Obituaries
— Class of 1962

Apr, 2022

Arthur B. Shattuck ’62, of Newport, R.I.; Sept. 16. He had a career in the field of computers working for such companies as Sperry, IBM, Lucent, the Hartford Courant, Coopers & Lybrand, and Stratus. In retirement, he enjoyed working with the Newport Preservation Society and Fort Adams. He also
enjoyed visiting battlefields, researching his genealogy, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Marianne; four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother-in-law; and two nieces. 

Apr, 2022

Sara Glock Peiter ’62, of Chelsea, Mich.; Oct. 25. She taught many years as both a private and public school elementary teacher. She authored the first iteration of A History of Chelsea, a storybook for elementary students. She enjoyed reading, especially mysteries, as well as gardening and and walking her dogs in the country. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and four grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022

Robert C. Wachter ’62, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Aug. 10, following a long battle with dementia and cancer. After graduating, he joined his father’s family business, Eastern Box Company in Detroit, where he remained for 40 years. He served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, was a board member of Ascension Brighton Center for Recovery, and was a member of the Rotary Club. He enjoyed fixing things. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; three daughters; two sons-in-law; and 14 grandchildren. 

 

Jan, 2022

John D. Holbrook ’62, of Bethel, Conn.; July 12. He worked for a short time at Procter & Gamble before founding Marketing Action Group and American Family Crafts, both in Danbury, Conn. Later, he pursued a lifelong passion and opened Holbrook Farm in Bethel, a premier organic farm and market. He served Bethel on the town Zoning Commission, helped to get the Francis J. Clarke Business Park established, and attempted a bid at First Selectman. He coached Bethel soccer teams to state championships and was a founding member of the Walnut Hill Community Church. He also helped the Cambodian New Life Church and Jericho Center in Danbury get established by selling them his old factory building for one dollar. He is survived by his wife, Lynn; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jan, 2022

Margaret “Peggy” Snyder Hinman ’62, of Atherton, Calif.; July 4. She worked at New York Bell Telephone and Cornell University until her husband, whom she met at Brown, graduated law school and they moved to California. Once in California, she raised a family and was active with the Junior League of Palo Alto. She was also actively engaged in the San Francisco Colonial Dames, Atherton Garden Guild, and the Garden Conservancy, where she served on the San Francisco Board. After her children left for college, she returned to school to become a landscape architect and opened her own business, Peggy Hinman Landscape Design. Eventually she refined her watercolor skills and became a botanical artist. She enjoyed being a member of the Stitch and Bitch group, playing tennis, horseback riding, hiking, skiing, and spending time with her family in the mountains around Sun Valley and the beaches of Carmel. She is survived by her husband, Harvey ’62; three children and their spouses, including son George ’87 and daughter Sarah Whittle ’90; nine grandchildren, including Phebe Hinman ’19 and Alexandra Whittle ’21; a sister; and a brother. 

Jan, 2022

Joseph Golouski ’62, ’72 ScM, of Smithfield, R.I.; July 20. He was employed by General Electric and later Brown & Sharpe. He enjoyed country dancing, playing golf, and traveling. He is survived by lifelong friends. 

Jan, 2022

Norman Barstow ’62, of Hartford, Conn.; July 31, after suffering for several years with frontotemporal dementia. He sang in the Brunaires while a Navy ROTC student at Brown. Following graduation, he spent two years serving on a destroyer in the Mediterranean, then returned to Mystic, Conn., where he worked for a book importer. For the next five years he worked as a group insurance underwriter and eventually became an elementary school teacher in Simsbury, Conn., where he spent his last ten years as the science curriculum coordinator. He served as president of the Connecticut Science Teachers’ Association. Music was a big part of his life and he sang in glee clubs and church choirs, taught sea shanties to girl scouts at Mystic Seaport, and was a member of the Spare Parts a cappella group. He enjoyed travel and foreign languages, acquiring enough vocabulary to interact with anyone he encountered through the years he lived in Greece and Bulgaria. He also liked taking photographs of interesting faces and beautiful landscapes and was a tinkerer who liked to create collages and mini sculptures out of a variety of found objects. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two daughters, including Amanda Barstow ’00; two grandsons; a sister; and a brother; and he will be mourned as the King of Limericks by his fraternity brothers, as W.H. Snapper by his Navy buddies, and as Stormin’ Norman by his neighbors.

