Obituaries
— Class of 1955

Jun, 2022

Ronald Scheckter ’55, of New Milford, Conn.; June 4, 2021. He was a successful builder/developer in New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey. He enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by a son and two sisters.

Jun, 2022

Veronica Stinnes Petersen ’55, of Falmouth, Mass.; July 28, 2021, after a brief illness. She graduated from Columbia Medical School, where she met her husband. After they completed their medical training they moved to the Boston area and she practiced pediatrics and taught at Harvard Medical School. She served on the boards and advisory councils of numerous Boston area educational organizations, but she was most proud of being a board member at Haverford College, where she endowed a professorship in Peace, Justice, and Human Rights studies. She enjoyed art, music, investing, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Robert; three children; eight grandchildren, including Margiana Petersen-Rockney ’11; and a sister.

Jun, 2022

William H. O’Donnell ’55, of West Roxbury, Mass.; Oct. 25. He had a career in the U.S. Navy prior to becoming a high school English teacher at Groton School in Groton, Mass. He also owned a fine gifts store in Marblehead, Mass. He was well versed in current events, had a great interest in politics, and enjoyed writing and attending the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He is survived by four nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2022

James G. McGall ’55, of Freehold, N.J.; Dec. 1. He began his career in the aerospace industry and later was supervisor in the information department of the American Federation of Musicians. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jun, 2022

Ronald Kramer ’55, of Toronto, Canada, formerly of Boston; Dec. 7. He is survived by his partner Selma Edelstone; four children and their spouses, including son Dan ’84 and daughters Sarah Kramer ’86 and Judith Kramer ’90; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2022

Walter B. Goldfarb ’55, of Portland, Me.; Oct. 13. He met and married Marcia Finberg ’55, who predeceased him. After receiving his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine and completing his surgical residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., where he was an instructor in surgery from 1963 to 1965, he moved his family to Portland and began a surgery practice at Maine Medical Center and Mercy Hospital. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and served at Fort Sam Houston (Tex.) and then became chief of surgery at Ireland Army Hospital at Fort Knox (Ky.). He was awarded the Army Commendation Medal and was commissioned as a Kentucky Colonel during his tenure there. He and his family returned to Portland to resume his surgical practice, from which he retired in 2003 as chief of general surgery at Maine Medical Center (MMC). During his tenure, he served in a variety of leadership positions, including president of the medical staff, trustee, and founding trustee of MaineHealth. He took pride in his involvement in the growth and development of MMC’s surgery department and was twice recognized as Teacher of the Year by surgical students. In retirement, he remained active for 10 years teaching third-year medical students in weekly surgical seminars. He was clinical professor of surgery at the University of Vermont and then at Tufts University School of Medicine when MMC changed its medical school affiliation. He was a member of several medical and surgical societies, including serving in leadership roles. He was also active in the Boston Surgical Society, serving on the executive committee for six years and as vice president in 2005. He wrote 40 articles and two book chapters in surgical literature. He served as a trustee over the years for the Portland Concert Association, Portland Chamber Music Festival, and Maine chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. He was a trustee of the Portland Museum of Art, serving as vice president in 2011, and donated major American paintings to the museum. He enjoyed fly fishing and playing squash. He is survived by three children, including daughter Miriam Goldfarb ’85 and son Adam ’82; and six grandchildren, including grandson Jonathan Aronson ’13. 

Apr, 2022

Harry L. Devoe Jr. ’55, of New Zion, S.C.; Aug. 17. After Brown he attended the University of Virginia School of Law and served as public defender for the 3rd District Judicial Circuit for more than 20 years. He was past president of the Clarendon County Republican Party and a member of the American Bar Association, the American Legion Post 149, and the Turbeville Ruritan Club. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of the Vietnam War. He is survived by two sons, five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and two nephews. 

 

Jan, 2022

Kendrick Thayer ’55, of Portland, Me.; Mar. 23, 2021. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Coast Guard and married. He worked for several years at Rockbestos Wire and Cable Co. in Connecticut before joining Fairchild Semiconductor in South Portland. He was employed by Fairchild and later by National Semiconductor for 35 years in various manufacturing, engineering, and quality assurance functions. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling with his wife, Joan Gately Thayer ’55, who survives him. He is also survived by three sons, including Matthew ’87; two daughters-in-law; and seven grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022

Socrates H. Mihalakos ’55, of Vero Beach, Fla.; July 6. He was a retired appellate court judge. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Air Force. He received the title of first lieutenant and was honorably discharged but continued to serve in the reserves. He attended law school at the University of Connecticut and earned his JD. After practicing in Cheshire, Conn., he was appointed a Connecticut Superior Court judge in 1985, and in 2000, while serving as chief administrative judge in Danbury (Conn.), he was elevated to judge of the Appellate Court, where he served until retiring in 2019. He was active in both Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Conn.) and St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church (Fla.). He is survived by his wife, Joani; four daughters; three sons-in-law; four grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022

