Obituaries
— Class of 1960

Nov, 2019

Frank A. Spellman III ’60, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; May 23. He was retired from IBM and enjoyed a good book, watching sports, and bowling. He was proud to have bowled a perfect game of 300 in 1980. He is survived by a sister-in-law and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019

William S. Clarke III ’60, of Princeton, N.J.; Aug. 21, 2018. He practiced corporate law for 50 years and was a philanthropist in land preservation, environmental issues, and animal protection. He was past commodore and trustee of the Barnegat Light Yacht Club and an active member of the International Lightning Class Assoc., the Catboat Assoc., the Steam Automobile Club of America, and the Nassau Club. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece and nephew.

 

Sep, 2019

Richard M. Galkin ’60, of Boca Raton, Fla.; Apr. 18, after a long illness. He oversaw Time Inc.’s entry into ownership of cable systems in the 1960s, including Sterling Manhattan Cable Television, where he served as president during the formation of HBO. After leaving Time Inc., he established the cable franchises for Providence, North Providence, and Pawtucket, R.I. He maintained an ownership position until its sale to Times-Mirror Corp. in 1985. He was instrumental in the creation and management of Comsat’s disruptive new venture Satellite Television Corp. For more than 30 years he served on the board of trustees and directors of The Royce Funds, as well as being chairman of its audit committee. In semi-retirement, he served as chairman of the City of Boca Raton Telecommunications Advisory Board for nearly 20 years and as president of the Boca Raton Marina Yacht Club. He established a scholarship at Brown in his father’s name, the Joseph Galkin 1931 Family Scholarship. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a brother; and three nephews, including Justin Sanders ’04.
 

 

Sep, 2019

Robert E. Casey ’60, of Stonington, Conn.; Apr. 13. He worked at Bankers Trust for one year and then served, until 1964, in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of lieutenant. After obtaining his MBA from Rutgers, he worked as a CPA for Lybrand in Hartford and San Francisco until 1970, when he moved to work as vice president and controller for National Life in Montpelier, Vt. In 1978 he moved to Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company in Hartford, where he attained the role of senior vice president and retired in 1994. He was active in his community and served on several boards. He enjoyed playing bridge, golf and tennis. He is survived by his companion, Neeltje Udo; two sons and daughters-in-law; a stepson; three grandsons; five nephews, a niece; and a sister.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Carl A. Wattenberg Jr. ’60, of St. Louis, Mo.; Mar. 27. He was senior vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary at Mark Twain Bancshares for 24 years. He was the director of several national and state chartered banks over the course of his career. He also served as director and general counsel for the St. Louis Jr. Chamber of Commerce, with the Jaycees, and as treasurer of Laumeier Sculpture Park. After retiring from banking, he was of counsel with the law firm of Kodner Watkins, as well as advisory director for Citadel Trust Services. He served in the U.S. Army as an intelligence officer and later in the U.S. Navy as a JAG for seven years. He enjoyed gardening, investing, and world travel. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two children; three stepchildren; and 10 grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

John A. Tisdale ’60, of Peabody, Mass.; Feb. 18. He was a junior engineer at Block Engineering; he matriculated to Bell & Howell Communications as a senior engineer in instrumentation; moved to RCA, which became General Electric; and then to Martin Marietta, where he was a test production engineer. He retired in 1994. He enjoyed singing as a part of the Protestant choir at Brooksby Village, served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, and was a member of the Glacier Society. He also served as a historical guide at the Buckman Tavern in Lexington and was an avid collector and procurer of HO scale railroading. He enjoyed hiking, canoeing, sailing, history, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Thelma; siblings; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

