Obituaries

Nov, 2018
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Alexis Saccoman ’04, of Aventura, Fla.; May 30. In addition to running his private psychology practice, he was also program director from 2013 to 2017 of AFY iTHRIVE, an early intervention program for teens struggling with substance use and minor criminal offenses. In June, AFY’s community training program was named the Dr. Alexis Saccoman Training Institute in honor of his legacy, work, and commitment. While a student at Brown, he was a resident counselor and a Brown University Relaxation Project (BURP) leader. After Brown and in partnership with his brother, he cofounded MyTherapyJournal, an online cognitive-behavioral and journaling tool to provide therapeutic services in the privacy of your home, which later appeared on ABC’s Shark Tank and is still in operation. Every September between 2004 and 2017 Alexis returned to Brown to present transformative Sex at Brown lectures, one of the most popular workshops on campus, and an endowed lecture will be established in his name. At the time of his death he was focusing on a book project with iTHRIVE. A memorial service will take place on May 23, 2019, to coincide with his 15-year reunion. He enjoyed learning languages (he spoke five), video games, swimming, meditation, exercise, and traveling. He is survived by his parents; a daughter; a brother; and ex-wife Michal Fire.

Nov, 2018
GS

Berenice A. Carroll ’60 PhD, of West Lafayette, Ind.; May 10. She was a scholar and activist who worked for world peace and women’s rights. She had been a professor in the Center for Women’s Studies at the Univ. of Cincinnati, an associate professor of political science at the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, director of Women’s Studies and visiting associate professor at the Univ. of Maryland, and visiting associate professor in the Department of Government at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. She published several books, including Design for Total War: Arms and Economics in the Third Reich; Liberating Women’s History: Theoretical and Critical Essays; Women’s Political & Social Thought: An Anthology; and In a Great Company of Women, a collection of essays on women throughout the world who engaged in nonviolent direct action. In addition, she edited Peace and Change: A Journal of Peace Research. In 2007 she coedited and republished Jane Addams’s classic essay Newer Ideals of Peace, originally published in 1907, writing an introduction that captured the connections between Addams’s theoretical and practical work for peace and justice. She played a leading role in building a women’s caucus in both the American Political Science Assoc. and the American Historical Assoc. She went on to become president of the National Women’s Studies Assoc. She was instrumental in the building of the International Peace Research Assoc. and the consortium on Peace Research, Education, and Development (COPRED). She chaired COPRED in the 1980s. Throughout her career she demonstrated ways to link theory and practice, which was exhibited in a 2007 celebration of her work titled Pen and Protest. She played a significant role in establishing a women’s residential crisis center in Urbana, Ill., in the 1970s and as a member of the Grassroots Group of Second-Class Citizens, she protested the Illinois state legislature’s refusal to endorse the Equal Rights Amendment.  From her early activism against the spread of nuclear weapons as a SANE (National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy) activist, to protest against wars in Vietnam, Central America, Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere, she was always on the front lines in support of peace and justice.  Additionally, she held memberships in several societies and was the recipient of numerous awards over the course of her career.

Nov, 2018
FAC

Jerome H. Weiner, of Manhattan; Sept. 19, 2016. He was the L. Herbert Ballou Professor Emeritus of Engineering and Physics at Brown. Previously, he was a professor at Columbia University. He is survived  by two sons; daughters-in-law Deborah Heiligman ’80 and Natalie Standiford ’83; and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
GS

Douglas R. Skopp ’74 PhD, of Plattsburgh, N.Y.; May 27, of cancer. He  was a professor of history at SUNY Plattsburgh from 1972 until he retired in 2006. He served as chair of the history department, acting associate vice president for Academic Affairs, codirector of the Center for Teaching Excellence, presiding officer of the faculty, and acting director of the Institute for Ethics in Public Life, where he played a central role for nearly 20 years. He also served as SUNY Plattsburgh’s official historian, a position he held until his death. In 1989 he authored a history of SUNY Plattsburgh entitled Bright with Promise. In honor of his contributions to the school, a permanent gallery in the Feinberg Library was named the Douglas and Evelyn Skopp Holocaust Memorial Gallery. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn; a son; and five grandsons.  

 

Nov, 2018
GS

Joan M. Reitzel ’71 PhD, of Venice, Calif.; May 25. Over the course of her career she worked as a college professor and a banker and retired as a grant worker for the City of Los Angeles Parks & Recreation Department. She is survived by a sister and two cousins.
 

 

Nov, 2018
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Jeffrey O. Young ’70 PhD, of Chapel Hill, N.C.; June 21. He was a professor at Ohio State Univ. until 1972, when he joined the staff of Campus Crusade for Christ. He held several positions with the organization, including a campus directorship at Missouri State Univ. and a year at the Univ. of Abidjan in Cote d ’ Ivoire, West Africa. He retired from missionary work in 1982 and moved to Chapel Hill to begin a 35-year career as a computer scientist researching atmospheric models for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He retired in 2017. He became an ordained minister in 2015 to officiate at his grandson’s wedding. He enjoyed running, biking, and playing the guitar. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
GS

E.S. Purandara Das ’70 PhD, of New York City; June 24. He was a retired vice chairman of Merrill Lynch and a former Brown Trustee. He is survived by his wife, Kuntala; three sons; and two granddaughters.

 

Nov, 2018
GS

Joseph N. Scionti ’67 PhD, of North Dartmouth, Mass.; July 1. He was a history professor at UMass Dartmouth and recipient of the Leo M. Sullivan Teacher of the Year award in 1971. He lectured and enjoyed Celtics basketball and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Elsa; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Nov, 2018
GS

Donald D. Hook ’61 PhD, of Georgetown, Del.; July 6. He was a professor of modern languages at URI, Nebraska State College, the Univ. of Hartford, Central Connecticut State College, and St. Joseph College before joining the faculty at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., in 1977, where he also served for more than seven years as chairman of the department of modern languages and Literature. He was the author or coauthor of numerous books and articles, including Madmen of History. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was an avid target shooter and gun collector. He enjoyed gardening and swimming and is survived by a daughter; a son, Terence ’80; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
GS

John Cuniberti ’61 AM, of Englewood, N.J.; July 2. He began teaching at Saint Francis College in Brooklyn and continued to teach at Westchester Community College, where he remained as a professor of film for 49 years. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; four children; a daughter-in-law; and a grandson.

 

Nov, 2018
GS

Joerg Haeberli ’60 PhD, of Morris Plains, N.J.; Nov. 13, 2017, of prostate cancer. An organic chemist, he spent his entire chemistry career with the former Ciba-Geigy Corp., first in Cranston, R.I., then in Summit, N.J. He participated in numerous field studies of the valleys of Arequipa, Peru; held several patents; and published many scientific papers over the course of his career. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; two sons; and four grandchildren.  
 

 

Nov, 2018
GS

Tom N. Cornsweet ’53 ScM, ’55 PhD, of Prescott, Ariz.; Nov. 12, 2017, after a lengthy struggle with multiple illnesses. He was an experimental psychologist and inventor of ophthalmic instrumentation. He was a professor of psychology at Yale, UC Berkeley, and UC Irvine, where he was awarded the American Academy of Optometry’s highest award, the Charles F. Prentice Medal, in 1985. He has written several papers and books and at the time of his death was working on a new book in reference to the theory of how we see color. He is survived by his wife, Diane; three daughters; two grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018
11

Ashley M. Aguilar ’11, of Sonoma, Calif.; June 16. While at Brown, she volunteered teaching Providence children and after Brown worked with AmeriCorps for two years. She coordinated a Reading Partners Program at Longwood Elementary School in Hayward, Calif., which led to a full-time teaching position as a kindergarten teacher. Her colleagues at Hayward will be establishing a “Kinder Play” area in her memory called Ashley’s Corner, as well as the Aguilar Award to recognize a sixth-grade student exemplifying her values. She enjoyed hiking, camping, fishing, and snorkeling. She is survived by her partner, Eric McNeil; her parents; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018
10

Jeffrey Knowles ’10, of San Francisco; June 7, of injuries incurred in a kite boarding accident. He was a scientist, sailor, musician, and engineer. At the time of his death he had completed his doctoral studies and dissertation at UC San Francisco and was preparing to defend his research and receive his degree. His scientific focus was auditory processing mechanisms in songbirds. He hoped to later translate his findings to similar systems in the human brain. At Brown he was captain of the sailing team, an honorable mention All-American, and an Academic All-American. He competed in the Bridge to Bridge races and was a youth sailing coach. Combining his love of music and surfing, Jeff launched a website called SwellSpect that translated ocean swell data from offshore buoys into sound (http://www.swellspect.com). Before turning to songbirds, Jeff’s earlier research focused on echolocation mechanisms in bats. He is survived by his parents and a brother.

 

Nov, 2018
79

Victoria J. Lewis ’79, of Cambridge, Mass.; June 11. She was most recently deputy director of Judicial Education, Executive Office of the Trial Court Judicial Institute of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Previously she worked at Greater Boston Legal Services in immigration and family law. She is survived by a daughter; her parents; a sister; two brothers, including James Lewis ’84; a niece; and two nephews.

