Obituaries
— Class of 1949

Send your news to class secretary Harold Gadon or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@brown.edu.

Apr, 2022

Zenas W. Bliss ’49, of Rumford, R.I.; Sept. 4. He spent his entire career working as an engineer with Factory Mutual Global. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling the world with his wife before her passing and in recent years with his grandchildren. He visited six of the seven continents several times. He was a decorated World War II Army veteran and served in the Rhode Island National Guard following the war. He enjoyed sailing off the Rhode Island coast. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022

Marilyn Taft Blake ’49, of Groton, Mass., formerly of Needham, Mass.; July 6. She was an active member of the First Baptist Church in Needham and had served on many committees for the church. She enjoyed swimming and was an avid lover of cats. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, a daughter and son-in-law, and four grandchildren. 

Aug, 2021

Milton H. Zara ’49, of Park Forest, Ill.; Apr. 2. He attended MIT and was drafted into the Army during World War II. Following his discharge from the military he attended Brown, where he played on the rugby team. In 1965 he and his family moved to Illinois, where he was hired by De Soto. Eventually he began his own building product consulting firm, Zara and Associates, which allowed him to travel all over the U.S. During that time, he established two U.S. patents. He had an interest in coin collecting, stamp collecting, and playing the piano and the mandolin. He was a member of the Mensa Society and active with the family ancestry. He is survived by his wife, Louise; and three children and their spouses.

Aug, 2021

Leonard J. Triedman ’49, of Narragansett, R.I.; Mar. 19. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and upon graduation joined the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and was stationed at Otis Air Force Base in Hyannis. After his military service, he moved to Boston, married, completed his residency in surgery at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston and did a fellowship in head and neck surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He later returned to Providence and for more than four decades served on the surgical staff of many Rhode Island hospitals, including Miriam and Women & Infants, and was a clinical associate professor of surgery at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was an avid New England sports fan and became a team physician for both the Rhode Island Reds and the Pawtucket Red Sox. He enjoyed playing golf and was also a ski patrolman and an avid runner who finished the Boston Marathon numerous times. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia; five children, including daughters Kim Triedman ’81 and Julie Triedman ’86; son Scott ’82, ’85 MD; daughter-in-law Mary Jo J. Kaplan ’82; son-in-law Eric Oldsman ’80; 15 grandchildren, including Charlotte Oldsman ’11 and Cole Triedman ’21; and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021

Mary Dure Johnson ’49, of Akron, Ohio; Apr. 14. She was a homemaker and for a short period of time she worked in real estate during the 1970s. A sports and animal enthusiast, she enjoyed playing tennis, skiing, and taking her dogs to the dog park or riding one of her horses. She became an accomplished equestrian, winning many ribbons for dressage in her later years. She also enjoyed the Cleveland Orchestra and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. She was well read and received three papers daily to stay updated on current world affairs. She is survived by three children, four stepchildren, seven grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021

Lois Jagolinzer Fain ’49, of East Providence; Apr. 17. She was a teacher at the Rhode Island School for the Deaf from 1970 to 1988. Active in the Brown Association of Class Officers, she served as president and vice president of her class, chaired several reunions, and was the 1994 recipient of the Alumni Service Award. Along with her late sister, she was a cofounder of the annual Dorothy and Carl Jagolinzer Commencement Recital and Concert of Brown’s Music department and Camp Dotty, part of the Tomorrow Fund at Hasbro Children’s Hospital. She was involved in many civic and service activities and was a Save the Children sponsor of a child in Bangladesh. She was a volunteer at RISD and a member of the National Council of Jewish Women, Temple Emanuel, the Narragansett Bay Quilters, and the Chaminade Club in Providence. She enjoyed baking, playing card games, and traveling, especially to China with her late husband. She is survived by a son, two grand

Jun, 2021

Werner R. Britsch ’50 ScM (see ’49).

Jun, 2021

Bradford W. Wild ’49, of Tigard, Ore.; May 6, 2020.

Jun, 2021

Morris P. Schwartz ’49, of Greenville, R.I.; Dec. 23. He was a World War II Army veteran and member of Temple Emanu-El and the Rhode Island Jewish Historical Society. He was known for his banana bread, enjoyed his weekly nickel-and-dime poker game, and was an avid Boston Red Sox fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three children; and six grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Barbara McAdams Hoyt ’49, of Northfield, Ill.; Jan. 18. She was a homemaker and volunteer with Benton House in Chicago and the Indian Hill Club. She is survived by five children and their spouses, 12 grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021

Christina Gartaganis Gargas ’49, of New Bedford, Mass.; Jan. 20. She was a retired teacher in the Framingham (Mass.) school system. She was a member of the New Bedford Garden Club and St. George Greek Orthodox Church, where she was a member of the Ladies Philoptochos Society. She is survived by cousins.

Jun, 2021

Werner R. Britsch ’49, ’50 ScM, of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Dec. 24. He was a NASA aeronautical engineer from 1962 to 1988. He served in the U.S. Army and was a member of Holden Arboretum. He was the recipient of a 1978 NASA award for stage fan casing treatment and a 1983 NASA energy efficient engine project team (Colombia Space Shuttle) contribution to mission success. He enjoyed skiing, hiking, dancing, music, photography, and playing golf. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2021

Louise Lisiecki Wesolowski ’49, of Suffield, Conn.; Sept. 18. She worked in the pathology lab at Hartford Hospital for several years prior to getting married and raising a family. Later, she taught biology at Bristol Central High School (Conn.) for 17 years and tutored children whose first language was Polish. She was active in civic organizations and enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and playing bridge and Scrabble. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two sons and daughters-in-law, and six grandchildren.

