The Classes

Photo of Marva E. Dates Belt, Loretta Dates Sheilds, Marjorie Filson Zettler and Mary Ann Filson Smith

Pembroke SISTERS Marva E. Dates Belt ’57, far right, and her sister Loretta Dates Shields ’60, far left—shown with Marjorie Filson Zettler ’60, back row center, and Mary Ann Filson Smith ’57, standing front—were the only two Black women pictured in the 1957 yearbook. Dates Belt was a first-generation-to-college student from Baltimore at a time when that city’s public schools were entirely segregated, she told her niece, Karen E. Dates Dunmore ’86, in a conversation recorded by the Pembroke Center Oral History Project in October 2018. “I don’t think I had ever seen a white person until I got to high school,” Dates Belt said. “The thing that kind of disturbs me even this many years on is that there were no expectations.” Dates Belt added that she felt welcomed amongst the “smart, determined” women on College Hill. She studied American Civilization, went to Simmons College for her master’s degree, and worked at Boston Public Library before returning to Baltimore, launching a long and successful career at the Enoch Pratt Free Library. She married a fellow librarian; they were active in the civil rights movement and were members of the Maryland Congress of Racial Equality, said the Baltimore Sun. Dates Belt died in December 2018. 

Oct, 2020
GS 70
Fashion Soldier
Glamour and heartache in a memoir from André Leon Talley ’73 AM
Read More
André Leon Talley
Related classes:
GS Class of 1970, Class of 1991
Oct, 2020
23
No Lunch Breaks
A chemist’s COVID schedule
Read More
Natasha Vargo
Related classes:
Class of 2023, Class of 2021
Oct, 2020
21
State of Play
This spring, Brown overhauled its athletics program. Varsity teams went club and vice versa, protests and lawsuits ensued, and some teams were reinstated—all in the shadow of the pandemic’s halt to competition. A look at the scoreboard.
Read More
portrait of Brynn Smith ’11
Oct, 2020
21
Gigs Are Out the Window
But a student band plays on
Read More
Orange Guava Passion band
Related classes:
Class of 2021, Class of 2023
Oct, 2020
21
Comedy of the Century
The Brown Jug is back
Read More
Image of Brown Jug
Oct, 2020
21
Coming to COVID Country
Brown’s international students face ever-growing tangles of anti-immigrant red tape to get here, and stay here—not to mention the world’s highest number of COVID-19 cases.
Read More
Image of Babak Hemmatian and Gaia-Marie Gerbaka
Oct, 2020
16
The Ethics Team
At Microsoft, Sharon Lo ’16 ponders how products can harm society
Read More
Image of Sharon Lo
Related classes:
Class of 2016, Class of 2019
Oct, 2020
10
Fresh Ink
Books by Bess Kalb ’10, Sarah Shun-lien Bynum ’95, and Larry Tye ’77
Read More
Books by Bess Kalb ’10, Sarah Shun-lien Bynum ’95, and Larry Tye ’77
Oct, 2020
10
Fierce Women
Empowering young women leaders
Read More
FierceWoman Project
Oct, 2020
91
Rules of Thumb
Clubbed Thumb, the trailblazing theater company, hopes its 25th year won’t be its last
Read More
Clubbed Thumb theater Men on Boats
Oct, 2020
90
The Feedback Loop
How our inventions have changed our culture
Read More
Ainissa Ramirez TED talk
Related classes:
Class of 1990, Class of 2001
Oct, 2020
87
Digital Pioneers
A decades-deep computer art collection
Read More
Ben F. Laposky’s Electronic Abstraction 4
Oct, 2020
83
A Man in Focus
For Lynne Sachs ’83, Film About a Father Who was a decades-long effort
Read More
Lynne Saches
Related classes:
Class of 1983, Class of 2004
Oct, 2020
83
Going Up Against Goliath
He took on Providence Mayor Buddy Cianci and R.I. political corruption. Now he’s coming for Zuckerberg. The unlikely moral crusade of David Cicilline ’83.
Read More
portrait of Congressman David Cicilline ’83
Oct, 2020
82
Under the Hood
The descendant of a Klansman probes the racial violence in his family background to expose larger truths about the history of white America.
Read More
Portrait of Edward Ball ’82
Oct, 2020
71
Flower Power
Upcycled blooms bring joy to Brooklyn.
Read More
Caroline Gates Anderson BloomAgainBklyn
Sep, 2020
FAC
Joy and Determination
Women’s gymnastics coach Jackie Court led the team through many victories.
Read More
Jackie Court image by Stew Milne
Aug, 2020
MD 93

Navin Singh ’93 MD (see Khalil Sivjee ’90). 

Related classes:
MD Class of 1993, Class of 1990
Aug, 2020
GS 88
In the news

Denice Spero ’88 PhD, president and chief business officer of ProThera Biologics, announced the company had entered into a licensing agreement with Takeda Pharmaceuticals to develop plasma-derived therapies for the treatment of acute inflammatory conditions. ProThera was co-founded by Yow-Pin Lim and Douglas Hixson, faculty members at Brown's Warren Alpert Medical School.

Aug, 2020
GS 88

Laura Hendrickson ’88 AM, ’08 PhD (see Patricia MacBride Hendrickson ’52).

Aug, 2020
GS 85

Kathleen M. Doyle ’85 MAT published her second children’s book, Blue’s River, a historical and environmental history of any town that settled near a river. This particular story happens to focus on Dover, Delaware. For centuries, Blue’s River has taken care of people and other living beings. Now the river cannot give anymore. Can a 10-year-old girl and a 400-year-old Great Blue Heron save Blue’s River? 

Aug, 2020
GS 84

Jeff Wallach’s ’84 AM debut novel, Mr. Wizard, was published in April with Open Books. The story follows two brothers who learn via DNA testing that their supposed father is not who they thought.

Aug, 2020
GS 78

Alan Mills writes: “Seeking to reconnect with old friends as we all sought to cope with the coronavirus, a group of friends from freshman year at Brown (West Quad, Class of 1978) decided to hold a Zoom reunion (now a biweekly get together). It has been great to remember why we became such close friends at Brown. Raymond Lane organized the Zoom and Abby Cohen, Jane and Chuck MacFarland, Amy and David Mantel, Villu Maricq, Elliot Steger, Eileen O’Hayer Towne, Karen Zaccor and I all participated.”

Aug, 2020
GS 73

Bernard Mendillo ’73 AM (see ’70).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1973, Class of 1970
Aug, 2020
GS 66

Charlie Shumway ’66 AM (see Bob Sanchez ’58).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1966, Class of 1958
Aug, 2020
GS 65

Jim Moody ’65 ScM (see Bob Sanchez ’58).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1965, Class of 1958
Aug, 2020
GS 65

Susan Adler Kaplan ’65 MAT (see Bob Sanchez ’58).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1965, Class of 1958
Aug, 2020
GS 56

Barbara Olins Alpert ’56 AM (see ’52).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1956, Class of 1952
Aug, 2020
GS 16

Alexander Kithes ’16 ScM was elected to the Woonsocket City Council (R.I.) in a particularly contentious special election. The election was reported on by the Boston Globe as an indicator of political trends throughout Rhode Island going into 2020. Alex writes: “I’m the most progressive person elected to the Woonsocket City Council in recent history.”

Aug, 2020
GS 14
Cosmic Tales
A storyteller for the stars
Read More
Kimberly Kowal Arcand
Aug, 2020
GS 13

Cindy Andrews Elder ’13 MPA (see Barbara Kirk Hail ’52).

Related classes:
GS Class of 2013, Class of 1952
Aug, 2020
GS 11
Ready to Pivot
Leading R.I.’s fight against COVID-19
Read More
Dr. Nicole Alexander-Scott illustration by Noa Denmon
Related classes:
GS Class of 2011, Class of 1987
Aug, 2020
GS 05

Michael Furman ’05 AM joined Rhode Island Medical Imaging as a radiologist after having completed his residencies at the Alpert Medical School in internal medicine and diagnostic radiology. He did his undergraduate studies at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and graduate studies at Brown. Dr. Furman earned a post-baccalaureate pre-medical certificate from Bryn Mawr College and his MD from the Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Widely published with extensive teaching experience, he is a member of the American Roentgen Ray Society, American College of Radiology, and the Radiological Society of North America.

Aug, 2020
GS 04

Ramadan Hussein ’04 AM, ’09 PhD, now at the University of TÜbingen in Germany, stars in the National Geographic four-part series Kingdom of the Mummies. Contact Ramadan at Ramadan.hussein@uni-tuebingen.de.

Aug, 2020
22
Remote Reimagined
Thrown onto Zoom last spring, professors prep for whatever “back to school” might mean.
Read More
Marie-Anne Barron ’22
Related classes:
Class of 2022, Class of 2019
Aug, 2020
21
Rotten Culture
Why removing “bad apples” won’t fix the police
Read More
Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve
Aug, 2020
21
Flying High
Record-breaking long jumps
Read More
Ijeoma Uche Brown Track
Related classes:
Class of 2021, Class of 2022
Aug, 2020
21
Old-School Photography
Five minutes with Hasiba Zandi ’21
Read More
Hasiba Zandi cyanography self-portrait
Related classes:
Class of 2021, Class of 2022
Aug, 2020
20
Justice, in Community
A non-punitive approach
Read More
Illustration by Anthony Russo
Related classes:
Class of 2020, Class of 2021
Aug, 2020
19
A Jamaican American in Paris
Six Questions for Makedah Hughes ’19
Read More
Image of Makedah Hughes
Related classes:
Class of 2019, Class of 2021
Aug, 2020
19
Summer of Understanding
Exploring racism in a new coming-of-age novel
Read More
Daven McQueen The Invincible Summer of Juniper Jones
Aug, 2020
16

Evan McManamy helps run a donation-based grocery delivery nonprofit in Providence. Contact Evan at cartwheelRI.org.

