Obituaries

Nov, 2019
FAC

David A. Inman, of Worcester, Mass.; July 23. After earning degrees at the University of Louvain, Belgium, he was ordained on July 1, 1962 and served as a Catholic priest in the Diocese of Providence. His first assignment was as associate pastor of St. John’s Church on Federal Hill. During that time he also taught Latin and religion at LaSalle Academy in Providence. In 1968 he moved to URI, where he served as chaplain and director of the Catholic Center. In 1976 he became chaplain at Brown and over the next 28 years held many positions at Brown, including director of student activities, special assistant to President Howard Swearer, coordinator of the Champlin Scholars Program, assistant dean of student life, and director of Faunce House and Student Activities. In addition to his administrative positions, he was also an adjunct professor of philosophy at Emmanuel College in Boston and URI. He lectured and published on issues of ethics in higher education, moral reasoning, and campus ministry. Upon his retirement from higher education in 2004, he began his final position at Notre Dame Academy in Worcester, where he taught Latin until 2012. He enjoyed biking, running, skiing, and swimming. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth O’Connell Inman ’83 AM; three daughters; a brother; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 08

Jennifer McCann Black ’08 MAT, of Pawtucket, R.I.; June 3, of angiosarcoma. She volunteered for a year in Camden, N.J., as part of the Jesuit Volunteer Corps and after working for nonprofits, she attended graduate school. She began teaching history and psychology at King Philip Regional High School in Wrentham, Mass., in 2009. She also enjoyed traveling and spending summer vacations abroad, particularly in Ireland. She enjoyed dancing, reading celebrity gossip, and watching Jeopardy! nightly. She danced and acted in many plays while in school and enjoyed attending Broadway musicals. She is survived by her husband, Matt; a son; her parents; a brother; and many extended family members.
 

 

Nov, 2019
GS 92

Ned Stuckey-French ’92 AM, of Tallahassee, Fla.; June 28. He was an associate professor at Florida State University. He is survived by his wife Elizabeth; two daughters; two sisters; and a brother.
 

Nov, 2019
GS 90

Joseph J. Basile ’90 AM, ’92 PhD, of Baltimore; June 15, from a brain tumor. He had been a professor of art history at the Maryland Institute College of Art since 1994 and served as associate dean of liberal arts. He was an associate director of the Brown excavations of the Petra Great Temple in Jordan and he also excavated sites in Greece and Italy. He enjoyed cooking, traveling, visiting museums, and rooting for New York sports teams. He is survived by his wife, Monica; two children; his mother; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and a nephew.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 78

Nina Perlina ’78 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; May 23, from complications following heart surgery. She helped create the Dostoevsky Literary Memorial Museum in Leningrad, where she worked until 1974. After emigrating to the U.S. and earning a Brown degree, she taught Russian literature at Macalester College and Rutgers University before joining the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Indiana University. She authored several articles and books, including Writing the Siege of Leningrad: Women’s Diaries, Memoirs, and Documentary Prose; Varieties of Poetic Utterance: Quotation in The Brothers Karamazov; and Olga Freidenberg’s Works and Days. She is survived by two cousins.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 78

Vito Buonomano ’78 ScM, of Narragansett, R.I.; June 6. A retired dentist. He served in the U.S. Army Dental Corp and was a member of the board of directors for St. Mary’s Home for Children. He volunteered at various local organizations and enjoyed carpentry, gardening, and spending time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Louise; five children; 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
GS 75

Lloyd “Kam” Williams ’75 AM, of Princeton, N.J.; May 30, of prostate cancer. He had a diverse set of interests and in addition to writing for business, also obtained a law degree from Boston University and held bar membership in five states. He attempted a career in screenwriting at Chicago’s WTTW, a PBS affiliate. He had a brief but recurring guest appearance on the The Howard Stern Show radio show, which led to him writing a film review of Howard Stern’s 1997 biographical film, Private Parts. Over the past two decades he published nearly 10,000 articles and reviews and throughout his 22-year career as a writer was best known for his film reviews and celebrity interviews for websites such as RottenTomatoes.com and more than 100 publications around the world, including Insight News. He also wrote countless book reviews, editorials, and a novel that will be published posthumously. He was commonly referred to as “Kam,” a nickname short for “Kamau,” a name given to him while he was a student at Brown by famed jazz musician Sun Ra. He was a supporter of civil rights related causes and published numerous op-eds on the topic and later joined the NAACP Image Awards Nominating Committee. His first wife introduced him to art dealing and the antique business, in which he subsequently deployed his corporate and legal knowledge for more than a decade. In addition to writing, he enjoyed music and boasted a large collection of albums. He also enjoyed walks in nature, was an avid sports fan, and participated in weekly trivia nights with friends at a local bar in Princeton. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a stepson; and four siblings.
 

 

Nov, 2019
GS 73

Joan Martin Roth ’73 AM, of Wakefield, R.I.; May 18, after battling kidney disease for more than 15 years. She taught at UCLA and became an on-air commentator for a local Los Angeles television news station. She later taught at several universities, including Tufts, before starting several successful companies, one being an educational toy company. She founded College Start Online to help students get into college. She also wrote four books, including Why Cities Go Broke, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. She lived in England for a period of time and traveled the world. She is survived by her husband, Jonathan; a daughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 72

Richard Schuler ’72 AM, ’72 PhD, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Feb. 13. He began his career as a professional engineer for the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company in Allentown. He was also an energy economist with Battelle Memorial Institute in Columbus, Ohio. He later taught at Cornell and was director of the Cornell Institute for Public Affairs and director of the Waste Management Institute, as well as an associate director of the Center for the Environment. He served on the board of trustees of Cornell and was a member of the faculty senate for 20 years. In addition to his Cornell appointments, he was on the executive committee of the National Science Foundation and was deputy chairman of the New York State Public Service Commission. He was a consultant to numerous government agencies and industries on pricing, management, and environmental issues, and to the World Bank on energy and infrastructure investment programs. From its inception in 1999 until April 2012, he was a founding board member of the New York Independent System Operator, responsible for operating the electric transmission grid in New York. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two daughters; a son; and seven grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
GS 72

Robert J. McBride ’72 ScM, of Edmonds, Wash.; Apr. 30. After graduating from Brown, he taught for one year at the Fenn School in Concord, Mass., then attended the Naval Officer Candidate School in Newport. He served as a special weapons officer living in Virginia, Pennsylvania, and California, before settling in Washington. He remained with the Naval Reserves until 1980, when he retired with the rank of lieutenant commander. He taught math for 30 years in Seattle public schools and upon his retirement from teaching in 1993, immersed himself in genealogy research. He was a supporter of the Cascade Symphony and in 2000 became the manager of the box office, a job he executed for more than a decade. He enjoyed gardening and solving puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Roberta; three children and their spouses; and a grandson.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 70

Benjamin Wolkowitz ’70 PhD, of Chilmark, Mass., and Madison, N.J.; Aug. 2, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired Morgan Stanley managing director. He had served as the vice chair of the Futures Industry Association, vice president of the Federal Reserve Board, and section chief of the Division of Research and Statistics. Most recently he served as a Madison Borough Councilman for two terms. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter; a son; and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 64

James P. Malmfeldt ’64 AM, of Osprey, Fla., formerly of Wayland, Mass.; July 10 of cancer. He retired from the John Hancock Life Insurance Company after nearly two decades. He actively volunteered with the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, the Presbyterian Homes and Housing Foundation of Florida, and the Masonic lodges in both Florida and Massachusetts. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; a daughter and her spouse; a son and his spouse; and three grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 64

Richard A. Derrig ’64 ScM, ’70 PhD, of Providence, Feb. 8. He was a visiting professor at Fox School of Business at Temple University and was an adjunct professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He taught graduate and undergraduate mathematics at Villanova University, Wheaton College, and Brown University for a total of thirteen years. In 2004, he established and was president of OPAL Consulting LLC, providing research and regulatory support to the property-casualty insurance industry. Over the course of his career he authored more than 60 books and papers and conducted professional presentations at universities across the globe. He was the recipient of several prizes and awards. Only just recently fully retired, he was senior vice president of the Automobile Insurers Bureau and a vice president of the Insurance Fraud Bureau, both of Massachusetts. Through the years, he remained a loyal alumnus of Brown and an avid Brunonian sports fan attending Brown football and hockey games since 1967. He was also a dedicated commencement forum attendee, an avid participant in the Brown Travelers Program, and honored to be an alumni marshal for the Graduate School in the 2003. By far, his favorite Brown moment was his granddaughter becoming a member of the Brown Class of 2020. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two children; a son-in-law; and granddaughter Tess Rossi ’20. 


(Below image of Richard A. Derrig ’64 ScM, ’70 PhD and granddaughter Tess Rossi ’20 in front of Van Wickle Gates)
 

Image of Richard A. Derrig ’64 ScM, ’70 PhD and granddaughter Tess Rossi ’20
 

Nov, 2019
GS 59

Richard L. Young ’59 PhD, of Boston; May 1. He worked as a biochemist and lab director at New England Nuclear and later at DuPont in Boston. After earning an MBA from Boston University, he went on to serve in the Peace Corps in Romania as a business consultant. He was a member of the Lutheran church in Newton Centre, Mass., and served as church treasurer and usher. He enjoyed traveling and reading. He is survived by his wife, Mary Jane; three daughters; a stepdaughter; a stepson; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 57

Leland Cratty ’57 PhD, of Clinton, N.Y.; May 27, from heart failure. He had a 38-year career as a chemistry professor at Hamilton College. During summer breaks, he would perform research at other universities around the country and his family would join him on the adventure. They enjoyed camping and visiting national parks. Leland also enjoyed attending operas in New York City, painting, writing poetry, and reading the daily funnies. He is survived by seven children and 12 grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
GS 54

George Veronis ’54 PhD, of New Haven, Conn.; June 30. After obtaining his PhD, he held research positions at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and MIT, before joining the Yale faculty in 1966. He was a Yale department chair from 1976 to 1979, head of the applied mathematics program from 1979 to 1993, and named the Henry Barnard Davis Professor of Geophysics and Applied Science in 1985. For 37 years he was the editor of the Journal of Marine Research and was a cofounder and director of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Summer Program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He was awarded the AGU Award for Excellence in Geophysical Education in 2008. Some of his many other honors include being elected a member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences (1963), being a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (1975), being a member of the Norwegian Academy of Science & Letters (1981), and being a member of the U.S. National Academy of Science (1994). He was a runner for many years and a long walker later in life. He was also a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed bird watching and languages. He is survived by his wife, Anna; a daughter and her spouse; a son and his partner; two grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Nov, 2019
GS 52

Rodger B. Dowdell ’52 ScM, of Lake Suzy, Fla., formerly of East Greenwich and Narragansett, R.I.; July 4. He was a professional engineer and worked in the industry, including at General Electric before becoming an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Bridgeport (Conn.). While teaching at UB, he received a fellowship to Colorado State University. Upon his return to Rhode Island, he became a full professor at URI until his retirement in 1989. He was considered an expert in fluid dynamics and flow measurement. He served as president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and on the International Committee for Flow Measurement Standards. He represented ASME and the U.S. and attended many worldwide conferences on the issue of flow measurement. His work in fluid dynamics is widely cited. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed sailing. He sailed his boat from Narragansett to Southwest Florida. He also enjoyed playing golf, reading, and traveling. He is survived by seven children, including Rodger B. Dowdell Jr. ’71; two stepchildren; 26 grandchildren, including Rory A. Dowdell ’06; five step-grand-children; and 29 great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2019
GS 49

Edward W. Ross Jr. ’49 ScM, ’54 PhD, of North Eastham, Mass.; Feb. 5. He was a member of the Methodist church in both Sudbury and Orleans, Mass. He enjoyed playing bridge and was a fan of the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Nancy G. Ross, and daughter Carolyn Francisco ’83, ’85 ScM.