Apr, 2021

John D. Pittenger ’49, of Wall, N.J.; Nov. 8. In 1953 he founded a home building business known as Pittenger Builders. He was a member of the Wall Township Lions Club, the Freemasons Asbury Park Lodge and director and longtime treasurer of the Shore Builders Association. He was a U.S. World War II Navy veteran and is survived by his wife, Rosemarie; four children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Irene A. Wilkinson ’49, of Charlotte, N.C.; Aug. of COVID-19. She was a retired librarian. She is survived by a sister and nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2021

Donald M. Nolan ’49, of Mansfield, Conn.; Aug. 4. He attended RISD prior to joining the U.S. Army during World War II. After discharge, he attended and graduated from Brown and was hired by the American Screw Company in Providence. He moved to its Willimantic, Conn., division in 1949. In 1963 he started his own company, Stick Screw Manufacturing, and was its president until he sold the business in 1987. He was a founding member of the Mansfield Lion’s Club, a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars and a volunteer for the Mansfield Senior Center and Committee on Aging. He enjoyed playing golf and traveling with his wife in the U.S. and in Europe. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, four grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandson.

Jan, 2021

Walter Lada ’49, of Cranston, R.I.; Aug. 9. After serving during World War II, he graduated from Brown and had a successful career as a mechanical engineer at Grinnell Corporation in Providence. He retired and cofounded Corner and Lada Company in Cranston, where they designed and fabricated pipe support systems for power plants worldwide. He was a generous supporter and volunteer for the Hope Alzheimer’s Center in Cranston. He is survived by a daughter; son, Walter ’76; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Sybil Finch Gilbert ’49, of La Grange Park, Ill.; Mar. 4. She is survived by her husband, John; three children; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

Leroy D. Aaronson ’49, of Providence; Oct. 14, 2019. He graduated from Albany Medical College in 1952, and following an internship at Rhode Island Hospital he spent three years serving as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force. He retired with the rank of captain. Upon his return to the U.S., he completed a residency in dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He began practicing in Rhode Island in 1959 and was affiliated as a board certified dermatologist at Kent County Memorial Hospital. He was appointed clinical assistant in dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1961, was an assistant in dermatology at Harvard Medical School in 1962, and received an honorary degree from Harvard Medical School for his work there. He retired in 1998. He enjoyed nature and animals and in 1980, while speaking at a medical conference in Kenya, he went on a safari and was able to observe wild animals up close in their natural habitat. In 1984, he bought a second home in Chatham, Mass., where he and his family enjoyed the outdoors, walks on the beach, and life in a small seaside town. He is survived by two daughters; two sons-in-law, including John Lawless ’91 PhD; and two grandsons.

Nov, 2020

John T. Townsend ’49, of Newton, Mass.; Apr. 22. After Brown, he studied theology at Wycliffe College and was ordained to priesthood in the Episcopal Church. He entered Harvard Divinity School and earned a doctorate in 1959. Following two years of parish work, he taught at the Philadelphia Divinity School. During his teaching years he also studied at Ulpan Etzion and Hebrew Union College, both in Jerusalem. He retired in 1994. He published numerous papers and was a contributing member of the Christian Scholars Group on Christian-Jewish Relations, serving one year as its chairperson.

Nov, 2020

Lilliam Barlowski Runyon ’49, of Marietta, Ga.; May 10. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, and a great-grandson. 

Nov, 2020

Joanne McKeever ’49, of Milford, Conn.; May 26. After Brown, she enrolled at Boston College Law School, where she met and married her husband. They traveled extensively in Europe after college and once had an audience with Pope Pius VII at the Vatican. She taught Sunday School in Milford, was well read, and was a member of the board of directors of Milford Mental Health. She enjoyed many types of music, including opera, classical, and heavy metal. She is survived by three children, four grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and a niece.

Nov, 2020

Muriel Broadbent Jones ’49, of Mansfield, Mass., formerly of Attleboro Falls; May 10. Her husband was president and owner of Lyons Advertising in Attleboro Falls, where she worked part-time. During the 1960s she was a substitute teacher at North Attleboro High School. She became an accomplished sailor on their 37-foot sloop Dauntless, sailing along the coast of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Maine. In 1983, she helped prepare Dauntless for an ocean yacht race from Marion to Bermuda, and then sailed the boat back from Bermuda. She was a longtime member of Angle Tree Garden Club and the North Attleboro Historical Society. She enjoyed gardening and travel and is survived by her husband Phillip ’48 and a son.