 

Nov, 2018
68

Alan L. Grenier ’68, of Topsfield, Mass.; July 2. He was the founder of the Grenier and McCarron law firm in Danvers, Mass. In addition, he was past president of the North Bay Council Boy Scouts of America and the Danvers Rotary Club and a member of American Legion Post 255. He enjoyed traveling and is survived by his companion, Joyce Volpe; two daughters; two sons-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018
68

John M. Gaydos Jr. ’68, of Coventry, R.I.; June 28, of prostate cancer. He was a middle school teacher for 38 years. He taught in Iran as a Peace Corps volunteer and later in Ohio and New Hampshire. He was nominated as 1987 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year. After retiring from teaching, he assisted in his wife’s jewelry business and additionally sold rocks and fossils as UoleFossil.com. He enjoyed learning and was active in his community and church. He is survived by his wife, Marian; and three daughters, including Megan Gaydos ’00 and Lindsey Gaydos ’09.

Nov, 2018
67


Lynn Taylor ’67, of Seattle; June 21, following a battle with systemic sclerosis. She was the director of Harbor Development at the Port of Seattle from 1980 to 1990. In 1990 she left the Port and started her own firm, Taylor Consulting, where she focused on strategic consulting in a range of public policy areas. She served on the Seattle City Club board, including two terms as president; sang with Seattle Pro Musica; volunteered at FareStart preparing and delivering food for shelters, while also helping to develop a curriculum to assist students in gaining employment. She enjoyed playing golf, reading, birdwatching, and spending time with family at their Black Butte Ranch home in Central Oregon. She is survived by her husband, G. Douglas Hurley ’71; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

 

Nov, 2018
67

Linda Mansfield Pointer ’67, ’69 AM, of East Falmouth, Mass., formerly of Lawton, Okla.; May 28, of cancer. She worked for many years with the U.S. Department of Energy and as an economist at McKinsey & Company, traveling extensively to serve clients and address matters of oil and gas supply models. In 2004 she left Oklahoma and moved to East Falmouth, where she was an avid watercolor painter and supporter of the Falmouth Artists Guild. She served as treasurer of the Guild, assisted in marketing efforts, and wrote grant proposals. She enjoyed sailing. She is survived by her husband, Ronald; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1967, GS Class of 1969
Nov, 2018
66

Clifford B. LePage Jr. ’66, of Wyomissing, Pa.; June 8. After earning his JD from the Univ. of Pennsylvania, he practiced law and was a partner at Austin, Boland, Connor & Giorgi in Reading, Pa. A lifelong athlete, he was an accomplished runner and cocaptain of Brown’s track team and proud to have completed the Boston Marathon. He enjoyed basketball as a competitor in the Reading City League and as a spectator traveling throughout the United States for more than 40 years to watch the NCAA tournaments. He also enjoyed playing bridge, attending theatrical productions, and visiting national parks. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; two sons; and four grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2018
65

Harry Roy ’65, ’66 ScM, of Troy, N.Y.; July 12, after a brief illness. He was a professor in the department of biological sciences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy for 42 years. A choral singer, he performed with Albany Pro Musica, Saint Paul’s Choristers, and Burnt Hills Oratorio Society. He enjoyed opera, the theater, and writing contributor letters and opinion pieces advocating for the environment. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a son and daughter-in-law; and two sisters, including Jamie Ross ’73.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1965, GS Class of 1966
Nov, 2018
65

Robert P. Gallagher ’65, of Arlington, Va.; June 21. He served in the U.S. Air Force as a Russian linguist stationed in Berlin. Upon graduation from Brown, he joined the State Department as a Foreign Service officer. After postings in Yugoslavia, South Korea, and West Germany, he transferred to the Department of Commerce, where he was an intelligence director for five secretaries. He was awarded the National Security Agency’s Signals Intelligence Directorate for his service. He was a black belt, a Boy Scout leader, and a volunteer at the local food bank. He is survived by his wife, June; three sons; two daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
63

Sally Jordan ’63, of Austin, Tex., formerly of Raymond, Me.; June 29. She worked at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, where she assisted in the publication of the Industrial Management Review. Later she joined Arthur D. Little Consultants in Cambridge, where she supported the Energy Group staff. In 1975 she moved to Texas and was an office manager and personnel administrator at Boone Chapman Insurance. She later became a legal assistant and worked at several firms before retirement. She enjoyed gardening and is survived by a brother, Mark H. Jordan ’68, and his partner, Margaret Thumm; a nephew; and several cousins.

 

Nov, 2018
63

R. Elton Duffy ’63, of Barre, Vt., formerly of Hartford, Conn.; June 2. He worked for the Hartford Insurance Group and moved to Barre as its Vermont agent in 1969. Years later he became a partner in the Berg, Carmolli & Kent Insurance Agency in Barre. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle, boating, water and snow skiing, snowmobiling, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Kate; two children and their spouses; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
63

Geoffrey N. Burnham ’63, of New Bern, N.C., formerly of Burlington, Vt.; July 1. He taught for 33 years at St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Vt. In retirement he moved to New Bern. He is survived by a brother, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2018
62

Eugene M. Pfeifer ’62, of Alexandria, Va.; June 10, of pancreatic cancer. During the 1960s he was an ardent civil rights activist and attended many marches and demonstrations in Washington, D.C. He began a legal career at the Food and Drug Administration. He was a law partner at King & Spalding in Washington, D.C., and prior to that was a law partner at Burditt, Bowles & Radzius. He was instrumental in the development of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984. He provided regulatory advice and representation on a wide variety of FDA, FTC, and DEA-regulated activities, including product approval and compliance issues. He served for a year in the General Counsel’s office of the Federal Trade Commission, where he represented the FTC in federal court to enjoin violations of the Federal Trade Commission Act. He had served 10 years in the Chief Counsel’s Office at the FDA as Associate Chief Counsel for Enforcement, Associate Chief Counsel for Drugs, and Deputy Chief Counsel for Regulations and Hearings. He volunteered at Habitat for Humanity in Easton, Md., and served on the board of Elite Pharmaceuticals. He enjoyed sports and was himself a gymnast, a former Brown hockey player, a biker, a sailor, and a winter skier. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a stepdaughter, a daughter-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
61

William G. Shade ’61, ’62 MAT, of Bethlehem, Pa.; June 17. He taught history at Temple Univ. before joining the faculty at Lehigh Univ. in 1966, where he served as director of American Studies for 25 years. He also taught at Lafayette College, the Univ. of Virginia, the Univ. of Limerick in Ireland, the Univ. of Nottingham in England, and most recently at Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. in Russia. He was the author and/or co-author of numerous scholarly papers, articles, and reviews, including Lawrence Henry Gipson: Four Dimensions; Seven on Black: Reflections on the Negro Experience in America; Our American Sisters: Women in American Life and Thought; Democratizing the Old Dominion: Virginia and the Second Party System 1824–1861; and Banks or No Banks: The Money Issue in Western Politics, 1837–1865. He was editor of the Pennsylvania History Journal from 1968 to 1973 and served on the advisory board to the Secretary of the Interior on National Parks, Historic Sites, Monuments, and Buildings. He was a member of the American Historical Assoc., the Pennsylvania Historical Assoc., the Social Science History Assoc., and the American Assoc. of University Professors. He enjoyed jazz music and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Mary Lou; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandsons.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1961, GS Class of 1963
Nov, 2018
58

William H. Tozier ’58, of New York City; May 29. He had a long career in banking, the majority of which was spent in London working for Smith Barney. He retired in 2001. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army National Guard and a member of Sigma Nu. He is survived by two daughters and two sisters.

 

Nov, 2018
58

William R. Starke ’58, of Albuquerque, N. Mex.; May 23. He was the proprietor of the Northern Hotel in Fort Collins, Colo., until its sale in 2000. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed both participating in and watching sports. He is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018
58

Benjamin F. Dudley II ’58, of Falmouth, Me.; June 28, after a brief illness. He worked for many years as a systems analyst for Hannaford Brothers and later was employed with the Maine Turnpike Authority. He enjoyed music, reading, and animals. He is survived by five children.

 

Nov, 2018
57

Nancy Myer Hopkins ’57, of Scarborough, Me.; July 5. She was a private consultant on family and child relations. She was involved in refugee resettlement with Lutheran Social Services in Minnesota. She was also a lecturer and consultant on clergy families. She enjoyed gardening, sailing, painting, sheep raising, and travel. She is survived by five children and six grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
57

James P. Cohen ’57, of Santa Fe, N. Mex.; June 2. He enlisted in the National Guard after Brown, followed by a time working in the family business, the Loma Dress Co., in Manhattan. He sold his shares at the age of 40 and retired to make ceramic sculptures. He enjoyed classical music and the opera and served for many years on the boards of the Santa Fe Symphony Orchestra & Chorus and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Additionally, he was on the board of Performance Santa Fe. He was also a master gardener, and his home garden appeared in the book Behind Adobe Walls: The Hidden Homes and Gardens of Santa Fe and Taos. He enjoyed playing tennis, dancing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Linda; son Richard ’90; and two grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
56

Ned P. Baugh ’56, of Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., formerly of Indianapolis; May 28. He worked for Dow Chemical Co. for many years and had a second vocation as a career counselor. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and Naval Reserves and member of Alpha Delta Phi. He enjoyed gardening, boating, traveling, and singing in church choirs. He is survived by his companion, Polly Leibe; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2018
54

Delfina Fiorini Shockley ’54, of Lake Havasu City, Ariz.; Dec. 19. She was a retired teacher and enjoyed family and traveling. She is survived by three daughters.