Aug, 2021

Charles Caperonis ’63, of North Andover, Mass.; Feb. 28, of Parkinson’s disease. After graduation, he joined the U.S. Navy serving as a communications officer. He earned his MBA at Columbia University and held positions with Procter & Gamble, Lever Brothers, and Berol Corporation. In 1980, he bought K.P. Thompson Co., a stationery and office products company in Andover and Lawrence, Mass. After selling his stationery company, he volunteered with the State Department and spent time getting an office products company started in Russia. He retired as an investment advisor with Fidelity Investments. He was a member and past president of the Lawrence Rotary Club, where he was elected a Paul Harris Fellow. He served as treasurer of the Congregational Church of Topsfield and served on the Boxford Personnel Board. He was an avid sailor and enjoyed travel and is survived by his wife, Serena; daughter Daphna Cox ’94; a son; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2021

James J. Leonard Jr. ’62, of Phoenix; Feb. 20. After Brown, where he was a member of the football team and captain of the baseball team, he was admitted to the University of Notre Dame Law School. He was admitted to the Arizona Bar in 1966 and practiced for nearly five decades representing injured victims of medical negligence, particularly birth-injured children. He was a professional mentor to other attorneys, a lecturer at professional conventions, a coach in youth sports, and a volunteer delivery driver for St. Vincent DePaul. He is survived by his wife, Sue Ann; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a sister; and four nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021

John R. Simpson Jr. ’62, of Dalton, Pa.; Jan. 20. He attended the Yale School of Drama before starting his acting career at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minn. He worked at many national repertory theaters, appeared in several Broadway productions, including Find Your Way Home and Sly Fox, and played a judge on Law & Order for more than 10 years. He was a member of Psi Upsilon, Actors Equity Association, SAG-AFTRA and the Clemo Hunting and Fishing Club and served as president of the Cherry Ridge Corp. He enjoyed telling stories and cooking. He is survived by his partner Dawn M. Richards; two daughters, including Phoebe Simpson Bean ’93; a stepson; four grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law. 

Jun, 2021

G. Arthur Padmore Jr. ’62, of Cary, N.C., formerly of Wilmington, Del., and Monrovia, Liberia; Jan. 7. After graduating from Brown, he returned to Liberia and obtained his law degree from the University of Liberia. Because of his lifelong love of music, he became a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and cofounder of the WAVE, a popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time. He also hosted the popular jazz radio show, Music for Moderns. Before leaving the country in 1980, he owned and operated a law practice and was general manager of Liberia Amusements Ltd. Once in the U.S., he settled in Delaware and sold insurance. Eventually, he served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for 15 years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the public advocate for the State of Delaware. He retired in 2010 and moved to Cary. He is survived by his wife, Pairlene; three daughters and their spouses; and four granddaughters.

Jun, 2021

A. Michael Honer ’62, of Asheboro N.C.; Feb. 9. He was an engineer in manufacturing and quality control. He had a private pilot’s license and owned his own airplane and logged more than 2,200 hours in the air traveling throughout the U.S. He was involved in amateur radio for 65 years and also enjoyed metal working, photography, and motor camping. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021

Archie Q. Frost ’62, of Gwynn, Va.; Feb. 14. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he worked in sales and retired from Tredegar Industries, formerly known as Crown, Cork & Seal. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; a son; a stepson; five grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021

David B. Casey ’62, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Dec. 10. He received his master’s degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Business in 1964 and served as an administrator and chief financial officer for the Rhode Island Department of Health for 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; six children and their spouses, including son Christopher ’03; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.

