Obituaries
— Class of 1958

Please send your notes to class secretary Jill Hirst Scobie or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@ brown.edu.

Jun, 2020

Frank D. Young ’58, of Kennett Square, Pa.; Jan. 17. He attended Brown and ran track for one year before transferring to the U.S. Naval Academy. He had a varied career as a naval officer, field training engineer, high school math teacher, and computer programmer. He was an avid runner, active in his community, and volunteered with several organizations, including the Freeport Historical Society and the Nassau County Math Teachers Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Carol Ann; two daughters and sons-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Jun, 2020

Henry E. Jakubiak ’58 of Glen Cove, N.Y.; Nov. 14, of cancer. He had a career as an economist for the International Monetary Fund. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; and two sisters.

 

Jun, 2020

John Downes ’58, of Bridgeport, Conn.; Aug. 8, 2019, after a short illness. He was the author of many books and was a financial consultant and writer whose career encompassed banking, corporate and public finance, and investor relations. His books included Dictionary of Finance and Investment Terms, The Barron’s Finance and Investment Handbook, and Investing and Personal Finance: Thriving in Today’s Investment Landscape. In addition to being a follower of current events and an avid reader, he was also a jazz pianist. He is survived by daughter Anne Downes Whelan ’91; two grandchildren; four sisters; nephew Hugh Nicholson ’88; and his former wife, Katherine Downes.

 

Jun, 2020

Judith Applegate ’58, of Princeton, N.J.; Dec. 3, after a long illness. She ran a successful antiques business in Massachusetts and Connecticut before returning to New Jersey in 1994. She held various adjunct teaching positions throughout her career, most recently with the Cooper-Hewitt Museum graduate program, the Bard Graduate Center, and the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her professional career in the arts included work as an assistant curator with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; director of education and chief curator at the deCordova Museum (Mass.); director of New York’s Place des Antiquaires; vice president of Citibank Art Advisory Services; and director of Litchfield County Auctions (Conn.). Returning to New Jersey, she enjoyed helping with the Master Gardeners of Mercer County and continued to run her own art and antiques appraisal business before retiring in 2016. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.
 

 

Apr, 2020

Robert J. Lawton ’58, of Fort Myers, Fla.; Oct. 23. He was an international corporate executive of 27 years in Latin America and Asia. He enjoyed jazz music and sports. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; six grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Apr, 2020

George D. Lamborn ’58, of Vero Beach, Fla.; July 17. He had a long career in the commodities industry. He served numerous financial organizations, among them the Chicago Board of Trade and New York Mercantile Exchanges, the NY Commodities Exchange, as well as markets in London and Asia. In 2005 he was inducted into the Futures Industry Hall of Fame. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, skiing, fishing, hunting, and traveling. He is survived by four children, a grandchild, a sister, and two former wives.

 

Apr, 2020

Richard S. Harrison ’58, of Warwick, R.I.; Oct. 20. He taught biology and biochemistry at Cranston East High School, retiring as director of guidance in 1990. He is survived by his wife, Rose; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Jane W. Givens ’58, of Frederick, Md.; Nov. 9. She was a special education teacher for Montgomery County Public Schools for 18 years and continued to teach in Frederick County until 2017. She volunteered as a teacher of illiterate adults in the Montgomery County Literacy Council Program and in church educational programs, and for 23 years she was a leader of Recovery Inc., a self-help group for those suffering from nervous disorders. She liked animals, especially dogs, and supported many charities to help protect and care for them. She is survived by her husband, Robert; five children and their spouses; 14 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2020