Nov, 2020

Shirley Whipple Hinds ’49, of Oconomowoc, Wisc.; June 6. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She had a passion for history and conservation and helped to secure the preservation of many of Oconomowoc’s original landmarks and buildings, most notably the 1886 Oconomowoc City Hall. Following her husband’s death, she went back to working outside the home after 40 years, first as the bookkeeper for the Waukesha County Red Cross and then as the innkeeper for the Inn at Pine Terrace, finally retiring at the age of 80. She continued her work with the Oconomowoc Historical Society and Museum as a member of the board of directors, as well as volunteering for many committees and projects for the American Association of University Women and the Heritage Trails (Oconomowoc) chapter of The Questors, an international organization dedicated to historical preservation and restoration. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by five children and their spouses, 10 grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, a brother and sister-in-law, and 15 nieces and nephews, including Richard Whipple ’77.

Nov, 2020

Joan McWeeney Geary ’49, of Jamaica Plain, Mass.; Apr. 25. She taught in the Pawtucket (R.I.) school system. She was also a remedial reading volunteer at St. Pius School in Providence and a volunteer for Meals on Wheels. She enjoyed playing bridge, solving word searches, and playing bingo. She is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020

Elizabeth Stone Ellis ’49, of Manchester, Conn.; May 4. Her husband bought two weekly newspapers and in 1967 she went to work in their circulation departments. The two merged into the daily Journal Inquirer a year later and she became the publication’s assistant publisher in 1970. She rose to publisher in 1973, overseeing the newspaper’s expansion in a time when the industry was mostly run by men. The New England Newspaper and Press Association honored her in 2000 with its prestigious Yankee Quill Award in recognition of her contributions to both journalism and the communities the Journal Inquirer covers. The newspaper also won the association’s Newspaper of the Year award under her leadership in 1987. She is survived by her husband, Neil ’48; two daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Nov, 2020

Paul C. Abramson ’49, of Teaneck, N.J.; Apr. 23. Upon his honorable discharge from the U.S. Army, he became president of the United Travel Agency in Manhattan, which he helmed for most of his adult life. During his lifetime he went on innumerable cruises and became an expert on the cruise industry and an icon in the luxury travel business. He was active with many travel organizations and a board member emeritus and vice chair Masonic brother. He retired from the travel business in his 80s, but never stopped his quest for new experiences. He continued to commute from Teaneck to Manhattan for activity-filled days, including visiting museums. He is survived by daughter Nancy Abramson ’81 and her spouse; son Richard ’84; and two grandsons, including Jesse Hertz ’13.

Aug, 2020

Joanne Worley Rondestvedt ’49, of Cheshire, Conn.; Mar. 15, from complications of COVID-19. She worked with troubled teens at Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute in San Francisco before moving to Connecticut in 1974. She was a lifelong flutist and enjoyed orchestral music. She played first flute with the Hamden Symphony Orchestra and she also played with Orchestra New England. She was a member of Spring Glen Congregational Church and the Spring Glen Garden Club. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by a sister, nieces, and nephews.

Aug, 2020

William H. Hubbard II ’49, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 3. He was retired from Bethlehem Steel Corporation’s credit department in New York City. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, a junior champion sailor, and a volunteer for years at St. Luke’s Hospital. He is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020

Helen Loughlin Herlitz ’49, of Alexandria, Va., formerly of Irvington, N.Y.; Feb. 4.  She was a homemaker and longtime member of the Thursday Club in Irvington, the Junior League of Westchester (N.Y.), and the Garden Club of America. She is survived by her husband, Fred; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020

Rose Jamiel Falugo ’49, of Cooper City, Fla., formerly of Attleboro, Mass.; Feb. 7. She was a teacher before she and her husband opened a bedding business in 1969, now run by their son. She enjoyed traveling with her husband and being with family. She is survived by her husband, Jay; four children; eight grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and three sisters.

Jun, 2020

Ellamae Andrews Magee ’49, of Great Barrington, Mass.; Dec. 29. She taught elementary education over the course of 25 years, first at Berkshire County Day School in Lenox and later at Pomeroy Elementary School in Pittsfield. In addition, along with her husband she ran a summer camp in North Adams, Mass., for 20 years. She was involved in religious and civic organizations and was a founding member of the Berkshire Quilt Guild. She enjoyed reading, ballroom dancing, yoga, and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Robert; five children; and eight grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Marilyn Silverman Ehrenhaus ’49, of Providence, formerly of Fall River, Mass.; Nov. 11. She taught school in Fall River and worked in the family business with her husband. She was twice president of the Fall River Chapter of Hadassah, she was on the board of directors of the Ninth Street Day Nursery, and she volunteered for the Fall River Food Pantry, in addition to being an active member of the Pembroke/Brown class. She enjoyed spending time at the beach with her family, solving crossword puzzles, traveling, and writing skits that she and her friend performed for years on New Year’s Eve. She is survived by three daughters, including Ellen Ehrenhaus Pasch ’78; two sons-in-law; eight grandchildren; and 13 great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Anthony D’Antuono ’49, of Naples, Fla.; Oct. 17. He was a high school principal in Cohasset, Mass. He later moved to Brockton, Mass., and was superintendent of public schools for many years. He followed that position by moving to Falmouth, Mass., to work as superintendent of the Sandwich/Mashpee public schools. He began wintering in Naples in 1979 before moving permanently in 1986. After retiring, he accredited colleges and universities for the government and eventually ended his long educational career by becoming a founder of Schiller International University in Dunedin, Fla. He is survived by two daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, two sons-in-law, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Shirley Gfroerer Buck ’49, of Bedford, Mass., formerly of Lexington, Mass.; Oct. 25. She was a former writer for the Lexington Minuteman. She is survived by a daughter and a son and their spouses, two grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Eloise Fleischer Pollack ’49, of Coconut Creek, Fla., and White Plains, N.Y.; Aug. 21, after a short illness. She is survived by three children and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Charles H. Keenoy ’49, of Hackettstown, N.J.; Nov. 25. His education was interrupted by his service in the U.S. Army during World War II, for which he received the Bronze Star and citations. He returned to Brown and upon graduation worked as a sales executive with McCall’s Corp. He lived in New Jersey, North Carolina, Vermont, and Massachusetts. He volunteered with Meals on Wheels, was a past member of the board of directors of Latham Centers (Mass.), and worked with the Governor’s Commission in Vermont for the employment of individuals with disabilities. He enjoyed baseball, football, listening to jazz and classical music, attending grandchildren’s sporting events, and building dollhouses for his grandchildren. He is survived by seven children and their spouses; 13 grandchildren and their spouses; two step-grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2020