Joseph Blumen ’55, of Newport, R.I.; July 25. After graduating from Tufts University School of Medicine, he enlisted as a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and served as chief of general surgery at the 67th Evac Hospital, Qui Nhon, Vietnam, and later on the surgical staff at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. He returned to Newport in 1967 to practice as a general surgeon and primary care physician. Active in the community, he was a member of the planning board for the City of Newport, was a trustee of the Seamen’s Church Institute and was a master Mason and member of St. Paul’s Lodge for more than 50 years. He also established the Dora and Elias Blumen Collection for the Study of Holocaust Literature at Salve Regina University. He is survived by his wife, Dale; four children and their spouses; and six grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022

Gene E. Bloch ’55, of Redwood City, Calif.; July 31. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Navy, studied physics at the University of Pittsburgh, then worked for many years as a software engineer. His love of language, learning, word games, and science, especially astronomy, never flagged. In mid-life, he and his wife were avid folk dancers in several Eastern European traditions. He is survived by his wife, Kristine Kimble; two brothers, including Dan ’74, ’77 MD; three sons and their spouses; six grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Jan, 2022

Anthony R. Jaffe ’55, of Pittsburgh; June 19, of cancer. He had a successful career in advertising, creating iconic commercial jingles and slogans including “Big Fig” Newtons and “Silly Rabbit, TRIX are for kids.” He began his advertising career at the former Doyle Dane Bernbach and rose in the business with positions at J. Walter Thompson, Dancer Fitzgerald, Campbell Mithun Esty, and Della Femina McNamee before joining MARC USA, where he became senior vice president and executive creative director in Pittsburgh. Audiences in the Pittsburgh region have seen his contributions in campaigns for the Pittsburgh Zoo, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the Rite Aid Corp., and UPMC Health System. His work has earned him numerous major creative awards, including Cannes Gold Lion, CLIOs, an international Radio and TV Gold Medal, and induction into the Pittsburgh Advertising Hall of Fame. He was a member of the American Society of Composers and Publishers and the Screen Actors Guild. He supported the Brown Sports Foundation and enjoyed solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. He is survived by his wife, Gwen; daughter Elizabeth Jaffe ’87; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2022

Eliot B. Barron ’55, of Hartford, Conn.; July 10. After Brown, he continued his studies at Tufts University School of Medicine, then served in the Army Medical Corps in Germany, followed by a psychiatric residency at the Institute of Living in Hartford. In the decades that followed, he was a psychiatrist in both Providence, R.I., and Hartford. He also served as a member of the Rhode Island Parole Board. Outside of work, he enjoyed traveling and was committed to his Jewish faith and community. He was involved in groups at his synagogues in Providence and West Hartford and is survived by his wife, Vida; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson. 

Oct, 2021

Richard M. Coveney ’55, of East Falmouth, Mass.; Apr. 30. After graduating from Harvard Business School, he began his professional career at Procter & Gamble, moved on to PepsiCo, and eventually founded Leasing Services, Inc., in Boston. He retired early from a successful career and eventually settled in Falmouth. His happiest days included sailing the coast of New England with his children, going on walking tours in the Adirondacks, and spending time on the Cape Cod seashore. He is survived by his companion, Margaret R. Steele; three children; and three grandchildren.

 

Aug, 2021

Sydney W. Noyes ’55, of Haddon Township, N.J.; Mar. 9. He served two years in the U.S. Army and worked in the field of finance for several years before joining a Philadelphia bank, where he became a senior vice president. He later owned and operated the Potted Plant in Cherry Hill, N.J., for 17 years. He was an avid boater and fisherman. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three granddaughters; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021

Emeline Green Gay ’55, of Tiverton, R.I.; Feb. 4. She dedicated her life to education. In her later years, she enjoyed playing golf with her good friend Sheila, traveling the world with her college roommate Brenda Brown Rew, and going to the casino with her son Jeff. Most of all, she loved spending time with her grandson Conor and became affectionately known as “Mamaw” to his group of friends, with whom she spent countless weekends playing poker. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, a grandson and his wife, a brother and sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2021

Nancy Harrold Thomas ’55, of Richmond, Va.; Nov. 18, from COVID-19. She worked at Johns Hopkins Hospital before marrying. She later was a tour guide for the Richmond Chamber of Commerce, an active community volunteer, and an H&R Block consultant. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, William; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2021

James R. Smith ’55, of Erie, Pa.; Oct. 20. While at Brown, he majored in English literature, played on the football team, and engaged in the ROTC program with plans to become a pilot in the U.S. Air Force. He became a pilot and served in both Korea and Vietnam, achieving the rank of Major USAF, and upon completion of his Vietnam duty he was given the assignment of command pilot for Gen. Graham Commander, U.S. Forces in Japan. This assignment moved Jim and his family to Japan on a three-year tour ending in 1970. His final duty was at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, Ohio, where he ran their flight simulator training program. In 1976, after 18 years in the military, he retired and moved to Erie, where he took a job with Pfizer Pharmaceuticals as a territory representative. During his 24-year career at Pfizer, he was honored with their Vice President’s Council award. He retired in 2000 and enjoyed playing golf and traveling. He is survived by four sons, a daughter-in-law, six grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece and three nephews.