May, 2019

Robert E. Nadeau ’60, of Little Compton, R.I.; Dec. 26. After graduating from Tufts Medical School and completing his residency at Dartmouth, he served as a captain and general internist in the U.S. Air Force from 1966 to 1969 stationed in Spangdahlem, Germany. He further trained in psychiatry at the University of Rochester (N.Y.), where he remained as associate clinical professor of psychiatry. He continued in private practice and teaching until retiring in 2009. He was a member of the American Psychiatric Assoc. and at Brown was a member of the varsity golf team and Delta Upsilon. He enjoyed driving his tractor and working in his woodshop. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Tillinghast Nadeau ’61; four children and their spouses, including Elizabeth Nadeau ’83, Dana Nadeau ’85, and Robert Nadeau ’96; eight grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019

Alan C. Laymon ’60, of Mantoloking, N.J.; Jan. 29. He had a career in advertising media sales at Young & Rubicam and later at CBS Sports. While at Brown he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and began playing bridge and competing in many tournaments. He served on the Mantoloking Borough Council for 10 years and enjoyed swimming and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; and four grandchildren.

May, 2019

Peter Kallas ’60, of Wilmington, N.C.; Jan. 12. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps as a captain at the Communications School in Camp Pendleton, Calif., he began a career in international banking, retiring as vice president of the Bank of New England in Boston. He traveled to more than 40 countries during 26 years in the industry and provided consulting services through the International Executive Service Corps to banks in Russia in 1993. While living in Colorado he served on the Denver World Affairs Council and the Institute for International Education Fulbright scholarship committee  and presented at the Aspen Institute and University of Colorado on world affairs. While living in Plattsburgh, N.Y., he volunteered with Friends of Point Au Roche and Kiwanis International and was a literacy volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Mara; three children; seven grandchildren; and wo brothers.

May, 2019

Donne Hansen Forrest ’60, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Jan. 7. She worked in publishing for more than 40 years. She retired as director of subsidiary rights for Penguin Random House in 2015. She is survived by two sons; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a sister.

May, 2019

James G. Conzelman Jr. ’60, of Wilton, Conn., formerly of St. Louis, Mo. Jan. 7. He worked in various positions over the course of his career, including project specialist with First National Bank of St. Louis, vice president of institutional sales at the brokerage firm of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, vice president of the US–USSR Trade and Economic Council, and executive director of the Association of Executive Recruiting Consultants. In early 2000 he began volunteering at the Bridgeport Rescue Mission and the Jewish Home for the Elderly of Fairfield County, and from 2006 to 2016 he volunteered at the Connecticut Hospice in Branford, Conn. He was an accomplished athlete and coached his grandsons’ youth football program. He also enjoyed cooking and music. He is survived by three children and eight grandchildren.

Mar, 2019

Jerry Rhine ’60, of Greenwich, Conn.; Aug. 12, after a long illness. He was a commercial real estate broker and is survived by his wife, Jennifer; a daughter; a son; and a brother, Donald ’57.

 

Mar, 2019

Robert W. McCourt ’60, of Short Hills, N.J.; Oct. 26. He worked for 43 years in various management positions at Public Service Electric & Gas Co. in Elizabeth, N.J., planning the electrical infrastructure of Newark Liberty International Airport and the redevelopment of Liberty State Park and Ellis Island. He specialized in electromagnetic field issues management, environment, health, and safety concerns. He provided expert advice on electromagnetic field issues to the general public and media and was a proud member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He worked to raise funds for various international Catholic organizations, churches, and schools. He also enjoyed woodworking, gardening, and reading, especially books about World War II by Samuel Eliot Morison. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019

James M. Bower ’60, of Providence; Oct. 16. He was an educator for more than 50 years, including a year at Colegio Franklin Delano Roosevelt, The American School of Lima, Peru. For several years he served as head of charter schools throughout Massachusetts and for 15 years was headmaster of Dedham Country Day School. His career concluded with a 15-year involvement with The San Miguel School in Providence, where he taught English and geography, was director of admissions, and coached baseball and chess. He served on the boards of both the Genesis Center and Hamilton House in Providence, and Family Service of Rhode Island. He enjoyed spending summers at his house in Maine with family and friends, sailing, and playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother, Richard ’56, and nieces Amy Bower ’81, Sally Maenner ’84, and Emily Maenner ’16.