Aug, 2020
14

Emily Kassie was nominated for a Peabody Award for her documentary Detained. The film is an immersive documentary which explores the rise and expansion of America’s immigration detention system.

Aug, 2020
13

Seamus Kirst’s first children’s book, Papa, Daddy, and Riley, was published on May 5 by Magination Press.

Aug, 2020
13
Super Bowl
Breakfast cereal for the 21st century
Read More
Magic Spoon
Aug, 2020
10

Brian Chin writes: “This year would have been my 10-year reunion. My college ’90s cover band, Firetruck, would have been performing for our class, but instead we are postponed. In the meantime, we are trying to sort out how we might do something virtually.”

Aug, 2020
06
Breaking Free
Alum directs Pixar short film
Read More
Edwin Chang Pixar film Wind still
Aug, 2020
04

Will Shapiro has been focused on building technology to understand the spread of COVID-19. In particular, Topos, the company he founded, has put out a COVID-19 Compiler, which allows users to look at COVID-19 data in relation to other relevant geospatial variables. This work was profiled by The Cooper Union and has been featured on news outlets such as the Rachel Maddow Show.

Aug, 2020
04
Disparate Data
The COVID-19 Compiler predicts trouble spots and trends
Read More
Screenshot of Topos
Related classes:
Class of 2004, Class of 2021
Aug, 2020
03
A Language, Liberated
Nitana Hicks Greendeer ’03 is a leader in the effort to bring the Wôpanâak language back.
Read More
Portrait of Nitana Hicks Greendeer ’03 with her daughters
Related classes:
Class of 2003, Class of 2019
Aug, 2020
99
Safe Space
Astronaut Jessica Meir ’99 on being at zero gravity and zero risk of COVID-19
Read More
Jessica Meir ’99 plays with a water droplet in space
Related classes:
Class of 1999, Class of 1987
Aug, 2020
98

Veronica Carbaja is running in the November 2020 race for mayor of El Paso, Texas.  If she wins, she will be the first Chicana/Latina and second woman to hold that position in the city’s history. She writes: “I am running as a fronteriza (borderland woman), lawyer, and environmentalist. I have been an attorney at Texas RioGrande Legal Aid, Inc., since 2004 and my practice areas have included environmental justice, community development, housing (real estate, rentals, discrimination), and natural disasters, including the mass shooting of August 3, 2019, among others. I am currently helping our advocates navigate COVID-19 issues impacting our client communities. I also self-published a bilingual children’s book last year.” 

Aug, 2020
98
Fresh Ink
Books by Anna Solomon ’98, Amity Gaige ’95, and Kelly McWilliams ’11
Read More
Books by Anna Solomon ’98, Amity Gaige ’95, and Kelly McWilliams ’11
Aug, 2020
97
In the news

BBC Studios named Rebecca Glashow ’97 president of BBC Studios-Americas. She will lead the region’s strategy to develop the company’s diversified distribution business activities in the U.S., Canada, and Latin American. She previously worked at Viacom-owned YouTube brand Awesomeness, where she was responsible for overseeing distribution deals for Awesomeness digital content, AwesomenessTV series, and Awesomeness Films on all platforms worldwide.

Aug, 2020
95
In the news

David Shrier ’95 is the program director of Oxford Cyber Futures online program at University of Oxford’s Said Business School. The 6-week program, in collaboration with MasterCard, is targeted towards senior executives. The program covers such topics as cyber security, threat analytics, data privacy, and digital ethics.

Aug, 2020
93

Tania Teschke is selling handcrafted soaps and creams made from natural and organic ingredients and in support of regenerative agricultural farmers who are creating carbon-sequestrating soil with their humanely cared for, grass-fed herbivores. Tania writes: “I began to learn about organic and sustainable eating at Brown and I am continuing to learn today. Visit my site at www.etsy.com/shop/BordeauxKitchen.”

Aug, 2020
93

Ariel Sabar’s nonfiction book VERITAS: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man, and the Gospel of Jesus’s Wife was published by Doubleday in August. Ariel writes: “The book grew out of a long investigative story I wrote for The Atlantic magazine about a Harvard historian who was tricked by a con artist into publishing a sensational papyrus forgery that would have rewritten the history of Christianity.”

Aug, 2020
93

Justin Massey (see Jennifer Morgan Massey ’56).

Related classes:
Class of 1993, Class of 1956
Aug, 2020
92

David Thorp writes: “No marathons, no books, and no PhD to report. I did, however, retire after 21 years of faithful service in federal law enforcement. My last assignment may have been the most fun. I now have to get serious as my boys are getting expensive what with college tuition, Philmont treks, and living in southern California. Karin, my wife of 23 years, is officially tired of being the only adult in the house. For friends with whom I’ve lost touch, please reach out to me at dgrahamthorp@gmail.com.”  

Aug, 2020
92

Andrew T. Chan is part of a group working out of Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard School of Public Health who have developed a COVID Symptom Study app to collect risk factor information and reports of symptoms. Their work was featured in the New York Times on April 1.

Aug, 2020
91

Daniel G. Newman wrote his first graphic novel, Unrig: How to Fix Our Broken Democracy (worldcitizencomics.com), about money in politics, voting rights, and stories of inspiring citizens who are making democracy work better. He is the president of MapLight, a nonprofit fighting online political deception. Contact Daniel at dnewman@maplight.org

Aug, 2020
91

Richard D’Abreu Jr., who is a saxophonist, pianist, and songwriter specializing in gospel jazz, has, since COVID-19, done a biweekly one-hour solo performance called “Friday Night Inspiration” live on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube from 7:30 to 8:30 pm EST. His debut CD, Jazz in the Spirit, will be available in physical form (cdbaby.com and other stores) and digital stores everywhere. Visit www.jazzinthespirit.com for more information.

Aug, 2020
91
Buried Knowledge
“Undone science” refers to data that have been ignored while other research gets done. Partly in the name of racial justice, some Brown folks are working to bring that information to light.
Read More
Professor Scott Frickel
Aug, 2020
91
Leading Amid Unrest
A Twin Cities college president’s Day One was the week of the riots
Read More
Image of Suzanne Rivers
Aug, 2020
90

Khalil Sivjee writes: “It’s hard to believe it’s been a year since attending the wedding of Navin Singh ’93 MD in beautiful Positano, Italy. It was great to have the trio of Navin, Ken Younge, and myself back together again. Ken wore a pink turban in a tribute to when we dressed up as the Pink Ladies and attend-ed a showing of Grease at Sayles Hall during Frosh week.”


Khalil Sivjee
Related classes:
Class of 1990, MD Class of 1993
Aug, 2020
89
Must-See TV
A new book shows how 1970s shows like Sesame Street shaped a generation of kids.
Read More
David Kamp
Related classes:
Class of 1989, Class of 1991
Aug, 2020
88

Kaui Chun DeMarzo writes: “I am close friends with a bunch of guys from ’88. This past autumn (Nov ’19), I was invited to the guys night out in Oakland. It was a fantastic time catching up with these fantastic men—James Brooks ’88, Clayton Earle ’88, Sean Hood ’88, and Jameison Martin ’88.”


Kaui Chun DeMarzo
Aug, 2020
87
NOW!
Brown alums on this year’s nationwide demands for racial justice & the urgent need for lasting change
Read More
Illustration of a riot scene
Aug, 2020
87
Walking the Labyrinth
For Heidi Kim ’87, combating racism is a lifelong practice deeply rooted in her Christian faith
Read More
Portrait of Heidi Kim ’87
Related classes:
Class of 1987, Class of 1990
Aug, 2020
87

Alex Weiner’s daughter, Livia Joan Weiner, has been accepted to Brown as a member of the Class of 2024. She is a member of the graduating class of 2020 from Croton-Harmon High School in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.

Aug, 2020
87

Lisa Sosa Solomon writes: “I’m a hospice social worker living in Staten Island.  I work, make dinner, and take walks. It’s a lovely simple life.”

Aug, 2020
87

Gary Schwartz writes: “Many of us are home all day trying to stay on top of what is going on with the COVID-19 pandemic. The main person that CBS goes to for economic and financial perspective is Jill Schlesinger. She’s been in this role with CBS for a while now but is getting a lot more airtime because of what is going on. She gives a really nice perspective on the economics behind it all.”

Aug, 2020
86

Susan Berfield published her first book, The Hour of Fate, on May 5. Susan is an award-winning feature writer and investigative reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek and Bloomberg News.

Aug, 2020
85

Hilary Massey Billings (see Jennifer Morgan Massey ’56). 

Related classes:
Class of 1985, Class of 1956
Aug, 2020
83

Jill M. Baren has been named provost and vice president of academic affairs at University of the Sciences. Dr. Baren is a national leader in academic medicine, healthcare, and higher education and comes to USciences from the University of Pennsylvania, where she was professor of emergency medicine, pediatrics, and medical ethics at the Perelman School of Medicine. She has served in the provost’s office as the Faculty Leadership Development Fellow. She is currently serving a term as president of the American Board of Emergency Medicine, whose mission is to ensure the highest standards in the specialty. Contact Jill at jbaren@comcast.net.

Aug, 2020
81
In the news

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has appointed members to several sector advisory councils charged with providing guidance to shape New York City’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic and help restart the city’s economy and life. Among the appointed were Ken Giddon ’81, proprietor of Rothman’s Men’s Clothing, to the Small Business Sector Advisory Council and Joshua Silverman ’91, CEO of  Etsy, to the Large Business Sector Advisory Council.

Related classes:
Class of 1981, Class of 1991
Aug, 2020
81

Glenn Kessler’s book Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: the President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims, and Flat-Out Lies was published on June 2 with Simon & Schuster.

Aug, 2020
80

Johanna Bergmans Musselman writes: “My husband and I live in downtown Boston, near Beacon Hill. It is strangely quiet here but we are doing fine with many adjustments to our routines. I am so happy that my class was able to have an incredible 40th reunion celebration last May in Providence. I feel sad for the Class of ’80 and all other 2020 reunion classes, along with the Class of 2020, that their experience this year will be very different from ours.”

