Obituaries

Apr, 2021
FAC

Michael Silverman, of Concord, Mass.; Aug. 29. He joined the Brown faculty in 1973 as an assistant professor in the department of English. He retired from the department of modern culture and media in 2010 and is survived by his partner of 30 years, E.J. Anderson ’81.

Apr, 2021
FAC

Dr. Rocco Marzilli, of East Providence and Jamestown, R.I.; Aug. 18. He graduated from Providence College as a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta and served in the U.S. Army for two years during the Korean conflict. In 1957, he enrolled at the University of Bologna School of Medicine in Bologna, Italy. Upon returning to the U.S. he and his wife settled in East Providence, where they would remain for more than 50 years. He completed his residency at the VA Hospital in Providence and remained on staff until 1968, when he decided to enter private practice specializing in gastroenterology. He was on staff at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital until 2008. He was the first medical director for Waterview Villa Rehabilitation and Health Care Center and continued in that role until 2010. He was also on the clinical staff at the Warren Alpert Medical School. He served as medical advisor for the Rhode Island Chapter of the National Foundation of Ileitis and Colitis (NFIC) while also serving on the board of directors of the Colitis and Ileitis Association, and he was the president of the Rhode Island Gastroenterological Society. He was named Physician of the Year in 1983 by NFIC. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, a grandson, and a sister.

Apr, 2021
FAC

L. Perry Curtis, of North Pomfret, Vt.; Apr. 9, 2019. Emeritus professor of history at Brown. During the course of his 40-year teaching career, he held appointments at Princeton and at UC Berkeley and retired from Brown in 2001. He was an American scholar who made a significant contribution to the study of Irish history. He published numerous works relative to Irish history, including Apes and Angels, Coercion and Conciliation in Ireland, and The Depiction of Eviction in Ireland, 1845-1910. He frequently visited Ireland, both for research purposes and for pleasure. He was a member of the Kildare Street and University Club for many years. In 2011 he lectured at the National Library of Ireland to a capacity audience and in 2015 he addressed the Parnell Summer School on “Rethinking the Origins of the Land War in Ireland.” His last visit to Ireland was in March 2018 for the opening of the Coming Home exhibition of art from the collection of Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut. He is survived by his wife Alison; a daughter; and a son.

Apr, 2021
FAC

Dan W. Brock, of Newton, Mass.; Sept. 26. Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. University Professor and professor emeritus in philosophy. Professor Brock joined the philosophy department at Brown in 1969, where he became professor of philosophy and biomedical ethics and director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics. He was chair of the department from 1980 to 1986 and eventually received a joint appointment in the medical school. During his 33 years at Brown, he established himself as a leading authority in bioethics and medical ethics. He served as staff philosopher on the President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine in 1981 and in 1993 was a member of the Ethics Working Group of the Clinton Task Force on National Health Reform. He left Brown in 2002 to join the department of clinical bioethics at the National Institutes of Health as senior scientist and head of the section on public health. In 2004, he became the Frances Glessner Lee Professor of Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. He served as an advisor to the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress, the Institute of Medicine, the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, and the World Health Organization. Over the course of his career, he authored six books and more than 150 articles establishing a high standard of analytical rigor in bioethics. He was president of the American Association of Bioethics and a founding board member of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He was an avid reader and is survived by his wife, Chon, formerly known as Charlene Stephens ’62; a daughter; and two sons, including David ’02.

Apr, 2021
MD 79

Desmond Jordan ’79 MD, of Hoboken, N.J.; Nov. 2. He was professor of anesthesiology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and a cardiothoracic anesthesiologist at New York-Presbyterian/ Columbia University Irving Medical Center. He joined CUIMC in 1987 and developed protocols for the care of heart and lung transplants. He was a pioneer in bioinformatics and healthcare technology in critical care medicine and an educator to physicians in training. He is survived by two daughters, including Kristin Jordan ’09.

Apr, 2021
GS 89

Jeffrey P. Whitman ’89 AM, ’91 PhD, of Selinsgrove, Pa.; Sept. 25. Following his graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, Jeff served in the U.S. Army. He was an artillery officer and spent a significant part of his career in Germany. He returned to West Point in 1987 and taught philosophy and English there until his retirement in 1995 with the rank of major. Jeff then began a second career as professor of philosophy at Susquehanna University. He served as philosophy department head from 2000-2010, was speaker of the faculty from 2005-2008, chaired the Edward S. and A. Rita Schmidt Lecture in Ethics for many years, was codirector of the Arlin Adams Center for Law and Society, and served on such committees as the Advisory Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, University Council, and the Faculty Affairs Committee. In recognition of his outstanding teaching and service, he received the John C. Horn Award for Distinguished Scholarship and Creative Activity in 1998. Jeff was a published expert of war theory and medical ethics. He was the faculty advisor for Susquehanna University’s ROTC cadets for many years and served on the Geisinger Medical Center Bioethics Review Committee. Active in the Selinsgrove community, Jeff served two terms on the board of directors of the Selinsgrove Area School District. He was a member of Sharon Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove, where he served as the Church Council president and sang in the choir. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; a stepson and his spouse; four grandchildren; a sister; and a brother

Apr, 2021
GS 89

Linda L. LaGasse ’89 ScM, ’91 PhD, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Sept. 19. She had been director of research at Brown’s Center for the Study of Children at Risk and at Women & Infants Hospital. She dedicated her life to infant and maternal health. She is survived by her husband, Barry Lester; five children; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 87

Ellen B. Furlough ’87 PhD, of Lexington, Ky.; Sept. 26, after a long illness. She taught middle school in South Carolina before obtaining her master’s degree. She later was a history professor at Kenyon College, where she earned tenure and served as department chair. She joined the University of Kentucky history department in 1999 and in 2005 received a UK Great Teacher award. Her research, focused on consumer cooperatives and the history of tourism, received international recognition and invitations to speak at conferences in several countries. Her publications have been cited by other scholars. She is survived by her husband, Frank; a son; a daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 79

Elizabeth Barclay Engen ’79 AM (see ’73).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1979, Class of 1973
Apr, 2021
GS 77

Aida M. Botelho ’77 AM, of Fall River, Mass.; Nov. 6. She taught in the Providence school system for 36 years and dedicated her life to caring for her parents and siblings. She is survived by a sister and many cousins. 

Apr, 2021
GS 73

Shirley Williams-Scott ’73 ScM, of Marrero, Ala.; July 29. She began her teaching career at Miles College as a graduate laboratory assistant and went on to teach life sciences as an instructor at Miles College and Lawson State Junior College. She then became an assistant professor of biology at Jackson State University and later a full professor of biology at Stillman College. While at Stillman, she served as acting chairperson of the natural science division as well as the faculty representative to the 1987 White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She became an associate professor of research in the College of Pharmacy and graduate faculty at Xavier University in New Orleans and retired from her teaching career after her tenure at Southern University in New Orleans (SUNO), where she was a professor of biology and served as chair of the biology department. While at SUNO she was instrumental in developing several partnerships, including the Howard Hughes Internship Program in collaboration with the University of New Orleans, and was codirector of the SUNO/LSUMC Collaborative Research Initiative in Stress Biology Program. She also developed SUNO’s first marine biology program and lab. Shirley had an extensive research career that included studies on hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, B-6 deficiency, and glucose metabolism, and collaborations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, Tulane University, and the Louisiana State University Medical Center. She was the author or coauthor of more than 50 scientific publications. In addition to her teaching and research, she served as a science evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) for Life Sciences, a grant reviewer for the Minority Research Center of Excellence Program (MRCE), and chair of the panel of the Research Improvement in Minority Institutions (RIMI) Program. Throughout her career she received numerous awards and honors. She was also instrumental in starting the Robert Charles Blakes Senior Bible College and Theological Seminary and served as the school’s first dean. She is survived by five children, 12 grandchildren, two brothers, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 72

Stephen M. Roberts ’72 MAT, of Grand Island, N.Y.; Sept. 21, of prostate cancer. He taught high school English until 1977, when he became assistant to the director of University Libraries at the University of Buffalo. He became associate director of University Libraries in 1986, and spearheaded initiatives automating the libraries, promoting resource-sharing among SUNY libraries, and envisioning the role of the libraries in the 21st century. He secured grants to develop resource sharing among SUNY university centers and built an off-campus storage library facility. He developed a road map for moving the libraries into the emerging digital environment and established UBdigit, the platform for digital collections. His efforts were recognized with the Joseph F. Schubert Moving Towards Excellence Award and the NYLINK Achievement Award. He retired in 2010 after serving as associate vice president for university libraries for five years. He is survived by his wife, Cindy; two daughters and their spouses; two stepsons; a sister and brother-in-law; and two brothers and sisters-in-law.

Apr, 2021
GS 72

Thomas E. Rosenbaum ’72 AM (see ’71).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1972, Class of 1971
Apr, 2021
GS 71

Ben R. Golden ’71 PhD, of Marietta, Ga.; Nov. 27. He taught for 55 years, including 40 years at Kennesaw State University, finishing his work there as professor emeritus of biology. He is survived by his wife, Noel; four children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Apr, 2021
71

Constance H. Buchanan ’71 AM, of New York City; Sept. 16, of complications from Parkinson’s disease. She led the Women’s Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School for two decades. Hired at age 30 in 1977, she stayed at Harvard until 1997. Along with directing the Women’s Studies in Religion Program, she was a faculty member and associate dean at the school and spent six years as special assistant to the president. Her greatest legacy was directing what is known as WSRP, which annually hosts five full-time research associates who serve as visiting faculty for a year and work on book-length projects. She published Choosing to Lead: Women and the Crisis of American Values in 1996, became a senior program officer at the Ford Foundation in 1997 and retired a decade later, well into her Parkinson’s diagnosis.

Apr, 2021
GS 70

Lawrence R. Ernst ’70 PhD, of Silver Spring, Md.; Nov. 4. He spent the majority of his career as a mathematical statistician for the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He is survived by his wife, Gail; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; and two granddaughters. 

Apr, 2021
GS 67

David M. Nicholas ’67 PhD, of Clemson, S.C.; Nov. 10. He taught at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln from 1967 to 1989 and retired from Clemson University in 2006 as the Kathryn and Calhoun Lemon Professor Emeritus of History. In retirement he continued to teach at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Clemson, including classes in classical music. He was an accomplished classical pianist and playing the piano was one of his favorite hobbies. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three stepchildren; and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 67

Francis Crowley ’67 MAT, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Aug. 14, 2019. He was a teacher with positions at Cranston West and Moses Brown schools, and later at Roger Williams and Rhode Island College. In 1970 he entered the private sector and began a 20-year career with CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, from which he retired in 1991 as a corporate director. After retiring, he entered Portsmouth Abbey Monastery and taught in the science and Christian Doctrine departments. For 15 years, Brother Francis also served as the community’s master of ceremonies, overseeing the liturgies and celebrants and altar servers. He is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, and a sister.