Jun, 2021

Nelson P. Bowsher II ’62, of Washington, D.C.; Jan. 4, of complications from COVID. While at Brown he was co-editor-in-chief of the Brown Daily Herald and worked as a reporter for the Providence Journal. In 1966 he moved to Washington, D.C., to write for Congressional Quarterly and the National Journal. In his professional life he advocated for affordable housing and community-based economic development. He worked for NeighborWorks, served on the boards of national nonprofits, and volunteered with local housing groups. After retiring, he became a master gardener and volunteered at the Polly Hill Arboretum on Martha’s Vineyard and at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He is survived by his wife, Sally Steenland; son David Bowsher ’95; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2021

Gilbert Peirce ’62, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Sept. 8. He worked briefly for the State Department before entering a 31-year career as an international banker, almost all of it with Bank of Boston. His work was mostly overseas, taking his family to Brazil, England, and Spain. In 1999, he retired to Vero Beach and pursued a lifelong dream of becoming a teacher at St. Edward’s School, from which he retired in 2003. He was a deacon at both Community Church in Vero Beach and Trinitarian Congregational Church in Wayland, Mass. He also served on the boards of Scripture Union, the Cleveland Foundation, and Project Impact. He is survived by his wife, Erika; a daughter; two sons, including Jay ’90; and nine grandchildren. 

Apr, 2021

Bruce W. Huffine ’62, of Stamford, Conn.; Nov. 29. He served in the U.S. Navy and then went on to earn an MBA from NYU. After working for JCPenney for many years, he started his own sales business until he retired in 2001. In retirement, he kept busy in the Stamford community. He volunteered at the Neighbor to Neighbor food pantry, was an avid curler at the Ardsley Curling Club, and was a member of the Stamford Men’s Club and Delta Phi. He and his wife enjoyed traveling with friends and especially enjoyed the trips they took with each grandchild when they turned 12. He was an avid collector of both stamps and political pins and enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandsons.

Apr, 2021

Robert B. Auchy ’62, of Agawam, Mass.; Oct. 24. He was a successful stockbroker and eventually transitioned to become a local business owner in Springfield, Mass. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and loved to laugh, travel, play sports, read, and spend time with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Rita; two children; six grandchildren; two stepchildren. 

Jan, 2021

Barry E. Miller ’62, of Bernville, Pa.; Aug. 1. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked in urban economic development and affordable housing programs in Philadelphia and Reading. In the late 1970s he founded the Barry E. Miller Company, consulting with national trade associations to help small business owners more fully understand their financial statements to help them make better business decisions. He volunteered with numerous programs and organizations, including his church’s food bank, Meals on Wheels, an urgent care center in Strausstown, various library and zoning hearing boards, and a program in which he mentored underprivileged young people. He enjoyed hiking in the Blue Mountains and taking road trips throughout the United States and Canada with his family. He is survived by his wife, Karen; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandsons.

Jan, 2021

Jane Goodwin Ferrigno ’62, of Great Falls, Va.; Aug. 14. She worked as a geologist at the Smithsonian Institution prior to working with the US Geological Survey, spending nearly 50 years studying Landsat imagery, and authoring and editing many works published within the field of glaciology. The Ferrigno Glacier in Antarctica is named in honor of her extensive contributions to glacial research. She was an avid explorer and visited more than 40 countries. She was active in the Great Falls United Methodist Church and enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren on intergenerational adventures, sailing, camping, solving puzzles, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Jim; three children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

Jan, 2021

Dennis C. Erinakes ’62, of Murphy, Tex.; July 29, from COVID-19. He was an engineering geologist and vice president of one of the largest water boards in Texas, as well as an avid goose hunter and fisherman. Dennis was the youngest commercial pilot on the East Coast when he earned his credentials in 1956 and spotted swordfish off the coast for fishermen. He was an Eagle Scout and first warden at the area summer camp. He is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