Aug, 2020
79
In the news

The Mount Sinai Health System announced the creation of a new Institute for Health Equity Research (IHER) to understand the effects of health issues, including COVID-19, affecting at-risk communities. The disproportionate impact in underserved populations has highlighted the importance of rigorously studying disparities and translating discoveries into sustainable, scalable initiatives and policies that benefit communities in New York and the nation. Richard A. Friedman ’79 will chair the IHER Task Force that will guide, publicize and inform on the research underway. Other Task Force members include Brian A. Benjamin ’98, Senator for the 30th District of the New York Senate and Senior Assistant Majority Leader of the Senate.

Related classes:
Class of 1979, Class of 1998
Aug, 2020
79

Barbara Smith (see Ellen Arnold Lloyd ’52).

Related classes:
Class of 1979, Class of 1952
Aug, 2020
79

Dorothy P. Holinger’s book The Anatomy of Grief was published on Sept. 1 with Yale University Press. The book is for everyone who has experienced the loss of a loved one, those who have been unable to mourn in traditional ways, those who must prepare for loss, and anyone who wants to understand and help someone who is grieving.

Aug, 2020
79

Julia Burbank Chin reports on how she is faring in the days of the coronavirus. “The uncertainty of the whole thing is so challenging. I feel as if I am in eternal limbo. I spend my time caring for my mother, tending my garden and chickens, and enjoying the beautiful outdoors in Maine.”

Aug, 2020
79

Elizabeth Andrews Byers (see Barbara Kirk Hail ’52).

Related classes:
Class of 1979, Class of 1952
Aug, 2020
79

Since 2018, Fred Baumgarten has been living in western Massachusetts and running the grants office at Mount Holyoke College. Recently, he produced the book The Western Minstrel: Voyages through the Life of Anthony Philip Heinrich (published by the Dvorak Society), based on his research into the life of the man called the “Beethoven of America” and into Heinrich’s relationship to John and Lucy Audubon. Contact Fred at fredbee.eater@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
78

 Plain Dealer Art and Architecture Critic Steven Litt is the recipient of an award for visual arts journalism from the Dorothea and Leo Rabkin Foundation of Portland, Me. The award goes to “visual art journalists who, with artists, are the backbone of the art community in every part of the country,” the foundation said in its announcement.

Aug, 2020
78

Joshua Hammerman’s book Embracing Auschwitz: Forging a Vibrant, Life-Affirming Judaism that Takes the Holocaust Seriously was published in May. The publication was timed for the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the camps.

Aug, 2020
76

William Tanenbaum is the editor of International Comparative Legal Guide to Digital Health 2020 and the author of the introductory chapter entitled “Digital Health, New Technologies and Emerging Legal Issues.” Bill is an IP and technology lawyer and the practice chair of HealthCare Technology & Innovation Group at the law firm Polsinelli. He was named a lead name in AI and a go-to expert on data by Who’s Who Legal. As class president, he encourages all ’76ers to join the next reunion. 

Aug, 2020
76

Elizabeth Robertson Laytin reports: “Tom McMahon spearheaded a creativity chain via email a few weeks ago and other ’76-ers joined in. Tom wrote the song ‘Existential Barstool Blues’ and sent the MP3 to his classmates. Craig Scott responded with a poem. Alice Drueding, with husband Joe Scorsone, designed a poster to encourage people to follow social distancing guidelines, and Russ Pollack uploaded his performance on guitar.”

Aug, 2020
75

Jan Blacher, a distinguished professor in UC Riverside’s Graduate School of Education, is executive-producer of Autism Goes to College. The documentary film spotlights the experiences of college students on the spectrum and has been screened in theaters, film festivals, and schools across the U.S. and Canada. Visit www.autismgoestocollege.org for a screening near you. 

Aug, 2020
74

Marc Freed received a master’s in Curriculum Development and Instructional Design and a Certificate of Online Teaching from the University at Albany (SUNY) in May. Marc writes: “I enrolled in the program a year ago after retiring from the financial services industry to learn how to teach math and data science online. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, I am currently teaching K-12 teachers how to teach online as a faculty member of the Academy for the Advancement of Teaching, Leadership, and Schools, the professional development arm of University of Albany’s School of Education.

Aug, 2020
71

H. Scott Thomson writes: “I hung up my suit and put away the briefcase from my years consulting, then tossed the gym bag full of hoops gear into the closet back in 2003, after several national championships playing for the Olympic Club in San Francisco, to start a long journey into a world I knew nothing about—training horses. Turns out, I was pretty good at it. After studying with some of the top horsemen in the country and being labeled a natural, I’ve spent 20 years training hundreds of horses and riders of all ages in the art of natural horsemanship. I’ve even had the chance to work with some mustangs right off the range. My wife and I live in Silver City, New Mexico, in a little ranch that backs up to three million acres of National Forest. For the past 10 years I’ve written a column about horses for our local paper, which has been picked up by some national horse publications. It’s all been intellectually and physically rewarding, but the old saying ‘I know there’s money in horses because I put it there’ still holds true. It’s been great to see the Sports Foundation still going strong after my years as the founding executive director back in the early ’80s. Hope to make it back for our 50th—if I saddle up now, I might be there in time.” Contact Scott at hsthomson@msn.com.

Aug, 2020
71

Steve Nagata writes: “Now that we are in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, I was browsing through the online issues of BAM here in my home in Honolulu during stay at home protocols. I could not help but read the class of 1971 notes. Man, has time passed. I fondly remember the days of Poland House, the Sharpe Refectory, my wonderful time in the Brunaires singing group, the fraternity, and my futile attempts to learn a semblance of knowledge in the introductory geology course (barely passed), having been an avid liberal arts political science major. I was totally naïve coming to Brown and left, hopefully, a bit more mature. After Brown, I entered the Air Force and served for two years stateside during the Vietnam War days. Thereafter, I went to Boston College Law School and then started practicing law in Hawaii—first as a law clerk in the Hawaii Supreme Court, as a deputy in the Hawaii Attorney General’s office, and then at a series of law firms, culminating in the legal department of Hawaiian Electric Company. And now I’m happily retired, but teaching law at the local community college, doing tai chi and other various martial arts, and, of course, playing golf. Going to Brown molded a big part of my character and I am grateful for that. My best wishes to all of you.”

Aug, 2020
70

Bernard Mendillo ’73 AM has a new novel, It’s What We Do, a humorous, episodic story about a man in his 70s who becomes a single parent when his wife leaves him just as they adopt a little girl from China. It is available on Amazon. 

Related classes:
Class of 1970, GS Class of 1973
Aug, 2020
69

Larry Wilson writes: “Our 50th reunion last year was so enjoyable that Peter Allgeier and I decided to continue the camaraderie by inviting some of our classmates to join us in taking an online course.” Bruce Butterworth, Kathy Kindl Norris, Rauer Meyer, Roger Sherman and Tom West accepted their invitation to meet weekly using Zoom to discuss the lectures. “We first took a Yale Open Course, “The Early Middle Ages,” then eagerly followed up with a Coursera Yale course, “The Age of Cathedrals,” and then a Great Courses course from American University, “An Introduction to the Qur’an.” We are now engaged in a Great Courses course from the University of Missouri – Kansas City School of Law entitled “Liberty on Trial in America.” Our preference, of course, would be to take online courses from our alma mater and we hope that Brown will consider expanding its limited offering of online courses for alumni/alumnae. Our 50th has definitely deepened our bonds of friendship and enhanced our interest in continuing education.” 

Aug, 2020
66

Susan Inglis Seal retired from a long career in high-end residential real estate sales in 2010. After retirement and aside from enjoying her children and grandchildren, she put her efforts into saving Odell House Rochambeau Headquarters near her home in Hartsdale, N.Y. The house was built in 1732. It stayed untouched in the Odell family until the late 20th century. It was where Gen. Rochambeau stayed for six weeks in 1781 while he met with George Washington. The house stayed boarded up and neglected for 50+ years. Susan convinced her local town government to take ownership and title on March 4, 2020. Despite the pandemic, plans are moving ahead to create a museum by the 250th anniversary of the Revolutionary War. The house is part of the National Park Service Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route (WARO). More information at odellrochambeau.org. Susan can be reached at odellrochambeau@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
66

Michael Levy writes: “After 50 years as a lawyer, 37 with the U.S. Department of Justice, I retired last September. I have spent the spring semester teaching Cybercrime and Evidence at the University of Pennsylvania Law School (my other alma mater). The virus drove us online from mid-March on. I’ve taught Cybercrime for about 15 years, but Evidence was a new adventure. Shifting to Zoom half-way through was an unanticipated challenge/opportunity. I thought I knew Evidence pretty well, until I prepared to teach it to others. I have to say I may have learned as much as my students this semester. Hoping that we can have a real, rather than a virtual, reunion next year.”

Aug, 2020
64

Lawrence A. Rand, a Weston, Mass., resident and a two-term Rye Brook (N.Y.) mayor, who has also served as a trustee and member of the Village’s Board of Trustees and as a member of the Westchester County (N.Y.) Ethics Board, was inducted on to the Wall of Distinction of the James Madison High School (Brooklyn, N.Y.). The induction took place on April 26, but because the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated closing all schools in New York State, the ceremony will be held at a later time.

Aug, 2020
63

Nancy Scull writes: “I am still heavily engaged with Building Brighter Futures for Tanzanian Children through Education (www.FriendsofMeali.org). We celebrated our 10th anniversary earlier this year, and can really see the huge difference we’ve made for three public primary schools support-
ing a collective 1600 students per year. We work in partnership with their communities. Our board of directors includes Ina Schwartz  Heafitz ’66.  Meanwhile, although I still live in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where I’ve been for more than 50 years, my personal life now includes frequent visits to Apex, North Carolina.”