John B. Lynch ’49, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of New Canaan, Conn. and Watch Hill, R.I.; Aug. 6. He was a member of the New York Stock Exchange and retired after a long career in the financial world. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and the Korean War. He was the recipient of several medals and commendations. He had been a member of the Brown men’s basketball team, served as head of the Brown Football Assoc., and was an active supporter of the Brown Sports Foundation. He enjoyed solving the New York Times crossword puzzle and playing golf, having achieved two holes-in-one. He is survived by his wife, Marguerite; three daughters, including Suzanne Lynch ’90 and Michele Matzinger ’92; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; brother Gerard ’66; sister-in-law Phyllis Gushae Lynch ’55; and several nieces and nephews, including Susan C. Lynch ’82, Jennifer Lynch Seemar ’87, Allison Lynch Longfield ’98, Robert K. Lynch ’90, Brendan B. Lynch ’92, and Coley M. Lynch ’95.

 

Jan, 2020

Carol-Ann Lantz ’49, of Warwick and Wakefield, R.I.; Oct. 1. She served in the U.S. Marine Corps for five years and rose to the rank of captain. After returning to civilian life, she joined a local chapter of the Women Marines Association and was treasurer of the organization for more than 20 years. She became a licensed dog handler while a teenager and enjoyed breeding and showing Dalmatians, Italian Greyhounds, and Salukis throughout the years. In the 1970s she assisted the editor of the international dog magazine Saluki World. For 21 years she owned and operated Wecochaconet Boarding Kennel in Warwick. She was a member of the Saluki Club of America and for 16 years served as its secretary. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, a stepdaughter, a sister-in-law, and two nieces.

 

Jan, 2020

Charles A. Cooper ’49, of New York City; Sept. 16. He served in Germany during the Korean War and later had a career in law, primarily title insurance. He was a founder of the Riverside Park Clay Court Tennis Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice; daughter Margery Cooper ’82; son Frederick Cooper ’79; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2019

Paul L. Sunderland ’49, of Westport, Mass.; July 19. He was a retired engineer who had worked as superintendent of engineering for Montaup Electric Co. in Somerset, Mass. He was an avid Boston Red Sox fan, a World War II U.S. Army veteran, and enjoyed spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Jean; three sons; seven grandchildren; a great-grandson; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019

Joan Dixon Keller ’49, of Westwood, Mass., formerly of Atlanta; Apr. 18. After college, she joined the junior executive training program of Filene’s department store in Boston. In 1967 she moved to Florida and later to Atlanta, where she lived for 40 years, before returning to New England in 2017. She participated in the Junior League, garden clubs, and the Colonial Dames. She enjoyed reading, swimming, tennis, golf, and playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019

William Seamans ’49, of Spofford, N.H.; Apr. 21. He began working at CBS News as an editor for the morning radio news, then moved to the evening news as an editor and writer for Walter Cronkite, which earned him an Emmy. In 1963 he joined ABC News as a correspondent and producer. He spent 22 of his years at ABC as Tel Aviv bureau chief, covering the Gulf War and receiving a second Emmy for the news special Nightline in the Holy Land, as well as Overseas Press Club awards for radio reporting on the invasion of Cyprus in 1974 and for a television documentary on Yitzhak Rabin. He retired to Spofford in 1991 and shared his expertise through commentary and editorials for Vermont Public Radio and the Keene Sentinel. He donated his working papers and other related materials to the Mason Library at Keene State College. He was a member of the Writers Guild, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, the Overseas Press Club of America, the National Press Club, and the Foreign Correspondents Association. In his personal life he enjoyed playing tennis and golf, target shooting, and attending summer performances at the Peterborough Players. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, and a niece.

Jul, 2019

David A. Turnquist ’49 of Aurora, Colo., formerly of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 23, of bile duct cancer. During his career he worked as an engineer with fire protection system companies in New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, including Grinnell Fire Protection in Newington, Conn. He retired in 1992. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a former member of the Verandi (the Rhode Island unit of the American Union of Swedish Singers). He enjoyed traveling and spending time with family on Salt Pond in Narragansett. He is survived by three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and brother Nelson Turnquist ’60.