James S. Dietz ’62, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., formerly of San Diego; Feb. 13, 2020. He started a career as a high school teacher but found his true calling in real estate sales and redevelopment, and then in small business and entrepreneurship. In 1975, he moved his family to San Diego and developed some businesses, including Baja Frame, Art Leasing, Cinemania, and Jim Dietz Vintage Posters, an internet-based poster store. In retirement he continued to serve as a movie poster appraiser and consultant for museums and collectors. He enjoyed jazz, poetry, art, travel, movies, sailing, dancing, and telling stories. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; two stepdaughters; two sisters; and three nieces and nephews.

Nov, 2020

Philip M. Reed ’62, of Litchfield, N.H.; May 24, of cancer. He worked for Travelers Insurance Company across the Northeast in senior management and commercial lines insurance. He later owned his own agency in Manchester, N.H. He served on various boards, including the Litchfield School Board, the Advisory Council of the Independent Services Network, and as president of the Pastoral Counseling Services in Manchester. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Shirley; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Sep, 2020

Paula Fitzpatrick Budinger ’62, of Monona, Wisc., formerly of Palo Alto, Calif.; Feb. 8. She worked in research labs at Stanford University and the Palo Alto VA Hospital. Years later she earned a degree in interior design at Canada College and  in 1980 moved to the Seattle area, where she worked as a nursing assistant, then an occupational therapy aide at a nursing center for young people with disabilities. She returned to school again and became a medical assistant and worked in several clinics before retiring as a medical transcriptionist in 2007 and moving to Wisconsin. She became an avid quilter and started a blog called Paula B. Quilts. She was a member of the Monona Quilt Group and the Garden Club. She is survived by a daughter, a granddaughter, and a sister.

Jun, 2020

John J. Monnes ’62, of Westbrook, Conn.; Dec. 27, of dementia. He spent his entire business career with Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; four children; three stepchildren; and 18 grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020

Henry Biller ’62, of Warwick, R.I.; Dec. 30. He was a professor of clinical psychology at URI, where he taught for more than 30 years. He authored many books and was a passionate baseball fan. He is survived by his partner, Suzette, and her daughter; five sons, including Jonathan ’85 and Kenneth ’86; eight grandchildren, including Conor Biller ’12; a sister Euda Fellman ’54; and nephew Richard Fellman ’80.

 

Apr, 2020

Harry F. Whiton ’62, of Norfolk, Va.; July 6. He was a mechanical engineer. He served on board the U.S.S. Traverse County and at Fleet Computer Programming Center. After naval service, he worked for several years in Ohio, then returned to Virginia. He is survived by three brothers, a sister-in-law, a nephew, and several cousins.

Apr, 2020

Peter H. Gould ’62, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Sept. 21, from a brain bleed. He earned a PhD from Georgetown in 1973 and a JD from the University of Virginia in 1979. After 29 years as general counsel at the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation writing briefs and representing the government before the Supreme Court, he retired in 2008. He served in the U.S. Air Force and was a national chess master. He is survived by a son and two brothers.

Jan, 2020

Ann R. Leven ’62, of New York City; June 26. She worked at the Colgate-Palmolive Company before becoming treasurer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1972. She left the Met in 1979, and after a brief tenure as vice president at Chase Manhattan Bank, she became staff director on Ronald Reagan’s Presidential Task Force for the Arts and Humanities in 1981. From 1984 to 1990 she was treasurer and chief financial officer at the Smithsonian Institution. Under her leadership, the Smithsonian’s endowment fund nearly doubled in value as she oversaw numerous exhibitions across the Institution’s collection of museums. In 1990 she became deputy treasurer of the National Gallery of Art and financially engineered dozens of famed exhibitions. For a majority of her career she also served as an adjunct professor at the Columbia University School of Business, where she taught courses in business strategy and administration (1975-1993). After retiring from full-time work in 2000, she remained active serving institutions, including  being a trustee of the Corporation of Brown, as an executive-in-residence at Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, as a member of the visiting committee at Harvard Business School, and additionally served on numerous boards, including the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York, and the New Leadership Division of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. She is survived by a brother and sister-in-law, six nieces and nephews, and numerous cousins.

