GS Class of 1973

Aug, 2020

Bernard Mendillo ’73 AM (see ’70).

Aug, 2020

Bernard Mendillo ’73 AM has a new novel, It’s What We Do, a humorous, episodic story about a man in his 70s who becomes a single parent when his wife leaves him just as they adopt a little girl from China. It is available on Amazon. 

Mar, 2019

Randolph Steinen ’73 PhD volunteers with the Connecticut Geological Survey at the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. He is also involved with quadrangle mapping and the geology of local state parks. He has posted several Earthcaches, which are geocaches—or treasure hunts using global positioning software—that specifically indicate interesting geological formations or processes. These can be looked up on EarthCache.org.

 

Obituaries

Jun, 2022

Joseph A. DiLorenzo ’71, ’73 MMSc, ’75 MD, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Jan. 12. He opened his own internal medicine practice in Cranston and was affiliated with Our Lady of Fatima Hospital and Roger Williams Medical Center. He was an avid camper and enjoyed hiking and canoeing. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, and seven nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021

Shirley Williams-Scott ’73 ScM, of Marrero, Ala.; July 29. She began her teaching career at Miles College as a graduate laboratory assistant and went on to teach life sciences as an instructor at Miles College and Lawson State Junior College. She then became an assistant professor of biology at Jackson State University and later a full professor of biology at Stillman College. While at Stillman, she served as acting chairperson of the natural science division as well as the faculty representative to the 1987 White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She became an associate professor of research in the College of Pharmacy and graduate faculty at Xavier University in New Orleans and retired from her teaching career after her tenure at Southern University in New Orleans (SUNO), where she was a professor of biology and served as chair of the biology department. While at SUNO she was instrumental in developing several partnerships, including the Howard Hughes Internship Program in collaboration with the University of New Orleans, and was codirector of the SUNO/LSUMC Collaborative Research Initiative in Stress Biology Program. She also developed SUNO’s first marine biology program and lab. Shirley had an extensive research career that included studies on hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, B-6 deficiency, and glucose metabolism, and collaborations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, Tulane University, and the Louisiana State University Medical Center. She was the author or coauthor of more than 50 scientific publications. In addition to her teaching and research, she served as a science evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) for Life Sciences, a grant reviewer for the Minority Research Center of Excellence Program (MRCE), and chair of the panel of the Research Improvement in Minority Institutions (RIMI) Program. Throughout her career she received numerous awards and honors. She was also instrumental in starting the Robert Charles Blakes Senior Bible College and Theological Seminary and served as the school’s first dean. She is survived by five children, 12 grandchildren, two brothers, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021

Edward D. Kleinbard ’73 AM (see ’73).

Jan, 2021

Edward D. Kleinbard ’73, ’73 AM, of Pasadena, Calif.; June 28, of cancer. After graduating from Yale Law School in 1976, he moved into corporate law, rising to a partnership at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton. In 2007, he moved to the public sector as chief of staff to the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation, then joined the faculty at University of Southern California’s Gould School of Law in 2009. He was a fellow of the Century Foundation and named Tax Person of the Year in 2016 by Tax Analysts. He was regularly quoted on tax and fiscal policy issues by major newspapers, including the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg News, the Washington Post, and the Wall Street Journal. His academic work focused on government taxation and fiscal policy. Along with numerous journal articles and opinion pieces, he published We
Are Better Than This: How Government Should Spend Our Money
in 2015 and his forthcoming book, What’s Luck Got To Do With It, is scheduled for publication in early 2021. He is survived by his wife, Norma; his mother; a son and daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a sister and brother-in-law Kris Heinzelman ’73, ’73 AM; and a brother and sister-in-law.

Nov, 2020

Gerald A. Greenberger ’72 AM, ’73 PhD, of Short Hills, N.J.; Apr. 3, from COVID-19. He taught French history at The College of William & Mary for several years before earning his JD from Yale Law School. He then had a 36-year career practicing law. He is survived by his wife, Debby; a daughter; a son; two brothers; two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew.

Apr, 2020

James T. Fahey ’73 PhD, of Troy, N.Y.; Nov. 23. He taught philosophy at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the University of Albany, Siena College, and Sage College. He enjoyed volleyball, softball, soccer, kayaking, bicycling, hiking, camping, and Irish music. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2019

Joan Martin Roth ’73 AM, of Wakefield, R.I.; May 18, after battling kidney disease for more than 15 years. She taught at UCLA and became an on-air commentator for a local Los Angeles television news station. She later taught at several universities, including Tufts, before starting several successful companies, one being an educational toy company. She founded College Start Online to help students get into college. She also wrote four books, including Why Cities Go Broke, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. She lived in England for a period of time and traveled the world. She is survived by her husband, Jonathan; a daughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

 

Jul, 2019

Gerald M. Miller ’73 AM, of Oxford, Ohio; Feb. 16, of cancer. He was a professor of economics at Miami University in Oxford, recognized by his peers and students as a best teacher, and honored as the recipient of the 1996 A.K. Morris Award. During summer breaks from teaching, he returned to New York and worked in various positions, including counselor and co-director at Camp DeBaun. In 1974 he was initiated into Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity as a faculty advisor for the Miami chapter. He served the fraternity in several different capacities on a local and national level for more than 44 years. He served as chapter advisor as well as director of the chapter’s house corporation and also served as National Scholarship Chairman, chairman of the SAM Foundation Scholarship Committee, and director of the SAM Foundation. After retiring from Miami University, he remained on several advisory committees, including the Cliff Alexander Office of Greek Life, and received a Proclamation of Outstanding Faculty/Staff on Oct. 6, 2018. He is survived by his husband, James Pater; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019

Marlene C. Browne ’73 AM, ’76 PhD, of Mitchellville, Md.; Dec. 1. She was an English teacher at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis and retired in 2009 as director of the Writing Center. She was an accomplished violinist and played in various local concert symphonies. She is survived by a brother, a sister-in- law, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Send us your news! 
Help us keep your class updated.

 

Send us an obituary
Help us memorialize your departed classmates