Apr, 2021

William H. Sargent ’55, of Kitty Hawk, N.C.; Nov. 7. An engineer and rocket scientist by profession, he spent most of his working life in aeronautics at Atlantic Research and belonged to The Propulsion Club, a group of engineers and rocket scientists. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He sang in his church choir, was a lifelong fisherman, and enjoyed cooking and hosting parties. He is survived by six children and their spouses, as well as numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2021

J. Philip O’Hara ’55, of Brooklyn, Conn., formerly of Providence; Oct. 18. He worked in the book publishing industry for 30 years before returning to Brown in 1987. After spending his first year in the Department of Athletics, he joined the Student Activities Office, from which he retired in 2011. He was a founder of the Brown University Mediation Project, oversaw the renovation of Faunce House, and was instrumental in his role as faculty adviser to the class boards. He spent his life in service to other people, volunteering with many organizations. He was the 2010 recipient of a Brown Excellence Award. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; three children; two stepsons; 17 grandchildren; four great-granddaughters; and a sister.

Apr, 2021

Kenneth E. Doonan ’55, of Providence; Dec. 2. He was an employment skills counselor in Providence for three years. He then worked as a rehabilitation counselor for the State of Rhode Island Office of Rehabilitative Services. While employed with ORS he returned to school and earned a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling. He worked in state service for 28 years, retiring as a disability examiner. After a few years in retirement, he worked as an employment skills teacher and coach at the Outreach Program at Rhode Island College. He and his wife taught ballroom dancing for Cranston Adult Education Programs in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Traveling the world together, they visited more than 20 countries, museums, and archeological sites and enjoyed the cuisine all around the world. As a devout Catholic, he always found a local Catholic church to attend Sunday mass no matter what continent or time zone. He enjoyed classical music, opera, and the theater and was a subscriber to the Rhode Island Philharmonic for nearly 40 years and the Boston Ballet for more than 15 years. He is survived by his wife, Loretta, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021

Nancy Stevens Carlson ’55, of North Eastham, Mass.; Oct. 24, after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s. She taught elementary school for 28 years in Barrington, R.I., Folcroft, Pa., and at the Lynch Elementary School in Springfield, Mass. She won several teaching awards, including a commendation from the mayor of Springfield for innovative teaching of our political system to her young students. She was active in Foster Congregational Church, interviewed aspiring candidates for Brown, and enjoyed gardening and hiking with the Eastham Hiking Club. She is survived by her husband Robert P. Carlson ’55; two sons, including Douglas ’83; and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021
Stephen Elrich image


Stephen R. Ehrlich ’55 established several scholarships, providing a foundation of support that continues to make Brown financially feasible for numerous students.

After graduating from Brown and NYU Business School, Stephen became a successful corporate bond trader. He was a partner at Mabon, Nugent & Co. in 1966 and became CEO in 1972. During his tenure, Mabon became one of the largest securities firms in equity capital. He retired in 1992 and formed private financial investment and consulting businesses in New Jersey and Florida.

He strongly believed in the value of higher education and served as a member of the Brown Board of Trustees of the Corporation from 1979 to 1984 and from 1986 to 1992. He and his wife, Mary Ann, were involved with Brown’s first named fund, the Stephen R. Ehrlich 1955 National Scholarship, and served as cochairs of the National Scholarship Program for eight years. Over the following years, they created scholarships including the Stephen R. Ehrlich Family Medical Scholarship, the Stephen R. Ehrlich Fellowship Fund, and the Stephen R. Ehrlich Brown Annual Fund. The Ehrlichs actively engaged with their scholarship students by hosting dinners and attending functions each year. “What started as an awkward dinner with two strangers freshman year grew into an incredible lifelong friendship. Stephen and Mary Ann Ehrlich have been there for me through many chapters of my life,” says Louella Hill ’03, who met Ehrlich through the National Scholars Program at Brown. Roxanne Vrees ’98, ’03 MD, a Stephen Ehrlich National Scholars Program recipient, says: “I still remember our first dinner at Hemenway’s my freshman year and the many other special moments I have shared with Stephen and Mary Ann over the 26 years of our wonderful relationship.” 

Stephen received numerous awards, most notably the H. Anthony Ittleson ’60 Award in 2000 and the Brown Bear Award in 2002. And both he and Mary Ann were honored in 2014 with the Artemis Joukowsky Award for their dedication and commitment to the Warren Alpert Medical School. Stephen also served on the boards of the Newark Museum, New Jersey Historical Society, New Jersey Building Authority, and the Rutgers Business Board of Advisors.

Upon retirement, he split his time between Palm Beach, Fla., and Short Hills, N.J., so that he could remain close with his children and grandchildren. He was an avid sports fan of the Yankees and Knicks and enjoyed playing golf and watching classic movies.