 

Nov, 2019
10

David B. Paesani ’10, of Los Angeles; Feb. 14. He is survived by his parents.

 

Nov, 2019
93

Angelica Vega ’93, of El Paso, Tex.; July 22. She served the El Paso community working at Child Protective Services and the West Texas Community Supervision and Corrections Office. In 2000 she began her career as a U.S. probation officer for the Western District of Texas, El Paso Division. She quickly advanced to senior U.S. probation officer and soon thereafter was promoted to supervising U.S. probation officer. She was involved in many district and national initiatives, such as Sendero and Evidence Based Practices. In 2018 she was awarded the Gloria Cobos Peer Recognition Award in appreciation for her outstanding dedication and service above and beyond the call of duty. She is survived by her son, her parents, a brother and sister-in-law, a niece, and several aunts, uncles, and cousins

Nov, 2019
87

Janice Nichols Harper ’87, of Lithonia, Ga., formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y.; July 31. She earned two master’s degrees from Columbia University Teacher’s College and began her career as an elementary education teacher in Brooklyn. She then founded Harper Education Support Services, an educational consulting business that provided innovative comprehensive services to public and private schools, and community-based organizations in areas of curriculum, instruction, and assessment, to improve the learning outcome of students. Over the course of her career she launched an alliance with Spelman College to prepare students as service leaders for a community literacy project; organized and implemented individualized reading and math curricula for students with diverse learning needs; designed and implemented multicultural reading and after-school programs for diverse urban primary and secondary students; and performed staff development trainings to support best practices in curriculum design. Her passion for education included both national and international speaking and teaching engagements, including two trips to South Africa, where she was a delegate in the People to People Program and then a presenter at the International Literacy Association conference. She received numerous awards throughout her lifetime. She was active with the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Council of Teachers of English, the International Literacy Association, and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. She is survived by her husband, Darren ’80; a daughter; two sons; five grandchildren; three brothers; two brothers-in-law; her mother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
81

Wendy M. Stein ’81, ’83 AM, ’92 MD, of San Diego; May 20. She was a geriatrician in San Diego and licensed to practice medicine in California and Massachusetts. She specialized in hospice and palliative care and is survived by her father and numerous family members.

 

Nov, 2019
77

Lloyd I. Miller III ’77, of Palm Beach, Fla.; Jan. 12. He is survived by his wife, Susan; two daughters; and three sons.
 

Nov, 2019
72

Glenn Normile ’72, of Marcellus, Mich.; June 26. Upon graduation, he worked for Brown’s department of public safety and later served as the director of public safety at Wheaton College (Mass.), Haverford College (Pa.), and Knox College (Ill.). He was past president of the Lower Merion, Pa., Little League, as well as a coach for many years. He enjoyed bringing people together and being a part of Alpha Delta Phi. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; two children; and three grandchildren.

Nov, 2019
72

Richard B. Noonan ’72, of Chatham, N.J.; May 26. He was a former superintendent of schools in several New Jersey districts. For 17 years he was an adjunct professor of education at Caldwell College. He went on to teach at the Workshop School’s Writing Center in Philadelphia. In 2017 he was involved with the Science Leadership Academy, where he taught and helped to develop the city internship program for high school students. He enjoyed outdoor activities and at age 50 became a marathoner, completing 13 marathons. He also enjoyed skiing, hiking, and canoeing. He is survived by his former wife, Pam Phillips Noonan ’82; two daughters; four siblings; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
71

John C. Theofanis Jr. ’71, of Austin, Tex.; June 2, of pancreatic cancer. After graduation, he traveled to Greece and taught English. He returned to Austin and worked as a sports writer, waiter, and middle school English teacher before obtaining an MFA from the University of Texas, where he later served as an academic adviser. He was most proud of his work with the TIP Scholars Program in the College of Natural Sciences and was recognized for his work with the James W. Vick Award for Academic Advising. He retired at age 62 and traveled, hosted a local TV show, wrote a novel, and painted—eventually putting on two art shows during a period of his illness. He is survived by his wife, Mona; daughter Rosa Theofanis ’97 and her spouse; two grandchildren; his parents; a sister and brother; two sisters-in-law; three brothers-in-law; an aunt and uncle; and 14 nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
70

John B. Rose ’70, of Saint Paul, Minn.; Apr. 14, of cancer.
 

Nov, 2019
70

Christopher Banus ’70, of Nashua, N.H.; May 7, of congestive heart failure. He was a chemical engineer and entrepreneur who traveled the world and held 13 patents. He is survived by his wife, Sylvie; a stepdaughter; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
69

Charles S. Carver ’69, of Coral Gables, Fla.; June 22. He had a long career at the University of Miami, where he was a distinguished professor of psychology and director of the adult division of the psychology department. His work spanned the areas of personality psychology, social psychology, health psychology, and more recently experimental psychopathology. His research was supported by the National Science Foundation, the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institute of Mental Health. He served as editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology’s section on Personality Processes and Individual Differences for six years and an additional six years as an associate editor of Psychological Review. He was the author of 10 books and more than 400 articles and chapters, and his work was cited numerous times. He is survived by his wife, Youngmee Kim; brother Jeffrey ’71; and several nieces.

 

Nov, 2019
68

Constance Sauer Clark ’68, of Whidbey Island, Wash.; May 17. She had a 30-plus year career at Bell Labs in Holmdel, N.J., before moving to Whidbey Island in 2006, where she became a volunteer for Beach Watchers (now Sound Water Stewards), supporting their website and computer operations. In 2017 she received the Jan Holmes Coastal Volunteer award. She was active at Langley United Methodist Church and enjoyed gardening and solving puzzles. She is survived by her husband, Neal; a son; five siblings; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
68

George W. Berko ’68, of Houston, Tex.; June 16. He was a CPA and began working for Arthur Anderson in New York City. He specialized in the oil and gas industry and worked for several companies throughout his career, including Ultramar Oil & Gas, where he was vice president of finance and worked for a short period of time in Venezuela. He retired in 2014 from Transworld Oil USA. He was an avid scuba diver and enjoyed radio control model airplanes, antique firearms, and hot rod cars. He is survived by a goddaughter and many friends.

 

Nov, 2019
66

Barry F. Kowalski ’66, of Arlington, Va.; June 30, from complications of a stroke. He graduated from Brown with a bachelor’s degree in political science, after which he was commissioned a U.S. Marine lieutenant and commanded an infantry platoon in combat during the Vietnam War. Following military service, he received a law degree from Catholic University of Washington in 1973. After a brief stint in private practice, he taught at the Antioch School of Law and Catholic University and then joined the U.S. Department of Justice in 1981. He spent 33 years defending civil rights under nine different attorneys general and four presidents. He retired in 2014 as one of the country’s premier civil rights prosecutors. Some of his high-profile convictions were against Ku Klux Klansmen in the death of 19-year-old Michael Donald, neo-Nazis in the murder of Jewish radio talk show host Alan Berg, and police brutality in the 1991 beating of Rodney King. Another highlight of his career was when he led a Justice Department inquiry into allegations that James Earl Ray’s assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was part of a conspiracy. He had been called the “lion” of the civil rights division and the Justice Department’s “pit bull.” An oral history and his papers related to the Vietnam War were donated to the John Hay Library. He was a member of the Sigma Chapter of Psi Upsilon and will be remembered in the words of his friends as “a truly remarkable individual whose dedication to defending peoples’ constitutional rights was palpable.” He is survived by his wife, Katie; three daughters; two granddaughters; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019
67

Saul A. Rothman ’67, of Stamford, Conn.; July 13, following a long illness. Following law school, he began his law career with F.D. Rich and went on to clerk for the Hon. John J.P. Ryan. He mentored new lawyers entering the profession and in 1981, he became a sole practitioner specializing in the practice of family law. He was an active member and participant in the Connecticut and Fairfield County Bar Associations and took pride in his work with the Special Master’s Program in the Stamford and Bridgeport Superior Courts. He received special recognition for his work with the Regional Family Trial Docket in Middletown Superior Court and he handled cases on a pro bono basis for Connecticut Legal Services in Stamford. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two granddaughters, a sister and brother-in-law, and a brother.

 

Nov, 2019
66

Jack D. Staley ’66, of Stow, Mass., formerly of Rochester, N.Y.; July 10. He worked as a mechanical engineer in Rochester before retiring in 2011 to Massachusetts. He enjoyed gardening, reading, and exploring New England. He is survived by his wife, Mary; daughter Sarah Staley ’03 and her husband; son Brennon ’00 and his wife; four grandchildren; and two brothers, including Peter ’67.