Related classes:
Class of 1963, Class of 1966
Aug, 2020
63

Fred Parker, current class treasurer, writes: “I have moved from Cape Cod to Apex, North Carolina, to be closer to family, warmer weather, and more opportunities to play golf. So far so good. I attended the kick-off meeting of the Brown Alumni Club of the Triangle, Raleigh, North Carolina. Being the most senior graduate present was a different and fun experience. The event was a great success. We all loved singing ‘Ever True’ with great gusto. Although I have moved, my personal life includes special trips to Cambridge, Massachusetts.”

Aug, 2020
63

Elaine Piller Congress is associate dean and professor at Fordham University Graduate School of Social Services. As associate dean, she represents two NGOs at the United Nations—the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) and the Institute of Multicultural Counseling and Education Services (IMCES). She oversees a group of Fordham graduate students whom she involves in UN activities. She published her twelfth book, Behavioral Science in the Global Arena: Addressing Timely Issues at the United Nations and Beyond. It provides a unique look at the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Social workers, psychologists, heads of NGOs, U.N. officials and a medical doctor have contributed chapters and many chapters recognize students as co-authors. Elaine welcomes every chance to talk about her work. Contact Elaine at congress@fordham.edu.

Aug, 2020
63

Brooke Kruger Lipsitt (see Russ Kinne ’50).

Related classes:
Class of 1963, Class of 1950
Aug, 2020
63

Barbara Smith Langworthy writes: “We know that Providence will be beautiful this fall. Unfortunately, the Class of ’63 Mini-Reunion will not be there. As with all other Brown functions, we must proceed cautiously. The board made this decision at our last meeting. We hope that all of our classmates will make use of our Facebook page. We also will send out frequent BRAVOS, but the University must have your current email address for you to receive them. Check your alumni listing and update it where necessary so that we can all keep in touch. Feel free to share your comments and ideas at blangwort@aol.com.” Barbara adds: “I received the Elizabeth Tuttle Beattie Service Award, which is the Littleton Regional Healthcare Auxiliary’s highest award. I have served on the board as treasurer for the past seven years and participated in most other auxiliary events. It was indeed an honor as my name is now on the hospital wall with so many people I truly admire.”

Aug, 2020
62

Leslie Armstrong announces the publication of her memoir, Girl Intrepid - A New York Story of Privilege and Perseverance. Leslie writes: “It covers the first third of my life: my upbringing in New York, my time at Brown, summers working at the Spoleto Festival in Italy, and my journey to becoming an architect at a time when there were few women in professions and fewer in architecture (See www.lesliearmstrongwriter.com). My husband, John Bowers, also a writer, and I live in Manhattan. I continue to work as an architect on small scale commercial and residential renovations. We and our five children (three of mine, two of his) and their families are well and safe.”

Aug, 2020
61

Ed Rotmer writes: “Lorraine and I are enjoying retirement. I am doing lots of volunteer work for several charity organizations and also continue to serve on the board of directors of the Brown Club of Rhode Island. We get to spend a lot of time with our two granddaughters and our children. They all live within a few miles of us. How lucky we are for that! We continue to winter in Naples, Florida, and manage to do some traveling as well. I look forward to our 60th in 2021 and I welcome contact from my classmates at (401) 523-4680; erlr@cox.net-mobile.”

Aug, 2020
61

David Parent writes: “Cathy and I are settling into our condominium at 91 Putter Drive in Wallingford, Connecticut. As the street address implies, our unit adjoins the Wallingford Golf Course and the view from our fourth floor window is beautiful. After 40 years in a quad level house set on a five level lot, we are happy to be on one floor. We spend a lot of time taking our grandchildren to school, medical appointments, and swimming lessons, going to the gym, having lunch at the senior center, Rotary and the Coast Guard Auxiliary, and going to a debating club in Stamford. The time goes by very quickly and happily. Seems hard to believe that 60 years ago we NROTC juniors were inside taking our navigation course with Lt. Jobe. The reunion will soon be upon us and we will once again be walking College Hill.” Contact David at townca2005@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
61

Courtland L. Munroe writes: “I retired from my internal medicine/geriatric medicine practice for the second time in December 2017. I worked in Carbondale, Illinois, for 31 years at The Carbondale Clinic, a multispecialty medical clinic, and as a clinical associate professor of medicine at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. I then worked from 2012-2017 at a small internal medicine clinic in The Villages, Florida. I continue to volunteer two half days a week at two local free clinics. Mary Lou and I have been married for 54 years, with four children and eight grandchildren. We finished our foreign travels because of several health issues that have slowed us down but have been fortunate to have seen almost every country in Europe accessible by cruise ship. In January we moved to Waterman Village in Mount Dora, Florida, a continuing care retirement community, and we find living here is just like being on vacation every day of the year. Our every need is cared for and there are countless activities. We would enjoy visiting with any classmates who live or are traveling in this area. Contact us at cmunroemd@comcast.net.”

Aug, 2020
61

John Edison writes: “This is my first communication update on my post-Brown career. After Brown I returned to my home state of Iowa and graduated from the University of Iowa’s medical school in 1964. My wife, Linda, and I headed west to Los Angeles, where I interned at Los Angeles County General Hospital. We then went to Pensacola, Florida, where I went through Navy flight training and the School of Aerospace Medicine. Fortunately we were stationed in central Florida, where I was a Wing flight surgeon for several Vigilante squadrons. I played doctor and did short tours on aircraft carriers while Linda had a very fun job with the Orange County, Florida, welfare department. We returned to the Midwest, where I did a residency in ear, nose, and throat and head and neck surgery at the University of Minnesota. Linda taught art until we started our family. We live in Ventura, California, where I practiced 40 years and retired three years ago. Now we divide our time between Ventura, our ski house in Mammoth Lakes, California, and our ranch in Pagosa Springs, Colorado. We both enjoy good health and ski regularly and I continue to fly my little RV-8 type aerobatic aircraft. Accolades I have received in the local medical community have been Teaching Physician of the Year, chief of staff at the local hospital, and recently retired physician of the year. Our children live in California and Colorado with their families and we visit them regularly. I have now been to several reunions and, if luck and health hold, would like to make my 60th.” Contact John at johnmedison@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
61

Richard Considine writes: “No, I am not retired. For my sins, I took over management of Safeway Storage in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in January 2018. In addition to the 309-unit storage business, I manage the 55,000-square-foot, three-floor building as well, with 10 commercial tenants on the top floor. I had sold this building to the current owner in 1985 and suggested he put self storage in the basement. (I spent eight years in Ireland establishing Barons Self Storage in Galway with a lawyer friend.) When Marcia and I returned to New Hampshire in 2011, Safeway’s owner told me he would need me. It has been an enjoyable challenge straightening the business out four days per week. Marcia and I also sold our big house in 2014 and bought a modest ranch in a 55-and-over community in North Hampton, which we love, especially because we back up to extensive woodlands with all the wildlife therein. We spend part of our summers in Cundy’s Harbor, Maine, with our youngest son and family and get out sailing now and then. Both of our sons and families are doing well and we see our three grands regularly. Life is good!” Contact Rick at rick@theconsidinefamily.com.

Aug, 2020
61

David Babson writes: “Just a note to let you know that I plan to run again for Carroll County Commissioner. I am now in my second term, which will end in December. Should I be lucky enough to win again, at my age it is basically a lifetime appointment. I have enjoyed serving the voters as a commissioner far more than I did as a member of the New Hampshire legislature, even as a member of leadership. At the county level you are one of three people; in the New Hampshire House you are one of 400 people. It is much easier to help people when you are the ‘boss.’ I still have my draft horses and milk cow but even they are getting old.” Contact David at davebab61@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
58

John Spicer, who gives his nickname as “Snowshoe,” writes about a weekend in Freedom, N.H. “It was my 93rd, granddaughter Nora’s 33rd, and grandson Sam’s 26th birthdays that we were celebrating in an extravagant former hunting lodge built for writer Corey Ford. The Airbnb description of our hillside abode hardly touched the triumph and tragedy of Ford’s “Stoney Broke” writing home. As a base for our explorations, Freedom offered an unexpected variety of hikes and climbs near a once huge volcanic blast site. Many were the presents, including recordings of favorite books by my own family. It was clear, however, that my creative family were the best presents of all.” 

Aug, 2020
58

Bob Sanchez continues his extraordinarily active life. The Brown Club has provided many interesting and engaging programs and outings: talks from faculty and administrators about campus and academic activities, a visit to the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens in Miami, a visit to an Everglades nature preserve, and a trip to Fort Myers to watch the Boston Red Sox. Bob attended a gathering at which the New Curriculum was the topic of discussion. “A number of those attending the gathering were actually on campus during the negotiations among the faculty, the administration, and the students. Robert Lynch ’69 was active in the brouhaha over the NROTC remaining or leaving. He wrote an interesting piece putting the events in context, The Almost Forgotten Story of How Brown University’s New Curriculum was Nearly Derailed by Subterfuge.” Bob keeps in touch with: Stan Dobson, Jim Furlong, Warren Healey, George Held, Pete Howard, Susan Adler Kaplan ’65 MAT, Jerry Levine, Jim Moody ’65 ScM, Tom Moses, John Reistrup, Charlie Shumway ’66 AM, Sandy McFarland Taylor, Bill Traub ’59, George Vandervoort, and Roger Williams.

Aug, 2020
58

Kenneth Kurze’s wife, Ingrid Fischer Kurze, died in May 2019. Since Kenneth was an officer in the Foreign Service, they shared a life of travel and adventure. She gave birth to her daughter and three sons, each in a different country: India, Nepal, Morocco, and Washington, D.C. She was an avid hiker, skier, trekker, and traveler.  

Aug, 2020
58

Judith Katz Block’s husband, Kean Block (Yale ’53, Harvard Business School ’55) died in March after 61 years of marriage and a ten-year battle with cancer. His career was primarily in finance. He was very active volunteering in their community and was the president of the Yale Club in Chicago for several years.  