Apr, 2021
GS 66

James B. Walker ’66 PhD, of Wilmington, Del.; Dec. 4. In 1967 he accepted a position as a research engineer in the plastics division of E.I. DuPont de Nemours Inc. in Wilmington. During his career at DuPont, he worked on numerous projects, including the development of Lucite and the plastic used for disposable drinking bottles. He spent several years in the United States and France working with partners in the fresh juice and wine industries, helping to extract sugar using membrane technology he invented. While at DuPont, he was honored to be named Research Fellow. He retired in 1991 to begin a second career as CFO and mechanical engineer of Designer Stencils—a design, manufacturing, and retail/wholesale company founded by his wife. His expertise enabled the family business to develop a customized cutting process and to serve retail and wholesale customers worldwide for more than 40 years. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
55
Ever True
Artemis A.W. Joukowsky ’55 was one of Brown’s biggest cheerleaders and fundraisers.
Read More
Artemis A.W. Joukowsky and Ruth Simmons
Apr, 2021
GS 66

Thomas Parr ’66 ScM, of Reading, Mass.; Oct. 2, of Alzheimer’s disease. He received a bachelor’s degree in geology from MIT and, after graduating Brown he joined the team at Draper Labs that designed the optics system for the Apollo Program. He was an early pioneer in remote sensing, working on the Landsat program, and later appeared on the TV program NOVA to discuss his work. Following his work for NASA he worked for TASC and Northrop Grumman, and he retired from BBN in 2012. He was an outdoors enthusiast who enjoyed rock climbing, hiking, camping, and skiing. He obtained his pilot’s license and owned a Cessna for many years. He was an avid traveler and also enjoyed photography. He had a mischievous spirit and enjoyed playing pranks. One of his proud accomplishments was using his rock-climbing skills to mount a red wooden heart on a tower on Brown’s campus in honor of Valentine’s Day. He is survived by his wife Mary; four children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 66

Thomas A. Johnson ’66 MAT, of Okeechobee, Fla., formerly of Ohio; Sept. 27. He taught mathematics, physics, science, and electronics in the Buckeye Local School District for 30 years. Through the Fulbright Classroom Teacher Exchange Program in 1986 he moved his family to Nottingham, England, exchanging teaching positions and homes for one academic year. Upon his retirement from public education, he was employed by LTV Steel Corporation in Cleveland to develop and teach its curriculum. He also spent three years at Geneva Area City Schools as the audiovisual director. He was an avid amateur radio operator and a member of the Ashtabula, Ohio, and Okeechobee, Florida, amateur radio clubs. He is survived by his wife, Lou; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 64

Paul Kechijian ’64 ScM (see ’61).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1964, Class of 1961
Apr, 2021
GS 64

Che C. Chow ’64 PhD, of Penfield, N.Y.; Nov. 26. He worked for the DuPont Company in Delaware for several years. In 1970, he accepted a position at Xerox Corporation in Rochester, N.Y., where he would spend the next 28 years as a research chemist. He was awarded numerous patents. During his time in Rochester, Che and his wife provided active support and assistance to international college students who came to the United States to study there. He spent many years serving as a deacon and singing in the choir of his local church. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter; a grandson; a sister; a brother; and numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 62

Teresa Gagnon Mellone ’62 AM (see ’39).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1962, Class of 1939
Apr, 2021
GS 62

Margaret O’Brien Donohoe ’62 MAT, of Narragansett, R.I., formerly of Forest Hills, N.Y.; Nov. 7. She was a Peace Corps volunteer in Ethiopia from 1962 to 1964. She came back to the U.S. in 1965, then in 1966 returned to Africa as Peace Corps staff in Somalia until 1968, when she began her career in education teaching in the West Warwick School Department, R.I. She later moved to Forest Hills, where she taught in a state correctional facility for seven years. In 1978, she was employed with District Council 37, New York City’s municipal labor union, representing the majority of New York City’s public employees. She retired in 2006 as an administrator and director of counseling. She is survived by three children and one grandchild.

Apr, 2021
17

Jack H. Ruddell ’17, ’22 MD, of Rancho Mirage, Calif.; Nov. 1. He achieved academic success while quietly managing the learning challenges associated with Tourette’s Syndrome. Before attending Brown he sang with the Paulist Choristers, and he continued to sing with Brown’s Bear Necessities a capella group. He explored various fields of medicine, including extended summer research and projects at Warren Alpert Medical School, a program in geriatric medicine at University of Rostock, Germany, and a fellowship at the UCLA neurology research lab. He was a co-lead and/or author of more than 20 medical papers and his research spanned a variety of topics, particularly the impact of opioid dosages post-surgery. He is survived by his parents and two brothers.

Related classes:
Class of 2017, MD Class of 2022
Apr, 2021
08

Evan Werlin ’08, of Philadelphia; May 27, of cancer. After Brown, he went to medical school at the University of Pennsylvania before moving to San Francisco to begin a surgery residency at UC San Francisco Medical Center. Throughout a series of treatments for cancer, he continued to practice medicine, serving as chief surgery resident and matching for a vascular surgery fellowship at UCSF in early May 2020. He enjoyed music and running and is survived by his parents and many friends and colleagues.

Apr, 2021
86

Nicholas M. Edgerton ’86, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; Nov. 16. He was a professional educator who started his career as a teacher and dean of students at the Kildonan School, a boarding school for dyslexic children in Amenia, N.Y. He was a tireless advocate for children and adolescents with learning differences. In 2000, he moved to Williamstown, Mass., where he was appointed head of Pine Cobble School. He moved his family to Kalamazoo in 2010 and continued to pursue opportunities as a school administrator and leader. As an administrator he dedicated himself to knowing each student and their family and was a stickler for grammar, manners, and propriety, and he carried with him an encyclopedia of knowledge. He is survived by daughter Elizabeth “Lily” Edgerton ’21; a son; his father; a brother and sister-in-law, and his former wife, Elizabeth.

Apr, 2021
85

Adrienne Metoyer Eng ’85, of Hayward, Calif.; Sept. 9. She had a career in human resources and senior compensation management in Silicon Valley; her last position was with Survey Monkey. She was an author of fiction under the pseudonym Addison James and was a member of Romance Writers of America; she had several Amazon short-story bestsellers and a blog. She is survived by two daughters, a sister, three brothers, two sisters-in-law, and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
80

Thomas A. Epstein ’80, of Carver, Mass.; Sept. 30, of cancer. He was a supervising engineer for the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management for more than 35 years, where he was credited with being a skilled writer. He wrote some of the first rules for solid and hazardous waste management programs and created the department’s first website as its webmaster. He retired in 2018, then drove a school bus and played Santa Claus for the Edaville Railroad. He was also an actor who won the role of Carver’s King Richard’s Faire’s Chef Crumpet in 1993 before being crowned king in 2002, a reign that lasted 16 years. He is survived by his wife, Diandra, and two children.

 

Apr, 2021
79

Cynthia M. Sheldon ’79, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Oct. 27. She was a property/casualty actuary for 40 years with the Metropolitan Insurance Company. She was also an active member of East Greenwich United Methodist Church. She enjoyed biking and skiing and took part in bicycling tours in Europe and throughout North America, and for many years she took regular ski trips to Killington Mountain in Vermont. She was formerly part of a crew team that sailed out of Newport, R.I., and an avid fan of the Boston Red Sox. She is survived by parents, two sisters, a brother, a brother-in-law, and several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Apr, 2021
78

Edward “Ted” von Gerichten ’78, of Boston; Sept. 19, after a seven-year battle with cancer. He was an attorney in Brown’s Office of the General Counsel for his entire career (1983-2013). He was a member of Brown’s men’s soccer team that reached the NCAA tournament final rounds during two of his seasons. He enjoyed sailing competitively on Narragansett Bay and giving back to the community, including coaching youth soccer. He held leadership roles in the Rhode Island Soccer Association, ultimately serving as president of Bruno United FC. He was a supporter of the YMCA, serving on the Bayside YMCA board of directors in Barrington for several years. He is survived by his wife, Carmen; two daughters, including Kristina von Gerichten ’13; and a son-in-law.

Apr, 2021
77

David E. Dudek ’77, of Hadley, Mass.; Oct. 9, of sarcoma. After graduating from Brown, he was hired by General Electric and employed in their Syracuse office until 1980, when he transferred to their offices in Seattle. He received his MBA from Seattle University and left GE to accept a position at Starbucks Coffee. After moving back East he became a professor of business management at UMass Amherst. He was an environmentalist and cultivated an organic garden. In addition, David and his wife raised Welsh Corgi dogs and participated in AKC dog shows. He enjoyed playing cards and board games as well as outdoor games, especially horseshoe pitching. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; his mother; and three brothers and their families.

Apr, 2021
76

William Pordy ’76, of New York City; Sept. 12, from sudden cardiac arrest after a long fight against frontotemporal degeneration. He graduated from NYU School of Medicine and was a nephrologist at Mount Sinai Hospital. He was also an accomplished inventor with several of his patented products on the market. He had a never-ending desire to learn and earned a membership to the Mensa Society. He enjoyed art, the opera, and traveling. He is survived by his brother Robert ’79, ’82 MD; a sister; two nieces; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
76

Frank J. Moncrief ’76, of Desert Hot Springs, Calif.; Oct. 7. He was a technical editor and publisher of magazines for electronic engineers and computer programmers. He cofounded a software company, founded a website design business, and taught community college computer courses. In 1983, he spent a year in Kyoto, Japan, practicing Aikido and Buddhist meditation. He wrote a novel, spoke four languages, and traveled the world. He dedicated the second half of his life to developing his psychological and spiritual awareness. He read the Collected Works of C.G. Jung and taught the Enneagram. He enjoyed his time at Brown, especially time with his football teammates and fraternity brothers, with whom he became lifelong friends. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice.

Apr, 2021
75

Paul Steen ’75, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Sept. 4, from a heart attack. He earned his PhD in fluid dynamics at Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University. In 1982, he joined Cornell’s School of Chemical Engineering and in 2008, he became the Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Engineering, an endowed professorship that he held until his death. For 38 years, he was a teacher and advisor across departments and graduate fields in the College of Engineering at Cornell. He was internationally recognized as a scholar in fluid mechanics and engaged broadly in the international research community. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2013) and the American Physical Society (1996), in addition to being the Alexander von Humboldt Fellow (1990, 1996, 2011, 2019). He was the recipient of the 2007 Henry Marion Howe Medal. He is survived by his wife, Kyra D. Stephanoff; two daughters, including Frances Steen ’15; a sister; three brothers, including John ’67 and Rodger ’69; and nephews Douglas Steen ’90, Andrew Steen ’00, and Eric Steen ’05.

Apr, 2021
74

Richard Preisler ’74, of Reisterstown, Md.; June 2, of progressive supranuclear palsy and possibly COVID-19. He was a chemistry professor and department chair at Towson University. He retired in 2017. He enjoyed classical music, reading, and family. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; his mother; and a sister.

Apr, 2021
74

Barbara A. Erwin-McGuire ’74, of Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.; Sept. 11, of pancreatic cancer. She obtained a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in neuroanatomy and joined the lab of Nobel Laureate Torsten Wiesel at Harvard as a postdoctoral fellow. She then moved to Rockefeller University in New York City, where she continued to explore the microscopic structure of the retina. She also lectured at Cornell Medical School. She became disenchanted with research science, returned to Columbia to obtain her master’s in social work, and practiced privately for 20 years. She enjoyed genealogy and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Don, and two daughters. 

Apr, 2021
73

Frederick Scott Reding ’73, of Venice, Fla.; Sept. 16. He was recruited to Brown to compete for the swim and water polo team that would go on to win the New England Championship. After earning his MBA from Columbia University securing a full fellowship both years, he had a long professional career in banking and finance as an assistant vice president of Union Trust Company (1974-1979), vice president of investment banking at Dean Witter Reynolds (1980-1987), director of investment banking at Nomura Securities International (1987-1996), CFO of Immuno Therapy (1995-1998), CFO of Zonagen (1998-2000), CFO of Molecular Staging (2000-2005), CFO of Biodel (2007-2007), and retired as chairman and CFO from the Leadership Group in 2012. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
73

Elizabeth Barclay Engen ’73, ’79 AM, of East Providence; Oct. 23, after a lengthy illness. She was a linguist and taught at the Rhode Island School for the Deaf. A lover of languages, she spoke Norwegian and Portuguese. She enjoyed sailing, riding horses, skiing, and visiting friends and family in Norway. She is survived by two sons and their spouses, and seven grandchildren. 

Related classes:
Class of 1973, GS Class of 1979
Apr, 2021
73

James T. Cahill ’73, of Petaluma, Calif.; Nov. 18, of cancer. He worked his entire almost 40-year career in the wine business, where he was very well respected. He was a life-long learner, a voracious reader, and amateur financial advisor. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and three children.

Apr, 2021
72

Stowe H. Tattersall ’72, of Edgartown, Mass., Vero Beach, Fla., and Lawrenceville, N.J.; Nov. 25, after a three-year battle with pulmonary fibrosis. He had been an assistant vice president in the private clients group of Bankers Trust Company in New York. He is survived by his wife, Peg; a daughter and son-in-law; a sister and brother-in-law; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
72

Donald S. McCullough ’72, of Boothbay, Me.; Sept. 29. He worked at Rolex, where he was top salesperson for many years. He enjoyed spending as much time as he could aboard his boat and was a member of the New York Yacht Club, the Cruising Club of America, and Lincoln County Rifle Club. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; two stepsons and their spouses; five grandchildren; and three sisters, including Sandy McCullough ’67.

Apr, 2021
71

Thomas E. Rosenbaum ’71, ’72 AM, of Mamaroneck, N.Y.; Sept. 16, of cancer. He worked for more than 40 years at the Rockefeller Archive Center in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. He also worked on behalf of the Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation of White Plains, N.Y., the United Way of Westchester, and several other organizations. He was the recipient of many awards for his service and dedication. He is survived by a sister, brother-in-law, niece, and nephew.

Related classes:
Class of 1971, GS Class of 1972
Apr, 2021
71

Thomas Goin ’71, of Jakarta-Pusat, Indonesia; Apr. 10, 2020, of cancer. He was a foreign legal adviser from 1984 to 2018. As a child of a Foreign Service officer, he grew up in Indonesia, Turkey, and Brazil. He traveled around the country giving lectures on law. He also coached teams for moot court. Previously, he worked at Bechtel Group and Thelin, Marrin, Johnson & Bridges, both in San Francisco. He enjoyed playing chess. He is survived by his mother, a sister, a brother, two nieces, and several cousins and friends.