Martin Bernheimer ’58, of New York City; Sept. 29, of a long battle with sarcoma. He was a former Los Angeles Times music critic and a Pulitzer Prize winner. He immigrated to the U.S. in 1940 and at the age of 14 submitted his first article to Opera News, which was accepted but later scrapped. At Brown, he studied music history and musicology. He also moonlighted as a supernumerary in opera productions with professional companies performing in Boston. As a graduate student back in Munich, he attended the renowned Hochschule für Musik und Theater München, where he studied musicology on a grant from the German state of Bavaria. Around this time, he published his first article in the New York Times, a short piece on Munich opera. Upon returning to the U.S., he enrolled at NYU and was a NYU part-time lecturer. In 1961 he became a temporary music critic at the New York Post and that same year was made a contributing editor for the Musical Courier. From 1962 to 1965, he served as assistant to the music editor of the Saturday Review and managing editor of the Philharmonic Hall Program. He joined the Los Angeles Times in 1965 and became the chief music critic. He stayed with the newspaper for 31 years and won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1982 and ASCAP’s Deems Taylor Award in 1974 and 1978. He was a member of several music-related education programs and became a faculty member of the Rockefeller program for the training of music critics at USC in 1966. In 1969 he joined the music faculty of UCLA and in 1982 became an honorary member of Pi Kappa Lambda. He was a regular lecturer and taught criticism at Cal State Northridge, San Diego State, and California Institute of the Arts. After leaving the paper, he served as a correspondent in New York for the London-based Financial Times covering opera, classical music, and dance. He also served on the board of Opera Magazine. He is survived by his wife, Linda; three daughters; a son; and his former wife, Cindy Bernheimer. (See “Music Appreciation” in the 2012 November/December BAM)  

 

Jan, 2020

Cynthia N. Peterson ’58, of Petersburg, N.Y.; June 16. After Brown, she went to the Yale School of Architecture. Among her jobs while studying at Yale was working on projects with the noted architect Paul Rudolph. After Yale, she then went to New York City, where she worked for the firm of Davis Brody. While there she worked on design plans for a University of Buffalo renovation, among her many projects. Leaving Davis Brody, she was then a professor of architecture at City College in New York City, a position she held until 1992, when she retired to Petersburg. In her retirement she served as an architectural consultant for the rebuilding of a portion of the public library in Petersburg, and for a while she was a rural mail carrier and even a ski instructor at Jiminy Peak. She donated her body to Albany Medical College and is survived by her sister, Diana Peterson Muzzarelli ’62.

 

Jan, 2020

Jean White Mosler ’58, of Hackettstown, N.J.; Aug. 26. She was a library director  at Hackettstown Library for many years before retiring. She is survived by many friends.

 

Jan, 2020

Alfred U. Howes ’58, of Providence; Aug. 22. He was a licensed navigator in the Merchant Marine for most of his career. He enjoyed spending time at the family farm in North Hero, Vt. and in 2000 donated the property to the Lake Champlain Land Trust. He was active at St. Martin’s Episcopal Church.  

 

Nov, 2019

Susan Langdon Kass ’58, of San Francisco; June 28. She taught high school biology in the Bay Area, then in 1975 found Scottish Country Dancing. In 1985 she studied for and passed the exam to become a Scottish Country Dance teacher and taught in San Francisco for more than three decades. In 2008 she was recognized for her contributions in promoting the Highland Games with a certificate of appreciation. In addition to Scottish Country Dance, she enjoyed swimming and teaching young children to swim at the UCSF Fitness Center. She also liked gardening. She is survived by her husband, Sid; a daughter; a son; two granddaughters; and two sisters.
 

 

Nov, 2019

Deane K. Fox Jr. ’58, of Lewisville, Tex.; Dec. 3, from Alzheimer’s. He had a career in sales working with the insurance and plastics industries. He retired in 2008 and enjoyed volunteering at the YMCA, sailing, biking, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; a sister-in-law; and two nephews.