 

Nov, 2019
65

John Freeman ’65, of Toronto, Ontario; Nov. 2, 2018, of cancer. He had a long career in law. He earned a law degree from the University of Toronto Law School and added a master’s of Constitutional Law from Osgoode Hall later in his career. John served on the boards of numerous organizations, including the West Park Healthcare Centre, for which he was president of both the Board and the Foundation. For more than a decade, he was the head of the Brown Club of Toronto, served on the BAA Board of Governors in the 1990s, was an alumni marshal in 1990, and has been an active volunteer interviewing prospective students for many years (at one point he chaired the alumni interview program for all of Canada, Mexico, and South America). In 1995, he received the Alumni Service Award from Brown. He is survived by his wife, Hilary; a daughter and her spouse; son Matt ’95 and his spouse; grandchildren; a brother; and two sisters-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019
64

Evans K. Newton III ’64, of Ocala, Fla.; Nov. 5, 2018. After graduation he joined the U.S. Peace Corps and was stationed in Panama. There he met his wife, Celmira, who would join him as a language instructor at the Peace Corps training center in Puerto Rico. He earned a master’s in Spanish from Indiana University and spent 34 years devoted to language, instruction, and cultural exchange at the junior high and high school levels. He also volunteered regularly as an ESL instructor. He formally retired from Westtown Friends School in Pennsylvania in 2007 but continued tutoring Spanish and teaching ESL upon relocating to Florida. He published short stories, including When Push Comes to Shove, in the 2016 issue of Aji Magazine. He is survived by his wife, Celmira; two daughters; a son-in-law; and his grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
63

Joel S. Silverberg ’63, ’70 ScM, ’76 PhD, of Providence; Aug. 11, of lymphoma. After earning degrees in music, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering, he received a postdoctoral certificate from the Institute for Retraining in Computer Science and held faculty positions at Vassar College, Boston University, Roger Williams University, and Brown. In retirement he pursued his long-standing fascination for navigational mathematics and the practical mathematics of the 17th and 18th centuries, writing several papers and conference presentations. He enjoyed singing and playing several instruments. He was an avid sailor and liked birding. He is survived by his wife, Patricia Brennan ’75; a daughter; a sister; and a niece and nephew.

 

Nov, 2019
63

Robert J. Rosen ’63, of El Paso, Tex.; July 13. He was a physician who served in Vietnam and later opened a private practice in El Paso that continued until 2008. He was involved in his community and served on the executive boards of the Jewish Community Foundation, Impact, Pro-Musica, and Chai Manor; was past president of Temple Mt. Sinai; and was a founder of El Paso’s first hospice. He enjoyed watching and playing all sports, playing poker, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jane; daughter Brooke  ’96; son Andrew ’92 and his wife; five grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.
 

 

Nov, 2019
63

Judith Neal Murray ’63, of Waban, Mass.; Aug. 2, of cancer. She had a 50+ year career teaching at various institutions, including Newton High School, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and at Harvard. At Brown she was valedictorian of Pembroke, class president from 2004 to 2009, and a class marshal for her 45th reunion. She was an active alum and enjoyed planning mini-reunions for her class. She was a docent at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and always enjoyed learning. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Charlie; two daughters, including Stephanie Nicolas ’94; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; six grandchildren; brother Ken Neal ’66; and nephew Edmond A. Neal III ’76.

Nov, 2019
63

John W. Kaufmann ’63, of Wellesley Hills, Mass.; Aug. 10. He graduated from Boston College Law School and specialized in civil litigation. He was a member of the Unitarian Universalist Society of Wellesley Hills and sang in their choir. He enjoyed spending time at his second home on the Cape, and was a fan of Brown football, the New England Patriots, and the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Katherine; a daughter and her spouse; a son and his spouse; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019
61

Henry H. Hood ’61, of Lancaster, Ohio; May 31. He served two years in the U.S. Air Force at Minot Air Force Base Regional Medical Hospital and taught at the University of Florida Medical School before opening up a private medical practice. Throughout his career in private practice, he spent Sundays offering medical services to the homeless while mentoring medical students from OSU medical school. He was a team physician for the Lancaster High School football team and constructed the Dr. Henry Hood Strength and Conditioning Center for athletes at LHS, fondly known as “The Hood.” He was a co-owner of the Lancaster Country Club, and a generous supporter of the Lancaster Festival. The Lancaster-Fairfield County Chamber of Commerce awarded him its Floyd Wolfe Community Service Award. For 35 years he worked to build the International Medical Corps into an organization which has provided medical relief, education, and training to 51 countries around the world. In addition, he was the cowriter of the IMC training manual, which remains today. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; two stepchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019
61

Norbert S. Fleisig ’61, of Mount Pleasant, S.C.; June 20. He was a computer programmer and freelance entrepreneur who developed his own software company. He also worked for NASA during the Polaris Navigation System project writing the simulator program for the Apollo space shuttle. He enjoyed solving puzzles, playing poker, listening to music, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, three grandchildren; a sister; and a niece.
 

 

Nov, 2019
61

Frances Murphy Araujo ’61, of Providence; June 13. She received a master’s degree in early childhood education from Rhode Island College and spent her career working with children. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, a sister, two brothers, a sister-in-law, and a brother-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019
60

Frank A. Spellman III ’60, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; May 23. He was retired from IBM and enjoyed a good book, watching sports, and bowling. He was proud to have bowled a perfect game of 300 in 1980. He is survived by a sister-in-law and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
60

William S. Clarke III ’60, of Princeton, N.J.; Aug. 21, 2018. He practiced corporate law for 50 years and was a philanthropist in land preservation, environmental issues, and animal protection. He was past commodore and trustee of the Barnegat Light Yacht Club and an active member of the International Lightning Class Assoc., the Catboat Assoc., the Steam Automobile Club of America, and the Nassau Club. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece and nephew.

 

Nov, 2019
59

Alvin L. Stern ’59, of Sun Lakes, Ariz.; May 17, following his struggle with leukemia. After graduating from ROTC at Brown, Al spent the next three years serving in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant and chief engineering officer on destroyers. After the Navy, he was admitted to New York University Law School. Upon graduation, he joined maritime law firm Poles, Tublin & Patestides in New York and went on to have maritime law related positions for the rest of his career. An active Brown alum, he was president of the Brown Club of Cape Cod and served as commencement marshal during his 50th reunion. He is survived by his wife Ann; his daughters Keelan Bodow ’89 and Leslie Stern ’93; sons-in-law Jonathan Bodow ’92 and Andrew Abramowitz ’92; four grandchildren; and brother-in-law Ross Harris ’73.

 

Nov, 2019
59

John M. Hatch ’59, of Lancaster, Pa.; May 21, of cancer. He was the director of purchasing for Howmet Aluminum (now Arconic Mill Products). He served as president of the board of directors at Easter Seals, where he introduced the “Buck-A-Cup” and “Rubber Duckie Race” fundraising campaigns to the Lancaster area. In 1982 he was presented with the A Brace for an Ace award by the Pennsylvania Easter Seal Society for outstanding volunteer service. He was also a hospice volunteer and an active member of Community Fellowship Church, where he served as an elder. He is survived by his wife, Louise; three sons; two daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
59

Wyndham Eaton ’59 of Derby, N.Y.; July 18, after a long illness. After graduating, he joined the family business, Eaton Equipment, a distributor of outdoor lawn and garden equipment and golf course supplies. He headed the company from 1978 to 1995. He served as president of Queen City Industrial Park from 1986 until his death, was president of the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce in 1970, past president of Wanakah Country Club and Ellicottville Ski Club, and a former member of the board of directors of First Federal Savings and Loan of Hamburg. At Brown he was captain of the men’s hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; two sons; two daughters; 11 grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Nov, 2019
58

Susan Langdon Kass ’58, of San Francisco; June 28. She taught high school biology in the Bay Area, then in 1975 found Scottish Country Dancing. In 1985 she studied for and passed the exam to become a Scottish Country Dance teacher and taught in San Francisco for more than three decades. In 2008 she was recognized for her contributions in promoting the Highland Games with a certificate of appreciation. In addition to Scottish Country Dance, she enjoyed swimming and teaching young children to swim at the UCSF Fitness Center. She also liked gardening. She is survived by her husband, Sid; a daughter; a son; two granddaughters; and two sisters.
 

 

Nov, 2019
58

Deane K. Fox Jr. ’58, of Lewisville, Tex.; Dec. 3, from Alzheimer’s. He had a career in sales working with the insurance and plastics industries. He retired in 2008 and enjoyed volunteering at the YMCA, sailing, biking, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; a sister-in-law; and two nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
58

Judith Riley Doherty ’58, of Westfield, Mass.; May 23, after a seven-year battle with Alzheimer’s. She was the co-owner of Riley’s Sausage Company in Holyoke, Mass. She also worked at ES Sports, Clayton Insurance, and the former Yankee Pedlar Inn in Holyoke. She was active at Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church and was a member of the board of directors of Saint Paul’s nursery school. She is survived by two daughters, two sons, two sons-in-law, and two grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
58

Joseph Des Roches ’58, of Warwick, R.I.; Feb. 10. He was employed with the Rhode Island Department of Labor & Training for 43 years. He retired in 2008 as chief of employment services. He was an active member of the Rotary Club of Warwick, a former member of the board of directors of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Warwick, and a U.S. Army Korean War veteran. He is survived by his wife, Norma.

 

Nov, 2019
58

Betsy Froehlich Hill ’58, of College Park, Md.; Aug. 11. She taught English as a second language in the Washington, D.C., area for many years. She also served as a docent at the National Gallery of Art and the Corcoran Gallery. She is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, a sister, a brother-in-law, and six nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
57

Richard H. Pierce ’57, ’63 PhD, of Westwood, Mass.; June 1, of a heart attack. He was a Classics and Egyptology professor at The University of Bergen, Norway. He traveled frequently back to the United States and was active working in Sudan and Egypt, was an adviser for numerous Sudanese PhD students as well as Norwegian students, and worked with colleagues in a variety of disciplines at the university. He is survived by his wife, Wenche, and a son.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1957, GS Class of 1963
Nov, 2019
57

Warren A. Larson ’57, of Lanesborough, Mass.; July 13. After a year of employment as a production supervisor with DuPont in Buffalo, N.Y., he served three years in the U.S. Air Force at Charleston AFB, S.C., as a chief of administration. Following military service, he was employed at Sprague Electric Co. in North Adams, Mass. He retired in 1991 as quality control manager. He was a member of the Mystic Lodge of Masons and the Berkshire Royal Arch Chapter of Masons. He enjoyed baseball card collecting, gardening, photography, fishing, hunting, and attending sporting events. He is survived by four children and their spouses, 11 grandchildren, a great-grandson, a sister and brother-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
57

Kenneth L. Greif ’57, of Washington, Conn., formerly of Baltimore; Aug. 20. He earned a law degree in 1961 from the University of Virginia School of Law. In 1968, he obtained a master’s degree in teaching from Johns Hopkins University. He practiced law for several years at Frank, Bernstein, Conaway & Goldman before joining the Park School faculty in 1963, where he served as English department chair and advised the school’s literary journal, Parkpourri. He retired in 1997. He maintained a second home in Washington, where he taught English from 2002 to 2004 at The Gunnery private school. He is survived by a daughter and four grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
57

Donald P. Bullock ’57, of Plymouth, Mass.; July 7, after a series of lengthy illnesses. He had a successful sales career that took him all over New England. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed collecting antiques, woodworking, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Marianne; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
57

Arthur C. Bartlett ’57, of Blairsden-Graeagle,Calif., formerly of Portola Valley, Calif.; May 2. He was a ski instructor before beginning his career in educational publishing at Addison-Wesley. In 1977, he joined W.H. Freeman & Co. and pursued his career in college textbook publishing. He and a former president of Addison-Wesley cofounded Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Inc., in Boston in 1983, though he worked out of the Portola Valley office. The company sold in 2007 and became Jones & Bartlett Learning, a subsidiary of Ascend Learning. He retired in 1997 and moved to Blairsden-Graeagle. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing golf, fishing, and skiing. He was also a fan of the Boston Red Sox and Stanford football. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter and son-in-law; and a granddaughter.
 