Both Mary Ann and Stephen contracted COVID-19 and were hospitalized. Stephen passed away on Aug. 6 from the virus, the day after Mary Ann was released from the hospital. In addition to his wife, he is survived by daughter Lisa Ehrlich Pearlman ’85; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren. The Stephen R. Ehrlich Memorial Research Fund has been established at Brown to support pulmonary and COVID-related research.

Jan, 2021

Shirley Morse Richmond ’55, of Wayne, Pa.; Aug. 14. After earning a master’s degree in library science from Villanova University, she worked as a library clerk for Upper Merion Middle School for many years. She was a member of Valley Forge Presbyterian Church, serving as the church’s librarian, president and treasurer of the Church and Synagogue Library Association, a member of the John Howland Society, and a volunteer for the Veterans Hospital. She collected stamps and enjoyed bowling, camping in the family RV, and traveling all over the world. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, nine granddaughters, seven great-grandchildren, and a stepsister.

Jan, 2021

William  P. Hinckley ’55, of Highlands Ranch, Colo.; Aug. 11. He was a coach and teacher at St. Peter’s School in Peekskill, N.Y. After marrying, he moved to New Jersey and joined his father-in-law’s independent insurance agency, R.H. Aaronson & Son. Bill purchased the agency in 1974 and sold it when he retired in 1994. While there, he was president of South Jersey and Long Beach Island wood carving clubs. In 1995, he retired to Colorado, where he enjoyed fishing and a cabin in the mountains while continuing to hone his wood carving skills. At the age of 80 he began to write books. He wrote and published three novels and one memoir, as well as contributed to a column on birds. Bill was an avid angler and enjoyed fishing. He is survived by his wife, Sue; a daughter; and two granddaughters.

Jan, 2021

Barry D. Coletti ’55, of Duxbury, Mass.; May 31. As a principal of Coletti Brothers Architects in Quincy, Mass., Barry was responsible for the design of nationally and internationally recognized buildings. He enjoyed assisting local homeowners with the design of historically accurate renovations and additions with meticulously hand-drawn and lettered plans and renderings. He was an avid outdoorsman and an accomplished dog trainer, competing in and judging AKC retriever field trials from Maine to North Carolina. He also liked to cook and was known to be a practical joker. He is survived by his wife, Ginny; three sons; four daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; three stepchildren; and a sister.

Nov, 2020

Cornelius J. Sullivan ’55, of Concord, Mass.; May 22, after a long illness. He worked for Honeywell and later Raytheon as a human resources manager. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He was an active member of Holy Family Parish, where he served as a Eucharistic minister and choir member. He is survived by his wife, Maureen; three daughters and their spouses; a son; and four grandchildren.

Sep, 2020

Thomas A. Westbrook ’55, of South Windsor, Conn.; Feb. 24. He operated his family’s manufacturing business and invested in real estate. He was an active member of the East Hartford Rotary Club and served as president in 1974. He was also president of the East Hartford Chamber of Commerce in 1974. He enjoyed family vacations, camping, canoeing trips, and playing the piano.

Aug, 2020

Arthur Scott Jr. ’55, of Bristol, R.I.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of sociology at Providence College. He retired in 2005. He also worked as a civilian contractor with the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed running, swimming, and proudly watching the New England Patriots, the Boston Red Sox, and PC basketball teams. He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a son-in-law, three grandchildren, a great-grandchild, and a brother.

Aug, 2020

Norman G. Orodenker ’55, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 18. He received his JD from Columbia University in 1958 and was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar. He was a senior partner at Tillinghast, Licht, Perkins, Smith, and Cohen; legal counsel at the Department of Employment Security (1960-1962); chief legal counsel for all Rhode Island departments of state government (1969-1972); chief legal counsel at the Registry of Motor Vehicles (1972-1974); and chief legal counsel of the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (1974-1982). He held numerous leadership roles in community, charitable, and religious organizations. He was recognized for his commitment, dedication, and passion involving social change and justice as a recipient of the NCCJ Humanitarian Award in 1999, the Jewish Federation of Rhode Island Joseph W. Ress Community Service Award in 2004, and the Urban League Humanitarian Award in 2004, and received the Martindale-Hubbell rating AV, which is the highest rating given to attorneys. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and two sisters.

Aug, 2020

Harold J. Morick ’55, of Lenox, Mass.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of philosophy at the State University of New York at Albany from 1967 to 2000, specializing in analytic philosophy, Wittgenstein, and Freud. He published three books of philosophy and at the time of his death was editing a selection of essays by Sigmund Freud for a volume about Freud as a philosopher. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; four daughters; and a granddaughter.