 

Jul, 2019

Kenneth B. Nanian ’49, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Mar. 7. He was a cardiologist at Rhode Island Hospital for 40 years. In addition to his medical societies, he was president-elect of the Rhode Island Society of Internal Medicine, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, and a member of Kappa Sigma. He enjoyed sailing, skiing, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Pat; three sons, including David ’83; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019

Phyllis J. Morton ’49, of Perrysburg, Ohio; Feb. 20. She was the founder of Abundant Life of Perrysburg and Abundant Life II, an elderly housing authority for which she received a national award from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. She was a court appointed special advocate for children for more than 35 years. In retirement she volunteered with several organizations until a few months prior to her passing, including Perrysburg Area Historic Museum and Advocates for Basic Legal Equality. She was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Mayor’s proclamation of Phyllis Morton Appreciation Day, 2012 Distinguished Citizen of Perrysburg Award, and a Virginia Secor Stranahan Citizenship Award from the League of Women Voters, a 2013 Jefferson Award honoring her for her positive efforts, the 2015 Access to Justice Community Advocacy Award, and the 2018 Bentley Historic Preservation Award. She enjoyed traveling to all seven continents and was a member of Zoar Lutheran Church in Perrysburg, where she organized monthly preparation and serving of meals at a homeless shelter in Toledo and helped build a home through Habitat for Humanity. She is survived by two daughters; four sons; 14 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

Doris Anderson Landau ’49, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 27. She worked in the U.S. Navy Department, then later at the Department of State until marrying and starting a family. She was interested in architecture and the preservation of America’s historic buildings and for many years volunteered at the National Building Museum. She enjoyed figure skating and ice dancing and skated until the age of 87. She is survived by her husband, Sherman; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Howard J. Kennedy ’49, of Rockville, Md.; Jan. 9. He was a retired director of engineering at ARINC Research Corp. in Annapolis and active in the St. Jude’s Choir and the Rockville Men’s Chorus. He is survived by three children; 11 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

Claire Davis Harrison ’49, of Wrentham, Mass.; Mar. 10. She taught music at Plainville Elementary School until retiring in 1989. She was both a cub scout den mother and a girl scout leader and enjoyed reading.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Allan R. Bellows ’49, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Feb. 9. After working at Amica Insurance for two years, he joined the family mortuary business of D.W. Bellows & Son in Pawtucket. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps, past president of National Selected Morticians, past president of the Rotary Club of Pawtucket, past chairman of the advisory board of the Salvation Army of Pawtucket, a trustee of the Boys & Girls Club of Pawtucket, a member of the Rhode Island Funeral Directors Association and of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, where he served as senior warden. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter; a son; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

May, 2019

Jeannette Silberman Roth ’49, of Davie, Fla., formerly of South Dennis, Mass., and Providence; Jan. 14. She was a social worker for the State of Rhode Island before starting a family. She later tutored students of all ages in math. She enjoyed reading and is survived by a daughter and a son.

Mar, 2019

Carl R. Ostroff ’49, of Canton, Mass.; Oct. 28. He was the former president of Abrams Bros., Inc, a carpet distributor in Natick, Mass. An avid Boston Red Sox fan, he passed away peacefully minutes after watching the Red Sox win the 2018 World Series. He also enjoyed traveling and his friendships with his Pi Lambda Phi fraternity brothers. He is survived by two sons, including Michael ’76; two daughters-in-law, including Joanne Topol ’77; and four grandchildren, including Alexander Ostroff ’14.

 

Mar, 2019

Helvi Olen Moyer ’49, of South Windsor, Conn.; Nov. 11. She retired from The Travelers Insurance Co. in South Windsor in 1983 as assistant manager. She is survived by her husband, Robert A. Moyer ’50; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019

Richard A. Dodge ’49, of Gloucester, Mass.; Sept. 6, after a brief illness. After obtaining a law degree from Boston Univ., he owned and operated his own firm, working with multinational companies for more than 40 years. He was a World War II U.S. Army Air Corps veteran and enjoyed sailing. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019

William J. Falk ’49, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 7. A notable track and field coach, he began full-time teaching and coaching in 1952 at Attleboro (Mass.) High School. Within three years his track team won a state crown. In 1956, he joined the faculty of Hope High School in Providence, also teaching and coaching track, and piloted Blue Wave teams to six successful seasons. He was both head and assistant coach of track at URI for 18 years, during which time he won five New England Coach of the Year awards while coaching five All-Americans, five IC4A titlists, and 20 New England champions. In 1960, together with Brown University trainer Jack McKinnon, he founded M-F Athletics, marketing molded heel protectors. His “athletic heel” was not confined to track and field athletes, but for a time was also used by members of the Cleveland Browns, Baltimore Colts, and Boston Celtics. He attended the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome to observe Olympic activities in his field of coaching, but also to ensure that the device was available to all who wanted it, eventually supplying several countries with the M-F Athletic Heel. He started M-F Track & Field catalog in 1968, which grew to become a leader in its field. His son now runs the company. During his career, he received numerous coaching awards, including induction into the URI Athletic Hall of Fame and the Rhode Island Track Coaches Hall of Fame. He is survived by a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jan, 2019

Theodore A. Hagios ’49, of Flemington, N.J.; Sept. 3. He was retired from the New Jersey Department of Transportation in the office of land acquisition. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a son and brother, Fritz ’54.

