Obituaries
— Class of 1958

Please send your notes to class secretary Jill Hirst Scobie or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@ brown.edu.

May, 2019

Catharine Calvo ’58, of Providence; Dec. 5. For 15 years she taught young school children, creating a unique classroom environment while she pursued her theatrical hobby. She guided the development of the Parents Cooperative School in Narragansett, R.I. She was a founding member of the Trinity Repertory Company and worked with the company as a lighting director for two and half years. She was a house manager at Providence Performing Arts Center, vice president of the board, on the production committee of Barker Playhouse, and spent more than 50 years with summer stock and community theater around New England. She experienced every aspect of theater and enjoyed set construction and technical elements. She is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

Mar, 2019

John P. Hopkins ’58, of Goshen, N.H.; Nov. 13. After teaching at Northeastern Univ. and at a private school in Great Barrington, Mass., he moved to Goshen in 1964 and taught English at Stevens High School in Claremont, N.H. In 1972 he changed career paths and opened a plumbing and heating business. He was also a volunteer firefighter for more than 50 years, a selectman, a school board member, and a budget committee member. He is survived by six children, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2018

William H. Tozier ’58, of New York City; May 29. He had a long career in banking, the majority of which was spent in London working for Smith Barney. He retired in 2001. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army National Guard and a member of Sigma Nu. He is survived by two daughters and two sisters.

 

Nov, 2018

William R. Starke ’58, of Albuquerque, N. Mex.; May 23. He was the proprietor of the Northern Hotel in Fort Collins, Colo., until its sale in 2000. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed both participating in and watching sports. He is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018

Benjamin F. Dudley II ’58, of Falmouth, Me.; June 28, after a brief illness. He worked for many years as a systems analyst for Hannaford Brothers and later was employed with the Maine Turnpike Authority. He enjoyed music, reading, and animals. He is survived by five children.

 

Sep, 2018

James Alaimo ’58, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 10. Better known as “Gerry” to the Brown community, came to Brown as a basketball center and left as one of the University’s all-time leading scorers with 1,046 points, having served as co-captain of the Bruins in his senior year, been named to the All-Ivy team, and won the J. Richmond Fales Trophy as the player who had made the greatest contribution to Brown basketball. After graduation he served in the U.S. Army, worked for a short time in the insurance industry and returned to Brown in 1963 to coach the freshman team. After one year, he left to coach Middlebury College basketball, where he remained for five years before returning to Brown as head coach. In 1974 he was inducted into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2006, in recognition of his accomplishments as a player, was named to Brown’s All-Time Team at the 100th anniversary celebration. After 10 years as head coach at Brown (1969-1979), he accepted a position as an administrator in the Providence College athletic department. He retired from Providence College in 2001 as senior associate athletics director and was inducted into the Providence College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

Sep, 2018

David Jenkins ’58, of Pompano Beach, Fla.; Apr. 18. He was ordained to the Sacred Order of Deacons in the Episcopal Church on June 17, 1961, and then to the Sacred Order of Priests on Dec. 23, 1961. He would continue to serve until his passing. He served at churches in the dioceses of Rhode Island, New York, the Windward Islands, and Trinidad and Tobago. From 1970 to 1991 he held multiple administrative and leadership positions at SUNY Albany. In 1991 he took early retirement from academia, bought a sailboat, and headed to the Caribbean to serve. In 2002 he sold the boat and moved to Florida. He is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.  

 

Jul, 2018

Richard E. Neal ’58, of Andover, Mass.; Jan. 20, of cancer. Following 40 years in education, he retired in 1998 as superintendent of the Andover Public School System. In 1989, he was named Middle Level Administrator of the Year for Massachusetts. An avid sports fan, he coached with Andover Little League and was founder of the Andover Hockey Assoc., where he also coached the Andover Bantam hockey team. In retirement, he worked for another 17 years at the TD Garden in Boston as a guest relations supervisor and was a supervisor for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, a brother, and a sister-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018