Jun, 2020

Gordon E. Perry ’55, of Barrington, R.I., formerly of Westport, Conn.; Dec. 9. At Brown he was a member of the ROTC for the U.S. Navy and upon graduation served two years in the Navy, becoming a lieutenant and chief gunnery officer. From 1958 to 1993 he worked in the insurance/pension business for Mutual of New York. He retired as vice chairman and a member of the board of trustees. He moved to Rhode Island in 1996. He was an active supporter of Brown athletics and served as president of the Brown Football Association and president of the Brown University Sports Foundation. He especially enjoyed watching his sons and grandsons play Brown football. He is survived by eight children and their spouses, including son Scott ’92; 12 grandchildren, including Robert Hughes ’17, Alexander Hughes ’20, and William Perry ’22; a great-grandson; and two sisters.

 

Jun, 2020

William S. Penhallow ’55, of Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 15, after a prolonged illness. He was a professor of physics and astronomy at URI for 35 years. Early in his career he conducted research at the Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory. He also taught and conducted research at Brown, Wesleyan University, and Indiana University. He served as director of the URI Quonochontaug observatory and was one of the founders and first directors of the Frosty Drew Observatory in Ninigret Park, Charlestown. He was a lifelong member of Skyscrapers, the Amateur Astronomical Society of Rhode Island, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Association of Variable Star Observers. As a member of the New England Antiquities Research Association, he made groundbreaking discoveries concerning the solar, lunar, and stellar alignments in the Newport Tower in Tower Park, Newport, R.I. He also served as chairman of the Chariho and Charlestown school committees and was the Charlestown Town Moderator. He was a Mason, past master at the Franklin Lodge and past high priest at Unity Chapter. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a brother; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jun, 2020

Harvey J. Ades ’55, of Cutler Bay, Fla.; May 19, 2019. He established The Harvey Ades Family Foundation to continue his parents’ tradition of philanthropy. He is survived by his wife, Rebecca; six children; six grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2020

Jeannette Sheridan Adams ’55, of Hilton Head Island, S.C.; Oct. 30. She was a volunteer at Hilton Head Hospital, a member at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, and a stalwart of the golf community at The Sea Pines Country Club. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses.

Apr, 2020

Robert D. Fitzgerald ’55, of Lake Forest, Ill.; Nov. 11. He was a banker and worked for the Harris Bank, the Continental Bank, and the Bank of America. He enjoyed traveling and being with his family. He is survived by his wife, Patty; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2020

Richard M. Beers ’55, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Oct. 21. He served as a U.S. Naval officer from 1956 to 1959 before moving to Rochester, N.Y. He worked as a Realtor at Red Barn Properties for more than 47 years and in 1971 was a founding member and EMT at Pittsford Volunteer Ambulance. He retired in 2019. He was an active Pittsford community member and is survived by his wife, Patsy; four children, including daughter Karen Frutiger ’79; 14 grandchildren; a great-grandson; five stepchildren; eight step-grandchildren; and a step-great-grandson.

 

Jan, 2020

Peter W. Lisbon ’55, of San Diego, Calif.; May 2.  

 

Jan, 2020

Stephen D. Booth ’55, of Brattleboro, Vt.; Aug. 19, of kidney and respiratory failure. He had a long career teaching at schools in Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Rhode Island before retiring to a slower paced life in Vermont. He was a voracious reader and historian and enjoyed researching his family tree. He also enjoyed jazz music and Broadway tunes. He is survived by his wife, Steffi; two sons; a stepdaughter; two stepsons; and four grandchildren.   

 

Nov, 2019

Richard K. Moore ’55, of Locust Valley, N.Y.; Aug. 2. He worked at J.P. Morgan for 30 years as a vice president in corporate finance and international private banking, both in New York City and London. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was discharged with the rank of captain. He is survived by four daughters; five grandchildren; a sister, Jacqueline Moore Copp ’54; and niece Catherine Colley ’82.

 

Nov, 2019

Richard B. Lund ’55, of Clemson, S.C.; June 11. He was a retired organic chemist who spent the majority of his career working for the Ciba Geigy chemical corporation. He held some original patents for epoxy glue and benzodiazepines. He enjoyed sailing, woodworking, clock building, and milling model engines. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; a daughter; two sons; and two grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Shirley Denno Fusco ’55, of Wilbraham, Mass.; June 16. She was store manager at Denno’s Jewelers in Pittsfield, Mass., and active in school, community, and church groups. She was a member and past vice president of the Wilbraham Women’s Club and member of the Wilbraham Garden Club. She enjoyed traveling and playing golf, bridge, and tennis. She is survived by two daughters, including Carol J. Kressen ’86; two sons-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

William P. Condaxis ’55, of West Roxbury, Mass.; June 23, after a period of congestive heart failure and dementia. He worked as a retail executive for Jordan Marsh (now Macy’s) in Boston, Elizabeth Arden in New York City, and Mervyn’s (now Target) in California and Texas. After working and living in Hong Kong for three years, he retired in 1995 to Cape Cod. He moved to Norwood, Mass., in 2006 and to West Roxbury in 2014. He was a U.S. Navy World War II and Korean War veteran. He enjoyed playing cards, skiing, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Frances; four children, including Paula Condaxis Angell ’78; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2019

