Obituaries
— Class of 1963

Sep, 2020

David A. Wheatland ’63, of Cumberland, Me.; Feb. 13. After earning his PhD from the University of Maryland, he was a professor of chemistry at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me. for six years. He left to become a research chemist for Scott Paper, then dedicated his time to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mapping the wetlands of New England, as well as volunteering at the greenhouse at the Morrison Center. He was a supporter of the Portland Symphony Orchestra, the Portland Stage Company, and the Portland Museum of Art. He and his wife enjoyed European travel through the Brown Travelers and spent several winters on Sanibel Island, Fla. He also enjoyed reading, bird watching, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Susan; daughter Rebecca Wheatland ’94; son Thomas Wheatland ’91; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren;
and two sisters.

Sep, 2020

Dennis R. Redding ’63, of South Yarmouth, Mass.; Jan. 9, of cancer.  He served in the military for 27 years and received the Distinguished Flying Cross, numerous Air Medals, and two Legions of Merit. He was honorably discharged as a colonel in 1989. He was a respected high school football, basketball, and softball official, as well as a college football official. He worked many tournaments and state championship games and volunteered as an umpire for the Cape Cod Senior Softball League for many years. His greatest accomplishment was working as a replay official for the Atlantic Coast Conference, culminating in his selection to officiate the 2017 Cotton Bowl. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four granddaughters; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020

Paul M. Allen ’63, of Biloxi, Miss.; Mar. 16. He was a gynecologist and obstetrician for more than 30 years and a staff member at Singing River Hospital. He retired in 1998 and joined the staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Biloxi, where he would ultimately serve as chief of the medical staff.  At the end of his career, he served as a surveyor for the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, a position that provided him with an opportunity for travel and to meet new people. He was a glider pilot and was fascinated with foreign languages. He studied Chinese, French, Arabic, and Spanish. He is survived by four sons and their spouses, seven grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and his former wife, Joan Weir Allen.

Jun, 2020

Fred R. Sanders ’63, of Santa Maria, Calif.; Dec. 24, of congestive heart failure. He taught high school English and choreographed plays before moving to Hawaii, where he was the general manager of the Liberty House stores. After moving to Santa Maria, he worked at Radco Products, a solar manufacturing business. He was active in the community and served as president of the Santa Maria Rotary Club from 1999 to 2000 and supported the Santa Maria Valley Humane Society and the Santa Maria Philharmonic. He is survived by his wife, Judy; a daughter and son-in-law; a sister and brother-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020

Merril W. Ruck ’63, of Aurora, Colo.; Sept. 6. He had a long career in the U.S. Navy. After retiring from the Navy in 1997, he served as a senior administrator and in July 2005 became the executive director of the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation in Monterey, Calif., until 2013. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Jun, 2020

James N. Roitman ’63, of Berkeley, Calif., formerly of Providence; Mar. 12, 2019. After obtaining his PhD in chemistry at UCLA, he worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture at their western regional research center in Albany, Calif. He retired in 2005. He was a car enthusiast who enjoyed traveling to vintage car events in California, good wine, and snorkeling in tropical waters. He is survived by his wife, Esther; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; sisters Barbara Roitman Holt ’67 and Deborah Roitman Venator ’70; brother-in-law Richard Holt ’67; and two nephews, including Alexander Holt ’01.

 

Jun, 2020

John A. Mohler ’63, of Tucson, Ariz.; Dec. 28, of Parkinson’s disease. He worked in banking and radio prior to becoming a corrections program officer and teaching college courses with Cochise College and at the Correctional Officer Training Academy. He volunteered with Prison Ministries and retired after more than 20 years with the Arizona Department of Corrections. He is survived by his wife, Becky; seven children; and 19 grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

George W. Davidson III ’63, of Barrington, R.I.; Oct. 20. He was a veteran captain of the U.S. Marine Corps and served in Vietnam. He is survived by two sisters and eight nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2020