 

Nov, 2018
54

Albert D. Kelly Jr. ’54, of Waterbury, Vt.; July 2, after a brief illness. He taught math and driver’s education at Harwood Union High School in Moretown, Vt. He was also an inaugural instructor and facilitator for the State of Vermont Project CRASH Program in 1973. He was an early member of the Vermont Teacher Credit Union and served on the slate of officers. He enjoyed teaching and in retirement tutored neighbors and volunteered with the North Central Vermont Recovery Center. An accomplished musician, he served in the U.S. Army Band and performed in choirs and bands throughout his life, including the choir at St. Andrew’s Church and faculty theater performances at Harwood. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; eight daughters; a son; 21 grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2018
53

John F. Valinote ’53, of Fort Myers, Fla., formerly of Dover, Mass.; June 23, from complications related to Parkinson’s. He was a retired general manager of Getty Petroleum in Dover. In 2001 he was inducted into the Boston Park League Hall of Fame. At Brown he was captain of the baseball team. He served as chairman of the Massachusetts Petroleum Council and enjoyed walking on Matunuck Beach. He is survived by his wife, Joan Powers Valinote ’53; four sons, including John Jr. ’83; a daughter; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2018

John M. Slattery ’53, of Canton, Mass.; June 28. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and, following honorable discharge, joined his brother in the family business, Slattery Brothers, which manufactured and sold leather to the major shoe and handbag companies in the United States. At Brown he was a member of the men’s hockey team. He enjoyed skiing, tennis, and golf. He is survived by six children and seven grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
53

Margaret Caldwell Karb ’53, of Williamsburg, Va., formerly of Moorestown, N.J., and Southborough, Mass.; Apr. 8. After raising a family, she worked for 10 years at Wellesley College, assisting in the science department and the alumni office. She visited all 50 states and all the Canadian provinces, as well as every continent except Antarctica. She enjoyed traveling and reading English literature and books on American history. She is survived by her husband, Alan ’53; four children, including James Karb ’86, ’88 MAT; six grandchildren; and two siblings.

 

Nov, 2018
53

Martha Bassett ’53, of Springfield, Mass.; July 7, after a brief illness. She worked as a court reporter in Springfield; an administrator to the Board of Selectmen in Longmeadow, Mass.; office manager for the firms John R. Morse PC in Gloucester, Mass., and Field, Eddy, and Bulkley in Springfield; was treasurer of the Laurels HOA Board of Directors and a member of the Rockport Art Assoc. She was accomplished at quilting and needlepoint and enjoyed baking, reading, playing bridge, and spending time with family at the shore in Old Lyme, Conn. She is survived by five children, nine grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018
52

Patricia Cruise Schlager ’52, of Basking Ridge, N.J.; July 17. She had a long career in publishing and technical writing. She supported many animal welfare organizations and enjoyed reading and traveling. She is survived by two children and their spouses and two granddaughters.

 

Nov, 2018
52

Beverly Mealey Murphy ’52, of Atlantis, Fla.; May 11. She was employed for more than six years with the Rhode Island DCYF and for 22 years with St. Mary’s Home for Children in North Providence, R.I. She is survived by three nephews.

 

Nov, 2018
52

Robert MacFarlane Jr. ’52, of Madison, N.J.; June 28, following a brief illness. He had a career as a research chemist working primarily with polymer manufacturing, with an expertise in quality and standards. He was founder and director of THO Services in Madison. He previously held positions at Allied Signal/Honeywell, ExxonMobil, and U.S. Rubber. He was chairman of the D20 Subcommittee of the American Society for Testing and Materials and honored by the D20 with an award for 34 years of Outstanding Achievement. He also served more than 28 years as chairman of the International Organization of Standards Subcommittee on Thermoplastics. In 2005 Technical Committee 61 honored him as its first recipient of the Award for Outstanding Service. He enjoyed traveling the world, photography, and the arts. He is survived by friend, Barbara Murphy; five children and their spouses; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; several nieces and nephews; and  former wife, Janet.

 

Nov, 2018
52

James A. Bradley Jr. ’52, ’63 MAT, of Easton, Md.; June 12. He had a 40-year career in education as a teacher, was a department head in five independent schools from Rhode Island to Florida, and was the first headmaster of Independent Day School in Tampa, Fla. He retired in 1997. In 2007 he founded and served as executive director of Rebuilding Together Caroline County. He was a volunteer at St. Martin’s Ministries, served on the board of Tuckahoe Habitat for Humanity, worked in the education and docent department of the Chesapeake Maritime Museum, and was a founding force behind Voice of the Homeless. He and his wife were inducted into the Maryland Senior Citizen Hall of Fame and received the GERI Award in 2017. He is survived by his wife, Patricia Crabtree Bradley ’54; five children and their spouses; 13 grandchildren; and seven nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1952, GS Class of 1963
Nov, 2018
52

David E. Barton ’52, of Coventry, R.I.; June 12. He worked for many years at Investors Diversified Services in Warwick, R.I., before retiring from the Speidel Division of Textron in East Providence. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. In addition to spending time with family and friends, he enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by four daughters, three sons-in-law, three grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Nov, 2018
52

Richard A. Barnstead ’52, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; July 15. After graduating from Naval OCS in Newport, R.I., he returned to Scarsdale and received a master’s degree in taxation from NYU Law School. A former principal at Alexander Grant & Co., Patterson Teele & Dennis, and Shell Oil Co., he retired as vice president of taxation from Peabody International Corp. in Stamford, Conn. He earned a private pilot license and was a member of the Campfire Club of America in New York. He enjoyed hunting, riflery, and flying his Cessna 182.

Nov, 2018
51

James A.D. Pollock ’51, of Mystic, Conn., and West Palm Beach, Fla.; June 30. He joined Lever Brothers after graduation and later General Foods, which he left in 1976 to form Karr-Dorr Foods. Eventually he started Target Sales Management, an independent sales company, and later founded Granitaur Marketing. He fully retired in 2014. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a member of the Brown Club of New York. He enjoyed crossword puzzles, specifically the New York Times crossword puzzle; golf; and the New York Yankees. He is survived by his life partner, Barbara MacDougall; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2018
50

Frances Trambowicz Sarnecki ’50, of Tariffville, Conn.; July 14. She was a nurse who worked from 1964 to 1984 at Saint Francis Hospital Medical Center in Hartford, Conn. In retirement she volunteered with the North Central Area Agency on Aging in Hartford, was a member of the Simsbury Aging and Disability Commission (Conn.), served two years as president of the Farmington Valley Chapter of AARP (Conn.), and was president of the Seniors of Simsbury for two years, president of the Saint Francis Retirees Club, and six times president of the Simsbury Grange. In 1991 she received the Simsbury Hometown Heroes award. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, and two nieces.

 

Nov, 2018
50

R. Wendell Phillips Jr. ’50, of New London, N.H.; June 25. He was an architect for Kent, Cruise & Associates in Providence and Boston before starting his own business, R. Wendell Phillips & Associates. He retired in 2017 at the age of 90. He was a volunteer with the New London Historical Society and the Boy Scouts of America. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children and their spouses; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018
50

Theodore R. Crane ’50, of Boulder, Colo.; May 8. He was professor emeritus of history at the Univ. of Denver. Before joining the Univ. of Denver faculty, he taught at Dartmouth College and Duke Univ. His published works included The Dimensions of American Education and Francis Wayland: Political Economist as Educator. He was active with the American Historical Society and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He enjoyed hiking, Shakespeare, and classical music.

 

Nov, 2018
49

Joseph W. Munnis ’49, of Glen Mills, Pa.; May 30. He was employed with Westinghouse as a sales engineer for 39 years, retiring in the early 1990s. In retirement, he was called upon by Henkles & McCoy to serve as vice president of marketing. He was an active member of St. Thomas the Apostle Church and enjoyed golf, gardening, and the Jersey Shore. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2018
49

Philip F. Denner Jr. ’49, of Nashua, N.H.; July 2. He was employed as a sales manager for the Nashua Corp. for 37 years before retiring in 1990. After retiring, he spent 14 winters in Florida before returning to Nashua full-time. He was an active member of First Church Nashua U.C.C., where he had been chairman of the board of deacons, a Sunday school teacher, superintendent of the Sunday school, and president of the Fellowship Club. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He enjoyed camping in New England. He is survived by his wife, Roberta; four sons; four grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Nov, 2018
48

Marvin N. Geller ’48, of Brookline, Mass.; Apr. 13. He was a retired Boston attorney who practiced primarily in the areas of real estate and secured lending, corporate securities, and corporate reorganization. A former president of the New England Region American Jewish Congress and former chairman of the property committee of Community Housing for Adult Independence, he was also appointed as the commissioner of the Martha’s Vineyard Commission in 1984. He was an avid swimmer and a supporter and advocate for those with intellectual disabilities. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by four children, including Ann Geller ’73; six grandchildren, including Nathan Weinberger ’13; and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
47

Mary Hodnett Hay ’47, of Hilton Head, S.C., formerly of Portsmouth, R.I.; July 6. She was a school teacher in the Providence and Portsmouth school systems before becoming a homemaker. She resumed teaching once her children began attending school. She volunteered in the Bluffton (S.C.) library and enjoyed reading and playing golf. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’47; sons Robert Jr. ’75 and Michael ’78; daughter, Margaret Hay ’81; four granddaughters, including Catherine Hay ’15; and sisters Jane Hodnett ’48 and Barbara Hodnett ’52.