Apr, 2021
69

Ronald S. Hutson ’69, of Norton, Mass.; Apr. 28, of COVID-19. His career began at the Providence Journal followed by work at the Call & Post, a weekly in Cleveland. He then covered City Hall for the Cleveland Press before joining the staff of the Boston Globe in 1974 as a general assignment reporter. While working at the Boston Globe, he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1975 as part of the newspaper’s coverage of court-ordered school desegregation. He also edited a series about race issues in Boston that was awarded a Pulitzer in 1984. After leaving the Globe, he worked as an adjunct professor of journalism at Suffolk University in Boston and at a nonprofit agency. He is survived by three daughters, two granddaughters, and two sisters. 

Apr, 2021
69

Harlan Hurwitz ’69, of River Edge, N.J.; Nov. 11. He had a career in dosimetry and software for cash handling systems. He kept active with a wide range of interests, including cars, languages, travel, and sci-fi novels and films. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; and a grandchild.

Apr, 2021
68

Diane Della-Loggia ’68, of Washington, D.C.; Sept. 23. She worked for more than 35 years at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, primarily on the Handbook of North American Indians, an encyclopedic multi-volume hardcover reference set about the prehistory, history, and cultures of the Indigenous peoples of North America. She retired in 2007 and was active in her church, book clubs, and volunteering in service positions that included writing letters to inmates as well as serving as a reading tutor for elementary students. She enjoyed gardening. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and a brother.

Apr, 2021
67

Edward C. Arnn ’67, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Nov. 1. He was a television anchor for WKTV in Utica, N.Y., for 13 years and a radio newscaster in the New York area for 25 years. Additionally, he taught science and math to children with special needs for 10 years. He is survived by his wife, Pam; a son; and two stepdaughters.

Apr, 2021
66

Maureen S. Levy Krasnow ’66, of Providence; Nov. 4. She was a fundraising professional for more than 30 years and helped ensure financial support for Meeting Street in Providence and for the Providence Public Library. She retired in 2010 but remained active with Hamilton House, an adult learning exchange in Providence, and Temple Sinai in Cranston. A proud alumna, she served as a grand marshal during her 25th reunion. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
65

John G. Poole ’65, of Stamford, Conn.; Sept. 27. After receiving an MBA degree from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, he began working with Merrill Lynch in investment banking. His career there took him to Chicago and New York. Later, he and two partners formed Stanwich Partners Inc., an investment firm in Greenwich and then Stamford, Conn. He was a member of Delta Upsilon, the University Club of New York, and Second Congregational Church. He is survived by three children, including son Jessie ’94; five grandchildren; and his brother Donald W. Poole Jr. ’60.

Apr, 2021
63

Stewart B. Hauser ’63, of Scotia, Pa.; Sept. 28. After Brown, he obtained his MBA from New York University, where he served as an adjunct professor while also working as a professor at Northampton Community College in Allentown, Pa. Former chair of D. Hauser Inc. and recognized as an industry pioneer, Stewart entered the world of freight forwarding in 1963 when he joined his parents’ business, D. Hauser, Inc. Within five years, he earned his customs broker’s and insurance broker’s licenses and was named president of the company. In 1971, he founded his own air freight company, Hauser Air Corp., which he incorporated into D. Hauser Inc. upon becoming chair in 1991. He had an active role on many committees within the NY/NJ Foreign Freight Forwarders & Brokers Association, including serving as president from 1993 to 2006 and, in 2007, receiving the NYC World Trade Week Global Trade Award for his leadership and years of educating the trade community. He also served with the National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association of America, which gave him its first Captain of Industry Award in 2016. He is survived by his wife, Michelle Maslow; two children and their spouses; two stepchildren and their spouses; a foster daughter; 10 grandchildren; and his former wife, Zoe Holmes.

Apr, 2021
63

G. William Greer ’63, of Richmond, Va.; Oct. 13. During his years at Brown, he took up the banjo and played in a folk group in the Providence area. After Brown, he moved to Chicago and graduated from the Institute of Design with a master’s degree in industrial design. He initially worked as a designer before pivoting to a career in marketing and research. His projects included historic architectural restoration throughout the southeastern United States. In the late 1970s, he moved to Richmond and was active in many cultural, educational, and philanthropic organizations as a board member and/or volunteer. In addition to playing the banjo, he enjoyed playing piano and singing in his church choir. He also dabbled in the antiques business while in Richmond, spending many weekends in Edenton, N.C., searching for Tidewater antiques, which he would refurbish and sell. He is survived by four children and their spouses, nine grandchildren, two sisters, and a brother.

Apr, 2021
62

Gilbert Peirce ’62, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Sept. 8. He worked briefly for the State Department before entering a 31-year career as an international banker, almost all of it with Bank of Boston. His work was mostly overseas, taking his family to Brazil, England, and Spain. In 1999, he retired to Vero Beach and pursued a lifelong dream of becoming a teacher at St. Edward’s School, from which he retired in 2003. He was a deacon at both Community Church in Vero Beach and Trinitarian Congregational Church in Wayland, Mass. He also served on the boards of Scripture Union, the Cleveland Foundation, and Project Impact. He is survived by his wife, Erika; a daughter; two sons, including Jay ’90; and nine grandchildren. 

Apr, 2021
62

Bruce W. Huffine ’62, of Stamford, Conn.; Nov. 29. He served in the U.S. Navy and then went on to earn an MBA from NYU. After working for JCPenney for many years, he started his own sales business until he retired in 2001. In retirement, he kept busy in the Stamford community. He volunteered at the Neighbor to Neighbor food pantry, was an avid curler at the Ardsley Curling Club, and was a member of the Stamford Men’s Club and Delta Phi. He and his wife enjoyed traveling with friends and especially enjoyed the trips they took with each grandchild when they turned 12. He was an avid collector of both stamps and political pins and enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandsons.

Apr, 2021
62

Robert B. Auchy ’62, of Agawam, Mass.; Oct. 24. He was a successful stockbroker and eventually transitioned to become a local business owner in Springfield, Mass. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and loved to laugh, travel, play sports, read, and spend time with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Rita; two children; six grandchildren; two stepchildren. 

Apr, 2021
61

Joseph N. Pierce II ’61, of Sebastian, Fla.; Sept. 14. He became a successful stock broker for Dean Witter Reynolds. After his retirement from Dean Witter Reynolds, he enjoyed spending time on the water in his speedboat and playing tennis. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and is survived by a daughter, three grandchildren, two sisters, a niece, and two nephews.

Apr, 2021
61

Andrea Henderson Mason ’61, of Albion, Me.; Nov. 24. After earning a master’s degree from RISD, she taught art at Lawrence Junior High School. She also enjoyed knitting and quilting and is survived by her husband, Gerald, a daughter, a son, two grandchildren, and a brother. 

Apr, 2021
61

Paul Kechijian ’61, ’64 ScM, of Manhasset, N.Y.; Nov. 30. He was a dermatologist in private practice in Great Neck, N.Y. He also held titles of clinical associate professor of dermatology at NYU School of Medicine and dermatology consultant at Holy Martyrs Armenian Day School. He was affiliated with North Shore University Hospital and New York Presbyterian/Lower Manhattan Hospital. He has authored several papers and is listed in Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare. He served in the U.S. Army and was the recipient of the Army Commendation Medal. He was also a member of the board of directors of the Brown Medical Alumni Association from 1976 to 1993, serving as president from 1982 to 1984. He enjoyed running, playing the banjo, and antique car restoration. He is survived by his wife, Janice; daughter Lisa Kechijian Aber ’06; son Douglas ’02; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1961, GS Class of 1964
Apr, 2021
60

George D. Tidd ’60, of Indio, Calif.; Aug. 29, of cancer. He served in the U.S. Air Force and rose to the rank of captain. For more than 35 years he worked for the Mobil Oil Corp. and lived in many places around the world before settling in Indio. He enjoyed reading and playing golf and is survived by his wife, Vera; a son; and a granddaughter.

 

Apr, 2021
60

Anthony J. Petrarca ’60, of Vandergrift, Pa.; Nov. 11. While playing Brown football he was drafted in the sixth round of the American Football League to play professional football for the then–Boston (now New England) Patriots but declined and became an English professor. He taught at Washington Township High School before embarking on a career as a college professor as well as working in depth on the equal rights movement at the college level. His early career included teaching at Edinboro Univ., Alliance College, and Gannon University before moving on to the English departments at the University of Pittsburgh and Community College of Allegheny County, from which he retired in 2013. He was an avid sports fan and was inducted into the Alle-Kiski Hall of Fame in 2012. He is survived by his wife, Judith; three children; and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
60

James A. McIntyre ’60, of San Diego; Aug. 16. He earned his JD from Stanford University Law School and spent his career at the San Diego law firm of McInnis, Fitzgerald, Rees, Sharkey & McIntyre as a civil trial attorney, where he became a named partner. Known as a formidable trial lawyer, he tried more than 115 civil jury trials, most notably winning the biggest jury award to date in San Diego County against Hartford Insurance Company in 1985. Jim had a long and impressive career as a legal professional and was nominated by President George H.W. Bush to the Federal District Court. In 1993, he was appointed as judge of the San Diego Superior Court and elevated to the Fourth District Court of Appeals in 1996, where he sat for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Victoria; four children; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
60

Carol G. Maclennan ’60, of Sarasota, Fla.; Aug. 25, from complications of a stroke. Toward the end of her junior year at Pembroke, Carol was recruited for a women’s internship program at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, N.J., where she learned FORTRAN and worked in the acoustics department. After graduating, she was hired in the Bell Labs acoustics department as a senior technical aide. She and her boss worked together for more than 35 years collaborating with space physicists around the world on data sent back by such spacecraft as Telstar, Voyagers I and II, Ulysses, and Galileo. Their office also worked on the Earth’s magnetosphere and she often traveled to set up and maintain instruments. She was promoted to the rank of technical staff and coauthored more than 200 papers on a variety of topics in geophysics. She was involved in the Murray Hill Canoe Club, which ran hikes, canoe trips, and ski trips for the Bell Labs community. Even into her late 70s, Carol was skiing, canoeing, hiking, and helping to run canoe trips to the Adirondacks. She enjoyed music, singing in several choral groups and getting involved in folk dance groups, and also enjoyed cross-stitch, knitting, and quilting. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren; and sister Iva S. Maclennan ’70.

Apr, 2021
60

Rosemary Smith Kostmayer ’60, of Baltimore; Sept. 27, of cancer. She worked as a financial spokesperson for Aegon insurance and later as an IBM systems engineer in both New York City and Washington, D.C. She continued to be active with Brown, interviewing prospective students in Maryland, serving as vice president of her class, as a class marshal in 1985, as cochair for the 60th reunion, and as her class webmaster. She was a member of the Associated Class Leaders Committee and received a Volunteer Leadership Excellence Award recognizing her numerous volunteer efforts. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
60

Harry H. Hersey ’60, of Williamsburg, Va.; July 21, after a brief illness. After graduating, he worked for the New Jersey Department of Transportation. He then entered a three-year training program with the U.S. Department of Transportation. As a highway engineer, Harry and his wife traveled across the country, living in California, Nebraska, and Texas prior to settling in Alexandria, Va., where they lived for 33 years before retiring and moving to Williamsburg. In retirement, he assisted his wife in her work with the Feingold Association of the United States and her publishing company Pear Tree Press. He is survived by his wife, Jane Hummerstone ’60; two daughters; two grandchildren; and brother-in-law Robert Hummerstone ’57.

Apr, 2021
60

Peter W. Conrad ’60, of Skillman, N.J.; Oct. 29. Before retiring, he was an adjunct professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark for many years; prior to that, he was an aeronautical engineer. He enjoyed rowing and was a member of the Carnegie Lake Rowing Association in Princeton. He is survived by a brother and sister-in-law and many cousins.

Apr, 2021
59

Peter J. Skowronek Jr. ’59, of Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.; July 21. During his 32-year career employed by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft/United Technologies, he worked for 10 years in East Hartford, Conn., then moved to Florida in 1970 and retired in 1992. Peter had a lifelong love of singing and was a 40-year member of the Choral Society of the Palm Beaches, serving as president several times. His motto was “always do the loving thing.” He served with many organizations including the East Hartford Jaycees, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics–Palm Beach County Chapter, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Palm Beach County. In retirement, he became a master gardener and volunteered at Mounts Botanical Garden. He is survived by his wife, Anne; four children, including son John ’86; nine grandchildren; a sister, and brother-in-law.