James L. Abernathy ’63, of New York City; Nov. 17, of complications related to the treatment of lymphoma. He held senior communications roles at ABC, CBS, and Warner Communications prior to founding Abernathy MacGregor in 1984, which grew to be a leading strategic and financial communications agency. Always willing to help those struggling with and recovering from alcoholism, and as director of The Caron Foundation, he helped to establish an alcohol and drug treatment program in the former Soviet Union in 1988 and in 1994 assisted in introducing that same program in Cuba. He also served as an overseer of the Brown University School of Medicine, a trustee emeritus of the Hackley School, a founder of Americans for Humanitarian Trade with Cuba, a member of the board of directors of The Caron Foundation, chairman of Caron New York, director of The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, and a former director of Episcopal Charities. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife, Kevin; three daughters, including Nell ’04, and their spouses; four grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Jan, 2020

Carol Van McGee ’63, of Dexter, Mich.; Aug. 30; As a career navy officer’s wife, she moved frequently. She was an English Language Arts assistant and executive assistant to a real estate firm vice president. She was involved with the Girl Scouts of America and played soccer for 10 years in an adult women’s league. She enjoyed raising a family, quilting, and antiquing. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’63; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Nov, 2019

Joel S. Silverberg ’63, ’70 ScM, ’76 PhD, of Providence; Aug. 11, of lymphoma. After earning degrees in music, electrical engineering, and biomedical engineering, he received a postdoctoral certificate from the Institute for Retraining in Computer Science and held faculty positions at Vassar College, Boston University, Roger Williams University, and Brown. In retirement he pursued his long-standing fascination for navigational mathematics and the practical mathematics of the 17th and 18th centuries, writing several papers and conference presentations. He enjoyed singing and playing several instruments. He was an avid sailor and liked birding. He is survived by his wife, Patricia Brennan ’75; a daughter; a sister; and a niece and nephew.

 

Nov, 2019

Robert J. Rosen ’63, of El Paso, Tex.; July 13. He was a physician who served in Vietnam and later opened a private practice in El Paso that continued until 2008. He was involved in his community and served on the executive boards of the Jewish Community Foundation, Impact, Pro-Musica, and Chai Manor; was past president of Temple Mt. Sinai; and was a founder of El Paso’s first hospice. He enjoyed watching and playing all sports, playing poker, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Jane; daughter Brooke  ’96; son Andrew ’92 and his wife; five grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.
 

 

Nov, 2019

Judith Neal Murray ’63, of Waban, Mass.; Aug. 2, of cancer. She had a 50+ year career teaching at various institutions, including Newton High School, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and at Harvard. At Brown she was valedictorian of Pembroke, class president from 2004 to 2009, and a class marshal for her 45th reunion. She was an active alum and enjoyed planning mini-reunions for her class. She was a docent at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and always enjoyed learning. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Charlie; two daughters, including Stephanie Nicolas ’94; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; six grandchildren; brother Ken Neal ’66; and nephew Edmond A. Neal III ’76.

Nov, 2019

John W. Kaufmann ’63, of Wellesley Hills, Mass.; Aug. 10. He graduated from Boston College Law School and specialized in civil litigation. He was a member of the Unitarian Universalist Society of Wellesley Hills and sang in their choir. He enjoyed spending time at his second home on the Cape, and was a fan of Brown football, the New England Patriots, and the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Katherine; a daughter and her spouse; a son and his spouse; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2019

Robert M. Adams ’63, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Apr. 29. He served in the U.S. Army and then earned an MBA from the Wharton School of Business. He started his career at Chase Manhattan Bank and in 1972 joined Loeb, Rhoades & Co. In 1977 he moved to EF Hutton overseeing financial institution transactions and the development of tax exempt mortgage revenue bonds. In 1984 he cofounded Adams Cohen & Associates and Adams Cohen Securities. He later worked with Tower Realty Trust; Keefe, Bruyette & Woods; and BAH Holdings, LLC. He enjoyed competitive sailing and downhill skiing. He is survived by his wife, Anita; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two stepchildren; two step-grandchildren; a niece; and a nephew.