 

Jan, 2019

Evelyn Pierson Gotschall ’49, of Sarasota, Fla.; Aug. 1. She received her master’s from UCLA and taught in the Santa Monica private school system. A former director of the Laguna Beach Art Association, she exhibited her work at Laguna Art Museum and in Southern California businesses. She also published several books of her poetry. She was active in the healing arts movement in Southern California and was certified as a practitioner of alternative medicine. She retired in 1990, moving to Florida. She is survived by longtime friend John Milligan; a daughter; a sister; and brother, Walter Pierson ’53.

 

Jan, 2019

George S. Doolittle ’49, of New London, N.H., formerly of Floral Park, N.Y.; Oct. 6. After receiving a master’s from Columbia Univ., he taught for one year at Glasgow High School in Montana, followed by 29 years at Sewanahaka High School in Floral Park. In both 1958 and 1961 he participated in the New York State Regents television project teaching English on channel 11. He was a professor of English, adjunct faculty at Nassau Community College from 1964 to 1983; and an associate professor of English, adjunct faculty at Adelphi Univ. from 1974 to 1976. In addition to teaching, he was the director of the Ruth M. Knight Summer Theater Workshop from 1962 to 1983. He retired from teaching in 1983, moved to New London and was active in the community volunteering with Meals on Wheels and as chairman of the board of trustees of the Tracy Memorial Library. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, a prisoner of war, and the recipient of the Purple Heart. He is survived by four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and one great-granddaughter.

 

Jan, 2019

Lawrence M. Bugbee ’49, of Gardnerville, Nev., formerly of Fair Oaks, Calif.; Aug. 25. He was a retired pediatrician. During his career he held many positions at Mercy San Juan Hospital, including chief of staff, chairman, vice chairman, and secretary of the department of pediatrics. He was actively involved with St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Carmichael for more than 35 years. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed writing and woodworking. He is survived by four children; 13 grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019

Warren Averill ’49 of Amherst, Mass.; Aug. 8. He continued his education at UMass Amherst, where he obtained a master’s and doctorate degrees in food science and analytical chemistry. In 1951 he was appointed assistant professor in agricultural and biological chemistry at the Univ. of New Hampshire. He later worked as a research chemist for Perkin-Elmer in Norwalk, Conn. He was a U.S. Army Air Forces veteran of World War II and a member of the American Chemical Society and the Institute of Food Technologists. He enjoyed fishing, sailing, clamming, woodworking, gardening, and traveling. He is survived by six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
 

 

Nov, 2018

Joseph W. Munnis ’49, of Glen Mills, Pa.; May 30. He was employed with Westinghouse as a sales engineer for 39 years, retiring in the early 1990s. In retirement, he was called upon by Henkles & McCoy to serve as vice president of marketing. He was an active member of St. Thomas the Apostle Church and enjoyed golf, gardening, and the Jersey Shore. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Nov, 2018

Philip F. Denner Jr. ’49, of Nashua, N.H.; July 2. He was employed as a sales manager for the Nashua Corp. for 37 years before retiring in 1990. After retiring, he spent 14 winters in Florida before returning to Nashua full-time. He was an active member of First Church Nashua U.C.C., where he had been chairman of the board of deacons, a Sunday school teacher, superintendent of the Sunday school, and president of the Fellowship Club. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He enjoyed camping in New England. He is survived by his wife, Roberta; four sons; four grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

Sep, 2018

Jean E. Miller ’49, of Arlington, Vt.; May 21, of a stroke.  She taught English for seven years in the public high schools of Westbrook, Maine, and Marshfield, Mass., followed by two years at Mount Vernon Seminary in Washington, D.C. She went on to teach English and become assistant to the headmaster of the Masters School in New York. She was later dean of student personnel at Bennington College in Vermont, headmistress of St. Timothy’s School in Maryland, and headmistress of Vivian Webb Schools in Claremont, Calif. She served as director of development at Poly Prep Country Day School in New York and was chairman of the National Association of Independent Schools—the first woman to serve in this capacity—before retiring. Active in Pembroke affairs, she joined the Pembroke Center Associates Council in 1989 and served as chair from 2002-2004. She endowed the Edith Goldthwaite Miller Faculty Fellow Research Fund in 2002 for the Pembroke Center and was a 1998 Brown Bear recipient.  She is survived by two brothers.

Sep, 2018

Muriel Hendrick Krauss ’49, of Post Falls, Idaho; Mar. 5. She served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, then continued her studies in psychology and earned two master’s degrees. She enjoyed doing volunteer work, studying history, and traveling. She is survived by four daughters and a son.

 

Sep, 2018

Albert J. Jacobs ’49, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Cranston, R.I.; May 27. After a brief career in engineering, he founded three fashion jewelry and findings import companies (Princess Fashions, Eastern Import Co., and Pegasus Import Co.) and served as president of each. He enjoyed jazz music, fishing, Asian art, home aquariums, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, sons Bradley ’79 and Theodore ’84 MD, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.