Nov, 2018
47

Richard H. Bube ’47, of Santa Clara, Calif.; June 9. He was professor emeritus at Stanford Univ. Between 1948 and 1962 he was a member of the research staff at the RCA David Sarnoff Research Laboratories in Princeton, N.J. In 1962 he joined the faculty of Stanford, where he served as a professor in the departments of materials science and electrical engineering. From 1975 to 1986 he was chairman of the department of materials science. He was the author of six scientific books and more than 300 research publications. As both a Christian and a scientist, he wrote seven books and more than 100 articles on issues in science and Christianity, striving to help scientists understand Christianity and Christians understand science. He was also a faculty sponsor for the InterVarsity Christian Fellowship at Stanford and taught an undergraduate seminar on the interaction between science and Christianity for 25 years. He taught adult education classes at several churches and was a member of the American Scientific Affiliation, as well as editor of its journal for 25 years. He was also a member of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and Sigma Xi. He is survived by four children and their spouses and five grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
47

Julian M. Brownstein ’47, of New Britain, Conn.; June 6. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II he had a career in radio sales. He later established Julian Associates in Newington, Conn., and began a career as an executive recruiter. He is survived by his wife, Joan; six children; and grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
46

Gabriel V. Pesce ’46, of Oxnard, Calif.; Jul. 6. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for several aerospace companies, including Lockheed, Republic Aviation, and Abex Corp., where he was a regional manager living in Wiesbaden, Germany. He eventually started his own company, Santa Ynez Engineering, in 1971, and later G.V. Pesce & Associates, working on numerous civil engineering and land development projects in Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Los Angeles counties. He concluded his career as contact base engineer at Morón Air Base near Seville, Spain. He was an accomplished artist and enjoyed sailing. He was active in the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and various yacht clubs in Ventura County and was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and Alpha Phi Delta. He is survived by four children, including Vincent ’73; four grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
46

George E. Berger ’46, of Los Angeles, formerly of Chicago; June 1, from complications of hip surgery. He and his brother established a family business, Rittenhouse Paper Co., in 1947 in Chicago. He retired in 1983, moved to Los Angeles, and pursued his interests in photography, literature, the French language, and traveling the world. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran and is survived by two daughters and three grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
43

James M. Keck ’43, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; May 22. After graduating from the College of Dental Surgery at Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, he served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He returned to Cranston and began a 30-year dental practice. He later worked for the State of Florida in Gainesville. He was a founding member of Temple Sinai, past president of the Rhode Island Dental Assoc., and a member of the Rhode Island State Dental Society, the American Dental Assoc., the New England Dental Society, and the Alpha Omega Dental Society. He enjoyed playing the trumpet as a member of the Duke Belaire Band. He also enjoyed traveling, gardening, cooking, and playing golf and was an avid Detroit Tigers baseball fan. He is survived by his companion, Madeline Cotoia; and three children.  

Nov, 2018
42

Willard C. Parker ’42, of Seaford, Del.; July 1. He was a retired insurance executive, a former harness-race horseman and driver, and active member of the BAA. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He is survived by a daughter; a son, Willard C. Parker II ’69; four grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2018
42

Dorothy Bragdon McCormick ’42, of McLean, Va.; Apr. 11. After graduation, she was commissioned in the U.S. Navy. Upon the conclusion of World War II, she entered service in the OSS, the precursor to the CIA. She eventually transitioned into the role of mother, homemaker, and volunteer for various organizations, including several years as a docent at the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History. In 1964, she founded the Country Play School, which eventually was reestablished as the Country Day School in 1971. She was the recipient of the 1970 Business and Professional Club Woman of Achievement award and in 1998 received a Certificate of Achievement from the American Assoc. of University Women. She retired in 2002. She is survived by six children and six grandchildren.

Nov, 2018
38

Virginia Macmillan Trescott ’38, of Exeter, N.H.; June 11. She worked at the Providence Public Library as a reference librarian, followed by work as a Pembroke archivist, then as curator of Brown’s McLellan Collection of Lincolniana for 21 years. She volunteered at the Providence Athenaeum and was an active member of the Rhode Island Library Assoc., the Rhode Island Historical Society, and the Providence Preservation Society. She enjoyed spending time with family, solving crossword puzzles, and reading, especially mystery novels. She is survived by two daughters, including Jean Trescott Lambert ’68; two sons-in-law; four grandchildren, including Alex Pinkham ’08, ’09 ScM; sister-in-law Joan Trescott Heald ’51; and niece Candace Heald ’74.

Sep, 2018
73
Robert A. Reichley
A farewell to the former BAM editor and "perfect PR man."
Read More
Bob Reichley surrounded by journalists
Related classes:
Class of 1973, Class of 1977
Sep, 2018
GS
Stanley Falkow PhD ’61
Stanley Falkow PhD ’61 was “one of the great microbe hunters of all time”
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photo of Stanley Falkow PhD ’61
Sep, 2018
60
William Simmons ’60
“One of the most distinguished scholars of Native New England”
Read More
photo of William Simmons ’60
Sep, 2018
49

Jean E. Miller ’49, of Arlington, Vt.; May 21, of a stroke.  She taught English for seven years in the public high schools of Westbrook, Maine, and Marshfield, Mass., followed by two years at Mount Vernon Seminary in Washington, D.C. She went on to teach English and become assistant to the headmaster of the Masters School in New York. She was later dean of student personnel at Bennington College in Vermont, headmistress of St. Timothy’s School in Maryland, and headmistress of Vivian Webb Schools in Claremont, Calif. She served as director of development at Poly Prep Country Day School in New York and was chairman of the National Association of Independent Schools—the first woman to serve in this capacity—before retiring. Active in Pembroke affairs, she joined the Pembroke Center Associates Council in 1989 and served as chair from 2002-2004. She endowed the Edith Goldthwaite Miller Faculty Fellow Research Fund in 2002 for the Pembroke Center and was a 1998 Brown Bear recipient.  She is survived by two brothers.

Sep, 2018
49

Muriel Hendrick Krauss ’49, of Post Falls, Idaho; Mar. 5. She served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, then continued her studies in psychology and earned two master’s degrees. She enjoyed doing volunteer work, studying history, and traveling. She is survived by four daughters and a son.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Albert J. Jacobs ’49, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; May 27. After a brief career in engineering, he founded three fashion jewelry and findings import companies (Princess Fashions, Eastern Import Co., and Pegasus Import Co.) and served as president of each. He enjoyed jazz music, fishing, Asian art, home aquariums, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, sons Bradley ’79 and Theodore ’84 MD, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
48

Richard A. Wise ’48, of Dover, Mass.; Apr. 28. He was employed as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in Washington, D.C. After returning to the New England area, he was employed with USM Corp., becoming general patent counsel. In 1971 he accepted the position as patent and trademark counsel of the Gillette Co. in Boston. He then became Of Council for Hamilton, Brook, Smith & Reynolds of Lexington, Mass. He was a World War II U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and life member of Norfolk Lodge AF&AM in Needham, Mass. He is survived by his wife, Geraldine; a granddaughter; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
47

William E. Stone ’47, of Philadelphia, Pa.; May 7. He was a retired pastor who had served in several locations, including Connecticut, New Hampshire, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. He was a member of the 112th Field Artillery Assoc., the Military Chaplains Assoc., and the Retired Officers Assoc. of Philadelphia. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, a great grandchild, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Elaine Laudati Regine ’45, of Cranston, R.I.; May 2. She was a social worker for the State of Rhode Island. After raising a family, she obtained a teacher’s certificate from Rhode Island College and became a substitute teacher in the Providence and Cranston school systems. She enjoyed sports, specifically playing golf, and was a member of Metacomet Country Club, where she scored a hole in one in 1966. She is survived by six children and their spouses, including son Louis J. Regine III ’73.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Thomas J. Loftus ’45, of Nahant, Mass.; Apr. 22. He was a retired administrator of the Boston Public School system. After retiring from the school system he worked for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Registry of Deeds for 15 years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and a founding member of the Walsh Post American Legion in Dorchester. He enjoyed Boston politics and Boston sports. He is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, and two great-grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
45

David E. Ferguson ’45, of Richmond, N.H., formerly of East Lyme, Conn.; Apr. 29. He was a retired senior engineer at Electric Boat in Groton, Conn. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy and retired from the USNR in 1961 as a lieutenant. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
45

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’45, ’62 MAT, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 30. She taught science at Hugh B. Bain Middle School in Cranston and was coprincipal of the Mourad Armenian School. She was a longtime member of St. Vartanantz Armenian Apostolic Church and is survived by a daughter, a son, and two siblings.