Apr, 2021
58

William E. Williams Jr. ’58, of Campton, N.H.; Nov. 1, after a short period of declining health. He had a career in real estate sales and development in New Jersey and with the Dunning Home Group in Hopkinton, N.H. He served two terms in the N.H. General Court and two terms on the Select Board in Sugar Hill. In retirement, he worked for the beaches in Wells and Ogunquit, Maine. In addition, he and his second wife operated the Inn at Skunk Hollow in Sugar Hill for almost eight years. He was an accomplished ice hockey official and past president of the National Ice Hockey Association for metropolitan New York and New Jersey, as well as a soccer official for almost 40 years and a baseball official in both New Jersey and New Hampshire. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He is survived by his wife, Lee; four children and their spouses; a stepson and his wife; nine grandchildren; one step-grandson; nine great-grandchildren; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
58

Robert W. Westgate ’58, of Newington, Conn.; Dec. 7, of complications related to COVID-19. He spent three years as an officer in the U.S. Navy deployed in Europe and throughout the Mediterranean. In 1964, he and his family moved to Newington and he began his career as a safety engineer at Travelers Insurance Company. He earned his MBA at night from the University of Hartford and spent 20 years as an evening instructor at Central Connecticut State University teaching organizational behavior and management courses. He sang in the Silk City Men’s Chorus and enjoyed woodworking projects and traveling to Maine. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
58

Harold A. Meyer Jr. ’58, of Washington, Conn., formerly of Ridgewood, N.J.; Nov. 8. He was active in the Brown University Club of NYC and New Jersey and involved with many local community activities. He is survived by his wife, Louise Burdett Meyer ’59; a daughter and son-in-law; son, Harold III ’86; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
58

Calvin E. Horsman ’58, of Denville, N.J.; Nov. 1, following a brief illness. Upon graduation from Brown and after serving in the U.S. Army, he returned to New Jersey to raise his family and pursue a career in insurance. He operated his own insurance agency in Morristown for years before retiring. He was a supporter of various local and regional charitable organizations and a longtime member of Saint Mary’s Church (Denville) and the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick Morris County. He is survived by a daughter, a son, four grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, three sisters, and many nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
58

Walter W. Fisher Jr. ’58, of Brookfield, Conn.; Jan. 23, 2020. He worked at MetLife in New York City and in the late 1960s accepted a position at Lederle Laboratories in Pearl River, N.Y. In 1974, the family relocated to Candlewood Shores in Brookfield, where they shared many years of adventure and happiness. Walter was a production manager for Davis & Geck for 35 years and in retirement remained active by doing volunteer work at the Congregational Church of Brookfield and at the Brookfield Library. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves and enjoyed traveling to England, France, Scotland, and Hawaii and spending time at his Bermuda timeshare. He is survived by three children, seven grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Apr, 2021
58

E. Robert Finnegan ’58, of Ormond Beach, Fla., formerly of Madison, Conn.; Oct. 24, after a long illness. He was a disaster recovery specialist with FEMA for 20 years and managed the 9/11 disaster relief center for FEMA in lower Manhattan. He spent time in Guam, Hawaii, and locations throughout the U.S. for months at a time after hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods. Prior to that, he was an owner of Beazley Realtors in Clinton, Conn., and during the 1970s he was principal of Daniel Hand High School in Madison, and East Hampton High School (Conn.). He enjoyed carpentry and sports, which included announcing the Friday night football games for Daniel Hand High School for years, and was an avid New York Yankees and Giants fan. He is survived by his wife, Carol; four children and their spouses, including daughter Kim Finnegan Drexler ’82; two stepchildren; and nine grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
58

Nancy Burgatti Dunleavy ’58, of Ocala, Fla., formerly of Miami, Cherry Hill, N.J., and Stratford, Conn.; Sept. 24. While living in Cherry Hill, she and her husband started Cherrydun, a kennel that bred Sealyham terriers. They moved to Stratford, were involved in the theater community, and began raising four foster children. In 1980 they moved to Miami, where Nancy worked for the U.S. Passport Office and continued to raise Sealyhams as well as perform volunteer work. In 2006, after her husband’s retirement, they moved to Ocala and advanced from dog breeders and trainers to judges and mentors. She is survived by a sister; a brother; brother-in-law Thomas Dunleavy ’60; and six nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
58

John W. Brown ’58, of La Jolla, Calif.; Sept. 15. He graduated from UConn School of Law and began his legal practice in Greenwich, Conn., specializing in trusts and estate planning. In 1974, he and his family relocated to La Jolla, where he established the estate planning division of Jenkins & Perry. He was later a founding member of Brown, MacDonald & Ravin. John played significant leadership roles in many local professional arts and charitable organizations over the years. He served as chair of the Estate Planning Trust & Probate Section of the San Diego County Bar Association and the La Jolla Probate Section. He was a longtime member and past president of the Rotary Club of La Jolla and also served on the boards of the San Diego Symphony, the Athenaeum Music & Arts Library, the San Diego Brown Club, and New Entra Casa. His wife became a federal prosecutor in the 1970s, and the two combined their practices and formed Brown & Brown in 1988. Their daughter Meredith Brown ’87 joined the firm in 1991, and John continued to practice with Brown & Brown until his death. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two daughters; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
58

Robert M. Barta ’58, of Maynard, Mass.; Sept. 29. He worked for General Dynamics Electric Boat Company until moving in 1965 to Rockville, Md., where he worked for the Vitro Corporation. In 1973, he moved with his family to Maynard and worked for Dynamic Research Corporation and later for the Bradford Corporation, retiring in 1996 after 22 years as a reliability engineer for Naval Sea Systems Command. He enjoyed grilling, traveling, and working on jigsaw puzzles and crossword puzzles and had a passion for partaking in Revolutionary War reenactment. He was a member of Theta Delta Chi. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter; three sons and daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Apr, 2021
57

Graham S. Rose ’57, of Williamsburg, Va.; Oct. 4. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Navy and, upon his honorable discharge in 1960, earned his JD from Harvard Law School. He was a trustee and deacon for many years at Garden City Community Church and later served as deacon at Williamsburg Presbyterian Church. Graham enjoyed the outdoors, priding himself in becoming a master naturalist with the Historic Rivers Naturalist Program of Williamsburg. He spent much of his time volunteering with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, determined to clean the waters by growing and maintaining his own oysters in the Lafayette River. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; a sister; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
57

Donald R. Lawton ’57, of Gansevoort, N.Y.; Sept. 28, of Parkinson’s disease. He was an electrical wholesaler for many years, owning his own business, Econ Electric, and later working at M. Gold & Sons and Clifford Gray Electrical, before retiring in the late 1990s. An avid sports enthusiast, he ran long-distance track in high school and college, played tennis, and was a Red Sox fan, who was able to meet his hero Ted Williams and the entire 1949 Red Sox team after winning an essay contest about his favorite team. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; four children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; three great-granddaughters; a sister; and two brothers.

Apr, 2021
57

David C. Lewis ’57, of Providence; Dec. 2. He was the professor emeritus of Community Health and Medicine and the Donald G. Millar Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown. In 1982, he founded the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and directed the center for 18 years. Prior to founding the center, he was chair of the Department of Community Health at Brown. He founded a think tank advocating for prevention and treatment rather than incarceration for substance use disorders called Physicians and Lawyers for National Drug Policy. He advised presidents, members of Congress, governors, and philanthropists in all aspects of the field of addiction, from recovery to decriminalization and legalization of drugs. He was a member of numerous boards, including the Drug Policy Foundation, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse, and the Coalition on Physician Education in Substance Use Disorders. He was an internationally known author of more than 400 publications. In December 1997, he received the American Medical Association’s Education and Research Foundation Award in recognition of “outstanding contributions and leadership in championing the inclusion of alcohol and other drug problems into the mainstream of medical practice and medical education.” He also received the W.W. Keen Medical Alumni Service Award from the Brown Medical School Alumni Association for “the physician leader and educator whose contributions represent the best of both clinical and academic medicine.” He enjoyed photography and traveling and was an active member of the North American Nature Photography Association and the National Association of Photoshop Professionals. His work can be seen at www.davidclewisphotography.com. He is survived by daughter Deborah Lewis ’84; son Steven ’87; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and seven nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
57

Stephen D. Cutler ’57, of Brookline, Mass.; Nov. 24. After earning his MBA at Babson College, he embarked on a successful career in investment management. In 1962 he was called to serve in the Air National Guard. Upon his return he held leadership positions at the Massachusetts Bay Company, Barings America, and ultimately Essex Investment Management, for which, since 1989, he was president and senior portfolio manager. He was active in his community and an engaged philanthropist who supported numerous causes, including Combined Jewish Philanthropies and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He was a trustee of Babson and established the Stephen D. Cutler Center for Investments and Finance, a world class lab that advances financial education for the entire Babson community. He was a member of Pi Lambda Phi. He is survived by his wife, Alice; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
57

Fred Behringer ’57, of Worcester, Pa., formerly of Ocean City, N.J. and Lansdale, Pa.; Dec. 3. Throughout high school and during summers while in college, he worked as a part-time sports editor for The Ambler Gazette, and upon graduating from Brown, he was hired as a managing editor. As the community newspaper group grew, he eventually served as vice president and executive editor for more than a decade. Other than a brief stint (1960-61) on active duty in Washington, D.C., as a member of the U.S. Air Force National Guard during the Berlin Crisis, he ran the editorial side of Montgomery Newspapers until his retirement in 2001. He then served as editor of GAP, the magazine of the Golf Association of Philadelphia, and spent 14 years as a writer and editor-in-chief of New Jersey Golf, the New Jersey State Golf Association magazine. He also was the author of Where Should We Have Stopped? The Story of a Remarkable Family. He was an active member of numerous newspaper societies and spent 12 years teaching courses in mass-media law, ethics, writing, and editing at Temple University. He was a member of the Pennsylvania Society of Newspaper Editors, the Penn State University–Pennsylvania Society of Newspapers Liaison Committee, and the Philadelphia Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, serving as president of each. He also served as a national ethics chairman for the Society of Professional Journalists, was cochairman of the 1980 National First Amendment Congress, and was secretary-treasurer of the First Amendment Coalition of Pennsylvania. At the local level, he served as a president of the King of Prussia Rotary Club and Ambler Public Library, playing a major role in the formation of the Wissahickon Valley Public Library. In addition to numerous state and national writing and design awards, he received the Freedom of Speech award from Temple University and the Ambler Jaycees Distinguished Service award. He enjoyed spending time with his family at his Ocean City home, playing golf, and following the Philadelphia Eagles and Phillies. He is survived by a daughter, son-in-law, and granddaughter. 

Apr, 2021
56

Wesley M. Vandervliet ’56, of Canton, Conn.; Dec. 6. He had a long career in public education beginning at Bloomfield High School, where he taught from 1963 to 1968. In 1968 he assumed asocial studies teaching position at Bulkeley High School in Hartford and became Social Studies Chairman for the city in 1971. Later in his career he became a school administrator and retired in 1994 as vice principal at Quirk Middle School. He enjoyed being on the water, either canoeing or sailing. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a son and daughter-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
56

George A. Midwood III ’56, of Sandy Springs, Ga.; Oct. 15, from stroke complications. After Brown, he entered the U.S. Army, where he served for two years as a counterintelligence analyst, then returned to civilian life for his doctorate studies at Tufts University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He left Fletcher and began an executive position at Exxon, living in Hong Kong, Malaysia, India, and Pakistan, and rose to the position of comptroller. During those years he became a competent speaker in German, Japanese, French, and Russian. In 1979, at age 45, he joined American Cyanamid as treasurer. In 1987 he was signed as treasurer and executive vice president by RJ Reynolds Nabisco and presided over one of the largest leveraged buyouts in U.S. corporate history. He moved his family to Georgia and in addition to golf, he enjoyed fishing, skiing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; a son and daughter-in-law; a stepdaughter and her husband; five grandsons; and four nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
56

Joseph B. Donahue ’56, of Noblesville, Ind.; Dec. 23. He was a sales representative for Anaconda American Brass in 1956, rising to regional sales manager before retiring in 2001. His career took him to Cincinnati for 22 years and eventually to Indianapolis. He volunteered at Handicamp (a Lutheran disabilities ministry) and was active for some time with the Miracle Place in Indianapolis. He worked with inner city youth tutoring after school and with the Boy Scouts of America. He was an avid runner who accomplished three marathons and enjoyed backpacking throughout the U.S. He is survived by his wife, Linda; five children; four grandchildren; two stepdaughters; and four step-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
55

Nancy Harrold Thomas ’55, of Richmond, Va.; Nov. 18, from COVID-19. She worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital before marrying. She later was a tour guide for the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, an active community volunteer, and an H&R Block consultant. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, William; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2021
55

James R. Smith ’55, of Erie, Pa.; Oct. 20. While at Brown, he majored in English literature, played on the football team, and engaged in the ROTC program with plans to become a pilot in the U.S. Air Force. He became a pilot and served in both Korea and Vietnam, achieving the rank of Major USAF, and upon completion of his Vietnam duty he was given the assignment of command pilot for Gen. Graham Commander, U.S. Forces in Japan. This assignment moved Jim and his family to Japan on a three-year tour ending in 1970. His final duty was at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio, where he ran their flight simulator training program. In 1976, after 18 years in the military, he retired and moved to Erie, where he took a job with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals as a territory representative. During his 24-year career at Pfizer, he was honored with their Vice President’s Council award. He retired in 2000 and enjoyed playing golf and traveling. He is survived by four sons, a daughter-in-law, six grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece and three nephews.

