhD, of Chevy Chase, Md.; May 20. He worked for IBM, where his initial assignment was working with major research universities in the western United States to set up mainframe computers on their campuses. He went on to have a long and successful career with the company, living in various cities and countries. After retiring, he spent 12 years in Carmel, Calif., where he enjoyed researching and writing about California’s history. He also served as a docent in the Monterey Maritime Museum. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 54

Robin L. Curtis ’54 PhD, of Brookings, Ore.; May 9. He began his career as a postdoctoral Fellow at NYU and was subsequently invited to join the faculty of the New Jersey College of Medicine. He and his family moved to Wisconsin, where he worked as a professor and research neuroscientist at Marquette University School of Medicine and then the Medical College of Wisconsin. He won many research grants and received multiple awards for his outstanding teaching. When he retired, he and his wife moved to southwest Oregon. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He is survived by his wife, Sheila; two children; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
GS 49

Marjorie Schaefer Freeman ’49 ScM, of Jersey Village, Tex.; Apr. 30. She was a research assistant at Texas A&M in the 1950s. After raising her children, she taught math and physics at South Texas Junior College, which later became the University of Houston Downtown and named her an associate professor of applied mathematical sciences. She was a longtime board member and officer of the Weather Research Center and the Weather Museum of Houston, and a member of the American Mathematics Association and the American Meteorological Society. In later years she raised Chesapeake Bay retrievers. She served as president and secretary of the South Texas Obedience Club and was a member of the board of the Southwestern Tracking Association of Metropolitan Houston. She is survived by six children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020
01

Elizabeth K. Reilly ’01 of Mountain View, Calif., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Apr. 27, after a long illness. She was a senior managing engineer for the Exponent Company in Menlo Park, Calif., for the past 10 years. She served on the American Gas Association’s Transmission Pipeline Operations Committee and was a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. She is survived by her husband, Philip Stephanou; her parents; a sister and brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Nov, 2020
80

Wendy Schornstein Good ’80, of New Orleans; May 24, after a battle with glioblastoma brain cancer. After Brown, she went on to Tulane Law School, where she was a member of Order of the Coif and Tulane Law Review. After clerking at the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, she joined Sessions, Fishman, Nathan & Israel in the estate and trust practice, remaining there until 1988. After Hurricane Katrina, she began photographing and documenting various aspects of street, burial, and musician culture and ritual. This included David Peters Montana, Big Chief of the Washitaw Nation Mardi Gras Indian Tribe, as well as local musicians, including Kermit Ruffins and his “We Partyin’ Traditional Style!” album. She served as an executive board member for Jewish Family Service of Greater New Orleans and of Temple Sinai, where she cocreated and led Sabbath of the Soul. She was a longtime supporter of local artists and the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. Prior to her death she had trained to be a medical advocate for victims of domestic violence with the New Orleans Family Justice Center. She is survived by her husband, Julian; two daughters and sons-in-laws; her parents; two sisters and their families.

Nov, 2020
76

Helen Eustis Ederer ’76, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Mar. 29. She was a real estate broker and enjoyed traveling the world, teaching the Transcendental Meditation technique, and competitive open water swimming. She is survived by her husband, David; a sister; and two brothers.

Nov, 2020
74

P. Kevin Walther ’74, of Flowery Branch, Ga.; Apr. 20. After receiving his law degree from Indiana University, he specialized in residential and commercial real estate law in the Atlanta area from 1979 until his death. He enjoyed cooking for and hosting family gatherings, gardening, and walking on the beach. He is survived by his wife, Kimberly; a daughter; his stepmother; two grandchildren; and six siblings.

Nov, 2020
73

Katherine J. Moore ’73, of Joshua Tree, Calif., formerly of Purchase, N.Y.; June 3. After Brown, she went on to study law at Rutgers University, where she was an editor of the Law Review. She joined the firm of Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy in New York City in 1978 and became a partner. She enjoyed and was a supporter of the arts. She also enjoyed reading and traveling. She is survived by a sister, two brothers, two nieces, and a great nephew.

Nov, 2020
73

Peter J. Durfee ’73, of Marshfield, Mass.; June 5, from prostate cancer. He earned a master’s in accounting from Northeastern, then worked at Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co. in Boston and as a partner in Durfee & Root. He retired as director of finance for the Beacon Mutual Insurance Company in Warwick, R.I. As a young boy he worked beside his grandparents, father, and brothers at Durfee Hardware Store in Cranston, R.I. and, at the time of his passing, was a co-owner and behind-the-scenes financial consultant. He also served as treasurer of Trinity Episcopal Church, coached a boys’ travel basketball team, and volunteered at the Scituate Art Festival. A lover of sports, he completed ten marathons, including three Boston marathons and three Mount Washington road races, and enjoyed playing golf (he was proud of his hole in one at the Pawtucket Country Club). He is survived by his wife, Sheila; a son and daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; two brothers, including David Durfee ’80, ’87 ScM, ’92 PhD; three sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and 11 nieces and nephews, including Kevin Durfee ’11 and Kyle Durfee ’14.

Nov, 2020
72

Carol Ann Marble Thatcher ’72, of Toronto, Canada; June 9. She worked in the electronic publishing field, including positions at Quicklaw, InfoGlobe, and Infomart, then held management positions at CGI and the Ontario Ministry of Health. She volunteered for Out of the Cold, sang with the Toronto Classical Singers, and enjoyed gardening, traveling, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Adrian; a sister and brother-in-law; two brothers and sisters-in-law; and nine nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020
70

Ronald S. LeFever ’70, ’71 ScM, of Easton, Pa.; May 28, from complications of prostate cancer. His landmark MIT thesis in 1982 on myoelectrical signaling was lauded internationally and went on to be a cornerstone in research in this area. He was a professor in his early years and later made his mark in the communications technology world with his work in defense contracting and cellular location services. He also worked for the Harris Corporation in the 1980s. He enjoyed problem solving and fixing anything broken. He is survived by his wife, Linda Brad; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-laws; five stepchildren; 13 grandchildren; and his former wife, Catherine LeFever.

Related classes:
Class of 1970, GS Class of 1971
Nov, 2020
69

Margaret Dworkin Northrop ’69, of Barrington, R.I.; June 4, of Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating from Brown, where she was a class president, and the Loyola University School of Law in Chicago, she practiced labor law, first in Chicago and later for the United Nations at its New York City headquarters. In some of the intervening years, she worked as a magistrate in the Connecticut court system. She was fluent in French, which she mastered as an American Field Service exchange student in Paris. She enjoyed traveling, socializing, and spending time by the ocean. She is survived by her husband, Tom; three sons; three grandchildren; and a brother, Peter Dworkin ’74.

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