Obituaries
— GS Class of 1965

Apr, 2022

Arthur C. Watterson Jr. ’65 PhD, of Nashua, N.H.; Sept. 2. He was professor of chemistry at UMass Lowell, where he also served as department chair and acting dean of the college of arts and sciences. He held multiple patents and published numerous papers detailing his study of polymers. He enjoyed the arts and was a fan of classical music, the ballet, and the Museum of Fine Arts. He sang in the choir at Nashua’s First Congregational Church for many years. He also enjoyed photography, mystery novels, crossword puzzles, and the Boston Celtics. He is survived by three sons and their spouses, eight grandchildren, a brother, two sisters-in-law, and nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022

Anne MacPherson Lindgren ’65 AM, of New York City; Oct. 31. She was passionate about housing and worked on both the public and private side, including with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. She was active with several nonprofits and served on the boards of Settlement Housing Fund and Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center. She enjoyed attending the opera and walking her dog through Central Park. She is survived by three children and seven grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022

Brian Hunt ’65 ScM, ’67 PhD, of Costa Mesa, Calif.; Mar. 31. After two years of service in the Royal Air Force and completing a degree in engineering at Cambridge University, he moved his family to Rhode Island on a Fulbright Scholarship. Upon the completion of two degrees at Brown, he traveled the U.S. for seven weeks and then returned to England and took a post as a lecturer at the University of Bristol. In 1979 he changed career paths and returned to the U.S. to join Northrop Corp. He left Northrop briefly for a position as chairman of the aerospace engineering department at the University of Maryland (1990-1992) only to return to Northrop, retiring from there in 2000 as vice president of engineering and technology. He did work as a consultant for an additional 10 years. Brown presented him with an engineering alumni medal in 1997. He is survived by his wife, Julia; a daughter; a son; and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2022

Joseph F. Ballou ’65 ScM, of Williamstown, Mass., formerly of Eden, Md.; Sept. 27. During his career in the Navy he earned the rank of commander. He served in the Vietnam War aboard the USS Torsk—which is now a museum in Baltimore—the USS Bacuna, and the USS Mount Katmai. On land his duties included time at the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Military Sealift Command. After retiring from the Navy in 1979, he continued to work for the U.S. Government as a civilian and then for Computer Sciences Corp. He fully retired in 2000 and settled in Eden. He was involved in his community in a variety of capacities and continued to take education classes. He enjoyed gardening and genealogy. He is survived by three children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2022

Susan Adler Kaplan ’58, ’65 MAT, of Providence, R.I.; Oct. 30. After graduating in 1958, she moved to New York. One year later, she returned to Providence to marry, continue her education, and work as a manager/secretary in the theater arts department. After a year and a half of managing work, she began to teach English at Classical High School, which she did for 28 years before moving into administration. She held various positions with Rhode Island Writing Assessment, Rhode Island Writing Project, and Blackstone Academy. Her love for teaching extended to roles as an adjunct professor at Providence College and Roger Williams University; she also did consulting in New York and California, and in Egypt with the Ministry of Education. She remained affiliated with Brown as a trustee, a trustee emerita, and chair of the Corporation emeritus executive committee. She chaired 100 Years of Women at Brown and served as the associate chair of Brown’s Advisory Council on Relations with Tougaloo College. She also chaired the Ogden Lectures on International Affairs. Her honors included an Outstanding Teacher Educator Award, a Brown Bear, an Ittleson Award, and being voted Teacher of the Year by Good Morning America. She was a proud supporter of Trinity Repertory Company in honor of her late husband, who was a founding member. She also served on the boards of Temple Beth-El and Miriam Hospital. She is survived by a granddaughter, a sister, and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022

Ernest C. Ilgenfritz ’65 ScM, of Easton, Md.; Aug. 22. He taught mathematics at Baltimore Polytechnic High School and Towson University, where he also served as department chairman. He ran in 13 Maryland marathons. He also enjoyed boating, fishing, crabbing, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn. 

 

Aug, 2021

Henry Helenek ’65 ScM, ’71 PhD, of Milwaukee; Mar. 7. He was a geology and chemistry professor at Bradley University. He enjoyed the symphony and theater, reading and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, a niece, and a nephew.

Aug, 2021

Lyle D. Baker ’65 MAT, of Topeka, Kans.; Mar. 24. He served in the U.S. Air Force, where he trained as a pilot. After military service, he taught high school in Clear Lake, Iowa, and junior college in Mason City, Iowa. He was a science and math coordinator for the Fort Dodge Public School system. In 1987, he began teaching at Washburn University in Topeka and with the Department of Education and the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, where he stayed until his retirement. He enjoyed photography, genealogy, hiking, traveling, and bluegrass music and its history. He is survived by three children and their spouses, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister-in-law.