 

Jul, 2019

Gordon R. Weihmiller ’63, of Annandale, Va.; Mar. 27, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired U.S. Navy lieutenant commander, naval weapons systems professional, and foreign policy expert. He served in Vietnam and later was a NROTC instructor at Princeton. He served in the Office of the Chief of Staff of the Defense Intelligence Agency and subsequently served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Upon his retirement from the navy he was a doctoral candidate at Georgetown Univ., where its Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at its School of Foreign Service engaged him to examine Cold War diplomacy at summit meetings. His analysis, U.S.-Soviet Summits, was co-published by the Institute and the University Press of America in 1986 with a follow up study published in 1987. He was the recipient of numerous medals of honor and enjoyed volunteering in his community and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two sons and their spouses; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

V. Annette Grant ’63, of Housatonic, Mass., formerly of New York City; Feb. 1. She was a book reviewer and general cultural reporter for Newsweek, a feature writer for Mademoiselle magazine, and in 1971 joined Seventeen as a features editor. In 1977 she joined the New York Times, where she was editor of the Living Section, which emphasized food, cooking, style, and entertainment. She resided in the Berkshires for the past 25 years and was a generous supporter of the arts and local agriculture. She is survived by her husband, Jonathan Baumbach, and four stepchildren, including Nico Baumbach ’98.

 

Jul, 2019

John W. Arata Jr. ’63, of Marblehead, Mass.; Feb. 5. After receiving his law degree from Boston University, he served as a legislative attorney for the Federal Aviation Administration in Washington, D.C., and was appointed to the Massport Board of Directors in 1983. He practiced law in Boston for more than 30 years, primarily as an environmental attorney, and was a founding partner at Perkins, Smith, Arata & Howard. In 1997 he moved to D.C. to become president of a specialized environmental risk management consulting firm at Howrey & Simon. He then directed national business development at AIG Environmental. In recent years he was the founder and president of Carbon Finance Strategies, LLC, and enjoyed being a developer of large solar installations. At Brown he was a member of the varsity football team and the club lacrosse team. He enjoyed jazz music, history, and his Sicilian heritage. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and three grandsons.

 

May, 2019

John Ford Noonan ’63, of Englewood, N.J., formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Dec. 16, of heart failure. For two years he taught Latin and English and was a basketball coach at Buckley Country Day School in Roslyn, L.I., during which time he began writing plays. His first play, The Year Boston Won the Pennant, was staged in 1969 at Lincoln Center. Productions that followed included Older People (1972) and Getting Through the Night (1976), but it was A Coupla White Chicks, produced in 1980 and starring Eileen Brennan and Susan Sarandon, that became his biggest hit. The play ran for four years, giving opportunity to other actresses, including JoBeth Williams ’70. Later, in Some Men Need Help, he addressed chemical addiction and subsequently adapted it for PBS American Playhouse in 1985. He occasionally wrote for television and in 1984 shared an Emmy Award with Tom Fontana and John Masius for outstanding writing in a drama series for an episode of St. Elsewhere called “The Women.” He continued to be staged regularly into the 1990s and in Talking Things Over With Chekhov (1990), he played one of the roles himself opposite Diane Salinger in an Actor’s Playhouse production in New York. In addition to writing numerous plays and screenplays, he would periodically be seen on screen in such films as Adventures in Babysitting, Flirting With Disaster, and My Divorce. He was a two-time Obie Award winner and received the New York Drama Desk Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. He is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

May, 2019

Elizabeth Walker Rotter ’63, of San Francisco; Nov. 26. She was a self-employed writer. In 1976 her first novel, a Regency romance, was published. She continued to write more than 30 Regency and contemporary romances. In 1998 she started e-book publishing with Belgrave House and added a second web address, Regency Reads, a year later. The sites continue under the management of her son and daughter-in-law. She volunteered for more than 20 years at UCSF and was a devoted feminist and progressive. She enjoyed traveling the world. She is survived by her husband, Paul; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and a son-in-law. 

May, 2019

Marc S. Levine ’63, of Hartford, Conn.; Oct. 16, after a long illness. He received a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, where he was associate editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. He left general practice in 1972 to specialize in real estate and founded Marc S. Levine Real Estate Interests. He expanded the availability of affordable housing in Hartford, worked on revitalizing downtown Hartford, created ArtSpace Hartford, and restored the classic Sage Allen building. He enjoyed spending time with family and is survived by his wife, Tammy; five children and stepchildren, including son Gregory ’90 and daughter Abby Levine ’93; and nine grandchildren.