Aug, 2020
58

Betty Belknap Stirling’s granddaughter, Amber Demers, graduated from Salem State University in June, while her younger sister, Jennelle, graduated from Pentucket High School and will enter Dean College this fall—both are honor students. The rest of her grandchildren are either college graduates or currently attending college.

Aug, 2020
57

Ronald E. Baker writes from Port Rowan, Ontario, Canada, on the North Shore of Lake Erie. “Still active and healthy (no COVID-19 here yet). On December 21, I was married to Barbara Ann Hill-Holland. We began our honeymoon travels with families in Baltimore and Florida; then Mexico in January and February, returning to Canada just before the national quarantine started. On July 1, I took over as president of the Rotary Club of Simcoe, Ontario. We’re now very active online as a community service club helping many needy causes in Canada and abroad. When the Canada/USA border opens again we will surely attend my 65th. I’m still able to march down the hill.” 

Aug, 2020
56

Jennifer Morgan Massey writes: “My daughter, Hilary Massey Billings ’85, is chair of the San Francisco branch of Habitat for Humanity and spent two weeks with her husband building houses all over Nepal and loved it. My son, Justin Massey ’93, has been re-elected to a five-year term on the Hermosa Beach City Council, where he is currently mayor pro tem.

Aug, 2020
56

Nancy Blacher Shuster writes: “Still teaching life story writing in Naples and in Narragansett. I’m lucky to still enjoy teaching at both locations. Next summer I will teach for Beachwood Senior Center in Wickford. I’m looking forward to being a great-grandma and enjoy acting as a surrogate mother to friends and students who have lost their moms. (Several of my students and friends have lost their moms. I offered to fill the role, which means on their birthdays I send them cards and a present and on Mother’s Day they think of me as well as the mom they lost. It works well. No pregnancy involved, just caring and kindness.) Life right now is like a science fiction movie. I hope we can conquer our invisible enemy. I’d love to hear from classmates. Too few class info bulletins.” Contact Nancy at Nshu4@aol.com.   

Aug, 2020
56

Tom and Phyllis Macchia Johnson sold their home and lived in an apartment until the new house was ready. Phyllis writes: “It’s quite an adventure trying to stuff a house’s worth of living into an apartment half the size.” Contact Phyllis at 11645 Monument Dr., #1125, Lakewood Ranch, Fla. 34211-1281; (941) 254-7949.

Aug, 2020
55

Bill Hinckley writes: “Sue and I are both happy with our new digs at Vi at Highlands Ranch, Colorado; my spouse of 65 years is in a lovely cottage and I am in an apartment in assisted living, a wonderful retirement facility, where one is assured of continuing care at all levels and can be busy or not. We have chosen the former with committee work, trips, and activities with friends and our daughter, a half-hour away. I especially enjoy a group, The Play Readers, where actors read from scripts of plays and musicals to audiences of 50 or more each month. I had to give up my carving of songbirds after 30-some years—no studio here. I wrote a monthly column on birds for a magazine for 10 years and wrote and published three novels and one compendium titled Back Then, on my life in the simple times of the 30s and 40s, which was published in February. Both grands are busy—eldest is a USMC captain and the other is with a veterinary group where she works rehabbing horses and other animals and is pursuing her doctorate. Busy kids. Daughter Marjorie is into the animal thing as well, heading up the Intermountain Rescue and Humane Society. A stern believer, she and Realtor husband Michael house seven in their beautiful home. I would love to hear from any and all Brunonians as we endure COVID-19. Happy 65th, wish we could have been there.” Contact Bill at (303) 471-4053; billhink9@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
55

Warren Ilchman reports: “Postponing commencement and reunions until sometime next year gave the Class of 1955 officers an opportunity to consider leadership. Originally president for our 65th reunion, I am stepping down and am pleased to welcome our class vice president John O’Brien to that position. Our secretary and treasurer, Lucy Brubaker Tortolani and Alan Lawson, will share the responsibility of the vice presidency if required. At the time of the reunion, the class will decide who should be vice president. The many activities that were planned to generate interest among our class members will be offered near the time of the coming reunion. I have been pleased to have had responsibility as president and look forward to the leadership of John O’Brien.”

Aug, 2020
54

Joan Bliss Wilson writes that she and Bob are hunkered down and self-quarantined like everyone else. “However, we’ve been catching up on projects planned since we moved from Princeton 19 years ago. We will miss our traditional family gatherings usually in the summer, especially a granddaughter’s California wedding, which we’ll celebrate later.”

Aug, 2020
54

Mary O’Neil Ward writes: “I am so privileged to be healthy and live in Florida, although recent leg injuries laid me up. Thanks to physical therapy I am recovering, and thanks to Brown/Pembroke I have many interests. I do watercolors, including portraits of family and friends and even landscapes. I text my 16 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren too. I appreciate all the work of the many caregivers during this COVID-19 crisis.”  

Aug, 2020
54

Jane O’Hara Page writes: “For many years my three daughters, a close friend, and I have traveled in April to Las Vegas for several days to gamble away their inheritance (according to husband Dick), partake of the night life and enjoy gourmet food. For obvious reasons, that didn’t happen this year, which was a great disappointment. Dick and I are sheltering and showering in place in our continuing care community in Needham, Mass. We are free to leave but must re-enter through the main lobby, where we fill in a form and have our temperatures taken. One very good meal is delivered to our apartment each day. All group social activities are canceled. We do have an internal TV network which provides information and entertainment. Our kids have introduced us to Zoom and virtual cocktail parties are regularly scheduled. We follow the rules and wear facemasks whenever we leave the apartment. Looking to the future, we have signed up with the Judkins, the Bishops, and Felice Rinder Kirsh for a trip on the Columbia River, but whether that will happen is anyone’s guess.”

Aug, 2020
54

Lynn Campbell Morris writes: “Greg and I have passed the ‘sailing test’ by spending time exclusively together for the last eight weeks. This year we celebrated 42 years of marriage. Our daughter Jennifer is in Costa Rica and our son Paul is in California. My Chaucer bibliography published in 1985 was just republished for the Chaucer library owned by the English publishers Taylor and Francis. Hope all Brunonians are safe and well.”

Aug, 2020
54

Writer Grace Hays Kone continues to write romance, mystery, suspense and sci-fi under her pseudonym Blair Bancroft. She has written and published more than 40 books. She writes: “I’m trying to squeeze time in to write a Regency Gothic while sewing 100 masks for family and friends and friends of friends. All this activity keeps me from getting bored.”

Aug, 2020
54

Charles “Red” and Nancy Kaufman Judkins planned an eighth ’54 mini-reunion with a small group of ’54s and friends to retrace the journey of Lewis and Clark down the Columbia and Snake Rivers in Washington state by paddle-wheel steamer. “We’re all hoping the trip through the lovely wine country of the Pacific Northwest will take place, and if so, there may still be room for you.” Contact Ed or Mary Bishop at (401) 274-4666/4667; maryfrancis.bishop@gmail.com.

Aug, 2020
54

Walt Halperin writes: “Willa and I have flown the coop (University House Retirement Home) to wait out the pestilence at our son’s house in Seattle. We get out to cycle the streets often (3-wheel recumbent bikes). On weekends we all go to Lopez Island (one of the San Juan Islands) to hang out on a 30-acre farm—fruit trees, beehives, Bald Eagles overhead, River Otters underfoot. We know just how lucky we are.”

Aug, 2020
54

Al Gerstein writes: “Naomi and I continue to do well, no great increase in the negative aspects of the aging process. As with everyone else, we are now embarked on a significant change in our daily functioning (learning how to order food online, getting excited when we score a few rolls of toilet paper). Until COVID-19 appeared we were having a splendid time in Florida, kibitzing on the beach with retirees from all sorts of backgrounds, swimming in the Gulf and working out (kind of) in the condo gym. When the Canadians left at the insistence of their children, we got the message—time to go home. At the last minute the auto train was canceled and we had to drive the 1,100 miles to Philadelphia. Not one of my favorite activities. On the plus side, we were able to cruise at a steady 80-plus miles per hour the whole way. The roads and motels were empty. Quite unnerving. Now I sit with a year’s supply of gloves and masks, two refrigerators chock full, a carton of bran (remember our age), and 24 boxes of Kleenex, sequestered from my fellow man. This better be over before 2024, otherwise we’ll have a reunion that will be truly historic. Did Brown have reunions in 1918?”

Aug, 2020
54

Paul Frontiero and Dorothy Zeiger Frontiero (’55 RISD) welcomed their first great-grandchild on January 31. Paul writes: “In these days of staying in place, we see him by Zooming twice a week together with our four children and five grandchildren in a five-state transmission coast to coast: California, Utah, North Carolina, Virginia, and Massachusetts. Transferring to North Carolina from New York by IBM in 1965, I remained here after retirement in 1995. I have finally convinced Dorothy that she is no longer married to an IBM executive but to a trombone player and I have a music degree from UNC-Chapel Hill to prove it.”

Aug, 2020
54

Howard “Skip” Fielding reflects on life during the pandemic: “Well, today was an exciting day. There was mail in the mailbox. Joyce and I miss our traveling. We’ve been to many countries on five continents and miss showing slide shows and lecturing about our travels to our church group. Before the quarantine we enjoyed an active life of dancing, movie-going, playing bridge, and seeing family and friends. Hope other ’54ers are also doing well.”

Aug, 2020
54

Marshall Cohen and his wife of 25 years, Arlene Sidell-Cohen, still enjoy travels to Europe, although he writes: “The suitcases look more like a hospital as we are senior members of the ‘Pill of the Month Club.’” Marshall has stepped down after serving for two years as president of the American Scandinavian Association but still chairs a photo group that meets at the National Press Club (NPC), where he has been a photographer for 36 years. He was awarded his 12th “Vivian” award from the NPC for his photographic service. Starting with Nikons and now using very light Leicas he has captured (on film and digital media) kings, queens, congressmen, presidents, film and stage stars, corporate leaders, and great Brown presidents Ruth Simmons and Vartan Gregorian. He hopes to complete an autobiography, The Night Nothing Happened, in time for the 70th reunion.