 

Nov, 2019

Judith Riley Doherty ’58, of Westfield, Mass.; May 23, after a seven-year battle with Alzheimer’s. She was the co-owner of Riley’s Sausage Company in Holyoke, Mass. She also worked at ES Sports, Clayton Insurance, and the former Yankee Pedlar Inn in Holyoke. She was active at Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church and was a member of the board of directors of Saint Paul’s nursery school. She is survived by two daughters, two sons, two sons-in-law, and two grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Joseph Des Roches ’58, of Warwick, R.I.; Feb. 10. He was employed with the Rhode Island Department of Labor & Training for 43 years. He retired in 2008 as chief of employment services. He was an active member of the Rotary Club of Warwick, a former member of the board of directors of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Warwick, and a U.S. Army Korean War veteran. He is survived by his wife, Norma.

 

Nov, 2019

Betsy Froehlich Hill ’58, of College Park, Md.; Aug. 11. She taught English as a second language in the Washington, D.C., area for many years. She also served as a docent at the National Gallery of Art and the Corcoran Gallery. She is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, a sister, a brother-in-law, and six nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2019

Thomas B. Bigford ’58, of Williamsburg, Va.; Apr. 11. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for Procter & Gamble in Cincinnati, followed by management positions with Carnation in Los Angeles, Ogilvy & Mather in New York, and Ketchum Advertising in San Francisco. He is survived by his wife, Annie; a daughter; a son-in-law; a grandson; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019

Edward D. Onanian ’58, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Apr. 1. His career was spent at the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C., focusing on labor management relations. Some career highlights included initiating a program for global economic conferences in Paris; being part of an official delegation to Israel led by the U.S. Secretary of Labor; and representing the U.S. in the Geneva economic conferences. He was an active member of the Armenian church and is survived by his wife, Zvart; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandsons; and a brother.

Jul, 2019

Lawrence T. Kocher ’58, of Windsor, Calif.; Mar. 16, of complications of Parkinson’s disease. After receiving a master’s degree in education at Harvard, he began his teaching career in Madison, N.J. He moved to California in 1961 and taught at Woodside High School until 1963. He received a master’s degree in history from Stanford and taught at San Carlos High School until 1982. His passion for history earned him a Fulbright Scholarship to India to study in 1967. Upon his retirement, he became a docent at the Immigration Station on Angel Island and a docent at de Young Museum in San Francisco. He became a master gardener and drove for Meals on Wheels, in addition to attending Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Sonoma State Univ. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a son; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019

Neal B. Mitchell ’58, of Northbridge, Mass.; Apr. 8. After graduating from Brown, he received a graduate degree in structural engineering from MIT and was awarded a fellowship to work with engineers and architects including Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy, Eduardo Torroja in Spain, and Manuel Rocha in Portugal. He held teaching positions at RISD, Tufts, Cornell, and Harvard. At the time, he was the youngest assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design at the age of 29 and then the youngest full professor on the Harvard College Faculty, where he started a technology laboratory that achieved an international reputation in teaching innovation and structural engineering. He served on three different Presidential Committees that studied aspects of education in the U.S. In the early 1970s he founded a consulting company that developed a series of management and engineering computer programs that became widely used around the world and marketed by IBM. The firm worked on many industrial and military programs, from the development of the General Motors subsidiary Saturn to the Penguin Missile Program for NATO, as well as many large building and civil engineering projects worldwide. He was recognized as a world leader in program management and lectured worldwide to major Fortune 500 corporations. In 2007 he was the recipient of the Brown Engineering Alumni Medal in recognition of his contribution to the engineering profession. He generously supported undergraduate summer research at the School of Engineering through the Neal B. Mitchell ’58 Award – Systems Thinking Project. He was involved in local government and lent his expertise to several local building, planning, and construction projects. He also helped to develop and teach a systems engineering course to high school students. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by his wife, Kristin; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

May, 2019

Catharine Calvo ’58, of Providence; Dec. 5. For 15 years she taught young school children, creating a unique classroom environment while she pursued her theatrical hobby. She guided the development of the Parents Cooperative School in Narragansett, R.I. She was a founding member of the Trinity Repertory Company and worked with the company as a lighting director for two and half years. She was a house manager at Providence Performing Arts Center, vice president of the board, on the production committee of Barker Playhouse, and spent more than 50 years with summer stock and community theater around New England. She experienced every aspect of theater and enjoyed set construction and technical elements. She is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