 

Nov, 2019
56

John A. Worsley ’56, ’63 MAT, of Lincoln, R.I.; Aug. 4, after a long illness. He taught at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and at the Community College of Rhode Island for 49 years. Early in his career he worked as a reporter for the Pawtucket Times and for the last twenty years he wrote a column about jazz and jazz musicians for the Times. Additionally, he was the primary grant proposal writer for the City of Central Falls School Department. He served on the executive board of the Providence Federation of Musicians from 1998 until his death and was a life member of the Musicians Union. He produced several jazz concerts at the Providence Marriott hotel and the University Club, and he was a strong supporter of the Rhode Island Philharmonic Orchestra. He also was on the board of directors of the Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame. He is survived by his wife, Rhoda; and a cousin.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1956, GS Class of 1963
Nov, 2019
56

Nancy Willenbecher Dickinson ’56, of Leeds, Mass.; Aug. 12. After graduating from Brown, she earned a master’s in fine arts from RISD and began welding, carving, and casting bronze life sized sculptures. She had a series of shows across western Massachusetts. In addition to her art, she also had a small business named Tiddly Products Inc., which manufactured doll-house-sized goods for toy stores and retail outfits. But she was known to most as The Acorn Lady because of her project, The Acorn People. She built an entire community based on acorns and nature, which included dioramas and photography of her creations. In 1985 she received the Hitchcock Center for the Environment photography award and in 2005 The Acorn People were showcased on the WGBY TV show Making it Here. Over the years she donated several of her displays and dioramas to schools, libraries, and museums. Her work can be viewed at www.nancydickinson.net. She is survived by two daughters, including Nina Lesher ’81; three sons; two daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 12 grandchildren; a brother; and brother-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019
56

Maurice C. Davitt ’56, of Barrington, R.I.; June 20. He served with the Southport, Conn., fire department in the 1950s. Later he worked at IBM and eventually became president and CEO of Academic Management Services. Subsequently he founded Student Resources, providing guidance for students and families navigating the college search process. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and was an avid golfer. He was inducted into the Rhode Island Golf Association Hall of Fame in 2018. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, including Kristin Davitt ’88; and six grandchildren, including Kellan Barr ’19.

 

Nov, 2019
55

Richard K. Moore ’55, of Locust Valley, N.Y.; Aug. 2. He worked at J.P. Morgan for 30 years as a vice president in corporate finance and international private banking, both in New York City and London. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was discharged with the rank of captain. He is survived by four daughters; five grandchildren; a sister, Jacqueline Moore Copp ’54; and niece Catherine Colley ’82.

 

Nov, 2019
55

Richard B. Lund ’55, of Clemson, S.C.; June 11. He was a retired organic chemist who spent the majority of his career working for the Ciba Geigy chemical corporation. He held some original patents for epoxy glue and benzodiazepines. He enjoyed sailing, woodworking, clock building, and milling model engines. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; a daughter; two sons; and two grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
55

Shirley Denno Fusco ’55, of Wilbraham, Mass.; June 16. She was store manager at Denno’s Jewelers in Pittsfield, Mass., and active in school, community, and church groups. She was a member and past vice president of the Wilbraham Women’s Club and member of the Wilbraham Garden Club. She enjoyed traveling and playing golf, bridge, and tennis. She is survived by two daughters, including Carol J. Kressen ’86; two sons-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
55

William P. Condaxis ’55, of West Roxbury, Mass.; June 23, after a period of congestive heart failure and dementia. He worked as a retail executive for Jordan Marsh (now Macy’s) in Boston, Elizabeth Arden in New York City, and Mervyn’s (now Target) in California and Texas. After working and living in Hong Kong for three years, he retired in 1995 to Cape Cod. He moved to Norwood, Mass., in 2006 and to West Roxbury in 2014. He was a U.S. Navy World War II and Korean War veteran. He enjoyed playing cards, skiing, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Frances; four children, including Paula Condaxis Angell ’78; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019
55

John P. Burke ’55, of Salisbury, N.C., and Buffalo, N.Y.; Jan. 20. He was a retired certified public accountant. He served as a lieutenant JG in the U.S. Navy from 1955 to 1963. He enjoyed volunteering in his community, reading, skiing, sailing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jackie; four children; and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
54

Arthur W. Vietze Jr. ’54, of Stratford, Conn.; Aug. 12. At Brown he was co-captain of the men’s hockey team. He served in the U.S. Army Signal Corp from 1954 to 1957. Upon leaving the army, he was employed by Liberty Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia. He left Liberty Mutual and was hired by Rite Box in Hamden, Conn. In 1969 he cofounded Valley Container, Inc., in Bridgeport, Conn., and in 1973 cofounded Fluted Partition Inc., also in Bridgeport. In 1996 he cofounded Honey Cell Inc. in Shelton, Conn. He enjoyed camping and hiking in the White Mountains of New Hampshire and skiing in Vermont and Colorado. He also enjoyed playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Carmella; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
54

Roderick Schutt ’54, of Ridgewood, N.J.; June 21. He practiced corporate law in New York City, was a counselor with the Fresh Air Fund Summer Camp, volunteered with Planned Parenthood of Northern N.J., and, after retirement, cooked meals for children in a group home. He is survived by his wife, Rose Marie; two daughters; two grandsons; and sister Katherine Chadwick ’58.

 

Nov, 2019
54

Harold H. Robinson Jr. ’54, of Manchester, Conn.; June 1. He taught English and for 38 years was head of the English department at Windsor Locks High School, where he was also chosen as Teacher of the Year. He served as adjunct faculty at the University of Hartford and at UConn. He later taught English at Manchester Community College and volunteered as an English tutor at Notre Dame Learning Center in Hartford. He enjoyed reading, camping, and traveling with family. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Madeleine; four children; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019
54

John J. Farrell ’54, of Indio, Calif.; Feb. 7.

Nov, 2019
54

Alton C. Emery ’54, of Cranston, R.I.; June 25. He managed the family businesses, Relton Realty and the Hope Theatre Company, for many years. He enjoyed fishing and gardening and is survived by three children, a granddaughter, and a sister.
 

 

Nov, 2019
53

Leonard A. Glaser ’53, of West Orange, N.J. and Longboat Key, Fla.; May 30. After graduating from Brown, he entered the Naval Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I., and specialized in naval communications. He served as a signal officer and was later promoted to lieutenant and became the radio officer and admiral’s communication aide. At the end of his enlistment he returned to New Jersey to work in the family retail furniture business, eventually opening his own business in Freehold, N.J. At Brown he was a member of the wrestling team, the Brown Key Society, and Pi Lambda Phi. He enjoyed solving crossword puzzles, building model trains, discussing current events, being active with charitable organizations, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Helene; three daughters and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
53

John P. DePasquale ’53, of East Greenwich, R.I.; May 31. A pharmacist, he operated DePasquale Pharmacy in Providence, a family-owned business, for 55 years. He was involved in public service and enjoyed volunteering on many political campaigns. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, and nine grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
52

Robert J. Torok ’52, of Avon, Conn.; May 2. At Brown he was a member of the varsity crew team and Beta Theta Phi. After Brown he joined the U.S. Marine Corps and was a flight officer who flew aerial photographic reconnaissance over Japan. He was discharged with the rank of captain and earned the National Defense Medal. He went on to work at Sikorski Aircraft (Conn.) leading the Black Hawk helicopter programs. He retired in 1979 as senior vice president of production programs. He launched a second career in the executive search industry, first at Antel Nagel & Moorehead (Conn.) and later at Korn Ferry International (N.Y.), recruiting and placing executives in the aerospace, defense, and high-tech marketing fields around the world. He retired in 1996 from Korn Ferry as vice president and partner. In retirement he enjoyed sailing and woodworking. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; four daughters and their spouses, including Amy Torok Carey ’93; nine grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Nov, 2019
52

Robert A. Goodell Jr. ’52, of Granville, Ohio; June 11. He worked in pediatric and adolescent medicine in Williamstown, Mass., for 20 years and served as the director of health services at Williams College. He retired in 2001 as a family physician with Downtown Medical Associates in Boston. He was an Eagle Scout and amateur ornithologist. He traveled to Africa, Central America, Europe, and the Arctic for birdwatching and devoted time in his retirement to the Massachusetts Audubon Society. He volunteered at the Council on Aging’s Senior Center in Marshfield, Mass., leading regular bird walks. He enjoyed music, art, gardening with his wife, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Irmadel; two daughters, including Karen Goodell ’88 and her husband John P. Hunter ’88; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and seven grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
52

Norman Silvernail Gates ’52, of Danvers, Mass.; June 16. She was a teacher in Danvers and Lawrence, Mass. She was an active member of Maple Street Congregational Church in Danvers, where she served as  moderator of the church council, deacon, and on the greeting and usher ministry teams. She was also a member of the League of Women Voters. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, three grandchildren, a great-grandchild, and four nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
52

John P. Ferbend ’52, of Chandler, Ariz.; Feb. 7. He spent his career at Allstate Insurance Company and retired in 1989. He was a U.S. Army veteran and is survived by a daughter, a son, three grandchildren, and a brother.
 