 

Sep, 2018
42

Ellen A. Hills ’42, of Skowhegan, Me.; May 3. She worked as a nurse, nurse educator, and private duty nurse. Later, after obtaining her teaching certificate, she taught first grade in North Reading, Mass. She continued to teach until her retirement in 1975. She was actively involved in protecting the environment and was the founder of Maine’s first green cemetery—Rainbow’s End, which was featured in a 2008 Classes profile in the January/February issue of BAM. She enjoyed knitting, needlepoint, rug hooking, quilting, embroidery, and traveling. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, 11 grandchildren, and two brothers.

Sep, 2018
45

Henry E. Altenberg ’45, of Kittery, Me., formerly of West Hartford, Conn.; Apr. 25, of multiple myeloma. He was a retired psychiatrist. He served as a psychiatrist in the U.S. Air Force in Alaska from 1952 to 1954. Moving back to the East Coast, he practiced psychiatry for the next 30 years. In 1984 he moved to Kittery, married, and enjoyed traveling and sailing along the Maine coast. As a member of the American Holistic Medical Assoc., he was trained in advanced Reiki and, with his wife, codirected the Spruce Creek Holistic Center in Kittery, where they ran a support group for people with life-threatening illnesses. He authored Holistic Medicine, A Meeting of East and West. He also contributed to Doctors Look at Macrobiotics. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four step-children; four grandchildren; and five step-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
44

Russel M. Geer ’44, of Gainesville, Ga.; May 22. He was the owner of an H&R Block for 40 years. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and two grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
42

Florence Northcott Cox ’42, of Vienna, Va., formerly of Cumberland, R.I.; May 15. She taught at Scott Elementary School in Warwick, R.I., for 19 years and owned Bay View Realty Co. in Jamestown, R.I. She was involved in many organizations in Rhode Island, including the Blackstone Valley Historical Society and Learning for Life. She was a member and Sunday school teacher of the Arnold Mills United Methodist Church in Cumberland. She is survived by three daughters, a son, 10 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
41

Celeste F. Griffin ’41, of East Providence, R.I.; Apr. 30. A former lieutenant in the WAVES, she later worked as an admissions officer at Brown. She retired in 1985. She is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
39

Edward H. Ziegler Jr. ’39, of Providence; July 10, 2017. He was a retired dentist. During World War II he served as a naval officer in the dental corps. He enjoyed flying, scuba diving, camping, creating stained glass pieces, and beekeeping. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
49

Barbara Dinkel Dillon ’49, of Darien, Conn.; Mar. 28. She worked as an editorial assistant at the New Yorker magazine in Manhattan, while also doing some freelance writing. She sold her first story, “The Grand Champion Peanut Racer,” to Woman’s Day magazine at the age of 23. Over the course of her career, she authored nine children’s books, including A Mom by Magic, which was made into an NBC TV movie, A Mom for Christmas, produced by Walt Disney Productions in 1990. She spoke at several local schools about her writing and remained an avid reader of children’s literature and the New York Times Book Review. She enjoyed attending the Darien Playhouse and New York City theater. She also played tennis, golf, paddle tennis, and bridge. She volunteered in several organizations, taught pre-reading skills to underprivileged children in Stamford, Conn., and was a volunteer for 25 years at Person-to-Person in Darien. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Sep, 2018
GS

Glenn S. Everett ’88 PhD, of Pembroke, Mass.; Apr. 19, after a struggle with leukemia and other health issues. He taught English at Temple Univ. and the Univ. of Tennessee at Martin. He enjoyed photography, singing, playing tennis, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two sons; a sister; a niece; and two nephews. 

Sep, 2018
GS

Rida M. Mirie ’77 ScM, ’80 PhD, of Lowell, Mass.; Feb. 16. He was a mathematics professor at UMass Lowell. He is survived by a daughter.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Richard G. MacKay ’74 MAT, of West Hartford, Conn.; Apr. 9. He taught in Watertown Public Schools and also worked for the State of Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection. He is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Mary Ogden Trotta ’72 MAT, of Clarksboro, N.J.; Apr. 18. She taught English at Woodbury High School for 30 years. After retiring from Woodbury, she joined the Univ. of Pennsylvania’s Literacy Network, where she devoted her time to professional development with teachers across the country. She enjoyed expanding literacy among children in under-resourced school districts. She is survived by her husband, James; a daughter; a son-in-law; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Marion Lord Kessen ’72 AM, of Branford, Conn.; May 24. She worked in various positions at Yale Univ., conducting research in the department of psychology. She enjoyed bowling and playing bridge and golf. She served as chairman of the Branford Human Rights Council in the 1960s and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by six children, six grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Arlene Haas Little ’70 AM, ’73 PhD, of Penacook, N.H.; Jan. 2. She had been a professor of psychology at UMass Amherst, retiring in 2002. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, a sister, and a sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Linda Daignault Howell ’69 MAT, of New Bern, N.C.; Mar. 29. After moving to Boston in 1974, she worked for the New England Governors Council. In 1976 she cofounded the Council for Northeast Economic Action, which became an international consulting firm focused on creating opportunities for growth in New England. She later moved to New Bern and focused on historic preservation and gardening as a member of the New Bern Preservation and Historical Society. As a member of the Questers, she worked to raise funds to restore Cedar Grove Cemetery. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, reading, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Jim; a son; a daughter-in-law; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Vittorio A. Bonomo ’69 PhD, of Blacksburg, Va.; Apr. 20, 2017. He began teaching at UC Santa Barbara. He subsequently taught at Virginia Tech in the College of Business for 48 years and was a winner of the William E. Wine Award for Teaching Excellence. He was a financial advisor to two Virginia governors and served on advisory boards for many banks and financial institutions spanning his career. He enjoyed painting, Virginia Tech football, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Fred I. Cooperstock ’66 PhD, of Victoria, B.C.; Jan. 17. He was a physics professor at the Univ. of Victoria. He enjoyed photography, writing, playing badminton, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Marjorie Harvey Purves ’65 AM, of Worcester, Mass.; Mar. 27, of lung cancer. She ran the volunteer program of the palliative care unit at UMass Memorial Medical Center for 10 years. She served on the board of Daybreak, then stepped down to be executive director until the early 1990s. After leaving Daybreak, she worked for the Battered Women’s Coalition in Boston. She was also a mediator for the court system for many years. She sang with the Worcester Choral Society and enjoyed poetry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a grandson, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Gordon R. Williamson ’64 ScM, of Hanover, N.H.; Feb. 15. He worked as an intellectual property lawyer in Boston before joining the staff of Byte magazine in the 1970s. In retirement he founded a nonprofit organization supporting artisans in Rwanda, authored a career guide for young lawyers, and volunteered with the Dartmouth athletics department. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’62 MAT (see ’45).

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Robert E. Green Jr. ’56 ScM, ’59 PhD, of Towson, Md. He was an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Univ. in Baltimore. He is survived by his wife, Sydney; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Sep, 2018
GS

Ryozo G. Kumekawa ’55 AM, of Wakefield, R.I.; Apr. 16. He served as the director of city planning for the City of Warwick (R.I.) from 1958 to 1972. He was then appointed as the executive assistant for Policy and Program Review for Gov. Noel of Rhode Island, serving from 1973 to 1977. From 1977 to 1979 he was the executive director of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors Policy Research Center, and from 1980 until his retirement in 1998, he was the director of the URI Graduate Program in Community Planning. He was honored with the distinguished leadership award by the Rhode Island Chapter of the American Planning Assoc. in 1996 and was elected a fellow in the American Institute of Certified Planners in 2001. He is survived by his wife, Yoshiko; three children; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Charles A. Pleasance ’53 AM (see ’50).
 

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Alice Slavin Krafft ’47 ScM, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 23. She was a retired science teacher. She is survived by eight children, 13 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
GS

Richard N. Berry ’41 ScM, ’47 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 26. He was a professor of psychology and brain sciences at Indiana State Univ. from 1947 until his retirement in 1987. He enjoyed following the stock market, gardening, and playing golf. He is survived by a sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
07

David Warren ’07, of New York City; Mar. 13. He is survived by his wife, Ali; his parents Bob ’73 and Sandy Wogrin Warren ’75; and sisters Susan Weston ’03 and Sharon Persson ’05.