Mar, 2019

John P. Hopkins ’58, of Goshen, N.H.; Nov. 13. After teaching at Northeastern Univ. and at a private school in Great Barrington, Mass., he moved to Goshen in 1964 and taught English at Stevens High School in Claremont, N.H. In 1972 he changed career paths and opened a plumbing and heating business. He was also a volunteer firefighter for more than 50 years, a selectman, a school board member, and a budget committee member. He is survived by six children, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2018

William H. Tozier ’58, of New York City; May 29. He had a long career in banking, the majority of which was spent in London working for Smith Barney. He retired in 2001. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army National Guard and a member of Sigma Nu. He is survived by two daughters and two sisters.

 

Nov, 2018

William R. Starke ’58, of Albuquerque, N. Mex.; May 23. He was the proprietor of the Northern Hotel in Fort Collins, Colo., until its sale in 2000. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed both participating in and watching sports. He is survived by five children, 10 grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018

Benjamin F. Dudley II ’58, of Falmouth, Me.; June 28, after a brief illness. He worked for many years as a systems analyst for Hannaford Brothers and later was employed with the Maine Turnpike Authority. He enjoyed music, reading, and animals. He is survived by five children.

 

Sep, 2018

James Alaimo ’58, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 10. Better known as “Gerry” to the Brown community, came to Brown as a basketball center and left as one of the University’s all-time leading scorers with 1,046 points, having served as co-captain of the Bruins in his senior year, been named to the All-Ivy team, and won the J. Richmond Fales Trophy as the player who had made the greatest contribution to Brown basketball. After graduation he served in the U.S. Army, worked for a short time in the insurance industry and returned to Brown in 1963 to coach the freshman team. After one year, he left to coach Middlebury College basketball, where he remained for five years before returning to Brown as head coach. In 1974 he was inducted into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2006, in recognition of his accomplishments as a player, was named to Brown’s All-Time Team at the 100th anniversary celebration. After 10 years as head coach at Brown (1969-1979), he accepted a position as an administrator in the Providence College athletic department. He retired from Providence College in 2001 as senior associate athletics director and was inducted into the Providence College Athletics Hall of Fame in 2011.

 

Sep, 2018

David Jenkins ’58, of Pompano Beach, Fla.; Apr. 18. He was ordained to the Sacred Order of Deacons in the Episcopal Church on June 17, 1961, and then to the Sacred Order of Priests on Dec. 23, 1961. He would continue to serve until his passing. He served at churches in the dioceses of Rhode Island, New York, the Windward Islands, and Trinidad and Tobago. From 1970 to 1991 he held multiple administrative and leadership positions at SUNY Albany. In 1991 he took early retirement from academia, bought a sailboat, and headed to the Caribbean to serve. In 2002 he sold the boat and moved to Florida. He is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.  

 

Jul, 2018

Richard E. Neal ’58, of Andover, Mass.; Jan. 20, of cancer. Following 40 years in education, he retired in 1998 as superintendent of the Andover Public School System. In 1989, he was named Middle Level Administrator of the Year for Massachusetts. An avid sports fan, he coached with Andover Little League and was founder of the Andover Hockey Assoc., where he also coached the Andover Bantam hockey team. In retirement, he worked for another 17 years at the TD Garden in Boston as a guest relations supervisor and was a supervisor for the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, a brother, and a sister-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018

James W. Hanner ’58, ’62 MAT, of Amherst, Mass., formerly of Arcadia, Calif.; Feb. 8. He was a retired financial consultant. He enjoyed singing in the Valley Light Opera and the Hampshire Choral Society. He also enjoyed watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