 

Jul, 2019

David M. Rust ’62, of Columbia, Md.; Feb. 12, from complications of Parkinson’s. He was a pioneer in the field of solar physics. His 40-year career included posts at Mount Wilson Observatory in Calif., Sacramento Peak Observatory in New Mexico, American Science and Engineering in Boston, and Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. In 1983 he joined Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab, where he worked until his retirement in 2007. His career was distinguished by breakthrough advances in both experiment and theory. He considered the Flare Genesis Project in Antarctica the pinnacle of his professional career and the greatest adventure of his life. Flare Genesis obtained unique data on the early magnetic evolution of solar activity. He enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake, hiking the Rockies, and spending a year in Paris. He was an avid art collector and also enjoyed the opera. At Brown he was yearbook photographer and editor. He is survived by his wife, Gail; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

May, 2019

Gary A. Richardson ’62, of Naugatuck, Conn.; Oct. 31, after a lengthy illness. A Naugatuck native, he lived most of his adult life in the San Francisco Bay area where he was a sales executive and outdoor enthusiast. He is survived by a daughter; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and three nieces.

May, 2019

Philip J. Schwarz ’62, of Richmond, Va.; Dec. 15. He became a professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth Univ. in 1972 and served as chairman of the Department of History. He won several teaching awards, was the author of six books, and served on the Richmond Slave Trail Commission. He is survived by his wife, Janet; two children; two granddaughters; and two siblings.

Nov, 2018

Eugene M. Pfeifer ’62, of Alexandria, Va.; June 10, of pancreatic cancer. During the 1960s he was an ardent civil rights activist and attended many marches and demonstrations in Washington, D.C. He began a legal career at the Food and Drug Administration. He was a law partner at King & Spalding in Washington, D.C., and prior to that was a law partner at Burditt, Bowles & Radzius. He was instrumental in the development of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984. He provided regulatory advice and representation on a wide variety of FDA, FTC, and DEA-regulated activities, including product approval and compliance issues. He served for a year in the General Counsel’s office of the Federal Trade Commission, where he represented the FTC in federal court to enjoin violations of the Federal Trade Commission Act. He had served 10 years in the Chief Counsel’s Office at the FDA as Associate Chief Counsel for Enforcement, Associate Chief Counsel for Drugs, and Deputy Chief Counsel for Regulations and Hearings. He volunteered at Habitat for Humanity in Easton, Md., and served on the board of Elite Pharmaceuticals. He enjoyed sports and was himself a gymnast, a former Brown hockey player, a biker, a sailor, and a winter skier. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a stepdaughter, a daughter-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Andrea Jacobson Grant ’62, of New Haven, Conn.; Apr. 4. She worked as a special education teacher. She enjoyed reading, gardening, and attending movies. She is survived by two daughters, two grandchildren, and two brothers.

 

Jul, 2018

Anne Jacobson Schutte ’62, of Chicago; Feb. 26, from a cerebral hemorrhage. She was a history professor at Lawrence Univ. (Wisc.) until joining the faculty at the Univ. of Virginia in 1992. She spent 14 years at UVA and retired in 2006. In retirement she lived in Venice, Italy, returning to the United States in 2016. A recipient of Fulbright and National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, she held several administrative positions during her career, including director of the Distinguished Majors program at UVA and director of the Associated College of the Midwest’s Florence Program while at Lawrence Univ. She authored more than 80 scholarly articles and five books, including Pier Paolo Vergerio: The Making of an Italian Reformer, which was honored by the Society for Italian Historical Studies with its Howard R. Marraro Prize. She was working on her sixth book at the time of her death. In 2012 she was awarded the Bodo Nischan Award for scholarship, service, and civility by the Society for Reformation Research. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a brother.