 

Sep, 2018

Barbara Dinkel Dillon ’49, of Darien, Conn.; Mar. 28. She worked as an editorial assistant at the New Yorker magazine in Manhattan, while also doing some freelance writing. She sold her first story, “The Grand Champion Peanut Racer,” to Woman’s Day magazine at the age of 23. Over the course of her career, she authored nine children’s books, including A Mom by Magic, which was made into an NBC TV movie, A Mom for Christmas, produced by Walt Disney Productions in 1990. She spoke at several local schools about her writing and remained an avid reader of children’s literature and the New York Times Book Review. She enjoyed attending the Darien Playhouse and New York City theater. She also played tennis, golf, paddle tennis, and bridge. She volunteered in several organizations, taught pre-reading skills to underprivileged children in Stamford, Conn., and was a volunteer for 25 years at Person-to-Person in Darien. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Sep, 2018

Edward A. Vincent ’49, of Springfield, Ohio; May 12, following a brief illness. He worked at Interstate Department Stores for 26 years before owning and operating the Downtown Specialty Store in Springfield for 14 years. He served on the Chamber of Commerce and was a member of the Downtown Merchants Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three children; five grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Ronald S. Pritzker ’49, of Hyannis, Mass.; May 15. He worked in the family outerwear manufacturing business, A. Pritzker and Sons, and later in beer, wine, and liquor sales and distribution. He was active in civic life and served as president of the Oak Hill Park Neighborhood Assoc. and Temple Mishkan Tefila. He volunteered with the Barnstable (Mass.) police department and enjoyed acting and singing. He is survived by his wife, Avis; a daughter; a son; their spouses; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Paul F. Hood ’49, of Salt Lake City, Utah; Mar. 17. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he lived and worked in various places, including jobs in the financial, pension, retirement areas with Aetna Life & Casualty, Equitable Life, Marsh & McLennan, Merrill Lynch, Watson Wyatt & Co., and Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank. He was listed in Who’s Who in Finance and Industry and enjoyed reading about the Civil War, watching golf, and playing tennis. He is survived by a daughter, Tracy Hood Golden ’85; a son; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and a brother, Ralph ’57.

 

Jul, 2018

William S. Capozzoli ’49, of Ellicott City, Md., formerly of Old Saybrook, Conn.; Jan. 26. He was a retired sales manager for Exide Battery and a U.S. Army World War II veteran. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three stepdaughters; and two nephews.

 

Jul, 2018

Constantine E. Anagnostopoulos ’49, of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., formerly of St. Louis; Jan. 20, after a brief illness. He joined Monsanto Company in 1952 as a research chemist. In 1954 he transferred to the organic chemicals division in St. Louis and was appointed a Monsanto Fellow in 1957. He served as vice president of Monsanto and vice chairman of its Corporate Development and Growth Committee and later was president and CEO of its Europe, Africa, and Middle East division. He retired from Monsanto in 1987 and began a second career as managing director of Gateway Ventures, headquartered in St. Louis. He was the author of numerous papers on technological entrepreneurship and corporate venture capital and, over the course of his career, developed several patents related to organic and polymer chemistry. He served on the Presidential Council on Innovation, the Industrial Research Institute, the National Inventors Council, and the European Government Business Council. He enjoyed watercolor painting and writing poetry. He is survived by a son, Paul ’74; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2018

Barbara Forbstein Arnstein ’49, of Dallas; Dec. 13. She worked for Neiman Marcus before becoming a full-time wife and mother. An accomplished pianist, she volunteered at the Jewish Community Center playing for the senior choir and at the Temple Emanu-El Judaica Gift Shop. She enjoyed playing golf and traveling. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by three sons, a daughter-in-law, and a sister.

Apr, 2018

Gala Connell Barker ’49, of Portland, Conn.; Dec. 3. She worked for a short time as a librarian at the Providence Athenaeum and worked in the back-office operations of Barker Trucking. She eventually earned her Class 1 driver’s license and enjoyed traveling the country by truck with her husband. She was an active member of the Portland Methodist Church, where she sang in the choir and played piano. She was an avid reader and could read, write, and speak five languages. She is survived by her husband, Gordon; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018

Harold Ludman ’49, of Seattle; Nov. 28. An internal medicine physician, he was on the clinical faculty of the SUNY Stony Brook School of Medicine until his retirement in 2004. He served in the U.S. Army and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Alpha Omega Alpha. He enjoyed gardening, traveling, reading, going to the theater, and visiting art museums around the world. He is survived by daughter Evette Ludman ’83; sons Neil ’79 and Mark ’76, ’79 MD; three grandchildren; one great-grandchild; and a sister.

Apr, 2018

Daniel Moore Jr. ’49, of Providence; June 25. He was a cardiologist in private practice until retiring in 1998 and a staff physician at Butler Hospital and St. Elizabeth Home in Providence, where he was medical director and chief of staff from 1978 until his retirement. A clinical instructor at Brown, he served as president of the Rhode Island Medical Assoc. and the Rhode Island Society of Internal Medicine and was a member of the American Medical Assoc. and St. Sebastian Church. He served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II and earned the Distinguished Flying Cross. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Nancy McKenna Moore ’50; four daughters; a son; three sons-in-law; and 14 grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

Gloria Negri ’49

Covering History
 

On a whim, Gloria Negri ’49 would sometimes hop a plane to a place she’d never been—Bangkok or Cairo, Saigon or Singapore, or Guatemala alone on a Christmas Eve.

“My experiences have not all been pretty,” she once wrote. “On more occasions than I care to remember, I have arrived in foreign lands in the middle of the night with no hotel reservations.”