Aug, 2021

Kenneth V. Anderson Jr. ’63 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Brandon, Fla.; Feb. 24. He was an educator and researcher. He worked at Emory University in Atlanta as an associate professor and then full professor from 1966 to 1979. He was chairman of anatomy and professor of neurosurgery research at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss. from 1979 to 1984. He was the recipient of the Research Scientist Development Award from the National Institute of Mental Health and a member of many professional associations. He published more than 60 research papers. Later he worked as a teacher, head track coach, and then headmaster of Brandon Academy. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter; and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2021

Leonard P. Fletcher ’61 AM, ’65 PhD, of Guelph, Ontario, Canada; Mar. 22. He was recruited by the University of Waterloo in 1965, becoming the fourth faculty member of the economics department. He taught at Waterloo for nearly three decades, retiring in 1994. He founded the Caribbean Canadian Investment Club in 1974. Additionally, he was a founding member of the K-W Caribbean Canadian Cultural Association. He is survived by his wife, Hilda; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021

Elizabeth Ballantine Gardner ’64 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Wellesley, Mass.; Dec. 1. She taught at Queens College in Flushing, N.Y., and Wellesley College before settling into a 50-year career teaching at Pine Manor College, where she also chaired the science department. She endowed a wildlife viewing site at J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida and established a scholarship for nurse practitioners at Newton Wellesley Hospital. Her interest in her mother’s family’s well-documented history led her to oversee the distribution of family papers, objects, and photographs to institutions where they could be used for research by the public. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2021

M. Gene Taylor ’65 ScM, ’68 PhD, of Kingston, Pa.; June 6, after a lengthy battle with Parkinson’s disease and COVID-19. He was long employed as a physics professor at Bloomsburg University (Pa.) and was previously a physics professor at the American University in Cairo and Wilkes University (Pa.). He held a pilot’s license and was a member of the Civil Air Patrol. He avidly followed the stock market and enjoyed traveling with his family around the world, especially to Egypt. He also enjoyed Ohio State University football, NASCAR, skeet shooting, tinkering with his cars and computers, and following the weather. He is survived by his wife, Wagiha Abdel-Gawad Taylor ’62 AM; three daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and a sister.

Jan, 2021

Gilbert H. Smith ’63 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Bethesda; July 6, of pancreatic cancer. He joined the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute as a fellow in the viral biology branch in 1965 and became senior investigator in the laboratory of biology in 1970. He most recently served as senior investigator in the basic research laboratory and head of the mammary stem cell biology section. In 2005, he received the National Institutes of Health Merit award. Gil was also a two-time nominee for the E.B. Wilson Medal, the highest award from the American Society for Cell Biology, and in 2008 was a finalist for the Nobel Prize for medicine. He retired June 30, 2020, and was named an NIH Scientist Emeritus. Gil is considered a pioneer in the biology of mammary/breast cancer and stem cells involved in mammary development and cancer. He lectured across the globe and authored 180 research publications while serving on several editorial boards and as scientific advisor for the Childhood Brain Tumor Foundation. While at NCI, he devoted his time serving as a mentor to hundreds of junior scientists around the world. He received the NCI Mentor Merit Award in 2003 and the NCI Outstanding Mentor Award in 2019. In addition to his brilliant scientific career, Gil was a well-respected soccer coach and youth soccer advocate in Northern Virginia, and one of several authors of the original McLean Youth Soccer bylaws. He was also a staff coach for the Virginia Olympic Development Program at the district and state levels from 1983-1990. He is survived by five children, eight grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

Nov, 2020

Bobby Z. Workman ’65 MAT, of Murray, Ky.; Apr. 3, after battling Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. He taught math and chemistry in Indiana before earning his master’s degree and entering the paper industry. He worked at Mead Paper (N.C.), then at Bowater (S.C.), and retired in 1998 from Weyerhaeuser (Wash.). He was a member of Epsilon-Lambda Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha.

Nov, 2020

John M. Howard ’65 MAT (see ’59).

Sep, 2020

John L. Mothershead III ’65 MAT, of Pasa-dena, Calif.; Mar. 1. He taught at Chadwick School, Flintridge Prep, and several Pasadena-area schools prior to joining San Marino’s Southwestern Academy, where he taught and served as dean of students for 45 years. He was president of the Rotary Club of San Marino, California, and involved with the effort to eradicate the polio virus by traveling with the Rotary teams for national inoculation days. He is survived by his wife, Therese, and a son.

Jun, 2020

Lawrence A. Retallick ’65 ScM, of Mayfield, Heights, Ohio; Jan. 1. He taught at both the college and high school level, ultimately running several schools for at-risk youth for the Urban League of Cleveland. He served for many years as the assistant executive director of the Cleveland Urban League, finishing his professional career with the United Way of Greater Cleveland. He was an avid sports fan and a gun hobbyist and enjoyed assembling replica model cars. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a sister, and nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019

Robert G. Goulet ’65 AM, ’69 PhD, of Brockton, Mass.; Dec. 29. He began his teaching career at Stonehill College in 1968 and continued there as a professor of English and film studies for 44 years. In addition to teaching, he initiated a faculty theater at Stonehill, where he produced and directed. Stonehill awarded him the Louise F. Hegarty Excellence in Teaching Award in 2002. In retirement he continued to work with students through the Boston Seminar Series. He is survived by a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and four nieces.

 

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