 

Sep, 2018
87

Lawrence B. Gardner ’87, of New York City; Mar. 27, of lymphoma. He was associate professor of medicine and associate professor of biochemistry and molecular pharmacology at NYU Langone Medical Center. He attended patients, performed research, and taught students. He was a fellow at Johns Hopkins Univ. and the head of the hematology oncology fellowship at NYU. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by a daughter, his mother, a sister, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
84

Gay Tokumaru Bessen ’84, of Williamsburg, Va.; Mar. 9, of cancer. She was chief of optometry at the Hampton VA Medical in Hampton, Va. She enjoyed the outdoors and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Andy; her mother; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
84

Elizabeth Olarsch Hunter ’84, of Gardiner, N.Y., formerly of Portland, Me.; Dec. 5, from a cerebral hemorrhage while awaiting a bone marrow transplant due to myeloid leukemia. She was a concert pianist and trained in Musical Munchkins, developmentally staged techniques for teaching music to children. After relocating to Gardiner, she opened a Musical Munchkins branch in New Paltz, N.Y. At Brown she was a member of the Chattertocks. She and her husband established the Free at Last band and toured the New England college circuit, eventually recording an album in 1996 title One Woman’s Song. She enjoyed music and raising her family. She is survived by her husband, Tim; two daughters; and two sons.

 

Sep, 2018
83

Paul R. Kemp ’83, of Seattle; Aug. 12, 2017. He was injured shortly after graduating from Brown, leaving him quadriplegic. After a year in the hospital and rehab, he moved to Seattle to continue his studies and obtained a ScM from the Univ. of Washington in 1993. He is survived by his mother and many friends.  

 

Sep, 2018
82

Andrew L. Shapiro ’82, of North Bethesda, Md.; Mar. 16, of multiple system atrophy. He practiced law in Houston, Tex., and Washington, D.C. He went on to assume a leadership role as a senior vice president at CAN insurance. He enjoyed sports, cheering for the Boston Red Sox and the Duke Blue Devils, playing golf, and being involved in Fantasy Football. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a daughter; a son; his mother; and a brother.

Sep, 2018
80

Peter M. Kriff ’80, of Columbus, Ohio; Mar. 26, of cancer. He was head of his own advertising/design agency in Burlington and a 30-year member of the Vermont Jazz Ensemble. For the last 10 years he was executive director of the Vermont Statewide Independent Living council. He is survived by his wife, Robyn; a son; a stepson; his mother; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Charles W. Reckard ’78, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 21. He managed Brown’s Grad Center Bar, Pot au Feu; Leo’s; and other restaurants and nightclubs in the Providence area for several years. After leaving the service industry, he worked for more than 25 years at Cox Communications, where he was a producer, director, editor, and audio engineer specializing in live event programming. He was the recipient of four Emmy Awards for excellence in broadcasting. He is survived by his wife, Lucia O’Reilly ’74; four brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Peter V. Kocot ’78, of Florence, Mass.; Feb. 27, after a brief illness. He was chief of staff for State Rep. Bill Nagle for more than 20 years. At the time of his death he held the title of chairman of the Joint Committee on Health Care Finance. During his tenure he was instrumental in the fight for civil rights, same-sex marriage rights, and landmark ethics reform. In 2015 he led the charge to reform and modernize Massachusetts’s public records laws. At Brown he was a member of the 1976 Ivy League championship football team. He enjoyed fishing and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Shauneen; two sons; four siblings; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
78

Susan Costabile Bubna ’78, of Colony, Kans.; Mar. 22. She was a nurse for more than 10 years at Olathe Medical Center. Later, she pastored the Colony Community Church, served as a drama coach at the local high school for several years, coordinated the Good News Club for 20 years, and directed theater for young adults with the Garnett Chamber Players Community Theater. She enjoyed biking, writing poetry, traveling, and taking care of her farm animals. She is survived by her husband, Stephen; three daughters; a sister; and a brother.
 

 

Sep, 2018
75

Susan Hayes Woods ’75, of Ocala, Fla.; Apr. 16. She was a riding instructor and competitor. She practiced dressage at her Four Winds Farm and traveled to judge and give instructional clinics across the country. A self-taught environmentalist, she worked on land use, farmland preservation, and water management in north-central Florida. She was honored by 1000 Friends of Florida and received a Florida Community Stewardship Award. She was recognized with an Unsung Hero Award by the UF Public Interest Environmental Conference. She was also a Reiki master and a student of Shamanism. She is survived by her husband, Bill; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
67

Gene F. Armstrong ’67, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Apr. 18. She was a self-employed computer consultant, an avid yoga enthusiast, and an experienced mediator. She is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
66

Robert E. Ginsberg ’66, of Oak Park, Ill.; Mar. 17, from Parkinson’s. He was a U.S. bankruptcy judge for the Northern District of Illinois from 1985 until his retirement in 2003. He had served as a trial attorney and special counsel with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington, D.C., prior to his judicial appointment. He was a professor at DePaul Univ. College of Law from 1974 to 1985, as well as a visiting professor at the Univ. of Illinois Law School in 1984. He was a member of the Illinois Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission and vice chair of the National Bankruptcy Review Commission from 1995 to 1997. He was the original author of Ginsberg on Bankruptcy, which later was known as Ginsberg & Martin on Bankruptcy. Together the two authors lectured in the field of bankruptcy law. He enjoyed skiing, playing golf, and playing goalie in the Chicago Park District ice hockey arena. He is survived by his wife, Gail Cohen Ginsberg ’66; two daughters, including Deborah Ginsberg ’91; two grandchildren; a sister; two brothers-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
65

Jane A. Adams ’65, of Pownal, Vt.; Mar. 2. After practicing law in New York City and being a staff attorney for the NYC Commission on Human Rights, she moved to Pownal in 1975. She practiced law in Bennington, Vt., and later rescued four thoroughbreds, cats, and dogs and dubbed her home Funny Farm. She held horse shows that enabled children to become riders and enjoy the horses and farm. She was a member of the Chattertocks.  She is survived by two nieces and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2018
64

Clifford Adelman ’64, of Kensington, Md.; May 3, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Nancy, and two sons.
 

 

Sep, 2018
63

William R. Caroselli ’63, of Pittsburgh; May 17. He was the founding member of the Caroselli, Beachler & Coleman law firm in Pittsburgh. He has been listed in the Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania Super Lawyers. He was a member of the Allegheny County (Pennsylvania) and American Bar Associations. He served as president of the Allegheny County Academy of Trial Lawyers and the Pennsylvania Assoc. for Justice. He was chairman of the Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and elected a 1989 Fellow in the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. He is survived by his wife, Dusty; two daughters; two sons; and a grandchild.

 

Sep, 2018
62

Andrea Jacobson Grant ’62, of New Haven, Conn.; Apr. 4. She worked as a special education teacher. She enjoyed reading, gardening, and attending movies. She is survived by two daughters, two grandchildren, and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
61

Joseph A. Cerutti ’61, of Center Harbor, N.H.; May 13. He taught industrial arts at Ashland High School (Massachusetts) before beginning a long career in the home building business. He worked for William Bell Associates in Ashland, Brill Homes in Vermont, and Hodgdon Homes in Maine before moving to Center Harbor to work at Prescott Homes in Meredith, N.H. In 1982 he cofounded Cerutti Custom Homes, which he managed until his retirement in 2007. He was an active member of the Lakes Region Home Builders Assoc. and in 1994 was named the Lakes Region Home Builder of the year. At Brown, he was a member of the football and rugby teams, ROTC, and Kappa Sigma. He enjoyed hiking, skiing, reading, traveling, and attending the theater. He is survived by his wife, Susan; two sons; a daughter-in-law; four sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018
61

William R. Biers ’61, of Columbia, Mo.; Apr. 12, from complications of Alzheimer’s. He was employed at the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece, before joining the faculty at the Univ. of Missouri in 1968. He taught classes in Greek art and archaeology until his retirement in 2001. In retirement he continued to teach Ancient Technology, a course he created to interest undergraduate engineering students. He served on many university committees, including the campus library committee, of which he was chair from 1999 to 2001. A classical archaeologist, he excavated in Turkey and Israel; was director of excavations at ancient Phlius, Greece; and was codirector of excavations at Mirobriga, Portugal. His many publications included The Archaeology of Greece: An Introduction; Mirobriga: Investigations of an Iron Age and Chronology in Classical Archaeology; and Art, Artifacts and Chronology in Classical Archaeology. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a daughter-in-law; and two grandsons.
 

 

Sep, 2018
60

Nail M. Senozan ’60, of Long Beach, Calif.; Apr. 29. He was a chemistry professor and researcher at Cal State Long Beach, where he was named University Outstanding Professor. He was appointed chair of the chemistry department in 1996 and served in this capacity until his retirement in 2007. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Diane.