Aug, 2020
54

Professor Arthur Blaustein, who recently retired from teaching Politics and Public Policy at UC Berkeley, wrote that he had spent the first month of the pandemic writing a new introduction to the new edition of his book, Democracy Is Not a Spectator Sport, which was published in July.

Aug, 2020
54

Sid Baumgarten writes: “At the time of this writing, we are currently in the New York City lockdown and luckily Terry and I and all the kids and grandkids are fine. I have been involved in a number of interesting interim projects. I have a small interest in a company that does decontamination as a federal contractor, so we have focused on decontamination of federal law enforcement vehicles. We have already completed projects for the Secret Service, U.S. Marshals, Army, National Guard, and more. We use electrostatic sprayers that cause the ‘fog’ to adhere to the surfaces, an improvement over regular sprayers. I won’t get rich on it, but it does keep me busy and is an important service during this pandemic. Terry is busy with a few of her clients, working remotely, and also engaged in a lot of projects for the Lions Club. I have also started writing a book about my exploits in the DA’s office and its work in Midtown Enforcement. I am focusing much of it on corruption at all levels. I do intend to have one chapter on my years at Brown and, of course, the Brown baseball team and the late, great Lefty Lefebvre. All the best and wishing you and all the 1954 survivors good health and many more years of alumni-ism.”

Aug, 2020
52

Sara Devine Townsend, a neighbor of Patricia MacBride Hendrickson at The Highlands in Topsham, Me., contracted the coronavirus and spent more than five weeks in the hospital.

Aug, 2020
52

Betsy Kissane Shequine is retired from her position as a judge but is active on the hospital board and edits her garden club newsletter. As her responsibility during the pandemic, she regularly calls members of her parish church in Millbrook, N.Y. to check on their physical and emotional well-being. For exercise, she has started taking long walks with a friend, each of them masked, and walking one on each side of the road. She measures her steps on her phone and tries to do a mile and a quarter each walk.

Aug, 2020
52

Class secretary David Nichols is in his home in Princeton, Mass., and is grateful that his son brings in groceries. His last physical check-up was through Zoom and he enjoyed sitting at his desk in his own home for the appointment. His cataract surgery was postponed since elective surgeries were cancelled at the time of this submission.

Aug, 2020
52

Ellen Arnold Lloyd is living in The Quadrangle, a retirement community founded by the Quakers of Haverford College, not far from where she grew up in Lancaster, Pa. She writes that she feels very fortunate to be able to be safe and cared for when so many others are in distress. She is required to take her temperature every day and report it to the community’s administration. No one can visit her but her groceries come to her door through a choice of vendors. She notices her garden more and the birds at her feeder. Every Friday evening at 6 p.m. she shares a Zoom cocktail party with family and friends. She finds that even with long stretches of time on her hands, certain projects—like organizing family pictures stored in shoe boxes—remain undone. Her eldest daughter, Barbara Smith ’79, a Presbyterian minister in Myersville, N.J., presents sermons on YouTube now. Her grandson’s wedding planned for June has been postponed for a year. Two other grandsons completed college coursework with online study from a vacation cottage in East Orleans on Cape Cod. And her daughter Ellie, a librarian in Toronto, is struggling with the protocols for opening Toronto’s libraries safely.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1979
Aug, 2020
52

Class treasurer Annette Barabash Leyden writes that one of the pluses of the pandemic is the chance to reconnect with classmates by phone, including Barbara Olins Alpert, Kitty Barclay Merolla, Lucy Laventhol Brody, and Pat Phelps. Annette lives in Kendal on Hudson, a retirement community, and has rediscovered walking with the assistance of a walker. She has not increased her reading much since the New York Times takes up so much time. She is active in local elections.

Aug, 2020
52

Patricia MacBride Hendrickson is living alone in her home in the Highlands, an assisted living community in Topsham, Me. While confined largely to her own space, she is able to take long walks around the beautiful surrounding rural area. She orders her groceries through the Highlands management and they deliver the groceries to her door. She maintains her very active involvement in politics, writing letters to the editor, participating in webinars, and working on campaigns to elect progressive leadership. Her daughter Laura Hendrickson ’88 AM, ’08 PhD, and husband Rupert, who is an anthropology professor at Cambridge University, UK, are self-isolating at home. Groceries are delivered by their food cooperative, and their 7-year-old daughter is engaged in remote learning with her school.

Aug, 2020
52

Ralph Crosby of Richmond, Va., a member of Alpha Delta Phi, writes that he returned early from his vacation home in Naples, Fla., to his home in Virginia due to the virus. His five sons and seven grandchildren live in Richmond and thus he has plenty of help during this shut-in period. He feels that Virginia is very fortunate in having a really competent governor who is leading the efforts in handling the deadly virus. Ralph is a trustee emeritus of Randolph-Macon College, having served 26 years on their board.

Aug, 2020
52

Sally Hill Cooper is weathering the pandemic in her apartment in Arlington, Va. Sally is a conscientious worker for the Democratic Party and is involved especially in national politics. She spends her extra home time “cleaning out her files” so she will be ready to roll when the restrictions are lifted.

Aug, 2020
52

Marybeth Keser Burbank is in her home in Brunswick, Me. She recently lost her husband, Jim. After many years of caring for him at home, she had to admit him to hospital care. With the virus necessitating prohibition of visitors, she and her children were not able to be with him for his last days.

Aug, 2020
52

Glenn N. Bower of Southern Pines, N.C., is secluded in his retirement place. Although it is composed of four large apartment buildings and homes and cottages, about 300 people altogether, with three dining rooms in their clubhouse, all of these facilities are closed. He is allowed no visitors and meals are brought to his door. He is allowed to visit the grocery store. He says North Carolina’s governor was concerned that two health centers in Pinehurst did not report deaths in a timely fashion and that there has not been good reporting from the State in general. Glenn was an Alpha Delta Phi at Brown, and his late wife, Suzanne Griffiths ’53, four daughters and one granddaughter graduated from Brown.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, Class of 1953
Aug, 2020
52

Ruth Arness Anderson is in London, Ontario, where, like so many others, she is a shut-in. She believes we have to work together to find a solution to end the pandemic and build a better world. She just read the BAM and it made her nostalgic for those good years at Pembroke College and Brown University.

Aug, 2020
52

Barbara Olins Alpert ’56 AM writes: “Several archaeologists who are studying Kapova Cave in Russia have obtained permission to translate my book into Russian. Kapova Cave is in the southern Ural Mountains and is dated 10 to 15,000 years ago. My book The Creative Ice Age Brain is about prehistoric art, primarily preserved in caves and best known in France and Spain. Much of it has been dated back to between 15,000 and 30,000 years ago. The book attempts to probe the minds of the artists who left this amazing early human legacy.

Related classes:
Class of 1952, GS Class of 1956
Aug, 2020
52

Class president Barbara Kirk Hail reports: “I have been in touch with several classmates to ask how they are faring during their coronavirus pandemic isolation. The virus has created a new reality for all of us. For our age group particularly, perhaps it is not all bad. It gives us time to think over, appreciate, and put in order, the experiences of our long lives. May we all come together in 2022 at Brown reunion and share our collective wisdom. All my hopes for good health for all of our classmates, and for the world.

As for myself, I am self-isolating in my condo in Warren, Rhode Island, but the adjacent bike path allows a physical and emotional release with walks along the river and opportunities to observe ospreys perched on their nests before darting down to scoop up fish to feed their young. My daughter, Cindy Andrews Elder ’13 MPA, fills my grocery list weekly and disinfects all boxes, cans, fresh vegetables, and fruit before delivering it to my refrigerator. My son, Clinton Andrews ’78, a professor at Rutgers, had to master the new art of teaching a seminar in urban planning by Zoom. My daughter, Elizabeth Andrews Byers ’79, is working from home in Elkins, West Virginia, through webinars and Zoom with her fellows at the State DEM. Elizabeth’s husband, Alton, is home writing proposals for their next trip to Nepal, where they study glacial melting. Their son, Daniel Byers ’08, is studying filmmaking at Columbia University and finished his academic year on Zoom while living with his parents. For the first two weeks after arriving home, his parents sealed off a section of the house for him and served him his dinner on a stump outside his door. It is a quiet household, all three of them in their separate corners, online, working hard. At 5 p.m. they break and go for a long walk six feet apart with masks on. The new reality.”

Aug, 2020
50

Russ Kinne writes: “I’m still living in mid-coast Maine; will be here forever, I think. Great place, great people. Living in a nifty little log house and driving my 11th Subaru (Maine’s unofficial state car). I don’t have a small airplane anymore and I miss it like mad. But at my advanced age of 46 (on each foot), the insurance is prohibitive. Sigh. Sure was fun. I keep in regular touch with Col. Charles Williamson, who is now living in Atlantic Beach, Florida, and I see him once a year on my ‘winter walkabout,’ which was 6,800 miles this year. Hard to believe. David Clough ’51 lives fairly close to me and I see him occasionally, but he spends half the year in Florida. I see Brooke Kruger Lipsitt ’63 and Paul Lipsitt, our class president, once a year too. Guess where? I miss the ‘old gang’ and hope some/all of you will visit. You’re always welcome. Hope we can meet at reunion, whenever it is. And if you want a few laughs get a copy of my first published book of almost-fiction, Rosie’s Lightning; it’s on Amazon and ridiculously cheap. I keep expecting Hollywood to call and buy it for a movie, but I guess they’ve lost my phone number. Sigh again. Fair winds to you all.”