 

Mar, 2019

Ann Erpenbeck Bottelli ’60 of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Summit and Newark, N.J.; Aug. 21. She was an accounting director at Prudential Insurance in Newark. She traveled widely for Prudential sharing accounting principles with regulators and industry colleagues. She also worked independently as a graphic designer developing her own business as a practicing artist and calligrapher while raising a family in Summit. She was a longtime volunteer with the Junior League of Summit and served on the board of directors for the New Jersey Center for the Visual Arts. She enjoyed playing tennis and trail walking. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a daughter; three sons; and two daughters-in-law.
 

 

Jan, 2019

Frederic M. Alper ’60, of Boston; Aug. 9, after a long illness. He was president and later chairman of Morris Alper, Inc., one of the largest food brokerage companies in the country, founded by his grandfather. Before his tenure at Morris Alper, he worked in the supermarket business in Latin America. After retiring from Morris Alper at age 55, he became a professor of entrepreneurial studies at Babson College. He was active in Brown affairs, beginning as an alumni interviewer in 1986 and progressively moved into service roles in support of his class fundraising; he was also a 1995 Class Marshal, a Swearer Center volunteer, and performed a wide range of services as a Trustee and member of the Brown Corporation from 1995 to 2001. Most recently he was a member of the President’s Leadership Council assigned to an ad-hoc committee of the Brown Corporation, where he produced the Alper Report, which led to the establishment of a need-blind admission policy at Brown. The Alper Family National Scholarship that was originally started by the late David Alper ’30 continued with the commitment of Fred and his brother Daniel ’63 to provide financial aid to students. Over the course of his career he sat on several boards, was a generous donor to multiple political and charitable causes, and was the recipient of numerous recognitions. He enjoyed classical music and played tennis. He is survived by his wife, Donna; two sons, including Jeremy ’95; two daughters-in-law; a stepdaughter; four grandchildren; a sister; two brothers, including Daniel ’63; and several nieces and nephews, including Robin Candler ’97, McKaile Alper ’95 and Ty Alper ’95. 

Jan, 2019

Francis C. Spicola ’60, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Aug. 3. He was a mechanical engineer who began his career at Pratt-Whitney before starting a 40-year career at the U.S. Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Newport. He enjoyed cooking, photography, and traveling the world. He is survived by five children and four grandchildren.

 

Jan, 2019

Linda Woodworth Keado ’60, of Dallas, formerly of Troy, N.Y.; Aug. 1. She taught social studies and was also a school librarian at Lisha Kill Middle School in Colonie, N.Y. She later was a volunteer tutor and mentor at Stults Road Elementary School in Dallas. She was involved in her local church and enjoyed playing tennis. She is survived by three daughters and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019

Stephen A Kanter ’60, of Pasadena, Calif.; Sept. 5. After serving with the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps, he practiced medicine, specializing in diagnostic radiology with expertise in angiography and interventional radiology. He practiced for more than 40 years in academic, private practice, health maintenance, and finally more than 20 years with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. He had a strong commitment to nonprofit organizations and served on many boards, including Coleman Chamber Music Assoc., the Historical Society of Southern California, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Pacific Asia Museum, and the Pasadena Conservatory of Music. He is survived by a brother.

 

Jan, 2019

Edward A. Forrest ’60, of Hilton Head Island, S.C., formerly of West Hempstead, N.Y.; Sept. 5, following complications of surgery. Before retiring in 2001 and moving to Hilton Head, he worked as a stockbroker and was a member of the Professional Ski Instructors of America, instructing disabled skiers at Windham Mountain in the Catskill Mountains. He was active in South Carolina community activities and enjoyed traveling and sailing. He is survived by his wife, Eileen; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and four nephews.