 

Jul, 2018

Michael S. Saper ’62, of Wilmette, Ill.; Feb. 23, after a long illness. He was a retired attorney, a former class president, and active in alumni affairs. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; a daughter; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2018

Robert L. Dillmeier ’62, of Hobe Sound, Fla., formerly of Garden City, N.Y.; Feb. 6. He began his career at Paine Webber as an investment banker. From there he cofounded Campbell and Dillmeier, a real estate investment trust consulting firm. He retired as president and CEO of Dillmeier Enterprises. He served on several boards over the years. At Brown he was president of Delta Kappa Epsilon and played lacrosse. An accomplished seaman, he was commodore of Loblolly Bay Yacht Club in Hobe Sound and enjoyed spending time on the water with his family. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; three children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Christopher V. Brown ’62, of Cicero, Ind.; Jan. 12. He was a self-employed attorney for 50 years. He was president of Festival Music Society (known now as the Indianapolis Early Music Festival), a board member of Broad Shoulders Productions, and a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Lambda Phi. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; three daughters; and a brother.

 

May, 2018

John F. Morse III ’62, of Boston; Dec. 30. He was the founder, president, and CEO of Global Access Telecommunications and worked in the broadcast and satellite industries for 30 years before retiring. He is survived by his wife, Sonya; a daughter; and a son.

 

Apr, 2018

James L. Thompson ’62, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Oct. 17. He was a civilian employee of the U.S. Army, working as a supervisory mechanical engineer in Warren, Michigan. He was active in his local church and enjoyed time with family. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Williams Thompson ’60; a daughter; a son; and three grandsons.

Feb, 2018

James H. Higgins III ’62, of Washington, D.C.; July 7. He was a faculty member at Governor Drummer Academy prior to working in corporate communications and marketing. He was an avid boater and traveler due to his passion for wooden boats. As a member of the Antique and Classic Boat Society he served as president from 1984 to 1985 and again in 1991 and was the recipient of the society’s highest honor, the Founders’ Award. He lectured both nationally and internationally and wrote articles about classic boats. He organized tours for boating enthusiasts and in 1987 led a trip to England’s Lake District. He was a founder of the annual Clamato Regatta (renamed the Lake Placid Regatta), a veteran of the U.S. Army, and a board member for several organizations. He is survived by a sister, a brother, three nieces, and a nephew.

Feb, 2018

Robert D. Klarsch ’62, of Lewisburg, Pa.; Aug. 30. He taught and coached at Winchendon School and at Cushing Academy, both in Massachusetts. He became dean of students at Wyoming Seminary in Kingston, Pa., in 1972 and in 1983 was headmaster at Annie Wright School in Tacoma, Wash., from which he retired. He served as president of the Pacific Northwest Association of Independent Schools, was on the board of the National Association of Independent Schools, and was active in community service programs. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a daughter; a stepson; a granddaughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

Feb, 2018

Lolt D. Proegler ’62, of Brooklyn, Mich.; Sept. 20, of brain cancer. He had a career in computer science doing statistical analysis at Landis Tool Co. in Waynesboro, Pa. He served in the U.S. Army from 1962 to 1977 and retired from the U.S. Army Reserve in 1983 with the rank of major. From 1974 to 1977 he was a programmer and systems analyst at the Army’s Operational Test and Evaluation Agency in Falls Church, Va. In 1977, he left active duty and worked for Vector Research Inc., where he was named vice president in 1991 and from which he retired as CFO in 2001. He continued to work as an independent computer consultant. He enjoyed solving puzzles and playing bridge. He is survived by his wife, Gwennie; daughter Heidi Proegler Chay ’86 and husband Dan Chay ’92; a son; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren, including Maya Chay ’13; four brothers and their wives; a sister; and 14 nieces and nephews.

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