During 53 years at the Boston Globe, Negri, who died last December 10 at 91, watched countless historic moments unfold, always returning to write a well-told tale. She was at Cape Kennedy for the launch of the first moon landing and in South Africa when apartheid’s grip began to loosen. She was in Fenway Park when Ted Williams hit his last home run and in Hyannis as Rose Kennedy wept in church the day after John was assassinated.

Arriving at the Globe in 1959, when the few female reporters on the staff were relegated to soft feature assignments for what was then called the women’s pages, Negri insisted that she be sent out to cover news. Through her determination, she broke ground for generations of women who later joined the Globe.

“All the women in the newsroom owe her a debt of gratitude,” says Patricia Nealon, a friend and an editor at the Globe. “She really decided that all of the news pages would be open to her. All of us who followed, followed in her footsteps.” Janet Walsh, the Globe’s weekend editor, says, “I am grateful to Gloria as one of a very few women who waged battle every day decades ago in a very male newsroom to make their voices heard.”

Gloria Negri was born on November 23, 1926, in Providence, where her father, Philip Negri, was an Italian immigrant, a carpenter, and a mason. Her mother and namesake, the former Gloria Louise Tella, was hobbled by diabetes, though Negri would share with close friends her tender memory of dancing with her mother in the kitchen when she was a girl.

Her parents had both died by the time she entered Pembroke College. “I think she worked her way through,” says her longtime friend Loretta McCabe. “I’ve always thought of Gloria as being the exemplar of true grit, because that’s what she needed.”

Negri told friends that after a summer bicycling trip in Europe she took a slow route home because the college dorms weren’t open yet, and she would have no place to stay. “I stayed on several weeks more after the other members of my group flew home,” she wrote in 2000 about the experience, “exchanging my airline ticket with a stranger I met in Amsterdam for a trip home on a freighter. While I waited for the ship to leave, I slept in hostels and other less-than-luxurious emporiums for wanderers like myself. I had several proposals, not always of marriage.”

After graduation, she worked first at the Jewish Advocate and then at the Daily Hampshire Gazette in Northampton, Massachusetts, the New Bedford Standard-Times, and the Miami Herald, where she produced a feature story every day. (She was also required to sweep the Palm Beach bureau office every night.)

Along the way, Negri, who had no immediate survivors, remained close to a trio of college friends and, later, to the children of Globe colleagues who lived nearby, who considered her an aunt whose freezer always contained ice cream for them. 

Stephen Kurkjian, a former Globe reporter and editor, says that as Negri regaled him with anecdotes about her reporting assignments, “I realized that she had covered the history of the end of the 20th century. It was always the same Gloria—notebook out, asking questions, getting as close as she could to where history was being made, whether it was in Vietnam or across the street from the Public Garden at The Ritz.”

On the event of the launch for the first moon landing in July 1969, she wrote “In daylight, standing a mere 1,500 feet from this big white behemoth that will take man to the moon, the overwhelming emotion is awe. The overwhelming urge is to pray … at dusk, as small lights round the spacecraft made it twinkle like a castle in fairyland, and again in the blackness of night, when floodlights cast Apollo 11 in a celestial halo.”

Rubbing shoulders with the Fenway faithful on September 28, 1960, while watching the Splendid Splinter’s last game, she noted that “Theodore S. Williams, baseball’s last angry man, the pride and sometimes the bane of the Sox, refused to tip his hat to the crowd throughout the game. ‘An individual to the end!’ a fan said in admiration.”

At the LBJ Ranch in October 1964, Negri was shown around in a station wagon by “a slender woman in bright pink slacks, silk blouse, and a pink chiffon scarf around her head.” Her driver was Lady Bird Johnson, the first lady. “The skin on her nose was beginning to peel from the Texas sun and there was a spring to her step that is restrained when she is in Washington,” Negri wrote. “The land is dear to Lady Bird Johnson, just as it was to the women who came West to settle years ago. And it is on the land that she can be most herself.”

Negri could cover an earthquake that killed thousands in Italy on one day and head off on vacation for her own adventure the next.

“As a longtime traveler,” she wrote, “I have always observed a few rules: Travel alone, travel lightly—just a knapsack, if possible—and never plan ahead.”

—Bryan Marquard

A longer version of this story was published in the December 12, 2017, Boston Globe.

Feb, 2018

William Kloner ’49, of Manhattan; Oct. 12. He was ordained in 1954 and for more than 50 years was Rabbi at Temple Beth Emeth of Flatbush, Brooklyn. He served 32 years in the U.S. Naval Reserve, attaining the rank of captain and was appointed rear admiral in the New York Naval Militia. His ministerial capacities spread across a range of institutions, including the Navy League of the United States, the Jewish War Veterans of the U.S.A., and the Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons of the State of New York. He was the head chaplain administering to rescue workers at Ground Zero. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two sons, including Ken ’93; five grandchildren; and two sisters.

Feb, 2018

William A. McKibben ’49, of Hingham, Mass.; Sept. 16. He was a commercial pilot for Eastern Airlines until his retirement in 1984. He was a World War II navy veteran and member of Delta Upsilon. In addition to flying, he enjoyed genealogy and investing. He is survived by four daughters, three sons-in-law, and seven grandchildren.

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