 

Nov, 2019
52

Asoong Len Elliott ’52, of Lebanon, N.H.; May 29. She was a social worker and worked in various subfields of the social work profession until her retirement in 1992. She enjoyed spending time with family in Hawaii. She is survived by her husband, Rogers Elliott ’52; two sons and their spouses; two grandchildren; two brothers and their spouses; a niece; and three nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
52

Ardene Stevens Butterfield ’52, of Avon, Conn.; July 13. She was a homemaker and enjoyed playing bridge, solving Sudoku puzzles, reading, and spending time with her family. She is survived by four children and their spouses, and eight grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
51

Eleanor R. Moushegian ’51, of Boston; Mar. 4. She is survived by a sister, a brother, and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019
51

David Hedison ’51, of Beverly Hills, Calif.; July 18. A theater, television, and screen actor who was best known as a submarine captain on Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea. In the early 1950s he appeared in the plays Much Ado About Nothing and A Month in the Country, which won him a Theatre World Award for most promising newcomer. Signed by Twentieth Century-Fox, he appeared in The Enemy Below (1957), Son of Robin Hood (1958), and The Fly. He was the first actor to portray CIA operative Felix Leiter in two non-consecutive James Bond films; Live and Let Die and Licence to Kill. He later had recurring roles on daytime dramas Another World and The Young and the Restless. He appeared in seven episodes of The Love Boat and six episodes of Fantasy Island. His last movie role was in Confessions of a Teenage Jesus Jerk (2017). Over the course of a six-and-a-half-decade career he appeared in more than 100 films and television roles but said theater was his first love. In the 1990s and early 2000s he appeared in regional theater, often in Massachusetts and Maine. He is survived by two daughters.

 

Nov, 2019
51

John G. Fuller ’51, of Warrenville, Ill.; June 25. While studying at Brown, he wrote an award-winning short story, Emma Gets Her Way. He later attended Northwestern Law School and passed the bar before being drafted. He served in the Korean War before joining JAG in Fort Benning, Ga. Despite success in law, he changed career paths and became an author. In 1960 he moved his family to live in Vienna for three years and Barcelona for a year while writing his novel Portrait of a Boy, which was published in 1968. He dedicated much of his life to poetry writing and won several awards, including the President’s Award for Literary Excellence from the National Author’s Registry in 1968. Through the years he published several volumes of his poetry, including The Forest Holds a Secret Place. He is survived by four children, including David ’75, and 11 grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
51

Gordon Fallow ’51, of South Yarmouth, Mass.; May 18. He worked for Sears, Roebuck & Company for 41 years in several different positions and as general manager of stores in Massachusetts and Maine. He retired in 1987. He also served in the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed fishing, golfing, gardening, and woodcarving. He is survived by his wife, Pauline, as well as a daughter, four sons, eight grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Nov, 2019
51

Francis L. Crowley ’51, of Groton, Conn.; July 2. He spent three years in U.S. Army Counterintelligence before starting his professional work career. He worked at General Dynamics/Electric Boat division contracts department in 1957. In 1970 he began working at Yale University School of Medicine as director of the school’s grants and contracts office. In 1985 he joined Ship Analytics Inc. in North Stonington (Conn.) and assumed the position of vice president for administration and general counsel. After a short time with a specialized law practice, he capped his professional career as director of health for Ledge Light Health District, which expanded under his team leadership from Groton to a six-town local public health agency. He retired in 2007. He was a member of the State of Massachusetts and Connecticut bar associations and the Court of Federal Claims bar. He owned several boats for cruising and sailing and enjoyed being past commodore of Ram Island Yacht Club. He was also a member of the Ocean Cruising Club and the Off Soundings Club. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, five grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
51

Larry Coletti ’51, of Norwich, Conn.; July 24. After completing a residency in general/vascular surgery at St. Luke’s Hospital, he returned to Connecticut, serving two years as chief of surgery at the naval base in Groton, followed by two years as a solo surgical practitioner at Backus Hospital. In 1969 he opened a private surgical practice in Norwich in conjunction with Backus Hospital and was involved in executive and philanthropic capacities. He retired in 2004 as chairman of the department of surgery. He was a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and an avid sports fan. He also enjoyed playing the clarinet and was a life-long learner. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; three children and their spouses, including Carolyn ’80 and Lee Psinakis ’80; eight grandchildren, including Thomas Wetmore ’10; two sisters; and a brother.
 

 

Nov, 2019
51

Saul D. Arvedon ’51, of Greenville, R.I., formerly of Needham and Plymouth, Mass., and Boynton Beach, Fla.; July 21. He was a sales representative for Lightolier for 32 years. He enjoyed traveling and cruising around the world. At age 50 he went skydiving for the first time and at age 73 he bungee jumped for the first time. He is survived by three children and three grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Ronald S. Wilson ’50, of Canton, Mass., formerly of Naples and Sarasota, Fla.; Aug. 9. He is survived by his wife, Dolores; a daughter; son David ’77; three grandchildren, including Victoria W. Wilson ’14, ’15 MAT; and a great-grandson.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Arnold F. Waring Jr. ’50, of Dixon, Ill., formerly of New London, Conn.; July 16. For a brief time he was a volunteer fireman in New London. He joined the U.S. Naval Reserves but was later drafted into the U.S. Army. He worked as a safety engineer with the former USF Insurance Company in Hartford, Conn. and was transferred to Dixon in 1962. He was an active member of the Presbyterian church in Dixon and served in many leadership roles. He was involved in Habitat for Humanity in Dixon after his retirement. He enjoyed playing the saxophone and piano, singing, painting, camping, blacksmithing, carving, and developing his own photographs. He is survived by two daughters, four grandsons, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Jonathan S. Tobey ’50, of Brattleboro, Vt.; June 22. He was an assistant professor of marketing and farm management for five years at Cornell University. He went on to work as vice president and technical director at Chase Manhattan Bank in New York City from 1965 to 1976. He retired in 1976 and moved to Townshend, Vt., where he enjoyed teaching cross-country skiing, helping with Grace Cottage Hospital fair days and running the Townshend Corner Store for two years. He moved to Brattleboro in 1994. Athletics remained important throughout his lifetime and he set national age group records in the Green Mountain Senior Games and the U.S. Senior Olympics. In 1994 he received the Vermont Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports Award and at age 90 was inducted into the Barrington High School Athletic Hall of Fame. He enjoyed volunteering at local sporting events, helping with the ski lift at Memorial Park, and took pride in setting the drag for the Guilford Hounds fox hunts for many years. He also enjoyed painting, woodworking, maple sugaring, fishing, kayaking, and growing giant pumpkins for the county fair. He is survived by a daughter, a son, six grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

William F. Smith ’50, of Providence; June 2. He was president of the Providence Washington Insurance Company. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Forces and while at Brown was a member of the football team. He enjoyed the outdoors and skied, fished, and played tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Alta, as well as four children, five grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Nancy Thornton Rey ’50, of Westerly, R.I., formerly of Windsor Locks, Conn.; May 21. She was an active member of Central Baptist Church in Hartford, Conn., where she was a Sunday school teacher and choir member. She was also a member of the Connecticut Horticultural Society and enjoyed gardening, quilting, basket weaving, and traveling. She is survived by four children and their spouses, nine grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Oliver L. Patrell ’50, of Bethel, Conn., formerly of Old Lyme, Conn. and St. Petersburg, Fla.; June 10. He worked at Aetna Insurance Company for 33 years, retiring as vice president. He then went on to serve as CEO of Empire Mutual of New York and Colonial Penn Insurance. In addition to serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, he attended Officer Candidate School and served in the U.S. Coast Guard during the Korean War. He remained in the Coast Guard Reserves until 1987, rising to the rank of Commander. He was a member of the Knights of Malta and president of his Brown class. He was a former member of the Brown swim team and endowed a coaching chair to support Brown’s swim program. He also was past president of the Boys and Girls Club of Hartford, Conn. He was elected to the town of Old Lyme’s Finance Board and was on the board of Easter Seals and Fairfield University School of Business. He enjoyed playing golf and baking (his family had owned Patrell’s Bakery in Springfield). He is survived by five children and their spouses, 13 grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Anna Hotaling Parrott ’50, of Delmar, N.Y.; July 7. She worked at Delmar Public Library, Harmanus Bleecker Library, and the Upper Hudson Library System. She served as adult services consultant at Upper Hudson Library System and retired with the title of director. She enjoyed reading, playing bridge, and going out to eat with friends and family. She is survived by three sons, two daughters-in-law, six grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, a sister, and brother-in-law.
 

 

Nov, 2019
50

Haven H. Newton ’50, of Hillsborough, N.H.; May 21. After serving in the U.S. Army, he worked in Washington D.C. and earned his master’s degree in industrial and labor relations at George Washington University. He joined Fieldcrest Mills in 1957 and retired as corporate vice president for industrial relations in 1985. In retirement he built a boat, hiked, and traveled cross country and around the world. He also enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his companion, Ann Ford; three children; seven grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a brother.
 