Apr, 2021
55

William H. Sargent ’55, of Kitty Hawk, N.C.; Nov. 7. An engineer and rocket scientist by profession, he spent most of his working life in aeronautics at Atlantic Research and belonged to The Propulsion Club, a group of engineers and rocket scientists. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He sang in his church choir, was a lifelong fisherman, and enjoyed cooking and hosting parties. He is survived by six children and their spouses, as well as numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
55

J. Philip O’Hara ’55, of Brooklyn, Conn., formerly of Providence; Oct. 18. He worked in the book publishing industry for 30 years before returning to Brown in 1987. After spending his first year in the Department of Athletics, he joined the Student Activities Office, from which he retired in 2011. He was a founder of the Brown University Mediation Project, oversaw the renovation of Faunce House, and was instrumental in his role as faculty adviser to the class boards. He spent his life in service to other people, volunteering with many organizations. He was the 2010 recipient of a Brown Excellence Award. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; three children; two stepsons; 17 grandchildren; four great-granddaughters; and a sister.

Apr, 2021
55

Kenneth E. Doonan ’55, of Providence; Dec. 2. He was an employment skills counselor in Providence for three years. He then worked as a rehabilitation counselor for the State of Rhode Island Office of Rehabilitative Services. While employed with ORS he returned to school and earned a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling. He worked in state service for 28 years, retiring as a disability examiner. After a few years in retirement, he worked as an employment skills teacher and coach at the Outreach Program at Rhode Island College. He and his wife taught ballroom dancing for Cranston Adult Education Programs in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Traveling the world together, they visited more than 20 countries, museums, and archeological sites and enjoyed the cuisine all around the world. As a devout Catholic, he always found a local Catholic church to attend Sunday mass no matter what continent or time zone. He enjoyed classical music, opera, and the theater and was a subscriber to the Rhode Island Philharmonic for nearly 40 years and the Boston Ballet for more than 15 years. He is survived by his wife, Loretta, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
55

Nancy Stevens Carlson ’55, of North Eastham, Mass.; Oct. 24, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s. She taught elementary school for 28 years in Barrington, R.I., Folcroft, Pa., and at the Lynch Elementary School in Springfield, Mass. She won several teaching awards, including a commendation from the mayor of Springfield for innovative teaching of our political system to her young students. She was active in Foster Congregational Church, interviewed aspiring candidates for Brown, and enjoyed gardening and hiking with the Eastham Hiking Club. She is survived by her husband Robert P. Carlson ’55; two sons, including Douglas ’83; and two grandsons.

Apr, 2021
54

Nicholas C. Siotka ’54, of Towson, Md., formerly of Longs, S.C.; Sept. 27. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Korean War and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Loretta; two daughters; two stepchildren; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
54

Keith G. Milligan ’54, of Seekonk, Mass.; Oct. 1. He was an underwriter executive assistant for Amica Insurance, earning his CPCU designation in 1966. He retired in 1996 after 40 years of service. In 1968, he was one of eight people that founded the Special Signal Fire Association. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the Masons, several antique car clubs, and Mensa.

Apr, 2021
54

Barbara Reuben Levin ’54, of Hartford, Conn.; Nov. 19. An accomplished artist, her paintings won juried prizes and awards throughout her career, and her work lives in individual museum and corporate collections. She was active in the Connecticut Watercolor Society and in an artists’ critique group in Greater Hartford. She joined the New Yorker readers group at the West Hartford Public Library and enjoyed discussions with her husband about matters of the day, with her sons-in-law to learn more about their work and interests, and with her grandchildren to hear about their triumphs and struggles. She is survived by her husband, Ira; three daughters; two sons-in-law; and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
54

Haven P. Cammett ’54, of Lake City, Fla.; Nov. 22, following a long illness. He retired from the U.S. Navy after 36 years as a Naval navigator. He then spent the next 20 years working as a data processor with the Jacksonville Electric Authority. He was a Vietnam War and Korean War veteran and enjoyed flying his private plane. He is survived by his wife, Pearline; four children; four grandchildren; and four sisters.

Apr, 2021
54

Richard G. Brodrick ’54, of Barnard, Vt., formerly of New Canaan, Conn.; Oct. 5. After graduating from Harvard Law School, he spent 10 years at a small New York firm specializing in trusts and estates before he founded his own firm, Cross, Brodrick, & Chipman, with an emphasis on corporate law. The firm merged in 1980 with the large international firm of Kelley, Drye & Warren. Dick served on its executive committee until his retirement in 2000. The last 10 years of his career focused on representing many broker-dealers and investment advisors. He provided legal and compliance services for brokerage firms, investment banking and advisory firms, discount brokers, and many of the largest specialist firms on the New York Stock Exchange. He managed and participated in major arbitration and enforcement actions. For three years after his retirement, he served as an arbitrator for the National Association of Securities Dealers in Phoenix. While living in New Canaan, he headed the Child Guidance Clinic. He is survived by his wife, Anne; two daughters; a son; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
53

Ann Peterson Zablocki ’53, of Ridgewood, N.Y.; Aug. 14. After graduating, she headed to Sweden for a year to explore her Swedish background, then volunteered to teach children of American military families in Nuremberg, Germany. She obtained a master’s in education and a master’s in ESL and from 1960-1967 taught elementary school in Montreal. She taught in Hartford, Conn., from 1967-1971 and finally moved to New York, where she taught for the NYC Department of Education until her retirement in 1999. She enjoyed traveling and reading and is survived by her husband, Bernard, and a son.

Apr, 2021
53

Joan Powers Valinote ’53, of Dover, Mass., and Fort Myers, Fla.; Nov. 27. She was a teacher prior to raising her family, then returned as a teaching assistant in the Dover elementary school system until retiring. She ventured around the world with the Semester at Sea Program and enjoyed spending summers at her Matunuck Beach ocean cottage with family and friends. She was an avid reader, enjoying sports, travel, and everything Irish. She will be remembered for her thoughtfulness, friendship, and many beautiful handwritten notes and cards. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; four sons, including John ’83; five grandchildren; two sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
53

Patricia Keane Miller ’53, of Valparaiso, Ind., formerly of Dowagiac, Mich.; Nov. 2. She taught kindergarten and second grade in Dowagiac and retired in 1994 from the Valparaiso school system. She enjoyed reading, gardening, and listening to Irish music. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
52

John E. Sarles Jr. ’52, of Brewster, Mass.; Sept. 19, of cancer. He began his career at J. Walter Thompson in New York City, then spent the majority of his career at Reader’s Digest in Pleasantville, N.Y. He began running in his mid-40s culminating in the completion of five New York City marathons. A deep thinker and consummate philosopher, he enjoyed chess, Sudoku, and golf. He was an advocate of Self-Realization Fellowship, following the teachings of Paramahansa Yogananda, and meditated for hours each day throughout his life. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by three children and their spouses, seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and 17 nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2021
52

Andrew M. Quinn ’52, of Houston; Oct. 21. He served in the U.S. Army as an intelligence specialist during the Korean War and later joined the marketing headquarters of Gulf Oil in Pittsburgh. Marketing assignments with Gulf took him to Iowa, Montana, and Illinois, and in 1975 he was transferred to the law department in Houston to assist the litigation attorneys. In 1984, with the merger of Gulf Oil and Standard Oil Company of California, the company was renamed Chevron and he was appointed the administrative manager for the domestic work of the law department, managing seven offices across the country. He retired in 1992. He is survived by three daughters, including Elizabeth Quinn Kurth ’81; a son; two sons-in-law; a daughter-in-law; 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
52

Rosemarie Duys Doane ’52, of Canaan, Me.; Nov. 30. After graduating, she moved to Belgium to perfect her French. Upon returning to the U.S., she moved to Maine and ran an equestrian school. Subsequently she became a teacher and worked at Canaan Elementary School for 26 years. She enjoyed spending summers on Martha’s Vineyard bicycling, gardening, and reading. She is survived by her husband, Robert; three stepchildren; a step-granddaughter; and six nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
52

Laura Martin Bell ’52, of Providence; Nov. 20. She taught English as a Second Language for many years in Providence and was still teaching ESL at International House in Providence as recently as February 2020. During the early 1970s, she was instrumental in the protests that led to the desegregation of the Providence Public Schools. She was passionate about our natural environment and is survived by three sons, including Joshua ’75; seven grandchildren, including Sarah J. Bell ’05; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

Helen McBride Ryer ’51, of Glens Falls, N.Y.; Nov. 28. She was a homemaker and is survived by two daughters, a son, seven grandchildren, a great-granddaughter, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
51

Joyce Borgeson Novak ’51, of Gloucester, Mass.; May 9, 2019. Due to her husband’s work, she moved 21 times, but called Gloucester home. Along the way and everywhere she lived, she became a champion for obtaining services for her disabled son and those like him, including fighting for special education inclusion. She remained an advocate for rights and services until her declining health rendered her unable to continue. She was an avid fan of hockey and football. A lifelong competitive athlete, she was an accomplished tennis player and golfer, water skier, and snow skier. She was creative with watercolor paintings, planning parties, and she enjoyed gardening. She is survived by four children and their spouses and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

William B. MacColl Jr. ’51, of San Francisco; Oct. 18, following a short illness. Most of his professional career was with Wells Fargo Bank in San Francisco, from which he retired as a vice president after 33 years. In 1949, he joined the U.S. Navy to fulfill his dream of becoming a fighter pilot. He flew single engine propeller planes and jets during the Korean War. Always a Navy man, he sported his wings pin on every jacket lapel and never missed the Blue Angels during Fleet Week. He married and together with his wife they skied at Sugar Bowl, hiked the High Sierra Camps, off-roaded in Idaho, and enjoyed time at Stinson Beach. As a member of the Montgomery Street Motorcycle Club and a founding member of the Boho Bikers, Bill’s avid love for motorcycling took them on innumerable excursions touring the western states, including a trip to the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally in South Dakota. He served for four decades as the treasurer of the Laguna Honda Hospital Volunteers, was a volunteer for the Friends of Recreation and Parks, and was a member of the Floor Committee for the San Francisco Cotillion. He enjoyed collecting trains and regularly operating a fleet of self-made model boats at Stow Lake in Golden Gate Park through the SF Model Yacht Club. He is survived by daughter Lauren MacColl Maass ’83; son Ian ’84; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

Robert S. Lynn ’51, of Center Valley, Pa.; Oct. 8, of COVID-19. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Air Force as a first lieutenant during the Korean War. Upon discharge, he attended the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business and then joined AT&T Bell Laboratories. He spent 32 years at AT&T before retiring in 1989. He enjoyed traveling with his wife Joanne before her passing, reading, and spending time at his summer residence in Ocean City, N.J. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

Henry A. Daden ’51, of Simsbury, Conn.; Nov. 26. He was a plant engineer, beginning his career at Bethlehem Steel and working at several local companies, including Stanley Works and Veeder-Root. He retired in 1991. He actively volunteered in Simsbury and oversaw the construction of the town’s first water treatment plant. He enjoyed woodworking and built his family home, as well as building furniture and dollhouses for family and friends. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He is survived by four daughters and their spouses, eight grandchildren, a great-grandson, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
51

John W. Cnossen ’51, of Uxbridge and Douglas, Mass.; Oct. 19. He served three years as an officer and six years as a Reserve officer in the U.S. Army, achieving the rank of captain and commanding a field artillery battery during the Korean War. He spent several years as a mechanical and electrical engineer in the aircraft industry in California and Connecticut before returning to Uxbridge as a local businessman and teacher of physics and math at Uxbridge High School from 1970 to 1986. In addition, he, along with his wife and sons, owned and operated Glen Acres restaurant and the Quaker Motor Lodge for many years. An avid lover of flying, he owned his first airplane at the age of 15 and enjoyed taking his family and friends flying. He was a former president at Douglas Camp Meeting and distributed Bibles with the Gideons International around the world. He is survived by four sons and their spouses, 12 grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

Herbert J. Burrows ’51, of Bowie, Md.; Oct. 13. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Navy and went on to serve in various positions while earning advanced degrees. He was an instructor at the U.S. Naval Academy during the 1960s, which led to a professorship at Charles County Community College (now Southern Maryland University). He retired after more than 20 years of service as dean of mathematics and science. He took pride in never missing a day at work in 40 years. He enjoyed poetry and traveling abroad, especially to London. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; three children; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
51

Bradford I. Boone ’51, of Warwick, Mass.; Sept. 24. He was a writer and a graphic designer. He wrote features for small magazines and produced newsletters, pamphlets, promotional materials, books, and magazines for numerous organizations. His favorite was the Bayside Banjo Aggregation, which he cofounded in the 1980s. He served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1952 to 1954 and he had a passion for sailing. He also collected antiques and played a variety of musical instruments. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses and by nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
50

E. Franklin Stone ’50, of Seattle; Aug. 20. He received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia and was drafted into the Navy. Upon discharge, he completed his residency in pediatrics at St. Christopher’s Hospital at Temple University followed by fellowships in developmental pediatrics at St. Christopher’s Hospital and at Johns Hopkins University. In Seattle, he worked in the Clinic for Child Study at the University of Washington, and later at Seattle Children’s Hospital in the birth defects clinic. He served five years as an Army civilian in Berlin, Germany, working as a developmental pediatrician. He enjoyed attending Seattle Opera and the Pacific Northwest Ballet and hiking in the Olympic Mountains. He was a Cub Scout master and supported scouting and youth soccer as a parent. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a stepson; a sister; and many nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
50

Arthur M. Oliva ’50, of Providence; Oct. 20. He was a retired math teacher for the East Providence School Department. He was a World War II Army veteran and a communicant of St. Sebastian Church.