James W. Hanner ’58, ’62 MAT, of Amherst, Mass., formerly of Arcadia, Calif.; Feb. 8. He was a retired financial consultant. He enjoyed singing in the Valley Light Opera and the Hampshire Choral Society. He also enjoyed watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

May, 2018

Charles H. Turner ’58, of Edmonds, Wash.; Jan. 8. He had a private law practice in Chicago in the 1960s, worked in the U.S. Attorney’s office there from 1962 to 1965, and was with the regional solicitor’s office of the U.S. Department of Interior in Portland from 1965 to 1967. He was appointed U.S. Attorney for Oregon under Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush and was lead prosecutor in several highly publicized criminal cases. Among these were the prosecution of the American Indian Movement figures in the aftermath of AIM’s occupation of the Wounded Knee site in South Dakota; the case of a Portland State Univ. professor who plotted to bomb the National Guard armory in Portland; and the case of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and members of his commune for the bioterror attack in The Dalles, Oregon, in which Turner was targeted for assassination. He retired from the U.S. Attorney’s office in 1993. He was a Chicago Cubs fan and enjoyed history, especially Civil War history. He is survived by his wife, Sharol; a daughter; a son; three grandsons; a sister; and a brother.

May, 2018

Joseph A. Santangini ’58, of Providence; Sept. 21.

 

May, 2018

Edward W. Poitras ’58, of Haines City, Fla., formerly of Winter Haven, Fla.; Dec. 30. At Brown he was a member of the Glee Club and the University Chapel Choir, and worked at WBRU. After graduation and service in the U.S. Army, he worked as a radio broadcaster in Binghamton, N.Y. He later moved to Winter Haven to manage Poitras Groves citrus operations and audition for the Bach Festival Choir of Winter Park, Fla., of which he remained a member for 20 years. He was a member of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church for nearly 50 years and directed its music ministry. He also worked with Christian Prison Ministries and at the time of his death was an officer and treasurer of Faith Alive Ministries. He is survived by his wife, Kay; three daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and three nieces.

 

May, 2018

William G. Olsen Jr. ’58, of New Ulm, Tex.; Dec. 24. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he worked at IBM as a computer programmer. Later he became a consultant in custom programming. He enjoyed building and fixing things, including his home in New Ulm. He also liked cooking and recipe sharing. He is survived by four children, six grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Charles H. Kershaw III ’58, of Contoocook, N.H., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Dec. 14. Before joining the U.S. Air Force, he practiced family medicine in Barrington for 15 years. He was a flight surgeon and commander during his 22 years of military service and retired as a colonel. He was a member of the Order of DeMolay and served as a master counselor. He enjoyed sailing, fishing, raising Appaloosa horses, and playing guitar. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three daughters and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2018

Peter Gemski ’58, of Asheville, N.C.; Mar. 15, 2017, of heart failure. He was chief of the Department of Molecular Pathology at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C., from which he retired in 1996. He was a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a member of the American Society for Microbiology, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi. He enjoyed jazz, playing the trumpet and flugelhorn, and acting as a band leader and arranger. He is survived by his wife, Lenny; a son; a daughter; three grandchildren; a sister, Olga Gemski Robinson ’57; a brother-in-law, John Robinson ’56; and a nephew, Chase Robinson ’85.

Apr, 2018

Judith Abbott Myers ’58, of Atlanta, Ga.; Oct. 11. She was a homemaker active in her community. She enjoyed playing tennis. She is survived by her husband, Dirck; three daughters; and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

Earle Webster Jr. ’58, of Raleigh, N.C.; Nov. 7. He worked as a sales manager for Blasch Precision Ceramics of New York before retiring to North Carolina. He is survived by his wife, Ethel; a daughter; two grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Fremont J. Camerino ’58, of Niles, Ohio; Sept. 29.

Feb, 2018

Ronald E. Oberg ’58, of Glastonbury, Conn.; Sept. 8, of cancer. He was an information systems administrator for the State of Connecticut until he retired in 1998. He was a longtime member of the Glastonbury Yacht Club and is survived by his wife, Mary; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

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