 

Nov, 2019
50

Robert A. Moyer ’50, of South Windsor, Conn.; July 23. He was employed with Hope Webbing Company and Travelers Insurance Company. He retired from Travelers as chief underwriter for life, health, and financial services in 1987. During World War II he served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was an avid runner and completed his first marathon at age 58. He is survived by two sons and their spouses, four grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, a sister, a sister-in-law, and a brother-in-law.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Viola Lenk Leonard ’50, of Ledyard, Conn.; June 8. After graduating with a degree in biology, she worked first for Boston Children’s Hospital and then for Connecticut College. Over the years she took many camping and canoe trips and later became a certified Master Gardener. She worked at Ledyard Public Library for 15 years and volunteered with the Ledyard Public Health Nursing Service. She was a member of the Handweaver’s Guild of Connecticut and enjoyed traveling and singing with the Sweet Adelines in the 1980s and with the Bell Choir and Senior Choir at Ledyard Congregational Church. She is survived by three daughters, including Catherine Leonard ’76 and Sarah Leonard ’85; a son; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
50

Stanley S. Gans ’50, of Chevy Chase, Md.; June 10. He was an employee of Ourisman Honda in Bethesda and received awards for being salesman of the year. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and is survived by his wife, Mary; four children; and a nephew.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Selna Konovsky Deitch ’50, of Providence; June 7. She went on to earn her masters in social work from Boston University and for the following 30 years was a special education social worker for the Providence School Department. She enjoyed reading, belonging to book clubs, and traveling. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Phyllis Towne Cook ’50, of Yarmouth, Me.; May 10. She was an accomplished chorister and sang with the Handel and Haydn Society, the Providence Singers, and church and civic choirs wherever she lived. She was a loyal attendee of the Bethlehem Bach Festival in Pennsylvania and was a member of the Bach Choir of Bethlehem. She was also a master seamstress, and enjoyed gardening, entertaining, and traveling. She is survived by five children, including Allison Cook Keith ’76 and Susan Cook ’88; 10 grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
50

Donald R. Colo ’50, of Scottsdale, Ariz.; June 23. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II he enrolled at Brown and picked up a football for the first time. Subsequently, he played nine seasons in the National Football League and was inducted into the Cleveland Browns Ring of Honor. While in the NFL, he played defensive tackle for the Baltimore Colts, New York Yanks, Dallas Texans, and for five years with the Cleveland Browns. He is survived by his wife, Prudence.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Florence O’Meara Baer ’50, of Clermont, Fla., formerly of Huntington, Conn.; Aug. 17. After raising a family, she worked as a computer operator at the Trumbull Times. She was active at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church and the Valley Squares dance club in Connecticut. Upon retirement, she and her husband moved to Florida and became active in Morrison Methodist Church. She is survived by three daughters, including Joyce Smith ’73; a son; a daughter-in-law; three sons-in-law; nine grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
50

Joseph E. Baclawski ’50, of Amherst, N.H., formerly of Fort Wayne, Ind.; Nov. 17, 2018. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and because he was fluent in English, Polish, and Russian, performed missions with Army Intelligence. After graduating from Brown, he married and lived in Fort Wayne, where he worked for General Electric as an engineer and manufacturing manager and earned seven U.S. patents. He took on international assignments for G.E., traveling to the Soviet Union and living in Sao Paulo, Brazil, for three years. He completed his career working at MIT, where he was responsible for coordinating research, engineering, and business for the president of the University.

 

Nov, 2019
49

Paul L. Sunderland ’49, of Westport, Mass.; July 19. He was a retired engineer who had worked as superintendent of engineering for Montaup Electric Co. in Somerset, Mass. He was an avid Boston Red Sox fan, a World War II U.S. Army veteran, and enjoyed spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Jean; three sons; seven grandchildren; a great-grandson; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
48

Jacqueline Archambault Smith ’48, of Wakefield, R.I.; June 23. She was a talented watercolorist. She enjoyed spending summer days with family and friends at Green Hill Beach and reading to her grandchildren. She is survived by five children, including son Dominic L. Smith ’87 and his wife, Annik Gagnon Smith ’87; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
47

Charles T. Hutchinson ’47, of East Greenwich, R.I.; July 1. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked at American Thread Company for 27 years. He worked his way up the corporate ladder from editor of the company newspaper to vice president of human resources. In 1984 he joined CVS as a senior vice president of human resources and retired in 1990. He spent the next 18 years doing pro bono human resources work for several local nonprofit organizations, including Tides Family Services. He enjoyed sailing, golfing with his grandson, playing tennis, summers on the Cape and traveling the world with his wife, Lillian, who survives him. He is also survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019
47

Marghretta Gilbane Hogan ’47, of East Providence, R.I.; May 15. She worked as a manager at the former Gladdings Department Store in Providence and as a senior analyst at WSBE Channel 36 Public Television in Rhode Island. She served as corporator of Women & Infants Hospital and was secretary of the Manhattanville Club of Rhode Island, and treasurer of the Women’s Auxiliary of the Pawtucket Medical Association. She is survived by two daughters, two sons, 11 grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
47

Joan Van Raalte Hellinger ’47, of Beverly Hills, May 26. She worked as a reporter and editor in New York City before marrying and moving to Beverly Hills. She continued to learn, earning a master’s in counseling at age 52 and at age 64 completing a doctorate in psychology and psychoanalytic training at the California Graduate Institute, where she spent more than 20 years as a teacher and training analyst. She enjoyed helping family and friends and is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, two grandchildren, a brother, and a niece.

 

Nov, 2019
46

Rodney G. Sarle ’46, of Brunswick, Me.; May 27. He served in the U.S. Navy’s officer training program then held business positions before he joined the faculty of the University of Maryland. He was later appointed to the faculty of the School of Business Administration at UNC Chapel Hill, where he earned a master’s degree from the School of Library Science. In 1958 he was selected by the Library of Congress to serve in various research, reference, and administrative positions before being appointed as the director of the Library’s acquisition and processing office attached to the American Embassy in Cairo, Egypt, in 1964. In 1967, following the Six-Day War, he was evacuated from Egypt and assigned as director of the Library of Congress office in Karachi, Pakistan. He later held dual appointments as director of both the Cairo and Karachi offices. Subsequently, he headed the Library’s offices in New Delhi, India, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. He returned to Washington, D.C., in 1976 and headed the Library of Congress’s programs in parts of Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America. He retired to Brunswick in 1989, where he continued to travel and volunteer at local libraries. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

Nov, 2019
46

Barbara Lerner Herzmark ’46, of San Pedro, Calif.; Mar. 22. She lived in Denver, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Tucson prior to San Pedro and was always involved in the community in which she lived. She taught, was a camp counselor, was a Cub Scout den mother, and was a volunteer. She liked hiking, biking, camping, and weaving. She is survived by three sons and their families.

 

Nov, 2019
45

Martha Gilman Saunders ’45, of Falmouth, Me.; May 20. She worked as a nurse in Denver and Seattle before returning to Providence, where she married and started a family. She eventually moved to Maine and served on the board of the Woodfords School, was active in the Portland chapter of the Women’s Literary Union, and was a docent at Portland’s Victoria Mansion. She was an avid reader, with a particular interest in American history. She is survived by three sons, two daughters-in-law, five grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
45

Daniel Fairchild ’45, ’48 ScM, of Barrington, R.I.; June 27. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he returned to Brown for his master’s degree. He worked at FRAM for 30 years and retired as a vice president. When he left the company he embarked on a second career teaching engineering at Roger Williams University. He enjoyed spending summers on Hog Island, playing golf, cruising in Europe and Alaska, and sailing in the Caribbean and Maine. He was an Eagle Scout and remained active with Boy Scouts of America. He was also an active member of Central Congregational Church, where he served as deacon. He is survived by five children, eight grandchildren, including Carl F. Olson ’02 and Neil F. Olson ’05; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1945, GS Class of 1948
Nov, 2019
45

Frank S. Arnold ’45, of White Plains, N.Y., and Scottsdale, Ariz.; Oct. 3, 2018. He is survived by his wife, Barbra; two sons, including Andrew ’74; and three grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
43

Helen Armbrust Pfeifer ’43, of Mequon, Wisc.; Aug. 14. She earned a master of library science degree at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 1981 and worked as a docent and librarian at the Milwaukee Art Museum. She was active in her church, was part of a quilting group, and enjoyed playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters, four grandchildren, and nine great-grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019
41

Robert W. Lougee ’41, ’52 PhD, of Storrs, Conn.; July 6. He joined the faculty of UConn in Storrs in 1949 as an instructor in the history department and later became a full professor. Before retiring in 1984 he was head of the history department and dean of the College of Arts & Sciences. In addition to being a distinguished professor and author of scholarly books and publications, he was also president of UConn’s faculty senate and actively involved with the University’s administration, working closely with the President’s Office and Board of Trustees. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He was a member of the National Audubon Society, the American Ornithological Society, and the Appalachian Mountain Club. He enjoyed hiking, camping, boating on Lake Winnipesaukee, reading, and annual summer vacations in New Hampshire. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1941, GS Class of 1952
Sep, 2019
69
Ken McDaniel ’69
Walkout leader and champion for low-income students in STEM
Read More
Photo of Ken McDaniel ’69 with others on stage at his 50th reunion
Sep, 2019
80
Tony Horwitz ’80
Finding the American story that lies between red and blue
Read More
Photo of Tony Horowtiz ’80 Puliter Prize winning author Farewell
Sep, 2019
FAC

 Andrew Browder, of Providence; Mar. 24. He joined the Brown faculty in 1960 and spent most of his life teaching mathematics with a specialty in functional analysis. In 1963 he was awarded a Miller Fellowship to UC Berkeley and in the early 1970s he spent two years at the Mathematical Institute in Aarhus, Denmark. He retired from Brown in 1998. He published many papers and his books include Introduction to Function Algebras and Mathematical Analysis: An Introduction. He was an avid photographer for years and focused on structural beauty of both industrial and natural subjects. In retirement he took courses on writing poetry, joined a local group of fellow poets called The Loft, and composed several poems. He is survived by his wife, Anna; three daughters, including Laura Browder ’84; and four grandchildren.

Sep, 2019
MD 79

Alan R. Cote ’79 MD, of Barrington, R.I.; May 5. He operated his ophthalmology practice in Fall River, Mass., for 32 years. He was a black belt in Taekwondo and enjoyed visiting baseball parks with his children and taking nature walks with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Leslie; five children; two grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 00

John Wicinas ’00 AM, of Irwin, Pa.; Apr. 7. He was an adjunct professor of English and history at Westmoreland County Community College. He was a Fulbright Scholar to Lithuania in 2000 and a member of Delta Chi. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, two brothers and sisters-in-law, an uncle, five nieces, and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 87

Richard P. Manning ’87 AM, of Providence, formerly of Flint, Mich.; Apr. 6. He worked for 30 years as an archivist for Brown’s Department of Modern Culture and Media. He was former codirector for the French Film Festival and was involved with the Africana Film Festival, the Providence LGBTQ Film Festival, and many others. He enjoyed sports statistics and sporting facts. He is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 74

Curtis B. Norwood ’74 ScM, of Wakefield, R.I.; Apr. 21. He was a research scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency’s laboratory in Narragansett, R.I. He retired in 2003. He enjoyed camping, woodworking, poker, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Lesley; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; a granddaughter; a sister and brother-in-law; and a sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 72

Richard W. Nopper Jr. ’72 ScM, of Wilmington, Del.; Apr. 11. After his first job at the U.S. Air Force geophysical lab, he went on to become an officer in the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army Reserves, a senior research scientist in exploration research and development at Conoco, a senior research associate in engineering and central research and development at DuPont, and he retired from The Chemours Company. He was a musician and enjoyed playing in several jazz bands. He also sang in his church choir and was a member of the Madrigal Singers. He enjoyed reading, photography, traveling, and languages. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two daughters and their spouses; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; his mother; and three sisters.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 70