Apr, 2021
50

Louis V. O’Brien ’50, of Novato, Calif.; Nov. 3. He spent 28 years at the Merck Marine Magnesium Plant in San Francisco, 17 years as plant manager. After retiring, he continued working part-time as a management consultant specializing in small business development for 20 years until fully retiring in 2000. He was a U.S. Army Air Corps World War II veteran and is survived by a daughter, two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a son-in-law.

Apr, 2021
50

Richard F. Novak ’50, of Greenport, N.Y.; Aug. 7. He worked in sales for IBM for more than 40 years and moved several times, including living on a sailboat in the U.S. Virgin Islands. At age 90 he went skydiving and at age 95 he enjoyed speed boating. He was a World War II Army veteran and enjoyed tinkering with old boats, jeeps, or anything with a motor. He is survived by four children and their spouses and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
50

Jack S. Macfadden ’50, of Rockville, Md.; Oct. 20, 2019. He was a retired New York City public school teacher. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, was a member of Jewish War Veterans of the USA, and was a volunteer with Meals on Wheels and Special Olympics. He enjoyed bicycling. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn; two children; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
50

George L. Hanshaw Jr. ’50, of Oakmont, Pa.; Dec. 6. He had a long career with U.S. Steel. He was a World War II veteran and in retirement enjoyed splitting his time between Pennsylvania and Florida, where he played golf and entertained. He is survived by three stepchildren, six step-grandchildren, two step-great-grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Apr, 2021
50

John C. Halliwell ’50, of Barrington, R.I.; Nov. 21. After serving in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II, he graduated from Brown and joined the Grinnell Corporation in Providence learning building design for mechanical systems and equipment. In 1954 he left Grinnell and founded Halliwell Engineering Associates (HEA), which grew to include plumbing, HVAC, and electrical systems design. Two of his sons later joined the company and added civil, structural, and environmental engineering services. In 1987, Walt Disney World hired HEA to be its lead engineer for environmental engineering and that relationship continues today. Throughout his career he owned several powerboats and sailboats and enjoyed sailing between Newport and Ft. Lauderdale. He also enjoyed playing the ukulele and created the Wicky-Wacky Ukulele Club, where he taught people how to play and made many new friendships. At age 90 he wrote the story of his time in the Air Force during World War II, entitled Flying Nightmare and published by Amazon Publishing in 2018. He is survived by his wife Diane and three sons.

Apr, 2021
50

Antoinette Loiacono “Billie” Dupont ’50, of Bloomfield, Conn.; Sept. 2, from complications of lung and heart disease. She graduated from Harvard Law School in 1954 among its second class of women and began her legal career as co-counsel for President Eisenhower’s Commission on the Application of Federal Law to the Virgin Islands before working briefly on Wall Street. She moved to New London, Conn., in 1956 and went into private practice. In 1977 Gov. Ella T. Grasso appointed her to the Connecticut Superior Court; six years later she was elevated to the appellate court. She served as chief judge from 1984 until taking senior status in 1997. During this period, she also served on two task forces on gender and justice. As a chair of the Task Force on Gender Bias in the Connecticut Courts, she did groundbreaking work to make the courts fairer to women. She also presided over the Connecticut Judges Association and continued to be an active member of the court and to sit on cases until 2016. She became a director of The Day in 1986 and was named to the newspaper’s board of trustees in 1989. She was a member of Zonta and the League of Women Voters. She is survived by daughters Ellen Dupont ’77 and Antonia D. van der Meer ’79; son William ’83; son-in-law Peter N. van der Meer ’79; seven grandchildren, including Nicolaas van der Meer ’06; two great-grandchildren; and two brothers.

Apr, 2021
50

Edward J. Dalton Jr. ’50, of Mansfield, Mass.; Nov. 23. Prior to retiring as a production planner, his career spanned 35 years at the Foxboro Company. He was a communicant of Saint Mary’s Church in Mansfield and a former member of the Foxborough Country Club and enjoyed playing golf and traveling. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; four children; six grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
50

Norman T. Campbell ’50, of Newington, Conn., and Ocean Park, Me.; Oct. 11. He was an engineer in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Texas prior to joining Pratt & Whitney, where he had a 37-year career as an engineer. His focus was air pollution emissions from jet engines. He enjoyed the ocean and served as commander of the New Britain Power Squadron. He was active in his church, where he sang in the choir and held lay roles for many years. He is survived by his second wife, Naoma; daughter Karen Campbell ’77 AM; a son; three stepchildren; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and two nephews. 

Apr, 2021
49

Louise Lisiecki Wesolowski ’49, of Suffield, Conn.; Sept. 18. She worked in the pathology lab at Hartford Hospital for several years prior to getting married and raising a family. Later, she taught biology at Bristol Central High School (Conn.) for 17 years and tutored children whose first language was Polish. She was active in civic organizations and enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and playing bridge and Scrabble. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two sons and daughters-in-law, and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
49

John D. Pittenger ’49, of Wall, N.J.; Nov. 8. In 1953 he founded a home building business known as Pittenger Builders. He was a member of the Wall Township Lions Club, the Freemasons Asbury Park Lodge and director and longtime treasurer of the Shore Builders Association. He was a U.S. World War II Navy veteran and is survived by his wife, Rosemarie; four children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
48

Myron L. Stein ’48, of Amherst, Mass.; Sept. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and completing residencies in psychiatry and child psychiatry, he taught, consulted and began a private practice. He was assistant professor of child psychiatry at Cornell Medical School and SUNY Syracuse. In 1965, he helped found the Center for Preventive Psychiatry in White Plains, N.Y., and served as its associate director until 1973. In 1974 he moved to Amherst and consulted for Pioneer Valley hospitals and mental health clinics and Amherst and Northampton schools. He is survived by his wife, Iso; three sons, including Alex ’84 and Andrew ’86; three daughters-in-law; and a grandson. 

Apr, 2021
48

Virginia Wilson Smith ’48, of Duxbury, Mass.; Oct. 9. She was a homemaker. While at Brown, she was a member of the fencing team, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. She was an avid gardener and landscaper, the family genealogist, a talented artist, and an award-winning photographer as a member of the South Shore Camera Club. She is survived by four sons, including Douglas ’71; three daughters-in-law; and three granddaughters. 

Apr, 2021
47

Gustav Getter ’47, of New Rochelle, N.Y.; Oct. 18. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy and attended Brown for officer training. He also earned a master’s degree in civil engineering from Polytechnic Institute. Upon return to civil life, he worked as an engineer prior to founding his own firm. His engineering firm­—which through a variety of partners and mergers always bore his name—created internationally recognized and award-winning designs, specifically the Hush House, which continues to be in use by the U.S. Navy and other armed forces in several locations to this date. The Hush House is a building in which a jet can be parked and turned on in order to test it, while keeping the outside quiet and clean from exhaust. Despite selling his firm—Getter, Segner, and Gironda—to Sverdrup Corporation and retiring, he remained available to answer questions from those who continued to seek his advice. He was awarded the Department of the Navy’s Naval Facilities Engineering Command Certificate of Commendation and the American Council of Engineering’s Engineering Excellence Award. He authored chapters on highways, bridges, pavements, and harbor engineering in Civil Engineering Data Book, a standard reference work. Gus sponsored two foster children located in Manila and visited them on multiple occasions. He volunteered with the United Way of Westchester County, was a member of Temple Israel Brotherhood, and enjoyed skiing into his 80s and ballroom dancing with his wife Ruth, who died just three days before he did. He is survived by daughter Elizabeth Getter ’81; son Chip ’76; a son-in-law; and two step-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
48

Paul J. Rosch ’48, of Yonkers, N.Y.; Feb. 26, 2020, due to complications from a fall. He was chairman of the board of The American Institute of Stress, clinical professor of medicine and psychiatry at New York Medical College, and a clinical professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He also served as president of the New York State Society of Internal Medicine, vice president of the International Stress Management Association, and chairman of the International Foundation for Biopsychosocial Development and Human Health. He was the recipient of many honors, including the New York State Medical Society’s Outstanding Physician Award, the Schering Award, and the American Rural Health
Association’s International Distinguished Service Award. His many memberships included The American Academy of Experts in Traumatic Stress and the Scientific Advisory Council of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Foundation. He was editor-in-chief of Stress Medicine and was on the editorial board of several journals.

Apr, 2021
48

Michelina Rizzo ’48, of Providence; Oct. 19. She started her teaching career in 1949 in Providence, where she taught at Kenyon School until transferring to Brigham School in 1956. Upon obtaining her master’s from Middlebury College in Vermont in 1959, she taught at Central High School from 1960 to 1967, including a one-year hiatus after receiving the Charles E. Merrill Fellowship to study abroad in Italy during the 1962-63 academic year. After Central she transferred to Classical High School, from which she retired in 1982. Throughout her career, she was an active member of the teacher’s union and many educational associations. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by a sister-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
48

Ruth Gadbois Matarazzo ’48, of Portland, Ore.; Nov. 13. After graduating with honors in psychology, she remained at Brown for one term as a graduate school teaching assistant. During that time she met her future husband, Joe, also a psychology graduate, but after being advised by several professors that it would be harmful to their marriage if they both became psychologists, Ruth applied for, and was accepted into, a one-year business program for women at Radcliffe. Upon graduation, she accepted a position in the personnel department of Marshall Field’s department store while her husband started his PhD program at Northwestern Univ. After learning that men were earning more than twice the wage of women doing the same work, she was compelled to continue her doctoral studies once they moved to St. Louis in 1950. She received her PhD in 1955 from Washington University. She was the only woman in her graduating class and during her clinical training was the first woman admitted into the VA’s hospital internship program. In 1955 she and her husband both accepted positions at Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts General Hospital. She was a research fellow and later became a staff psychologist. In 1957, both she and Joe were recruited to establish the first medical psychology department at University of Oregon Medical School, Oregon Health & Science University’s precursor, now called the department of behavioral neuroscience. She was the second full-time female faculty member at the school and went on to serve as a distinguished researcher, clinician, and educator. She specialized in neuropsychology, treating patients with brain injuries and psychiatric conditions and serving as a well-regarded expert witness in court cases. Another of her achievements was her leadership in helping women in medicine and science. She arrived at the school eight months pregnant and worked until she gave birth to her first child. Her example helped change policy for working women at OHSU. She served as a liaison to the Association of American Medical Colleges advocating for women faculty, including the participation of women on medical school committees. She served on numerous editorial review boards and held leadership positions in local, regional, and national psychological associations. She was the recipient of the 2007 Presidential Award of the American Psychological Association for her lifetime of professional contributions and public service. She enjoyed classical music and the opera and served as a founding member of the board of directors of the Portland Opera Association. She is survived by her husband, Joe ’47; two daughters, including Elizabeth Holman ’81; son Harris ’79 and his wife; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild.