John P. Burke ’55, of Salisbury, N.C., and Buffalo, N.Y.; Jan. 20. He was a retired certified public accountant. He served as a lieutenant JG in the U.S. Navy from 1955 to 1963. He enjoyed volunteering in his community, reading, skiing, sailing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jackie; four children; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

Joseph F. Granger Jr. ’55, of Matthews, N.C.; Mar. 10. His career was spent in the employee benefit and insurance industry and he retired as senior vice president at Marsh & Company. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a fourth degree Knight of Columbus. He spent 25 years as a member of the Eastern Association of Intercollegiate Football Officials and enjoyed playing tennis and cheering for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

May, 2019

Margot Wood Morgan ’55, of Old Saybrook, Conn.; Jan. 23. She was a retired Old Saybrook High School English teacher. She was secretary of the Old Saybrook Board of Education from 1992 to 1994 and chairwoman from 1994 to 1995. She enjoyed time spent each summer in Maine. She is survived by her four children and four children from her second marriage, including John Morgan ’81 MAT; a grandson; and a great-grandson.

May, 2019

Paul H. Letiecq ’55, of Albion and Holley, N.Y.; Nov. 7. He served as the pastor of the Holley Presbyterian Church for ten years. He later served as pastor of the Universalist Church of Middleport for more than 20 years. He was a member of Planned Parenthood, past president of the Cobblestone Society, and active with the prison ministry at the Orleans and Groveland Correctional Facilities. He enjoyed playing tennis, gardening, and supported NPR and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. He is survived by three sons and their spouses; two brothers; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Mar, 2019

David V. Yale ’55, of Wallingford, Conn.; Oct. 31. He worked at Pratt & Whitney before moving to Prudential Insurance in sales and lastly to Nationwide Insurance in claims management, where he remained until his retirement. At Brown he played varsity football and was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019

Alice Emmert Ward ’55, of Wellesley, Mass.; Oct. 29. She worked for many years as a chemist at Dow Chemical in Midland, Mich., and at Ciba Labs in Summit, N.J. She later taught in the computer labs in local schools, including Wellesley Middle School. She was a Girl Scout leader, Boy Scout den mother, soccer coach, and longtime supporter of Wellesley youth athletic programs. Following retirement, she was active with the Wellesley Council on Aging. She enjoyed spending summers at Big Island Pond in Derry, N.H., with family and friends. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019

Henry Juncker III ’55, of Gloucester, Mass.; Oct. 11. He taught in the Marblehead Public School system for more than 50 years. He was an active member of the Annisquam Village Church, where he served as a clerk, Sunday School teacher, and choir member. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he was also a longtime member of the Chorus North Shore. He is survived by his wife, Judith Lamb Juncker ’58; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

 

Jan, 2019

Geoffrey H. Spranger ’55, ’67 MAT, of Middletown, R.I.; Aug. 2, following a brief illness. While at Brown he was captain of the sailing team and during summer breaks he was a sailing instructor at Bristol and Barrington Yacht Clubs. Following graduation, he was hired as an English/social studies teacher, sailing coach, and dorm master at St. George’s School in Middletown, where he remained on the faculty until 1971. In 1958 he purchased a Hereshoff Class S-Boat, which he raced for 10 years, winning the class championship in 1968. In 1971 he left teaching to become an associate editor at Sail magazine, where he remained until 1979. He then accepted the position of editor for The Practical Sailor, steering the publication until 1987. In his final working years, he was the salesroom manager at Jamestown Distributors, retiring in 1998. Highlights of his sailing and racing career include being a member of the Newport to Bermuda Race crew in 1964, reporting on racing for the America’s Cup for the Newport Daily News, and acting as copublisher of the America’s Cup Report in 1980 and 1983. His last boat, a custom yacht he spent 10 years building, allowed him and his wife to cruise and race for more than 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019

Rose DiTommaso Marcaccio ’55, of North Providence, R.I.; July 28. She was an elementary school teacher in North Providence for many years, where she was honored as Teacher of the Year. An avid gardener, she was a member of the Sundial Garden Club. She enjoyed cooking and entertaining. She is survived by her husband, Edward Marcaccio ’54; two sons, including Edward Jr. ’82; two daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019

Sylvia Blackledge Earle Legault ’55, of Somerset, Mass.; Aug. 15, after a brief illness. She began teaching in Rehoboth, Mass., and then in the Fall River (Mass.) public school system. She taught fifth grade at Fowler Elementary School in Fall River for more than 30 years, retiring in 2004. She was a classically trained pianist and gave piano lessons prior to her teaching career. She sold Avon for many years and enjoyed reading, traveling, and watching her grandkids play sports. She is survived by her husband, Ron; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and  her grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019

Carl M. Albert ’55, of Cathedral City, Calif.; July 28. He and his brothers owned Plainville Wayside Furniture in Plainville, Conn., for 30 years. During winters he volunteered at Haystack Mountain in Vermont as a ski patrolman. After retiring in 1993, he and his wife sailed from the East Coast through Panama to the West Coast and settled in California, where Carl taught computer classes for the past 18 years and volunteered at the Indian Wells Tennis tournament. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed traveling, skiing, and playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three children; and five grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Eliot Fiske Sugerman ’55, of Fort Myers, Fla., formerly of Shaker Heights, Ohio; Mar. 30. She was a college consultant in the Cleveland area before retiring to Sanibel Island, Fla., in 1982 and selling real estate with Merrill Lynch Realty. She was an avid reader and enjoyed playing bridge and tap dancing. She is survived by her companion, Jerry, and two daughters.