Charles W. Higginbotham ’70 PhD, of Lexington, Mass.; Apr. 2, from complications of Parkinson’s. He worked in the field of academic computing for GT&E and as a consultant to several universities, including the University of Alaska Fairbanks. In 1979 he joined the faculty of Rensselaer Hartford and retired as associate professor in 1996. He was a member of First Church of Christ Congregation in Middletown, Conn., where he sang for many years in the senior choir. He was a fan of the Boston Red Sox and enjoyed sailing, skiing, tennis, crossword puzzles, and genealogy. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a daughter; a son, Andrew ’97; three grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 68

Aloke K. Das ’68 ScM, of Warwick, R.I.; Apr. 14. He was a quality control engineer for Cherry Semiconductor Corp. and North East Safety Training Co. before retiring. He enjoyed sports and cultural activities and was an avid fan of tennis. He also enjoyed Bengali and English literature and Bengali cuisine. He is survived by a son, three sisters, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 58

Lawrence M. Washington ’58 PhD, of Weybridge, Vt.; Apr. 23. He began teaching at Kings College in 1950 and subsequently taught at Gettysburg College, Bowdoin College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Hamline University, and Upsala College before spending the last 20 years teaching at UMass Dartmouth, together with his wife, and running a successful German degree program. He and his wife published the textbook A Preview of German Literature in 1969. He was a veteran of World War II, in which he served as a translator. He is survived by six children, 16 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, and a brother.
 

 

Sep, 2019
GS 57

Charles E. O’Rourke ’57 ScM, of Brookline, Mass., formerly of New Canaan, Conn.; Apr. 17. He had been a longtime employee of Union Carbide Corp. and Carbtrol, Inc. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and is survived by his wife, Marilyn; five sons; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 56

Warren P. Roque ’56 AM, of Providence; Apr. 12. He taught in the Providence public school system for 20 years and was a school principal in Richmond and Coventry, R.I., for 12 years. After serving as an educator, he worked for the U.S. Post Office. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and a communicant of St. Mark Church in Cranston, R.I. He enjoyed reading and writing stories and poetry. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three sons and their wives; a daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren; two sisters; and three brothers.

 

Sep, 2019
94

Richard E. Salisbury ’94, of Austin, Tex.; Apr. 28. He began his law career in corporate law and moved on to complex civil litigation. After clerking for a federal magistrate judge in Florida, he worked in private practice in Dallas and later spent ten years as an assistant attorney general at the Texas Attorney General’s Civil Medicaid Fraud Division. He enjoyed the opera, skeet shooting, and yoga. He is survived by Elizabeth, mother of his twin daughters; his parents; a sister and brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
83

Jonathan R. Spencer ’83, of Arlington, Va.; May 13. He was an attorney. He served as general counsel of the Museum of Science Fiction in Washington, D.C., was vice president and associate general counsel of Verisign, general counsel of Shenandoah Telecommunications Company, and associate general counsel of Cable & Wireless Communications. He is survived by three brothers, two sisters-in-law, and 10 nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
77

Grady E. Lake ’77, of Elmhurst, Ill.; Aug. 13, 2018. He was vice president of Liberty Bank for Savings in Chicago. He enjoyed fishing, gardening, traveling, playing hockey, and cooking. He is survived by his fiancé Sandra Heinz; a daughter; a son; three stepsons; two grandchildren; and two sisters.
 

 

Sep, 2019
77

John H. Berardi ’77, of South Attleboro, Mass.; Apr. 15, after a brief illness. He worked for Narragansett Wire Company for many years and was a real estate agent since 1989, most recently with Century 21. He is survived by his father, a brother and sister-in-law, and two nieces.

 

Sep, 2019
75

Guy H. Tuttle ’75, of Atlanta; Mar. 28. He was an award-winning art director and production designer for Atlanta film and television for more than 30 years. In 1985 he launched Special Projects to provide art direction, set design, construction services, and prop rentals for television, motion picture, and commercial productions. He cofounded Televent, LLC in 1988 to offer design, management, planning, and technical production. He served as art director for Greenleaf and Step Up, was production designer for The House Next Door, and oversaw production and management of Turner Broadcasting’s Annual Trumpet Awards for 13 years. Since 2002 he worked with Habitat for Humanity. He was a member of the Art Directors Guild, National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and he served on several boards. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; two sisters; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2019
68

Stephen D. Barbaro ’68, of Austin, Tex.; Mar. 27. He served in the U.S. Army Reserves in New Jersey and later enjoyed a long career as a financial portfolio manager. He was a great supporter of the Austin Opera and served on the community advisory board of Helping Hand Home for Children for several years, where he and his wife started a golf program for children. He is survived by his wife, Polly; two daughters; four grandchildren; a stepdaughter; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
66

Paul F. Clements ’66, of Bloomington, Minn.; Mar. 15. He was a founding partner in MultiMedia Inc., a media production company based in Minneapolis that he guided for 50 years. He enjoyed reading, traveling, scuba diving, skiing, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Kristine; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother, Tim ’73.
 

 

Sep, 2019
63

Robert M. Adams ’63, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Apr. 29. He served in the U.S. Army and then earned an MBA from the Wharton School of Business. He started his career at Chase Manhattan Bank and in 1972 joined Loeb, Rhoades & Co. In 1977 he moved to EF Hutton overseeing financial institution transactions and the development of tax exempt mortgage revenue bonds. In 1984 he cofounded Adams Cohen & Associates and Adams Cohen Securities. He later worked with Tower Realty Trust; Keefe, Bruyette & Woods; and BAH Holdings, LLC. He enjoyed competitive sailing and downhill skiing. He is survived by his wife, Anita; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two stepchildren; two step-grandchildren; a niece; and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
61

Robert Lussier ’61, of Pecos, N.Mex.; Apr. 19. He served four years in the U.S. Navy and then studied for five years with noted musician C. Alexander Peloquin. In 1963 he moved to New York City to pursue an acting career and in 1969 moved to Los Angeles, where he continued his career in theater, film, and television. In 1986 he entered the Pecos Benedictine Monastery and studied for the priesthood at St. John’s Seminary in California. In 1992, he received a master of divinity and a master of arts in religion and was ordained into the priesthood on Dec. 19. He traveled extensively conducting seminars, retreats, workshops, and parish missions. In Pecos, he was involved with retreat programs, and the music ministry and was assigned formation director and novice master. He also served at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe and ministered at the Carmelite Monastery and Cristo Rey parish. He is survived by eight nieces and nephews, as well as many friends.

 

Sep, 2019
61

Edward K. Forbes ’61, of Kennebunkport, Maine, formerly of Wellesley, Mass.; Apr. 26. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he worked in medical sales. He enjoyed thoroughbred racing and automobiles. He is survived by his wife, Martha; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
60

Richard M. Galkin ’60, of Boca Raton, Fla.; Apr. 18, after a long illness. He oversaw Time Inc.’s entry into ownership of cable systems in the 1960s, including Sterling Manhattan Cable Television, where he served as president during the formation of HBO. After leaving Time Inc., he established the cable franchises for Providence, North Providence, and Pawtucket, R.I. He maintained an ownership position until its sale to Times-Mirror Corp. in 1985. He was instrumental in the creation and management of Comsat’s disruptive new venture Satellite Television Corp. For more than 30 years he served on the board of trustees and directors of The Royce Funds, as well as being chairman of its audit committee. In semi-retirement, he served as chairman of the City of Boca Raton Telecommunications Advisory Board for nearly 20 years and as president of the Boca Raton Marina Yacht Club. He established a scholarship at Brown in his father’s name, the Joseph Galkin 1931 Family Scholarship. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a brother; and three nephews, including Justin Sanders ’04.
 

 

Sep, 2019
60

Robert E. Casey ’60, of Stonington, Conn.; Apr. 13. He worked at Bankers Trust for one year and then served, until 1964, in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of lieutenant. After obtaining his MBA from Rutgers, he worked as a CPA for Lybrand in Hartford and San Francisco until 1970, when he moved to work as vice president and controller for National Life in Montpelier, Vt. In 1978 he moved to Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company in Hartford, where he attained the role of senior vice president and retired in 1994. He was active in his community and served on several boards. He enjoyed playing bridge, golf and tennis. He is survived by his companion, Neeltje Udo; two sons and daughters-in-law; a stepson; three grandsons; five nephews, a niece; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
59

Carolyn Mayo Mansell ’59, of Palo Alto, Calif.; Apr. 3, after a brief illness. After staying home and raising her children, she began a career in real estate with Wright & Co. and quickly became the top producer in Los Altos. In 1984 she founded Mansell & Co. and was later recognized by the Los Altos Board of Realtors as “Top Achiever for 10 Consecutive Years.” Over the decades she mentored other agents and pioneered many practices now considered standard in the industry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a sister, and a brother-in-law.
 

 

Sep, 2019
59

Richard A. Cleary ’59, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked at New England Life Insurance Company in Boston and later was a Naval Intelligence agent in Newport, R.I., from 1963 to 1967. For 21 years he worked as a special agent for the FBI and then until 2003, as a self-employed investigator/consultant. At Brown he was a member of the men’s varsity hockey team and later was an active member and past president of the Brown Hockey Association. He played until the age of 78 and for several years was invited to play in the Charles Schulz Snoopy’s Senior World Hockey Tournament. He also enjoyed playing softball, tennis, and golf. He is survived by four daughters, three grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
59

Richard J. Beland ’59, of Poquoson, Va.; May 10, from Parkinson’s disease. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 30 years, retiring in 1989. He spent years training students to fly, briefly interrupted by a tour in Vietnam, where he flew 290 combat missions. For four years following, he served as an advance agent for support and security for Air Force One, serving under Presidents Carter and Reagan. He then did a four-year tour to Germany. He was a member of the NATO Flight Safety Group. In retirement he served as a lector and usher at Langley Chapel, was a member of the Peninsula Pathfinder Volksmarch Club, and was chairman of the Board of Zoning Appeals in Poquoson for 18 years. He enjoyed traveling with his wife, Sonya, who survives him. Other survivors include two sons, a daughter-in-law, a grandson, a sister and brother-in-law, a niece, a nephew, and an uncle.