Apr, 2021
48

Janet French Laughlin ’48, of Chelmsford, Mass.; Nov. 4. After marrying and raising a family, she obtained her real estate license and worked at Emerson Real Estate in Chelmsford and Westford. She was an active member of the Chelmsford Garden Club and enjoyed skiing, eventually building a ski house in Intervale, N.H. She is survived by five children and their spouses, including daughter Pamela Emerson ’79; and seven grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
48

Donald G. Harrington ’48, of Endwell, N.Y., and Colchester, Vt.; Nov. 15. He worked for Pratt & Whitney in Hartford, Conn., before joining IBM in Schenectady in 1950 as a customer engineer in product testing. He moved on to become manager of laboratory operations at Glendale and retired as controller of IBM Glendale in 1984. He enjoyed collecting and restoring antique automobiles and for 20 years showed his cars at meets and drove them in various parades. He was president of the Southern Tier Model As. He was also a ham radio operator and enjoyed flying radio-controlled planes and woodworking. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and is survived by two daughters, a son, three sons-in-law, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
48

Patricia Aloe Haight ’48, of Pasadena, Calif.; Oct. 29, of kidney failure. She worked in public relations in New York City before marrying and starting a family. She enjoyed the Dodgers, USC football, and playing bridge and golf. She belonged to five different golf clubs in two states and was an official in the 1984 Olympic Games. She collected more than 200 silver spoons dating back to the 19th century and enjoyed traveling, visiting 68 countries on five continents. She was active in community organizations, including 25 years with the Pasadena Tobacco Prevention Coalition. She is survived by five daughters and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
43

Marion Jagolinzer Goldsmith ’43, of Greenville, R.I.; Nov. 13. She earned a master’s degree in child development and family relations from the University of Rhode Island in 1971 and became an innovator in childcare programs in the State of Rhode Island. She served in the State House under Gov. John H. Chafee, creating standards for home-based childcare and helping to upgrade licensing for all Rhode Island daycare centers. She was founder, president, and honorary board member of the Mount Hope Day Care Center and headed Project ENABLE (Education and Neighborhood Action for Better Living Environment) of the Urban League of Rhode Island. She was also an adjunct professor and instructor in the psychology and sociology departments at Rhode Island College. Among her many accomplishments were the creation of a family day care education program, including a 10-part TV series (Family Day Care and You) produced locally by WPRI and subsequently used throughout the U.S. and Canada. She served as president of the 50th and 75th reunions of the Brown University Class of 1943. In memory of her deceased daughter Dorothy, she, along with her husband, sister, and extended family, founded—under the auspices of the Tomorrow Fund—a summer day camp for young cancer patients at Hasbro Children’s Hospital. Camp Dotty has served children ages 4-7 since 1996. Additionally, she and her sister Lois Jagolinzer Fain ’49, with their father Carl Jagolinzer, established the annual Dorothy and Dr. Carl Jagolinzer Commencement Recital and Concert of Brown University’s Music Department in 1981, in memory of their mother Dorothy, who died in 1945. She was president of the Rhode Island Chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women and later served as president of the Sarasota-Manatee section. She served on the board of the Brown Alumni Club and the board of the Brandeis University National Women’s Committee, and was involved in Volunteers in Action, Volunteers in Rhode Island Schools, Rhode Island Congress of Parents and Teachers and many other organizations. Her numerous honors include a proclamation by the State of Rhode Island Permanent Advisory Commission on Women for Service to Women in Rhode Island, the Rhode Island Association for Home Day Care for outstanding concern and leadership, and the Citizen of the Year Award from the South Providence Tutorial Program. In her later years, she wrote stories about her mother and father and family times together and created a small book full of memories and family history for her children and grandchildren. She was known for her handwritten notes in her inimitable turquoise ink and cards to commemorate all kinds of occasions, her thoughtfulness towards others, and for always being fashionably dressed. She enjoyed bringing people together, cooking, and entertaining, and was famed for her apricot whip pie and chicken paprikash. She is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, and sister Lois Jagolinzer Fain ’49.

Apr, 2021
48

Carmine J. Capalbo ’48, of Greenville, R.I.; Oct. 3. After serving in World War II and upon discharge from the U.S. Army, he graduated from Brown and then received his medical degree from Georgetown Medical School. Surgical internships followed at Rhode Island Hospital, where he remained as a surgical staff member for 46 years. He was also a clinical associate professor emeritus of surgery at Brown. His memberships included the American College of Surgeons, New England and Providence surgical societies, and Rhode Island and Providence medical societies. He was known as “Cap” or “Cappy” to staff colleagues and truly enjoyed patient care and clinical practice. He is survived by five children and their spouses; eight grandchildren, including Sarah Engle ’11; two brothers, including William ’57; and two sisters-in-law.

Apr, 2021
48

George F. Bland ’48, of Salisbury, Md.; Nov. 4. He was a longtime IBM executive before being named assistant dean of student services at N.C. State University School of Engineering. He was also named associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. Subsequently he was a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Virginia. He enjoyed flying, sailing, model railroading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Brown Bland ’55, and two sons.

Apr, 2021
47

Elizabeth Reilly Socha ’47, of East Providence, R.I.; Oct. 7. She was employed for many years as chief clinical psychologist for the State of Rhode Island. A long-time member of the American Psychological Association, she was a vocal advocate for those with intellectual and emotional challenges. She was an active member of the Pembroke Club of Providence for more than 70 years, serving in many positions, including past president and hospitality chairperson. She was also a member of St. Martha’s Rose and Altar and the East Providence Historical Society. Elizabeth was a master quahogger and instructed many generations in its finer points. She is survived by two daughters; three sons, including Stephen ’76; 10 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
47

James C. Sisco ’47, of Smithfield, R.I.; Dec. 17. He worked in the insurance industry for Mutual of New York. He also worked as an accountant for many years before retiring. He was an active member of AARP and the Sons of Italy and a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He is survived by a daughter, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
47

Raymond S. Barnstone ’47, of Framingham, Mass.; June 17. After Brown, he went on to graduate from MIT’s Sloan School of Management. He had a long and successful career in financial management at Raytheon, Booz Allen, Honeywell, and Codex. He was also a part-time professor of finance for more than 40 years at Northeastern’s D’Amore-McKim School of Business. He was a member of Temple Beth Am in Framingham for more than 50 years and was active in its Brotherhood. In retirement he enjoyed photography and traveling with his wife Helen, exploring New England, California, Europe, and Japan. He is survived by four children, including son Wayne Barnstone ’77; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Apr, 2021
46

Myron Gordon ’46, of Palm Desert, Calif.; Dec. 6. Upon completion of his medical degree at the University of Buffalo and his Naval service, he became a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Flower Fifth Avenue Hospital (New York City), chief of staff at Metropolitan Hospital (New York City), and in 1980 chairman of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Albany Medical Center. He enjoyed playing tennis, dancing, and visiting the Saratoga Race Track. He is survived by his wife, Karol; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandsons.

Apr, 2021
45

William F. Kahl ’45, of Slingerlands, N.Y.; Dec. 4. While obtaining his master’s degree, he taught at Boston University. After earning his PhD he then moved to Simmons College, where he served as provost for almost a decade. He left Simmons to join Russell Sage College in Troy, N.Y., and served as president from 1976 until his retirement in 1988. He was a historian and strong advocate for women’s education. At both Simmons and Sage he focused on modernizing the curriculum for women’s education, opening the way for women to have careers beyond the prescribed roles of that era. He was active in the community, serving on multiple boards, including the Hudson River Valley Association, Albany Symphony Orchestra, State Bank of Albany, Tenement Museum in New York City, Albany Institute of History and Art, Wildwood School, and Albany Academy for Girls. He was an avid reader and enjoyed walking in nature and visiting museums and historical sites. He and his wife traveled extensively in Europe, Turkey, and China and spent the summers enjoying the arts by listening to classical music at Tanglewood, watching the ballet at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center, or attending an opera at Glimmerglass. He is survived by his wife, Mary, and two children.

Apr, 2021
44

Russell T. White ’44, of Umatilla, Fla.; Sept. 24. A retired World War II Navy commander, he was employed by New England Telephone Company for 35 years. He was a volunteer with the Vero Beach and Indian River County Humane Society and was a member of the Telephone Pioneers of America. He is survived by three children and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
43

Joseph R. Lombardo ’43, of Norwell, Mass., formerly of West Hartford, Conn., and Duxbury, Mass.; Sept. 23. He served on the Hartford Board of Education and was employed by Connecticut Mutual for 34 years. He had been an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army Air Forces in Europe during World War II. In retirement he and his wife traveled to Europe and all across the U.S. following their passion for the arts, music, and culture. He was not just a patron of the arts but also performed as a bass player in jazz bands. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and nephews John Lombardo ’76, Michael Lombardo ’79, and Jeffrey Lombardo ’84.

Apr, 2021
41

Mildred Robinson Field ’41, of Sarasota, Fla.; Dec. 8, at 100 years of age. After graduating, she worked as a social worker. She then married and started a family and was active at Temple Emanuel, also serving as president of the Miriam Hospital Women’s Association. Mildred and her husband retired to Sarasota in 1973, where both became active members of their community. They volunteered at the Senior Friendship Center and joined the Longboat Key Club, where they played tennis and Mildred served as a president of the tennis association. From 1985 until 2012 Mildred was a dedicated volunteer at the Sarasota Visitor and Convention Bureau. She enjoyed cooking and baking and is survived by four grandchildren and four great-granddaughters.

Apr, 2021
41

Guy W. Chipman Jr. ’41, of Boerne, Tex.; May 3, at the age of 100. He founded the Guy Chipman Company Realtors in 1946 and for more than 50 years was a prominent realtor in both San Antonio and Boerne. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Juanita; seven children and stepchildren; 15 grandchildren; and 22 great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
40

Maxwell A. Sturtz ’40, of Somers, N.Y.; Nov. 11, at 101 years of age. He was a retired attorney and World War II veteran. He enjoyed singing, fishing, and performing in community theater. He is survived by his wife, Carol; daughter Laura Sturtz Kleinman ’77; son Ted ’80; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
40

Elizabeth Hunt Schumann ’40, of Providence; May 6, at 102 years of age. She lived for eight years in Champaign-Urbana, Ill., and five years in Swarthmore, Pa., before moving back to Providence in 1962. Upon her return, she earned a master’s in library science from URI in 1968 and worked as a reference librarian at Brown in the 1970s and 1980s. She was active in the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity and attended the 1963 March on Washington, where Dr. Martin Luther King gave his “I Have a Dream” speech. She was also active in the League of Women Voters. While living in Laurelmead Cooperative, she helped establish and manage its library. She knit and crocheted hats and blankets for newborns in hospitals as well as for friends and family, and she loved to read, especially biographies and books about history. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren, including Thomas Schumann ’06; three great-grandchildren; sister Constance Hunt Del Gizzi ’51; a sister-in-law; and six nephews.

Apr, 2021
40

Elizabeth Gleason Caldwell ’40, of Port Royal, S.C.; Nov. 6. She worked in the U.S. State Department Foreign Service and served as executive secretary to several ambassadors in Latin America until her marriage in 1950 in Caracas, Venezuela. She and her husband, who was a career civil engineer with the U.S. State Department, continued to reside in various locations throughout Latin America and in Washington, D.C., before retiring in 1969 to South Carolina. She is survived by three nephews.

Apr, 2021
39

Teresa Gagnon Mellone ’39, ’62 AM, of Barrington, R.I.; Sept. 21, three weeks shy of her 101st birthday. She graduated with a degree in French and Italian, having entered as a freshman at the age of 15. As an undergraduate, she also had the opportunity to hone her art skills with courses at RISD and later received a master’s in linguistics. Education was extremely important to her and her teaching career spanned all grade levels. After college, she taught medieval and European history and Italian at Woonsocket (R.I.) High School. After she was married, she taught all grades at the U.S. Dependents Elementary School in Ansbach, Germany, where her husband was stationed. Already fluent in French and Italian, she learned to speak fluent German while there. After returning to the United States, she resumed her teaching career in Barrington and taught second grade for 24 years at Primrose Hill School. She was an active alumna, having served as class president and as a member/officer of the Pembroke Club, a member of the Commencement Pops Committee, Brown Street Series, Brown Community of Learning in Retirement, Pembroke Center Council, Faculty Club Board of Managers, and a longtime Brown Annual Fund fundraiser. She enjoyed music and playing the piano and was on the board of directors of the Rhode Island Philharmonic and a member of the Friends of the Philharmonic. She was also part of the original fundraising for the restoration of the Crescent Park Looff Carousel. She was a member of the Barrington Garden Club for many years and a devoted fan of the New England Patriots, calling herself their head cheerleader. She was proud to be a recipient of the Brown Bear Award and featured in the July/August 2019 BAM story “100 Years of Gratitude.” She is survived by three daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren, including Justin Monti ’99; and five great-grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1939, GS Class of 1962
Jan, 2021
FAC

Sergei Khruschev, of Cranston, R.I.; June 18. He was a retired senior fellow at the Watson Institute, the son of former Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, and a rocket engineer and computer scientist who developed guidance systems for rockets and cruise missiles. As a rocket engineer and computer scientist in the Soviet Union, he played an active role in developing guidance systems for missiles, including cruise missiles launched from submarines from 1958 to 1968. He then took up writing and lecturing. His areas of expertise included Soviet economic and political reforms, U.S./Soviet relations from 1950 to 1964, and the history of the Soviet space program. In addition, he helped his father write his four-volume memoir in Russian and then translated it into English. He moved to Rhode Island in 1991, shortly after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, to lecture at Brown as a visiting scholar on the Cold War. He remained a senior fellow at the Thomas J. Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs and a fellow at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He also taught at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I. While at the Watson Institute, he taught, lectured extensively around the country, and wrote three books about his father and the Cold War. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1999, though he also maintained his Russian citizenship. He is survived by his wife, Valentina; a son; and a granddaughter. 