 

Sep, 2018

Edmond A. Neal ’55, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 10. He was president of the former Russell Harrington Cutlery in Southbridge, Mass. He retired in 1996. He had also been president of Washington Forge in New Jersey and the American Cutlery Manufacturers Assoc. He was on the board of Hyde Manufacturing Co. and Harrington Hospital in Southbridge and a deacon of the Roman Catholic Church in Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; two daughters; five sons, including Edmond A. Neal III ’76; three daughters-in-law; two sons-in-law; 13 grandchildren; a sister, Judy Neal Murray ’63; a brother, Kenneth R. Neal ’66; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and a niece, Stephanie Nicolas ’94.

 

Sep, 2018

Norman M. Bouton ’55, of Washington, D.C.; Apr. 7. He served his country as a U.S. Naval lieutenant and Foreign Service Officer. He was posted in Rio, Naples, Athens, and Mexico City, and was chargé d’affaires in Antigua. He enjoyed sailing, medieval history, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jane Philipp Bouton ’56; three children; and five grandsons.

 

Jul, 2018

Leslie Travis Wendel ’55, of Newtown, Pa., formerly of Brooklyn, Conn., and Providence; Jan. 1. She was a reporter for the Hartford Courant from 1971 to 1978, and through 1995 she was a freelance journalist whose articles had appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Examiner, and the Chicago Sun Times. From 1978 to 1986 she was director of communications and donor relations at Brown. She then spent five years as managing director of Wendel Associates before returning to Brown in 1991 as coordinator of the Friends of the Library. She was editor of Special Collections at Brown University: A History and Guide and The Carberry Cookbook. In 1999 she was the recipient of Brown’s William Williams Award for distinguished contributions to the Brown University Library. She was a longtime board member of the Eastern Shore Land Conservancy and served two terms as president. In 1990 she spent time in Argentina weighing, measuring, and banding penguins as part of a research project of the New York Zoological Society. She was a member of the Women’s League of Washington College and a former Regent of Old Kent Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She is survived by two sons, including Andrew ’85; a grandson; and two brothers.

Jul, 2018

W. Kent Montgomery ’55, of Oakham, Mass.; Feb. 19. He was the vice president of human resources at Memorial Hospital in Worcester, Mass., and later a human resource consultant with Montgomery Associates in Oakham prior to his retirement. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; four sons; two daughters-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

 

Jul, 2018

Gerold N. Borodach ’55, of New York City; Feb. 15. He was a retired physician and anesthesiologist. He was a member of the American Medical Assoc. and the American Society of Anesthesiologists. He is survived by his wife, Ardell Kabalkin ’57; a daughter; sons Andrew ’93 and Samuel ’87; and a son-in-law, Kenneth Elmore ’85.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Vaino A. Ahonen ’55, of Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J.; Feb. 4. He had a career in international banking. He retired in 1991 as senior vice president at Summit Bank, which later became Bank of America. He was active in the New Jersey Trade Council, where he served as vice chairman, director, and treasurer. He was also a trustee of the Bergen Philharmonic and the Community Resource Council. He is survived by nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Lorle Patzau Wolfson ’55, of Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Dec. 8. A commercial interior designer, she worked as a resource coordinator with several firms in Philadelphia, which allowed her to collaborate with other designers. She eventually established her own resource consulting business, Resourcing. She was involved with the Main Line Unitarian Church in Devon, Pa.; served as a host family for many foreign students; and was a board member and volunteer for Philadelphia’s Nationality Service Center, which serves immigrants. She enjoyed cooking, knitting, and needlework. She is survived by her husband, Bertram ’52; a daughter; a son; five granddaughters; and a brother.

 

May, 2018

John Shearing ’55, of Los Angeles, formerly of Port Murray, N.J.; Dec. 3. He was a Broadway sound designer. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After Brown, he joined his father at Masque Sound & Recording in New York City. After his father’s death, he bought out his partner, and under his direction Masque became a leading Broadway sound shop whose credits include Grease, Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Ain’t Supposed to Die a Natural Death. He was instrumental in establishing Local 922 Sound Designers Union, of which he became president. He enjoyed skiing all over the world, sailing, playing golf, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Jane; five children and their spouses, including sons Geoffrey ’94 and James ’98; 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018