Aug, 2020
50

Jerry Green, longtime sports columnist and writer for The Detroit News, is now the only print writer to have covered all 54 Super Bowls. He covered Super Bowl LIV when the Kansas City Chiefs were the victors over the San Francisco 49ers in Miami Gardens in February. Two colleagues who kept streaking with him for 53 years since Super Bowl I in 1967 dropped out. Green retired from the active staff of The News in 2004, but continued to write daily and game Super Bowl columns afterwards. “I’m recalled to active duty every January,” he says. Green was elected to the writers’ wing of the Pro Football Hall of Fame as recipient of the Dick McCann Award in 2005 and the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 2003.

Aug, 2020
50

Class president Paul Lipsitt writes: “Much is topsy turvy since our last class note. The bad news is that our well planned 70th reunion for May was postponed. The good news is that we will look forward to it. My co-chair, Caroline Decatur Chick, and I are thinking ahead to that time and that many classmates will be with us then. We are remaining sheltered, and maintaining contact with friends and relatives through the marvel of electronics. FaceTime reassures us that grandchildren do not forget us, and Zoom is wonderful for courses and parties. Ever true.”

Jul, 2020
86
Language and Plague
In locked-down NYC, with a feverish son, Marie Myung-Ok Lee ’86 considers COVID-19 and Camus
Read More
Marie Myung-Ok and son
Jun, 2020
GS 68

Ed Benson ’68 AM, ’71 PhD, writes: “Oscar Dupuy d’Angeac ’17 and his mates made a splendid 40-minute documentary, called Providence Lost, about a family harassed and then evicted by a landlord seeking to convert their building into student housing. The film turned into an effective tool for activists organizing around the housing crisis. One elderly parent died from living in their car during the filming, while the house remained vacant a year later.”

Jun, 2020
GS 14

Zhongquiang Zhang ’14 PhD has been awarded tenure and promoted to associate professor of mathematical sciences at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He is co-author of the book Numerical Methods for Stochastic Partial Differential Equations with White Noise and has helped organize WPI seminars on numerical methods, the Finite Element Circus Conference, and New England Numerical Analysis Day.

Jun, 2020
GS 03

Steve Anglin ’03 ScM has reached the 2,000+ professional applied computing books published/contributed to milestone for Apress Media, LLC, a Springer Nature company. Contact Steve at stevemanglin@gmail.com.

Jun, 2020
18

Zachary Witkin will serve as a community health support agent with the Peace Corps in Senegal from 2020 until 2022.

Jun, 2020
17

Oscar Dupuy d’Angeac (see Ed Benson ’68 AM, ’71 PhD)

Jun, 2020
15

Jessica Sachs (see Brad Sachs ’78).

Related classes:
Class of 2015, Class of 1978
Jun, 2020
15

Izzy Rattner writes: “In his very first legal case after passing the bar and becoming a licensed attorney, Steven Chizen ’14 represented me in a personal injury settlement. We can’t share the details but are thrilled that Steven is undefeated in his law career!”

Jun, 2020
12

Sarah Levy wrote an essay for the New York Times about how she survived wedding season in her first year of sobriety. Five out of the seven weddings she attended that year were for fellow Brown classmates. Visit: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/15/fashion/weddings/how-i-survived-wedding-season-in-my-first-year-of-sobriety.html?

Jun, 2020
04
In the news

Abdullah Alsharekh ’04 has been named managing director of markets and investment banking at Kamco Invest, one of the largest investment firms in the Middle East. He previously led the economic and investment team of the Hareer and Boubyan Development Agency and was managing director at Sharq Capital, where he led investment activity across asset classes. He has held executive positions with Goldman Sachs, the National Bank of Kuwait, and NBK Capital.

Jun, 2020
02

Eli Batalion writes: “After collaborating with Jerome Sable ’01 on the Sundance and Toronto International Film Festival cult classic The Legend of Beaver Dam, and pivoting to the touring series YidLife Crisis, I have now put out my very first quasi-autobiographical solo project all about the trials and tribulations of living the start-up life: Appiness, a film supported by Telefilm Canada and distributed by Gravitas Ventures. Appiness is influenced in no small part by the Brown Entrepreneurship Program back in my senior year, a real game-changer in my career. The film is now available to rent or own on streaming services, including Amazon Prime Video, iTunes, Google Play, and Vudu; and on cable video on demand, including Comcast, Verizon, DirecTV, and Dish, in the United States.” 

Jun, 2020
00

Seth Andrew and his wife, Lana Zak, welcomed their third and final child in 2018. Seth writes: “Lana is an anchor at CBS and I’m launching new social enterprises at the intersection of technology, democracy, and education with DemocracyBuilders.org. We just moved back to New York City in January 2020.” Contact Seth at seth@alumni.brown.edu.

Jun, 2020
99

Cort Malone and Al Lairson ’99 proudly announce the release of their new app, Tick Tock: The Game. Cort writes: “Tick Tock is a challenging and wildly addictive multiplayer strategy game where players race against each other and the clock to win real cash prizes. We would also like to thank Alex Walter ’99 for his contributions to Tick Tock, and for hosting us on his Alex Asks Anything podcast series to discuss the development of the App. To our fellow Brunonians: we welcome you to download Tick Tock (ticktockwin.com) and try to win!

Jun, 2020
98

Ian Maisel signed with the Johnson Talent Agency for feature film representation as an actor. Ian also creative directs promotional films, event advertisements, and 4K video channels featured on large-scale video installations in high-tech office buildings and restaurants across the country. His clients include the founder of the commercial video production company Elevar Pictures and the co-Chief Executive Officer of Alexandria Real Estate Equities, Inc. You can view samples of Ian’s videos at www.ianmaisel.com.

Jun, 2020
98
In the news

Benjamin Moser 98 won a Pulitzer for the authorized, 800-page biography Sontag: Her Life and Work. Moser spent seven years working on the account of the acclaimed writer’s life. Susan Sontag taught at Brown in the mid-80s, and died in 2004. 

Jun, 2020
96

Sophia Ruan Gushée is launching a detox deep dive, the Ruan Detox Immersion, a structured program to help people detox toxic chemicals, heavy metals, and man-made radiation from their home, self-care, diet, and technologies. In connection, Sophia is publishing eight detox workbooks this year, including Cleaning Detox, Self-Care Detox, Home Design Detox, Kitchen Detox, and Technology Detox. Her website is www.ruanliving.com.

Jun, 2020
95

Lenore Zeuthen writes: “Brown alumni in Los Angeles are invited to join the new Brown Book Club. We meet every second Sunday, 2-4 p.m., at La Brea Bakery Cafe (468 South La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, 90036). Email me at lenorezeuthen@gmail.com to join the email list and follow us @BrownBookClub_LA on Instagram and Facebook.”

Jun, 2020
95

Celeste Katz Marston married Jonathan Marston (Cornell ’95) in a family ceremony in October in South Florida. She writes: “I’m excited to be starting a new chapter of life in Boston after nearly 20 years living and working in New York. I continue my written and radio reporting on politics and elections. Jon is a director of a new company that develops self-driving cars. I’d love to hear from friends.” Contact Celeste at celestekatz@protonmail.com.

Jun, 2020
94

Heather Seal Breslin (see Susan Seal ’66). 

Related classes:
Class of 1994, Class of 1966
Jun, 2020
93
In the news

New Jersey’s 34th Secretary of State, Tahesha Wright Way ’93, is chair of the New Jersey Complete Count Commission, which seeks to increase awareness around the state and develop a plan for getting people to return their census forms on time. She is also responsible for other initiatives focused on enhancing New Jersey’s civic health, including the State Council on the Arts and the State Archives.

Jun, 2020
93

Alina Moran has been named president of Dignity Health—California Hospital Medical Center and will lead the overall direction, strategy, and operation of the hospital. In her more recent role, she served as chief executive officer for NYC Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan in East Harlem, N.Y., as well as chief patient growth officer for the NYC Health + Hospitals system. Contact Alina at alina.moran@dignityhealth.org.

Jun, 2020
93

William Castle writes: “After serving as Acting General Counsel of the Department of Defense for nearly a year under then Secretary Jim Mattis, Defense Secretary Mark Esper has awarded me the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service. The Medal is the highest that the Department can confer on a non-career federal employee and has previously been awarded to three presidents. The accompanying citation reads, in part, ‘Mr. William S. Castle is recognized for distinguished public service as Principal Deputy General Counsel… [and] was critical to successful outcomes in the most sensitive classified operational and intelligence matters of the Department… .’”

Jun, 2020
88

Fuller House Executive Producer/ Showrunners Bryan Behar and Steve Baldikoski ’90 welcomed their old schoolmate, legendary singer-songwriter Lisa Loeb ’90, to Fuller House, where she both played herself and performed her new single “Sing Out”—an LGBTQ anthem released in honor of Pride Week. Lisa also appeared in the series finale.

Bryan Behar, Steve  Baldikoski and Lisa Loeb on the set of Fuller House.

 

Jun, 2020
87

Benjamin Filene has been appointed the new Associate Director for Curatorial Affairs at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

Jun, 2020
87

Ilana Cass has taken over as the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center after 20 years in Los Angeles. She is joined on this New Hampshire adventure by her husband Robert “Bear” Barnes ’86 and their tenth grader, Leo. The move brings the family much closer to daughter Roxanne ’21, at Brown, as well as middle daughter Leila, who thought, incorrectly, that enrolling at Vassar would get her far away from her parents. Ilana writes: “We’re very new in town and would love to hear from ’86 or ’87 classmates.” Contact Ilana at bearbarnes1@gmail.com.

Jun, 2020
86

Cecilia Pineda writes: “Hello ’86ers! Coming up on our 35th Reunion! Over the past year, from Cali to Italy and in between, our fellow classmates have connected in private homes, pubs, restaurants, and other venues to keep the Brown spirit alive. Please contact us at ceciliafpineda86@alumni.brown.edu if you are up for organizing local Between-Reunions events. If you haven’t already, you can join our Facebook group at https://facebook.com/groups/bruno86. On Instagram you can follow us at https://www.instagram.com/brownclassof1986. Be sure to tag us in your relevant photos as well. Our class site is https://sites.google.com/a/brown-class-of-1986. We are updating our slide show. How about some ‘Then and Now’ side-by-side scans? Send us updates for us to add at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5AtANNYk4o&feature=youtu.be.”