 

Sep, 2019
58

Thomas B. Bigford ’58, of Williamsburg, Va.; Apr. 11. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for Procter & Gamble in Cincinnati, followed by management positions with Carnation in Los Angeles, Ogilvy & Mather in New York, and Ketchum Advertising in San Francisco. He is survived by his wife, Annie; a daughter; a son-in-law; a grandson; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
57

Robert M. Press ’57, of Houston; Apr. 22. He and his wife owned and operated Lorandi Optical in Houston until they sold the business in 1998. He enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; two daughters; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
56

Gretchen Reiche Terhune ’56, of Falmouth, Maine, formerly of Darien, Conn.; Apr. 24, of a stroke. From 1983 to 1994, she was the executive director of the Darien United Way and Community Council. Always active in volunteer activities over the years, she had been a district chair of the Darien Representative Town Meeting, the director of volunteers at Darien High School, and a director of the Fairfield County Pembroke College Club. She is survived by her husband, Richard; three sons; three daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
56

Bruce W. Lovell ’56, of Agawam, Mass., formerly of Enfield, Conn.; Apr. 13. He was employed with Aetna Life Insurance for 28 years before retiring and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed Austin-Healy racing, boating, model railroading, and watching his children’s and grandchildren’s participation in sports. He is survived by three children, four grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2019
54

James M. McSherry ’54, of West Falmouth, Mass., formerly of Charleston, S.C.; Apr. 9. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began working at E.R. Carpenter Company in Richmond, Va., and later at West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company, which eventually became Westvaco. He retired in 1994 as vice president of the Kraft Division in Charleston. He was a member and former commodore of the Chapoquoit Yacht Club in West Falmouth and the Lions Club of Charleston. He enjoyed family summers on Chapoquoit Island and is survived by his wife, Joanne Webster McSherry ’53; four sons, including Peter ’78; 11 grandchildren; a sister; a brother; sister-in-law Joan Edgley Webster ’58; brother-in-law Gordon Webster ’54; and niece Alison Webster ’83.

 

Sep, 2019
54

S. Thomas Gagliano ’54, of Red Bank, N.J.; Apr. 13. He joined the law practice of Potter and Fisher, Long Branch, in 1960 and became senior partner of the firm, which later became Gagliano, Tucci, Iadanza & Reisner, representing municipal governments, land use boards, and authorities. In 1991 he became of counsel at Giordano, Halleran & Ciesla, then senior vice president for corporate and legal affairs at EPS Corporation. Active in county politics, he was elected to the Borough of Oceanport Council in 1967, became County Surrogate for a five-year term, and served in the New Jersey Senate for three terms beginning in 1977. He rose in leadership ranks to hold the post of minority leader of the Senate, as well as ranking member of the transportation and communication committees. He was instrumental in forming what is now New Jersey Transit, to which he would later be appointed executive director. In 1991 he formed the Jersey Shore Partnership. He was a member of the Amerigo Vespucci Society of Long Branch; served on the board of East Jersey Savings and Loan; was a founding member of the Ironbound Bank; a founder and board member of Future Vision Cable, which became part of Comcast; and a member of the legislative committee of Meridian Health Care. He is survived by his wife, Maria; four children, including son John ’85; and 11 grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
54

Loring W. Chadwick ’54, of Leesburg, Fla.; Apr. 26. He was a music teacher for 28 years in the Cumberland, R.I., school system. He cofounded the Cumberland-Lincoln Community Chorus and served as codirector for 12 years. He was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1958 and served at various locations throughout Rhode Island. After moving to Ocala, he joined the Church of the Advent, assisting as the director of music.

 

Sep, 2019
53

Mary Bromage Topper ’53, of Dayton, Ohio, formerly of Stuart, Fla.; May 2. She was an accomplished seamstress and enjoyed knitting, playing golf, and fly-fishing. She is survived by four children, including daughter M. Kathleen Walworth ’76 and her husband, James W. Walworth ’76; 12 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; sister Elizabeth Van Schenck ’56; and nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
53

Kendall R. Richardson ’53, of Needham, Mass.; Apr. 7. He began his teaching career in Glastonbury, Conn., and was awarded a John Hay Fellowship at Harvard. In 1968 he began teaching history at Needham High School, retiring in 1993. He was well-known for wearing a carnation in his lapel every day. He enjoyed traveling to the former USSR with students and was a contributor to From Russia to USSR: A Narrative and Documentary History. He was an avid reader and book collector and is survived by his wife, Betty; two daughters; and seven grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
53

Amelia Stern Revkin ’53, of North Branford, Conn.; Apr. 25. She was a social worker in Rhode Island and an active member of the League of Women Voters before starting a family. With a master’s degree in political science from URI, she began teaching courses in political science and history at East Greenwich High School, R.I. In 1984, after years of helping her students, she obtained a Doctor of Education degree from Boston Univ. and became a guidance counselor and college admissions counselor. For several decades she was active with the BAA, including interviewing prospective students. In her early retirement she settled in Stuart, Fla., and volunteered at the public library. After moving back to her Branford retirement community, she played a key role in evaluating Silver Pen Award scholarship entries, served on resident committees, and acted as an informal mentor and counselor whenever she could provide support. She is survived by her husband, William ’50; daughter Diana Revkin ’83; sons Andrew ’78 and James ’81 MD; four grandchildren; brother Michael Stern ’57; niece Barbara Revkin ’70; and nephew Richard Stern ’88.

 

Sep, 2019
53

William H. Miller ’53, of Needham, Mass., formerly of Cambridge, Mass.; Mar. 21. He served in the Korean War, followed by a 50-year career as a certified public accountant in Boston. He is survived by his partner Dee Dee Wilcon; four children and their spouses, including daughter Cathy Miller Schlosberg ’80 and her husband Jeremy Schlosberg ’80, son Scott Miller ’81, and daughter Marcy Miller Schaffir ’87 and her husband Jonathan Schaffir ’87, ’90 MD; and 11 grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
52

Richard A. Goeben ’52, of Niantic, Conn., formerly of Winnetka, Ill.; Apr. 9. He worked as a sales manufacturer representative for Grenville Davis Company in Chicago from 1958 to 1979 and then for 14 years with Cleary Sales Associates in Northfield, Ill., as a vice president. He retired to Connecticut in 1993. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
52

John P. Finlay ’52, of Ipswich, Mass.; Apr. 28, due to complications of a fall. He was a retired senior vice president of Lindenmeyr Munroe in Peabody, Mass. He was a member of various trade organizations, among them the National Paper Trade Association and the New England Paper Merchants Association. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. In addition to enjoying singing with the Boston Saengerfest Men’s Chorus, which performed twice at the Royal Albert Hall in London, he also enjoyed spending time with family at his cottage in Cape Cod and later at his ski house in New Hampshire. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; two great-grandsons; a brother and sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2019
51

Claire Fitzpatrick Luther ’51, of Elkhart, Ind.; Apr. 24. She was a founding member of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Elkhart and an active member of the community. She enjoyed playing golf and tennis, traveling, and solving crossword puzzles. She is survived by four daughters, five grandchildren, and two sisters, including Virginia Fitzpatrick Bainton ’49.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Henry P. Reynolds Jr. ’50, of Duxbury, Mass.; Apr. 14. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, he attended Brown and studied mechanical engineering. He had a long career with U.S. Rubber/Uniroyal. In retirement, he was active in the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Woodbridge, Conn., where he served as commander and later was a board member and chaplain for the Duxbury Post 223 American Legion. He enjoyed speedboat racing, skiing, sailing, yoga, bowling, tennis, gardening, and mountain climbing. In addition, he bicycled many Pan Mass Challenge Sturbridge to Provincetown rides and enjoyed a 23-mile ride with his family through Duxbury on his 90th birthday. He is survived by two daughters, including Anne Ward ’82; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
50

William C. Munroe Jr. ’50, of Lincoln, Mass.; Apr. 22. He was an attorney and a retired lieutenant of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two daughters; a daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Robert F. King ’50, of Buffalo, N.Y.; May 10. He was a sales executive in the food industry. After retiring, he was the equipment manager for the Canisius College basketball team. He is survived by four children and their spouses, four grandchildren, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
50

John A. Dillingham ’50, of Southwick, Mass., formerly of Westfield, Mass.; May 12, after battling Parkinson’s disease. He was employed by Old Colony Envelope Co. from 1950 to 1987 as auditor and treasurer and later was vice president and controller of Hammermill Paper Co., now International Paper. He also worked for Healy-Pease Funeral Home as business manager in the Westfield and Northampton locations. He served on many committees and was a former treasurer of the YMCA of Greater Westfield, former treasurer and trustee for Westhills Home Health Care, treasurer of Pine Hill Cemetery, trustee of Westfield Athenaeum and Westfield Academy, and a member of the Westfield Historical Society. He was an active member of First Congregational Church of Westfield, where he served as a deacon and past chairman of invested funds. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and both the Naval and Coast Guard Reserves. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; four children; a stepson; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Anne Lord Arnold ’50, of East Marion, N.Y.; Apr. 8. She served in the Canadian Women’s Army Corps until she was old enough to transfer to the U.S. WAVES, then entered Brown after being discharged. After graduation, she accepted a position with American Metal Co., followed by the Creole Petroleum Co. in New York City, working as a librarian/cataloger. In 1964 she began working as a school librarian at Greenport School and retired in 1986. She enjoyed collecting giraffes from around the world. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, three grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
49

Joan Dixon Keller ’49, of Westwood, Mass., formerly of Atlanta; Apr. 18. After college, she joined the junior executive training program of Filene’s department store in Boston. In 1967 she moved to Florida and later to Atlanta, where she lived for 40 years, before returning to New England in 2017. She participated in the Junior League, garden clubs, and the Colonial Dames. She enjoyed reading, swimming, tennis, golf, and playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
48

A. Sheffield Reynolds ’48, of Warwick, R.I.; Apr. 12. He worked for 45 years at Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank before retiring as senior vice president of commercial lending. He later worked for three years as a consultant for Bank Boston. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. A Mason for 64 years, he was the recipient of an Exemplary Service Medal from Adelphoi Lodge in 2005 and served the Masonic Grand Lodge of Rhode Island as grand master in 1978. He was a member of the Rhode Island Shriners and elected Potentate in 1989. He was also a member of the Scottish Rite Valley of Providence and a recipient of the Honorary 33rd Degree. He is survived by two children, seven grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Send us an obituary
Help us memorialize your departed classmates