May, 2018

Charles H. Turner ’58, of Edmonds, Wash.; Jan. 8. He had a private law practice in Chicago in the 1960s, worked in the U.S. Attorney’s office there from 1962 to 1965, and was with the regional solicitor’s office of the U.S. Department of Interior in Portland from 1965 to 1967. He was appointed U.S. Attorney for Oregon under Presidents Reagan and George H.W. Bush and was lead prosecutor in several highly publicized criminal cases. Among these were the prosecution of the American Indian Movement figures in the aftermath of AIM’s occupation of the Wounded Knee site in South Dakota; the case of a Portland State Univ. professor who plotted to bomb the National Guard armory in Portland; and the case of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and members of his commune for the bioterror attack in The Dalles, Oregon, in which Turner was targeted for assassination. He retired from the U.S. Attorney’s office in 1993. He was a Chicago Cubs fan and enjoyed history, especially Civil War history. He is survived by his wife, Sharol; a daughter; a son; three grandsons; a sister; and a brother.

May, 2018

Joseph A. Santangini ’58, of Providence; Sept. 21.

 

May, 2018

Edward W. Poitras ’58, of Haines City, Fla., formerly of Winter Haven, Fla.; Dec. 30. At Brown he was a member of the Glee Club and the University Chapel Choir, and worked at WBRU. After graduation and service in the U.S. Army, he worked as a radio broadcaster in Binghamton, N.Y. He later moved to Winter Haven to manage Poitras Groves citrus operations and audition for the Bach Festival Choir of Winter Park, Fla., of which he remained a member for 20 years. He was a member of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church for nearly 50 years and directed its music ministry. He also worked with Christian Prison Ministries and at the time of his death was an officer and treasurer of Faith Alive Ministries. He is survived by his wife, Kay; three daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and three nieces.

 

May, 2018

William G. Olsen Jr. ’58, of New Ulm, Tex.; Dec. 24. After serving in the U.S. Air Force, he worked at IBM as a computer programmer. Later he became a consultant in custom programming. He enjoyed building and fixing things, including his home in New Ulm. He also liked cooking and recipe sharing. He is survived by four children, six grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Charles H. Kershaw III ’58, of Contoocook, N.H., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Dec. 14. Before joining the U.S. Air Force, he practiced family medicine in Barrington for 15 years. He was a flight surgeon and commander during his 22 years of military service and retired as a colonel. He was a member of the Order of DeMolay and served as a master counselor. He enjoyed sailing, fishing, raising Appaloosa horses, and playing guitar. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three daughters and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2018

Peter Gemski ’58, of Asheville, N.C.; Mar. 15, 2017, of heart failure. He was chief of the Department of Molecular Pathology at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C., from which he retired in 1996. He was a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a member of the American Society for Microbiology, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa Phi. He enjoyed jazz, playing the trumpet and flugelhorn, and acting as a band leader and arranger. He is survived by his wife, Lenny; a son; a daughter; three grandchildren; a sister, Olga Gemski Robinson ’57; a brother-in-law, John Robinson ’56; and a nephew, Chase Robinson ’85.

Apr, 2018

Judith Abbott Myers ’58, of Atlanta, Ga.; Oct. 11. She was a homemaker active in her community. She enjoyed playing tennis. She is survived by her husband, Dirck; three daughters; and five grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

Earle Webster Jr. ’58, of Raleigh, N.C.; Nov. 7. He worked as a sales manager for Blasch Precision Ceramics of New York before retiring to North Carolina. He is survived by his wife, Ethel; a daughter; two grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Fremont J. Camerino ’58, of Niles, Ohio; Sept. 29.

Feb, 2018

Ronald E. Oberg ’58, of Glastonbury, Conn.; Sept. 8, of cancer. He was an information systems administrator for the State of Connecticut until he retired in 1998. He was a longtime member of the Glastonbury Yacht Club and is survived by his wife, Mary; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

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