 

Sep, 2018
60

Gordon E. Wood ’60, of Danvers, Mass.; Apr. 7. For three years he was the English department chairman at Timberlane Regional High School in Plaistow, N.H. In 1972 he was appointed the coordinator of Language Arts for the Melrose Junior and Senior High Schools. He retired from secondary education in 2001. In addition, he was an adjunct professor in English at Middlesex Community College in both Lowell and Bedford, Mass., for 23 years and taught English composition and literature at North Shore and Northern Essex Community Colleges. He enjoyed following the Red Sox, reading, dancing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons and their wives; two step-daughters; and three grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
60

John D. Ross ’60, of West Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 8. He had a career in the Boston financial district, did nonprofit management consulting, and, in retirement, environmental stewardship as past chair of the board of Buzzards Bay Coalition, as well as serving as a board member at Cape Cod Maritime Museum. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; two sons; and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
60

Theodore C. Anderson Jr. ’60, of Conway, S.C.; Apr. 20. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and later in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for nine years, discharged with the rank of captain. He was a buyer for Bloomingdale’s and Allied stores, both in New York. He also owned and operated Ted’s East End Market in Southampton, N.Y., for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Diane; four children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

 

Sep, 2018
59

Charles M. Trammell III ’59, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Apr. 14. He was a junior officer in the U.S. Navy and later an instructor at the Navy’s nuclear prototype at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory site in New York. In 1967 he joined Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in Newark, N.J., and assisted with the licensing of the company’s Salem Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey. He joined the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Bethesda, Md., in 1975 and was a licensing project manager for numerous nuclear facilities. He retired from NRC in 1993. He was a member of the West River Sailing Club and served as commodore in 2002. He enjoyed playing the flute, piano, and clarinet. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children; and six grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2018
59

Carroll Trainor Stein ’59, of Sedona, Ariz., formerly of Chicago; Mar. 11. She taught English and social studies in Chicago, was a residential fellow at the Univ. of Chicago, and then raised a family. She later returned to teaching and was a professor at Washburn Univ. in Topeka, Kans. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’59; two daughters, including Leah Kimmet ’98; a son, Adam ’93; and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
58

James Alaimo ’58, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 10. Better known as “Gerry” to the Brown community, came to Brown as a basketball center and left as one of the University’s all-time leading scorers with 1,046 points, having served as co-captain of the Bruins in his senior year, been named to the All-Ivy team, and won the J. Richmond Fales Trophy as the player who had made the greatest contribution to Brown basketball. After graduation he served in the U.S. Army, worked for a short time in the insurance industry and returned to Brown in 1963 to coach the freshman team. After one year, he left to coach Middlebury College basketball, where he remained for five years before returning to Brown as head coach. In 1974 he was inducted into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2006, in recognition of his accomplishments as a player, was named to Brown’s All-Time Team at the 100th anniversary celebration. After 10 years as head coach at Brown (1969-1979), he accepted a position as an administrator in the Providence College athletic department. He retired from Providence College in 2001 as senior associate athletics director and was inducted into the Providence College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

Sep, 2018
58

David Jenkins ’58, of Pompano Beach, Fla.; Apr. 18. He was ordained to the Sacred Order of Deacons in the Episcopal Church on June 17, 1961, and then to the Sacred Order of Priests on Dec. 23, 1961. He would continue to serve until his passing. He served at churches in the dioceses of Rhode Island, New York, the Windward Islands, and Trinidad and Tobago. From 1970 to 1991 he held multiple administrative and leadership positions at SUNY Albany. In 1991 he took early retirement from academia, bought a sailboat, and headed to the Caribbean to serve. In 2002 he sold the boat and moved to Florida. He is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.  

 

Sep, 2018
56

Donald I. Trott ’56, of Wayne, N.J.; May 4, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired financial analyst and founder of the Consumer Analyst Group of New York. He had a 50-year career on Wall Street. He was active in his community and enjoyed mentoring future analysts. He is survived by his wife, Frances; two daughters; and two granddaughters.

 

Sep, 2018
56

Seymour G. Karnes ’56, of Palm Coast, Fla., formerly of Warwick, R.I.; May 11. He was a retired textile chemist for the former Sequoia Chemical Co. of Providence. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, a 1996 heart transplant recipient, and a member and former two-term commander of the Jewish War Veterans of Palm Coast. An avid New York Yankees fan, he enjoyed all sports, playing bridge, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
56

Charles H. Eden Jr. ’56, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Apr. 14. He was an area sales manager for Nicholson File Co. in Providence. He retired in 1996 as vice president of sales for the former Russell Harrington Cutlery Co. in Southbridge, Mass. During the Korean War, he served in the U.S. Army. An avid golfer, he was a founding member of Clinton Country Club (Connecticut) and a longtime member of Wannamoisett Country Club (Rhode Island). He enjoyed building and flying remote controlled aircraft and was a member of the Academy of Model Aeronautics. He is survived by his wife, Paula; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018
55

Eliot Fiske Sugerman ’55, of Fort Myers, Fla., formerly of Shaker Heights, Ohio; Mar. 30. She was a college consultant in the Cleveland area before retiring to Sanibel Island, Fla., in 1982 and selling real estate with Merrill Lynch Realty. She was an avid reader and enjoyed playing bridge and tap dancing. She is survived by her companion, Jerry, and two daughters.

 

Sep, 2018
55

Edmond A. Neal ’55, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 10. He was president of the former Russell Harrington Cutlery in Southbridge, Mass. He retired in 1996. He had also been president of Washington Forge in New Jersey and the American Cutlery Manufacturers Assoc. He was on the board of Hyde Manufacturing Co. and Harrington Hospital in Southbridge and a deacon of the Roman Catholic Church in Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; two daughters; five sons, including Edmond A. Neal III ’76; three daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 13 grandchildren; a sister, Judy Neal Murray ’63; a brother, Kenneth R. Neal ’66; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and a niece, Stephanie Nicolas ’94.

 

Sep, 2018
55

Norman M. Bouton ’55, of Washington, D.C.; Apr. 7. He served his country as a U.S. Naval lieutenant and Foreign Service Officer. He was posted in Rio, Naples, Athens, and Mexico City, and was chargé d’affaires in Antigua. He enjoyed sailing, medieval history, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jane Philipp Bouton ’56; three children; and five grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Virginia Fellows Maloney ’54, of Charlotte, N.C.; May 19. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She enjoyed playing bridge and traveling. She is survived by her husband, William ’51; a daughter; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Robert I. Kramer ’54, of Dallas; Mar. 5. He was a founding partner of Pediatric Associates of Dallas, president of the medical staff at Children’s Medical Center of Dallas, and chairman of the department of pediatrics at Baylor Univ. Medical Center, where he founded the Baylor Pediatric Center for Restorative Care. He was also a faculty member and clinical professor of pediatrics and pulmonology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. He was well-known for his work treating cystic fibrosis patients, primarily through Children’s Medical Center. He was a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, a diplomate of the American Board of Pediatrics, and a member of the American College of Physician Executives. He is survived by his wife, Joan; four daughters, including Lisa Morgan ’86 and Megan Kramer ’93; a brother, Frederick ’52; and nephews James Kramer ’85 and Andrew Kramer ’88.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Nathaniel W. Horton ’54, of Yorba Linda, Calif., formerly of Northbrook, Ill.; Mar. 23. After passing the Illinois State Bar, he entered into a legal career and advanced through a series of positions at Continental Illinois National Bank, Illinois Central Railroad, United Airlines, and the First National Bank of Evanston (Illinois), where he became vice president and head of the Trust Department. In 1972 he moved to California and was chief legal officer of Capital Guardian Trust in Los Angeles. After further positions with United California Bank and First Interstate Bank, he began a private practice with his wife, Horton & Horton, specializing in estate and family matters. He enjoyed singing in performing groups such as the Over the Hill Gang and Jabberwocks. He also enjoyed traveling and playing golf. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War and is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter, a son; a stepdaughter; two granddaughters; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
54

Mary Sisk Caulfield ’54, of San Rafael, Calif.; May 8, after a long illness. She was a physician at Spencer and King Orthopedic Group in Philadelphia. She moved to Bethesda, Md., where she worked for the Department of Education and later, after moving to San Rafael, she worked in the emergency department of Letterman Hospital and then the Permanente Medical Group in San Rafael. She retired from practice in 1996. She enjoyed painting and woodworking and was a ham radio operator and an avid gardener. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Harry; a daughter; three sons, including Walter H. Caulfield III ’84 and James ’86; 13 grandchildren, including Walter H. Caulfield IV ’15; a sister, Jane Sisk ’63; and nephews John Willems ’85 and James Willems ’89.

 

Sep, 2018
53

Ann Thomas Moring ’53, of Annapolis; Apr. 6. She was a homemaker and a volunteer in schools, nature centers, and libraries. She enjoyed gardening, reading, cooking, sewing, knitting, and solving crossword puzzles. She is survived by a daughter, two sons, and five grandchildren.  