 

Sep, 2018

Nail M. Senozan ’60, of Long Beach, Calif.; Apr. 29. He was a chemistry professor and researcher at Cal State Long Beach, where he was named University Outstanding Professor. He was appointed chair of the chemistry department in 1996 and served in this capacity until his retirement in 2007. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Diane.

 

Sep, 2018

Gordon E. Wood ’60, of Danvers, Mass.; Apr. 7. For three years he was the English department chairman at Timberlane Regional High School in Plaistow, N.H. In 1972 he was appointed the coordinator of Language Arts for the Melrose Junior and Senior High Schools. He retired from secondary education in 2001. In addition, he was an adjunct professor in English at Middlesex Community College in both Lowell and Bedford, Mass., for 23 years and taught English composition and literature at North Shore and Northern Essex Community Colleges. He enjoyed following the Red Sox, reading, dancing, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons and their wives; two step-daughters; and three grandsons.

 

Sep, 2018

John D. Ross ’60, of West Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 8. He had a career in the Boston financial district, did nonprofit management consulting, and, in retirement, environmental stewardship as past chair of the board of Buzzards Bay Coalition, as well as serving as a board member at Cape Cod Maritime Museum. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; two sons; and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2018

Theodore C. Anderson Jr. ’60, of Conway, S.C.; Apr. 20. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and later in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves for nine years, discharged with the rank of captain. He was a buyer for Bloomingdale’s and Allied stores, both in New York. He also owned and operated Ted’s East End Market in Southampton, N.Y., for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Diane; four children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

 

Jul, 2018

James C. Butler III ’60, of Greenbelt, Md., formerly of Syracuse, N.Y.; Feb. 9, after a brief illness. He was president of the family business, Syracuse Pottery, for many years prior to moving to Maryland. He enjoyed fishing, bowling, and boating. He is survived by a daughter, Janet Butler Berry ’91; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

May, 2018

Fred A. Windover ’60, of Boston; Dec. 4. He worked briefly in Florida before joining Sprague Electric in Lexington, Mass., in 1967 as an attorney. He was general counsel and acting vice president with Sprague through several transitions. He retired in 2009 from Allegro Microsystems in Worcester, Mass. He served the boards of the Williamstown Theater Festival, North Adams Hospital, the Massachusetts College of the Liberal Arts, and the Worcester Art Museum. He was a member of the Massachusetts Council for the Arts. He is survived by his wife, Joan; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; eight grandchildren; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Katherine Guthrie Bergen ’60, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Dec. 18. She worked briefly as a writer and editor in New York City and was a staff member on Nelson Rockefeller’s 1964 campaign. She was involved in Port Washington community affairs, including the Science Museum, the Community Chest, and the Landmark on Main Street. She enjoyed tennis, bridge, Scrabble, and reading. She is survived by her husband, G.S. Peter Bergen; three daughters; and four grandchildren.

 

Feb, 2018

Bruce C. Barton ’60, of Littleton, Colo.; Aug. 20, of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; a daughter; two stepchildren; and three grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Caroline King Barnard Hall ’60, ’66 AM, ’73 PhD, of Moon Township, Pa.; July 13. She was associate professor emerita of English and Women’s Studies at Penn State. She also taught at Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., the Univ. of New Orleans, Tulane Univ., Louisiana State Univ., Loyola of New Orleans, and Xavier Univ. of New Orleans. She was awarded senior Fulbright lectureships at the Univ. of Klagenfurt (Austria), the Univ. of Copenhagen, the Free Univ. of West Berlin, and the Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). She was an accomplished cellist and enjoyed field hockey, tennis, golf, and skiing. She is survived by her husband, John Hall; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018

Edwin W. Hansen ’60, of North Andover, Mass.; Aug. 19. He served in the U.S. Navy before beginning a career at IBM. He later was the director of research at the Boston Co. and then founder and managing director of Harbor Capital Management in Boston. He was a trustee of Stevens Memorial Library in North Andover and enjoyed athletics, traveling with family, and playing golf and bridge. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; two daughters; his mother; and a brother.

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