Jun, 2020
86

Steve Leara (see Bob Tracy ’76).

Related classes:
Class of 1986, Class of 1976
Jun, 2020
85

Jeannie Gainsburg’s first book, The Savvy Ally: A Guide for Becoming a Skilled LGBTQ+ Advocate, has been published by Rowman & Littlefield. She writes: “This book is an encouraging, engaging, humorous, and easy to understand guide for being an ally to the LGBTQ+ communities.” Jeannie can be reached at www.savvyallyaction.com or, alternatively, at savvyallyaction@gmail.com.

Jun, 2020
84

John Shalvey writes: “After 22 years as an independent financial planner, I chose to pursue my passion of health and fitness by becoming a doctor of chiropractic. Inspired by Rodney Dangerfield’s classic Back to School, Life University in Marietta, Georgia, became my home for five years. Many science prerequisites were completed before being accepted into the chiropractic curriculum. After returning to central Ohio, where I am the primary doctor at The Joint (ticker: JYNT) in Grandview, removing nerve interference through chiropractic adjustments is my passion now, along with nutrition guidance and, of course, proper strength training technique. Stop in for an adjustment from Dr. Hammerhead if you are ever in central Ohio.”  

Jun, 2020
84

Sheryl Renee Dobson was honored to have been selected as 1 of 32 artists to be featured in the “Dawn of A New Decade” group art exhibition sponsored by the Staten Island Arts Council. Included in the exhibit was her abstract painting “Safe Water” that focuses on the tragic contamination of the water with lead in Flint, Michigan.

Jun, 2020
83

Eric Jay Dolin’s newest book, A Furious Sky: The Five-Hundred-Year History of America’s Hurricanes, was published on June 9, 2020, with Liveright. It covers the science, politics, and human drama of hurricanes and their tremendous impact on American history. Eric writes: “For more on the book, and where I will be speaking this summer and fall, please visit www.ericjaydolin.com. And, if you are ever in Marblehead and want to grab a drink and get a tour of the town’s history, contact me.” Contact Eric at ericjayd@aol.com

Jun, 2020
81

Alfred Siewers writes: “I’m teaching English at Bucknell University again, after a year fellowship at Princeton’s James Madison Program, where I was William E. Simon Research Fellow in Religion and Public Life. Last year, I was ordained a Subdeacon in the Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia. I am warden of a mission church in Lewisburg, St. John of Shanghai and San Francisco. My wife and I have two sons, one of whom is taller than me now, and another who soon will be.

Jun, 2020
80

Christian McBurney published George Washington’s Nemesis: The Outrageous Treason and Unfair Court-Martial of Major General Charles Lee During the Revolutionary War on January 30 with Savas Beatie. The book relies on original documents (some newly discovered) to combine two dramatic stories involving the military law of treason and Court Martials, creating a balanced view of the American Revolution’s most fascinating personality.

Jun, 2020
80

Melanie Mitchell’s new book, Artificial Intelligence: A Guide for Thinking Humans, was published in 2019 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Jun, 2020
79

Bill Woodson writes: “Finishing up my first year as a Sarasota resident and dean and chief diversity officer at the New College of Florida. I’m putting my recently awarded PhD in organizational leadership from the University of Minnesota to work! Feeling particularly connected to Brown after attending the September 2018 All Class Black Reunion, and our 40-year class reunion in May 2019. Really good to see Al Glenn, Honey Goldberg, Kevin Guynn, Marc and Marcia Band McReynolds, and Sylvia Ortiz, and way too many more classmates to name at our 40th and I’m already talking to those who missed out about making the 45th. If you’re passing through SRQ (Sarasota), an email will likely get you a lunch!” Contact Bill at bill.woodson@yahoo.com.

Jun, 2020
78

Brad Sachs and Karen Meckler are now in their 40th year of marriage, having met during freshman year. Brad’s newest book, The Good Enough Therapist: Futility, Failure and Forgiveness in Treatment, was published by Routledge in October 2019. He continues to write and to see patients in Columbia, Md. Karen continues working as a psychiatrist at a mental health clinic and in private practice. Their daughter, Jessica Sachs ’15, is now halfway through medical school at The Medical College of Wisconsin. They have two granddaughters, courtesy of their oldest son and daughter-in-law, and have already begun the process of inviting the girls to consider matriculating at Brown, a possibility that would not occur for at least another decade. Contact Brad at drbradsachs@gmail.com or through his website, www.drbradsachs.com. Contact Karen at drkarenmeckler@gmail.com.

Jun, 2020
78

David Hahn writes: “I was a comp lit/classics student at Brown. I have since developed a career as a composer. My new CD, pressed and released to the masses on June 1, 2019, is titled For the Trees and is dedicated to Greta Thunberg, a pioneer revolutionary for climate action. Though CDs have been eclipsed by streaming, I prefer physical media. Please write if you would like a copy. Also, when asked by my friend, Marilynn Mair ’70, an international mandolin luminary, to provide a piece for her new anthology, I composed a set of variations on the theme from The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle, to be published by Mel Bay in 2020.”

Jun, 2020
77

Frank Feldman writes: “Six of my brand-new piano recordings are now available to hear and/or download on Spotify, Amazon, Apple Music, YouTube, and elsewhere on the net, including ‘Anima,’ ‘Take the 7 Train,’ and ‘Classical-ish.’

Jun, 2020
76

Bob Tracy writes: “My wife Kathy and I live in Hoover, Alabama. We are experiencing empty nest syndrome as our daughters, both Ole Miss graduates, are living in Nashville, Tennessee. Our oldest girl was married on March 2 in Birmingham, Alabama. Mike Bernert and his wife attended, as well as Steve Leara ’86 and his wife. I have been in the carbon and graphite business for nearly 44 years, all with the same company. There is no retirement date in sight. My wife and I would certainly enjoy hearing from Brown friends.” Contact Bob at bob.tracy@morganplc.com.

Jun, 2020
76

William Grebenc writes: “I retired in June 2019, having been employed in various commodity trading positions with Continental Grain, Cargill, Peabody Energy, and COFCO International.”

Jun, 2020
74

Frank Morgan has begun a two-year term as president of the St. George’s Society of New York in its 250th anniversary year. With a staff of five, including two social workers, it provides housing, nutrition and other assistance to those of British and Commonwealth descent in distress in the tri-state area. It also awards scholarships at Lehman and Hunter Colleges and supports pediatric cancer patients and their families visiting from the United Kingdom for treatment in New York. Frank writes: “After a life of many blessings, it is time to give back.” Visit: www.stgeorgessociety.org

Jun, 2020
74

William A. Darity and A. Kirsten Mullen published From Here to Equality: Reparations for Black Americans in the Twenty-First Century on April 20 with UNC Press.

Jun, 2020
74
In the news

Stuart Symington IV ’74 has been appointed special envoy for South Sudan by the U.S. State Department. There, he will lead efforts to support the peace process and a successful political transition. He is a retired ambassador who previously served as chief of mission in Nigeria from 2016 to 2019, Rwanda from 2008 to 2011, and Djibouti from 2006 to 2008.

Jun, 2020
74

Brian Bixby, co-chair of Burns & Levinson’s Private Client Group and chair of the Probate & Trust Litigation Group, was named to the Massachusetts Clients’ Security Board, which works to preserve the public’s trust in the legal profession by reimbursing client-victims who have suffered financial losses due to misappropriations by Massachusetts lawyers.

Jun, 2020
73

Bruce Miller is the 2020 recipient of the Weaver-Tremblay Award for Applied Anthropology, given by the Canadian Anthropology Society/ La Société Canadienne d’Anthropologie (CASCA). The award is the highest honor for anthropology in Canada. Portions of the award citation read: “Dr. Miller’s work with Indigenous communities has demonstrated the value of oral history as evidence in trials involving Indigenous communities in Canada, the United States . . . His work is grounded in community and driven by community interests. In today’s bitterly divided world, scholars like Bruce Miller serve as needed reminders of how important it is to design and conduct research in ways that will build capacity within Indigenous communities and contribute to expanding understanding about Indigenous culture within settler society.” He is a professor of anthropology at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver and author/editor of eight books, among them Oral History on Trial and The Problem of Justice: Tradition and Law in the Coast Salish World.

Jun, 2020
72

Jeff Paine writes: “After two-plus years of hard work, my wife and I have just converted much of the ground floor of our house in Hossegor, France, into a modern, private, two-bedroom holiday rental apartment. Good chance that I may be there this summer as well and we can catch up in person. I will put together a special Brown welcome package if you let me know you’re coming over email or at bit.ly/2L4LuFq.” Contact Jeff at jtpaine@att.net.

Jun, 2020
72

William Liddicoet writes: “On Oct. 19, 2019, a dogwood tree was dedicated in the memory of Richard B. Noonan, who passed away on May 26, 2019. The ceremony was presided over by Chaplain Janet Cooper-Nelson and in attendance were his sister Jean Noonan Mojo, his daughters Kendra and Brooke Noonan, and friends and classmates Rulon Anderson, Daniel Cummings, Chas Gross, Samuel Halpern, Robert Hayes, Fred Radway, Richard Ramsay ’71, and myself. The tree is planted in Patriots Court and is marked by a plaque bearing a quotation from W.B. Yeats: ‘Think where man's glory most begins and ends, and say my glory was I had such friends.’ We hope all Dick Noonan’s friends, classmates, and fraternity brothers will take a moment to visit his memorial when next on campus.”

Richard Bernard Noonan

Jun, 2020
70

Marilynn Mair (see David Hahn ’78).

Related classes:
Class of 1970, Class of 1978

Send us your news! 
Help us keep your class updated.