 

Sep, 2018
53

Rose Dolce Maxwell ’53, of Webster, N.Y.; Mar. 10. She was a retired high school English teacher. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by her husband, Vincent; six children; five grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018
53

David A. Lownes ’53, of Needham, Mass.; May 18, of complications from Parkinson’s. He worked at the family company, American Silk Spinning, before leaving to work at Brown & Bigelow advertising firm in Boston. He had a passion for antiques and Chinese Export Art and served on the board of directors for the Peabody Essex Museum, the Forbes House Museum of Milton, and Gore Place in Waltham. He is survived by his wife, Rosamond; a daughter; a son; and three grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
53

Charles E. Dyer Jr. ’53, of Waterford, Conn.; May 4, after a brief illness. He was a retired pharmacist. He owned and operated Dyer’s Pharmacy in New London, Conn., for 50 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and rooting for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, a granddaughter, and his companion, Elin Schoonmaker.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Margaret Caldwell Karb ’52, of Williamsburg, Va., formerly of Moorestown, N.J., and Southborough, Mass.; Apr. 8. After raising a family, she worked for 10 years at Wellesley College, assisting in the science department and the alumni office. She visited all 50 states and all the Canadian provinces, as well as every continent except Antarctica. She enjoyed traveling and reading English literature and books on American history. She is survived by her husband, Alan ’53; four children, including James Karb ’86, ’88 MAT; six grandchildren; and two siblings.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Warren R. Jewett ’52, of Cary, N.C., formerly of Tucson, Ariz., and Woodbridge, Conn.; Apr. 20. He was a biomedical engineer. While living in Connecticut, he built a business designing biomedical instruments that was purchased by Schick in 1970. In 1975 he joined the faculty of the Univ. of Arizona in the electrical engineering department, from which he retired in 1985. He was involved in several business ventures during the course of his career, including being president of Sonodyne America Ltd., CEO of IEP Group, and president of the National Hemophilia Foundation; he held numerous patents on his inventions. He enjoyed reading and spending time at Smith Mountain Lake in Virginia. He is survived by his wife, Brenda; two daughters, including Tamison Jewett ’75; a son; nine grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Albert W. Heinz ’52, of Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Feb. 19. He was a retired branch manager for IBM in Camp Hill, Pa. He is survived by two daughters, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Sep, 2018
52

William E. Downey Jr. ’52, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Mar. 24. After Brown, he studied theology at Boston Univ. and was ordained in 1955. He worked in Pawtucket at Smithfield Avenue Congregational Church before getting a doctorate from Andover Newton Theological School. In 1970, he and his wife had a joint ministry appointment at Edgewood Congregational Church in Cranston, R.I. They moved to Berlin, Germany, in 1977 and worked in the German church and at two hospitals as chaplains. He retired in 1996 and traveled back and forth from Germany to the United States to enjoy the Rhode Island beaches and family. He is survived by his wife, Sabine; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Joan Laboissoniere Lisi ’51, of Wakefield, R.I., formerly of Sharon, Pa.; May 19. She was a pediatric nurse prior to switching career paths and becoming a flight attendant for United Airlines. In 1977 she moved to Rhode Island and worked for Scallop Nursing Home while completing her master’s in gerontology. She enjoyed learning, reading, cooking, and traveling. She is survived by four children, a stepson, four grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.

 

Sep, 2018
52

Chen Yang ’52, of Columbus, Ohio; May 1. He taught physics at Ohio State Univ. until his retirement in 1998. He enjoyed playing tennis and ping pong and is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Edward H. Toole ’51, of Whately, Mass.; Mar. 28. He had a 30-year career with the CIA, specializing in Russian and European countries. He also served a tour as executive secretary of the U.S. Economic Intelligence Agencies board. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marines and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Barbara, and seven children.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Peter N. Kondon ’51, of Acton, Mass.; May 18. A retired dentist. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard before attending Tufts Dental School and practicing in Concord, Mass. He enjoyed playing golf and spending time with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Julie; a daughter, Mary Kondon Toth ’81; two sons, including Nicholas ’84; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Maxwell A. Howell ’51, of Washington, D.C.; May 4. A lawyer, he spent the majority of his legal career as a sole practitioner specializing in transportation. He was an accomplished musician; he performed in the U.S. Army Band, duos, trios, and quartets, and was a member of the Alexandria Citizens Band. He was a skilled marksman and a model railroad hobbyist, and he enjoyed deep sea diving, woodworking, reading, bicycling, and photography. He is survived by his wife, Jill; daughter, Patricia Geyer ’78, ’80 AM; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five stepchildren; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Harold C. Fisher ’51, of North Conway, N.H.; Mar. 22. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began a career in the investment business. He worked in Boston for several investment firms and retired in 1987 from MASSCO Investments. He then founded Conway Investment Management Services, where he managed individual investments until his early 80s. He was commodore of the Conway Lake Sailing Assoc. and served on the Conway Lake Conservation Assoc. for more than 25 years. In addition to sailing, he enjoyed skiing, fishing, hiking, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Marge; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
51

Dimas Costa ’51, of Rumford, R.I.; Apr. 3. He worked as a civil engineer from 1952 to 1998 and served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Daniel ’74; daughter Elizabeth M. Costa ’87; 11 grandchildren, including Hilary Costa ’06, Paul Costa’07, Laura Costa ’13, Elizabeth J. Costa ’14, and John Costa ’20; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018
50

John R. Welchli ’50, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Mar. 23. He was vice president and treasurer of Securities Counsel Inc. in Jackson, Mich., and owner of Investment Counsel Inc. in Grosse Pointe. At Brown he was a swimmer, ran track for four years, and captained the cross-country team. He began rowing after an accident and became a member of the U.S. team that took a silver medal in the four-man crew at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia. He was involved in U.S. National and Canadian Henley National championships in sculling and sweep rowing and for many years held the national record in the lightweight single and double. In 1979 he was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame. In recent years he rowed in the veterans categories at Head of the Charles Regatta in Boston. He is survived by his wife, Lynn; two sons; a grandson; and a brother.

Sep, 2018
51

Ronald J. Burns ’51, of Jacksonville, Fla., formerly of Connecticut; Mar. 12. He began his financial career as an analyst for J.P. Morgan, specializing in the oil industry, then working at Amerada Hess. He later was a financial executive at CIGNA. In 1964 he joined the Home Insurance Co. in New York City, where he rose to executive vice president and in 1978 joined the Bank of Boston as chief investment officer. After moving to Florida in 1985, he founded Augustine Asset Management, where he served as chief executive officer before retiring in his 80s. He also served on several boards over the course of his career and was a former trustee of Brown and a U.S. Army veteran. He enjoyed golf, tennis, bridge, skiing, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; seven grandchildren; a great-grandchild; two sisters and their spouses; several nieces and nephews; and his former wife.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Charles H. Stephens ’50, of Easton, Md.; Mar. 3. He had a U.S. Navy military career and moved all over the world. In retirement while living in Easton, he was active in volunteer work.  

 

Sep, 2018
50

Fredi Kovitch Solod ’50, of Warwick and Providence, R.I., formerly of Morristown, Tenn.; Mar. 26, of complications of Alzheimer’s. She was a published short story writer and essayist and for years wrote a weekly column for the Citizen-Tribune newspaper in Morristown. Her columns were later collected in a book entitled Is Anyone Listening? While in Providence, she worked in Brown’s Office of Development as a proposal writer and retired as director of publications. She acted with the Morristown Theatre Guild, was outspoken for women’s rights, and volunteered for the League of Women Voters and the American Red Cross. She was a lifetime member of Hadassah and a member of the National Council of Jewish Women. She was also a member of the board of Friends of Trinity and the Friends of the Rhode Island Philharmonic. She enjoyed traveling the world and doing photography work. She is survived by three daughters, including Lisa Solod ’78, and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two sisters, including Seena Kovitch Dittelman ’51.
 

 

Sep, 2018
50

Charles A. Pleasance ’50, ’53 AM, of Greenville, Del.; Mar. 18. He was a retired manager of Wescom Inc. in Downers Grove, Ill. During his long career in the telephone industry, he had an interest in the history of the independent telephone industry and self-published a book on the subject in 1989, The Spirit of Independent Telephony. He was a member of the Independent Telephone Pioneer Assoc. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, five grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2018
50

Henry W. McGreen ’50, of Narragansett, R.I.; Mar. 17. After serving in the U.S. Army for two years, he joined the U.S. Rubber Co. in Providence and worked in its human resource department. He later worked as a trust officer for Industrial National Bank and then was co-owner of Haxton’s Tollgate Liquors Inc. in Warwick, R.I., where he worked for 50 years before retiring in 2005. He was past president and board member of the Rhode Island Amateur Hockey Assoc. and a member of the Cranston (R.I.) Advisory Committee on Parks and Recreation. He enjoyed playing golf and is survived by his wife, Florence; nine children; 19 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Joseph J. Magsamen ’50, of East Providence, R.I.; Apr. 28. He was a self-employed insurance consultant who founded New England Insurance Assoc. in 1958, and Surplus Lines Inc. in East Providence in 1978. He enjoyed playing golf and belonged to country clubs in Rhode Island and Florida. He is survived by a niece.

 

Sep, 2018
50

Angelyn Rocchio Kiernan ’50, of East Greenwich, R.I.; May 1. She worked for the State of Rhode Island before starting a family. She enjoyed traveling, reading, and power-walking. She is survived by two daughters; two sons; two daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; sisters Madelyn Rocchio Dee ’50 and Elena Rocchio ’52; longtime companion Vincent Cullen; and many nieces and nephews, including Laurel Rocchio ’78 and Nancy Dee ’82.
 

 

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