Everett A. Pearson ’55, of Warren, R.I. and Estero, Fla.; Dec. 24. Along with his cousin, Clinton Pearson ’52, he founded Pearson Yachts, a pioneer fiberglass boat building business company that was later owned by Grumman. He published The Lure of Sailing in 1965. With Frederick Tillotson ’68, he started Tillotson-Pearson Inc. (TPI) in Warren, which built wind blades for US Windpower, materials for Disney, and numerous other products. He earned a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Fabricators & Manufacturers Assoc. In 2002 he sold most of the business and eventually started Pearson Pilings. An avid sailor and a member of the New York Yacht Club, he competed in local-yacht-club and ocean racing. He also enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He was captain of the Brown football team and inducted into the Athletic Hall of Fame in 1983. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; eight grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

William J. Frazier Jr. ’55, of Darien, Conn.; Jan. 27. He worked in finance for more than 20 years in New York City and ended his career at Lummis & Co. in New Canaan, Conn. He served as a Eucharistic minister, was captain of one of the local senior men’s tennis teams, and refereed youth hockey until his retirement at age 82. He was a supporter of the Stamford Symphony and the Connecticut Grand Opera, a veteran of the U.S. Navy, a former Brown rowing team member, and a member of Beta Theta Pi. He enjoyed hockey, tennis, biking, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; four grandsons; and a brother.

 

May, 2018

Ernest H. Fontan Jr. ’55, of Kissimmee, Fla., formerly of Lyndhurst, N.J.; Sept. 20. He was a retired corporate manager and a former salesman for Shore’s Men’s Store in Kissimmee. He is survived by his wife, Avalon; three sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

May, 2018

John W. Cobb ’55, of Newburgh, N.Y.; Dec. 31. After a stint in advertising, he spent 30 years in the restaurant business, then practiced law with Cobb & Cobb for 24 years. He was a member of the New York Bar Assoc. and Psi Upsilon. He is survived by his wife, Verna Werlock Cobb ’57; five children, including son Stephen ’86; and 15 grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2018

Bruce A. Bradley ’55, of Monmouth Beach, N.J.; Nov. 9. He was a supervisor at Kiely Construction for 42 years before retiring. He also served as Monmouth Beach commissioner for 19 years, was a 54-year member of the Monmouth Beach fire department, and a longtime member of the Monmouth Beach board of education and recreation departments. He is survived by his wife, Rita; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Apr, 2018

Claire Fredette Sennott ’55, of Amherst, Mass.; Nov. 10. She was an artist and homemaker. She is survived by three daughters, a son-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Margaret Harper Peterson ’55, of Wolfeboro, N.H.; Sept. 25. She was a longtime active member of the Melvin Village Community Church, where she participated in the bell choir. She is survived by two daughters, a son, four grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Albert O. Saart ’55, of Cranston, R.I.; Aug. 22. After serving in the U.S. Navy and working in the corporate world, he owned and operated Island Lock and Key on Aquidneck Island (R.I.) until he retired in 2007. He was an avid reader and enjoyed the history of World War II and watching Animal Planet. He leaves his partner, Marion Moreid; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two sons-in-law.

Feb, 2018

Robert B. Conner ’55, of Newport, R.I.; Sept. 8. He worked at Raytheon in various positions for 40 years and retired in 2000 as an international marketing executive. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and active in numerous local and national sailing organizations. He was a certified International Sailing Federation judge, president of the Narragansett Bay Yachting Assoc., treasurer of the US Sailing Assoc., chairman of the Rhode Island Olympic Sailing Trials, and a director of the C. Thomas Clagett Jr. Regatta. He was a member of the New York Yacht Club Race Committee during the 1970s America’s Cup years and later served as chairman of the New York Yacht Club Race Committee and chairman of the New York Yacht Club Jury. He enjoyed listening to classical music and opera. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018

Thomas S. Cottrell ’55, of Cutchogue, N.Y.; Sept. 17, of a stroke. After serving in the U.S. Navy and earning his MD, he became senior associate dean of New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y., in 1968. In 1979 he joined the faculty of Stony Brook Univ. as a founding member of the School of Medicine, where he was known as Doctor Tom. He had a 21-year tenure as executive associate dean and associate professor of pathology before retiring in 2000 as professor emeritus. He is survived by his wife, Jane Chichester Cottrell ’57; daughters Anne Cottrell Patin ’87 and Sarah Jane Lazar ’90; a son; two grandsons; and a brother, Stephen ’57.

Feb, 2018

Stewart H. Moir ’55, of Palm Desert, Calif.; June 13. He is survived by his wife, Ruth.

Feb, 2018

Dolores LaPorte Nazareth ’55, of Cumberland, R.I.; Sept. 30, of cancer. She was a homemaker recognized by the Rhode Island Association for Retarded Citizens for her advocacy for the developmentally disabled. She was active in alumni affairs and enjoyed genealogy. She is survived by her husband, George; four children, including Annette Nazareth ’78 of 3060 Foxhall Rd., N.W., Washington, DC 20016; eight grandchildren, including Stephanie Minor ’07 and Roger Ferguson III ’13; and one great-grandson.

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