Jan, 2021
FAC

Sture K.F. Karlsson, of Charlottesville, Va.; July 17. He received his PhD in engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1958 and after a year as a visiting researcher at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, he joined the Brown faculty in the engineering department. He taught in the area of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. During those years, he was also a visiting professor at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, and the National Cheng Kung University in Tainan, Taiwan. During his tenure at Brown, he published numerous research articles and became an active member of the Brown Orienteering Club and the New England Orienteering Club. He is survived by daughter Lynn-Marie Karlsson ’74; a son and daughter-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
FAC

Thomas G. Breslin, of Bristol, R.I., and Delray Beach, Fla.; Mar. 7. He was a urological surgeon with privileges at Rhode Island Hospital, Fatima Hospital, and St. Joseph’s Hospital and successfully ran his private practice, Breslin Urosurgical, for 31 years. He was appointed to the Rhode Island Board of Medical Review and was a clinical instructor at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was one of the first to practice groundbreaking surgical techniques in Rhode Island, including cryosurgery and lithotripsy. He was active in his community as past president of the Bristol Highlands Improvement Association, a member of the Harbor Commission, and fleet surgeon and former board member of the Bristol Yacht Club. He enjoyed numerous Block Island Race weeks, Newport to Bermuda races, and cruising with his family aboard his yacht, the Watch. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Carolyn; five children; 11 grandchildren; and brother, Robert H. Breslin ’50.

Jan, 2021
MD 94

Michael Chalfin ’94 MD, of Newton, Mass.; July 2, of cancer. He completed his residency in psychiatry at Cambridge Hospital, where he then dedicated himself to caring for underserved and traumatized patients for the next 21 years. He served a vital role in the psychiatry department at Cambridge Health Alliance as director of psychopharmacology and he enjoyed being an assistant professor in the psychiatry department at Harvard Medical School. He was the recipient of the Alfred S. Margulies Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching and he coauthored Formulation and Treatment of Suicidality in Patients with Trauma. He enjoyed morning bike rides and birding. He is survived by his wife, Sharon Jacobs ’89, ’94 MD; a daughter; a son; his mother; and two sisters.

Jan, 2021
MD 89

Jeffrey E. Harb ’89 MD, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Mar. 7, of Ewing sarcoma. He was a physician at Sansum Country Medical Clinic in Solvang, Calif., before entering into private practice. From 1999 to 2011, he cared for the health of Santa Barbara residents before leaving the practice to lend his expertise to the insurance sector. He was an avid golfer who could always be found on the local Santa Barbara fairways devoting his weekends to his quest to make it on the Senior Tour. He is survived by two children, his mother, a sister, a brother, and his former wife, Kristi.

Jan, 2021
MD 08

John N. Bergeron ’80 MD (see ’77).

Related classes:
MD Class of 2008, Class of 1977
Jan, 2021
GS 02

Drew M. Love ’02 AM, of Albany, Ga.; June 6. He received degrees from Paine College (Ga.), where he pledged the Eta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta Univ., and a degree in microbiology-immunology from Alabama State Univ. He also obtained multiple certifications from the American Society for Quality. He worked with biotechnology manufacturers, such as Abbott Laboratories, Amgen, Biogen Idec, Cardinal Health, and Wyeth, to maintain quality standards. In 2014, he joined the Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research as a compliance officer. In 2016, he joined Ernst & Young as part of the advisory risk transformation practice and served as manager in quality and compliance. He provided consultancy to clients across the U.S. and around the world. He is survived by two brothers, two aunts, three uncles, and several cousins.

Jan, 2021
GS 01

H. Jack Feibelman ’01 AM, of Cranston, R.I., formerly of New York City; June 19. Having immigrated to the U.S. at the age of 15, he graduated from Chillicothe Business School in Missouri and moved to New York City, where he eventually secured a job as a clerk at Coro Jewelry. He advanced to bookkeeper and was reassigned to Providence. While working at Coro, he obtained a business administration degree from Northeastern University and rose to credit manager, assistant comptroller, and finally director of product development. In 1966, he formed Feibelman & Krack, which represented select jewelry manufacturers to the wholesale market. Separately, in 1967, Jack formed A&H Manufacturing Company to manufacture and market his revolutionary concept of hanging display cards for earrings. He was a longtime member and officer of Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths Association and belonged to the Fashion Jewelry and Accessories Trade Association. He was a member of Temple Beth-El and Temple Sinai and volunteered on the Endowment Committee of the Jewish Alliance. He served on Miriam Hospital’s board of governors, its finance committee, and the Miriam Foundation Board of Trustees. In 2014, he was honored as Miriam Hospital Person of the Year. He enjoyed traveling and playing bridge. He is survived by a daughter, Barbara Feibelman ’73; a son-in-law; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren, including Marcy Feibelman ’04; and two great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
91

Lena P. Dame ’91 AM, of Brentwood, Calif.; July 17. During her career, she traveled the world serving as an English teacher and school librarian and published a book before settling in California to be near her grandchildren. She was known by all for her remarkable energy, dedication to family, and willingness to help others. She is survived by three children, six grandchildren, and four siblings.

Jan, 2021
GS 90

Nancy E. Olsen Ross ’90 AM, of Kingston, R.I.; June 14, from mesothelioma. After graduating high school, she hitchhiked around Norway, Denmark, and Sweden, and remained in Norway as a nanny for a while. She graduated from Marietta College in 1962 and served two years in the Peace Corps in Thailand. She married and then worked at America’s first Job Corps Center for two years teaching high school dropouts in Kentucky. She returned to Rhode Island in 1968 and raised a family in Kingston, with the exception of living one year in Indonesia from 1982 to 1983. Throughout her adult life, she taught reading and English. She received two English as a Second Language (ESL) master’s degrees,  one from Rhode Island College and a second from Brown. Nancy worked 26 years in South Kingstown’s public school system. In her free time, she volunteered with South Providence Neighborhood Ministries and spent four summers in a girl’s orphanage in Romania. She is survived by her husband, Neil; three children; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
GS 75

Peter H. Laurie ’75 PhD (see ’65).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1975, Class of 1965
Jan, 2021
GS 75

John C. Drake ’75 AM, of Niagara Falls, N.Y.; Jan. 25, 2020. He was the executive director at Center City Neighborhood Redevelopment Corporation in Niagara Falls and was also an adjunct professor at Niagara County Community College. When he was not helping his community or teaching, John enjoyed rowing, running marathons with his wife, and reading. He was also a passionate Boston Bruins fan and is survived by his wife, Estelle; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Jan, 2021
GS 73

Edward D. Kleinbard ’73 AM (see ’73).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1973, Class of 1973
Jan, 2021
GS 72

Carl DeSimone ’72 AM, of Providence; June 13, after a brief illness. He taught for a short time in Switzerland. After returning to Providence with his family in the late 1970s, Carl worked in the family business, New England Egg Service, until he resumed teaching in the Providence School System. He taught history and English at Classical High School until his retirement. Carl was also an actor and singer and performed with numerous local theatre and music groups, including the Rhode Island Civic Chorale & Orchestra. His favorite role was Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof. In recent years he was a soloist at Saint Mary’s Church in Cranston. He was active in his community and with many organizations, including World Wildlife Fund, Narcotics Anonymous and LGBTQ equality. He also continued to teach at Hamilton House, an adult learning exchange in Providence, and several senior centers. He is survived by two daughters and a brother.

Jan, 2021
71

Enrique Sauer ’71 PhD, of Orlando, Fla.; July 26, of pneumonia as a result of COVID-19. He became a citizen of the United States and started his career as a scientist in the aerospace industry. In 1980, he moved to Orlando after taking a position at Martin Marietta, from which he retired in 2008. He is survived by his wife, Vera; two sons and their spouses; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Jan, 2021
69

Patricia Tanis Sydney ’69 MAT, of Newtown, Pa.; July 31. She produced her own works of art and taught at Mount Ida Junior College (Mass.), Bucks County Community College (Pa.), and Philadelphia Community College. Additionally, she worked as a curator for the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown, Pa. In 1998, she coauthored The Philadelphia Ten: A Women’s Artist Group, 1917-1945. She served on the board of the Youth Orchestra of Bucks County and enjoyed playing tennis, traveling with her family, and attending classical music concerts. She is survived by her husband, A. David Sydney ’68; three daughters, including Sarah Sydney ’00; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

Jan, 2021
GS 69

Burton N. Kendall ’69 PhD, of San Francisco; June 22, from complications of ALS. After graduating, he began teaching at UC Santa Barbara. He left teaching in 1973, having learned a trade through his physics research, and was hired by Systems Control, Inc., a fledgling computer company. He later worked at Measurex and then moved on to Octel Communications. He was a cofounder of LifeMasters (originally HiLife) in South San Francisco, which used cutting edge computer tech to manage the health of patients with chronic illnesses. He joined SnapTrack in 2000 as they were being acquired by Qualcomm and spent the rest of his career at Qualcomm, working on location technology for cell phones. He retired from Qualcomm in 2015. He volunteered with the Exploratorium, was a docent at the California Academy of Sciences, and enjoyed leading walking tours with City Guides. He also traveled extensively. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three children and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021
GS 67

Gerard H. Martineau ’67 ScM, of Falmouth, Mass.; June 26, one day short of his 83rd birthday. He was a physics instructor at Portsmouth Abbey School in Portsmouth, R.I., for eight years. He later worked at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and for the United States Air Force radar site PAVE PAWS Cape Cod. Finally, he worked at the Naval Undersea Systems Center in Newport, R.I., retiring after more than 20 years. He was an avid supporter of the arts and frequently attended classical music concerts both in Boston and Cape Cod. He is survived by two sisters-in-law, a niece, and a nephew.

Jan, 2021
GS 65

M. Gene Taylor ’65 ScM, ’68 PhD, of Kingston, Pa.; June 6, after a lengthy battle with Parkinson’s disease and COVID-19. He was long employed as a physics professor at Bloomsburg University (Pa.) and was previously a physics professor at the American University in Cairo and Wilkes University (Pa.). He held a pilot’s license and was a member of the Civil Air Patrol. He avidly followed the stock market and enjoyed traveling with his family around the world, especially to Egypt. He also enjoyed Ohio State University football, NASCAR, skeet shooting, tinkering with his cars and computers, and following the weather. He is survived by his wife, Wagiha Abdel-Gawad Taylor ’62 AM; three daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021
GS 63

Donald P. Wei ’63 ScM, of Monroeville, Pa.; Aug. 1. He worked as a senior systems analyst at Westinghouse Research and Development for 36 years. Donald was an avid reader and Steelers fan and enjoyed cooking, gardening, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Yuling Li Wei; three sisters; and many nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021
GS 63

Neil B. Tame ’63 MAT, of Standish, Me.; June 5. Prior to attending Brown, he taught two years at Limington Academy (Me.), one year at Greely Jr. High (Me.), and after his army service, six years at Monmouth Academy (Me.). After Brown, he was a Shell Merit Fellow at Cornell University and attended Michigan State University. ln 1965 he became the head of the math department at the new Oxford Hills High School and for several years was curriculum coordinator for math throughout the school district, helping teachers and students with innovative math programs. He conducted many workshops and conferences throughout the state and was one of the founders of PiCone Math League. He was proud of his math teams as Oxford Hills was very dominant in competitive math competitions in Maine and New England. He was a member of the Association of Teachers of Math in Maine and the first secretary for the Maine Association of Math Leagues. He was awarded the Maine Presidential Award in 1983; the meeting at the White House with the president was one of the highlights of his life. Oxford Hills Chamber of Commerce named him citizen of the year in 1985. ln retirement he volunteered in schools with fun after-school math sessions. He enjoyed landscaping and winters in Florida. He is survived by his wife, Martha; three daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters; two brothers; and several nieces and nephews.

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