May, 2019

John G.C. Banks ’63, of Westwood, Mass.; Dec. 16, from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. He worked as a reporter and photographer for Mansfield News, then as a television reporter for the NBC affiliate. Later he became the anchor of the 6 pm news, followed by the position of news director. In 1982 he began his 25-year career as a stockbroker with Tucker, Anthony & R.L. Day. He served on several boards, including the Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse Stage and the Red Cross. He was a former member of the Jabberwocks and continued to sing in choirs after graduation. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife, Julia; a daughter and her husband; a son and his wife; five grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Nov, 2018

Sally Jordan ’63, of Austin, Tex., formerly of Raymond, Me.; June 29. She worked at the Sloan School of Management at MIT, where she assisted in the publication of the Industrial Management Review. Later she joined Arthur D. Little Consultants in Cambridge, where she supported the Energy Group staff. In 1975 she moved to Texas and was an office manager and personnel administrator at Boone Chapman Insurance. She later became a legal assistant and worked at several firms before retirement. She enjoyed gardening and is survived by a brother, Mark H. Jordan ’68, and his partner, Margaret Thumm; a nephew; and several cousins.

 

Nov, 2018

R. Elton Duffy ’63, of Barre, Vt., formerly of Hartford, Conn.; June 2. He worked for the Hartford Insurance Group and moved to Barre as its Vermont agent in 1969. Years later he became a partner in the Berg, Carmolli & Kent Insurance Agency in Barre. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle, boating, water and snow skiing, snowmobiling, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Kate; two children and their spouses; and five grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2018

Geoffrey N. Burnham ’63, of New Bern, N.C., formerly of Burlington, Vt.; July 1. He taught for 33 years at St. Michael’s College in Colchester, Vt. In retirement he moved to New Bern. He is survived by a brother, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018

William R. Caroselli ’63, of Pittsburgh; May 17. He was the founding member of the Caroselli, Beachler & Coleman law firm in Pittsburgh. He has been listed in the Best Lawyers in America and Pennsylvania Super Lawyers. He was a member of the Allegheny County (Pennsylvania) and American Bar Associations. He served as president of the Allegheny County Academy of Trial Lawyers and the Pennsylvania Assoc. for Justice. He was chairman of the Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and elected a 1989 Fellow in the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. He is survived by his wife, Dusty; two daughters; two sons; and a grandchild.

 

Jul, 2018

Susan Humphreys Schappell ’63, of Holmdel, N.J.; Jan. 20. She worked at Bell Laboratories in Whippany, N.J., for many years and retired in 2001 as district manager at AT&T in Piscataway, N.J. She is survived by two daughters, four grandchildren, two sisters, and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Charles R. Warner ’63, of Minneapolis; Nov. 8. He worked at the U.S. Housing and Urban Development office in Chicago for two years before moving to the Minneapolis HUD office. Active in providing affordable housing in Minneapolis for more than four decades, he was the founder of Home Line, a statewide hotline for tenants dealing with landlord troubles that received thousands of calls over its 25 years in service. He also founded the Minnesota Housing Partnership, a nonprofit that worked for 30 years to grow and finance affordable housing statewide. In 1973 he was instrumental in organizing tenants behind the Minnesota Supreme Court decision permitting tenants to withhold rent if landlords failed to keep buildings up to code. After leaving HUD in the 1980s, he organized Minnesota’s major effort to preserve federally subsidized housing complexes. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed woodworking.

Feb, 2018

John H. Barry ’63, of Beaufort, S.C.; Aug. 17. He worked for AT&T in various positions and locations until becoming a human resources executive. He enjoyed model trains and is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, and a brother.

Feb, 2018

Donald W. Mischke ’63, of Raymond, N.H.; Sept. 18. He was a retired manager of Midas Muffler shops in Seabrook, N.H.; Rochester, N.Y.; and Newburyport, Mass., and was former head of Penacook Energy in Penacook, N.H. He is survived by three children.

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