Obituaries
— Class of 1976

Jan, 2022

George C. Scott ’76, of Malvern, Pa.; July 29. He spent 15 years as a member of the technical staff at AT&T and was an assistant professor at Rider University for 14 years, a senior manager at AstraZeneca for 11 years, an assistant professor at Temple University College of Public Health, and a lecturer in analytics at Northeastern University. He had a private pilot license and certification in scuba diving. He volunteered interviewing prospective students for Brown and enjoyed woodworking, traveling, and playing trivia games. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, nieces and nephews, and his former wife, Julia Scott. 

Jan, 2022

John W. McEvoy Jr. ’76 of Belmont, Mass.; Aug. 25. While at Brown he played football and baseball and was captain of the varsity baseball team. After Brown, he continued to play baseball in the Intercity Amateur League for the next 18 years. He graduated from Suffolk Law School in 1979 and was appointed an assistant Middlesex District Attorney. He served in that capacity for 42 years. During his tenure, he was a supervisor for each of the three regions within the Middlesex DA’s office; as chief of homicide for more than 20 years and as first assistant district attorney for three consecutive administrations. One of his greatest satisfactions was seeing the continued accomplishments of the many talented dedicated assistant district attorneys whom he helped train. He remained involved with sports and his community, coaching several youth teams. He is survived by his wife, M. Jane Walsh; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; and two sisters. 

Aug, 2021

Beth Hyams ’76, of Portland, Ore.; Mar. 13, of cancer. For more than two decades she was the voice of public radio on Oregon Public Broadcasting. She began her career as a reporter and anchor at Pacifica radio KPFA in Berkeley. In 1989, after moving to Portland, she was a volunteer coordinator at community radio station KBOO and was hired at OPB in 1993. She joined OPB as morning anchor before settling in at All Things Considered. She retired from the air, remaining as editor and focusing on training and development. A lifelong dancer, she danced with the African dance communities in San Francisco and in Portland. She also liked hiking and gardening. She is survived by her wife, L.C. Hansen; a stepson; a sister; a sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021

Claude Cazzulino ’76, of Pasadena, Calif.; Feb. 26. After Brown, he was a cub reporter for the Daily Record in New Jersey. In 1984, he graduated from Northeastern University School of Law in Boston, where he studied labor law. He moved to Los Angeles and for more than 32 years was an attorney and partner at Schwartz, Steinsapir, Dohrmann and Sommers LLP, where he advised labor organizations and their healthcare and pension trust funds. He authored an article on domestic relations and employee benefit plans and was a contributing editor to the American Bar Association’s treatise on Employee Benefits Law. He swam with the Masters Swimming Team for more than 10 years, was a potter, and enjoyed skiing, hiking, camping, and traveling with family. In 2017 he was diagnosed and treated for a brain tumor. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; two children; a grandson; his mother; and a brother.

Apr, 2021

William Pordy ’76, of New York City; Sept. 12, from sudden cardiac arrest after a long fight against frontotemporal degeneration. He graduated from NYU School of Medicine and was a nephrologist at Mount Sinai Hospital. He was also an accomplished inventor with several of his patented products on the market. He had a never-ending desire to learn and earned a membership to the Mensa Society. He enjoyed art, the opera, and traveling. He is survived by his brother Robert ’79, ’82 MD; a sister; two nieces; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021

Frank J. Moncrief ’76, of Desert Hot Springs, Calif.; Oct. 7. He was a technical editor and publisher of magazines for electronic engineers and computer programmers. He cofounded a software company, founded a website design business, and taught community college computer courses. In 1983, he spent a year in Kyoto, Japan, practicing Aikido and Buddhist meditation. He wrote a novel, spoke four languages, and traveled the world. He dedicated the second half of his life to developing his psychological and spiritual awareness. He read the Collected Works of C.G. Jung and taught the Enneagram. He enjoyed his time at Brown, especially time with his football teammates and fraternity brothers, with whom he became lifelong friends. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice.

Nov, 2020

Helen Eustis Ederer ’76, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Mar. 29. She was a real estate broker and enjoyed traveling the world, teaching the Transcendental Meditation technique, and competitive open water swimming. She is survived by her husband, David; a sister; and two brothers.

Jan, 2020

Charles F. Wochomurka III ’76, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Franklin, Tenn.; July 28. After graduating, he went to work for his family’s button business. He then went on to work for more than 20 years at Cummins Engine Co. in various roles spanning several states. He was strong in his Catholic faith and active in parishes where he lived. He enjoyed sports, both professional and local. He is survived by his wife, Jayne; three sons; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.  

 

May, 2019

Edith Andrews Tobin ’76, of San Francisco; Jan. 23, of complications from a brain tumor. While at Brown, she was a member of the women’s track team and spent a summer working on an archaeological dig. After graduation, she traveled the world and visited six continents. A fixture in society columns, she sometimes was a guest and sometimes was a host but always was involved in the greater good. Some of her gala beneficiaries were the Edgewood Center for Children and Families and the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic. She worked as a docent for the Asian Art Museum in 2015 and served on several boards, including Grace Cathedral. She enjoyed time spent at Lake Tahoe and hiking. She is survived by her husband, Joseph; a daughter; two sons; her mother; and two brothers.

Jan, 2019

Kenneth L. Stein ’76, of Chicago; July 18, from metastatic brain cancer. An outstanding diver at Brown and captain of the 1976 swim team, he competed in the NCAA Swimming and Diving Championship in 1976. After Brown he became a plastic surgeon in Chicago, holding board certifications in plastic and reconstructive surgery and in otolaryngology. He traveled annually with Hearts in Motion, a mission group that provided free surgery to treat craniofacial anomalies to Central Americans in need. He was a member of numerous medical societies, including the American College of Surgeons, the American Medical Assoc., the Chicago Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society, the Midwestern Association of Plastic Surgeons, and the Latin American Society of Plastic Surgeons. He enjoyed entertaining and sang with the Rockin’ Docs Band for more than 30 years. He is survived by his three sons; four sisters; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and 11 nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jan, 2019

Gail R. O’Day ’76, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Sept. 22. She was the dean and professor of New Testament and Preaching at Wake Forest University School of Divinity. She began teaching at Hamilton College in 1982 as an instructor in the religion department. From there she served at Eden Theological Seminary and Emory University’s Candler School of Theology prior to joining Wake Forest. Over the course of her career she wrote numerous New Testament reference works and articles and co-authored Preaching the Revised Common Lectionary: A Guide. She was general editor of the international Journal of Biblical Literature and on the editorial board of The New Interpreter’s Bible. In 2014 she became a member of the 4,000 Footers Club, for hiking all 48 mountains above 4,000 feet in New Hampshire. She was an articulate advocate for theological education and is survived by her husband, Thomas Frank; her mother, Sally Wilcox O’Day ’53; four sisters; a niece and a nephew.

 

Jan, 2019

Kevin N. Anderson ’76, of Washington, D.C.; May 23, of kidney disease. He spent 10 years as a business reporter and editor at USA Today covering health issues until leaving in 1992 to be communications director for the Alliance for Health Reform. In 1993 he joined the White House Office of Communications, where he served as a chief health policy spokesperson during the rollout of the President’s Health Reform Plan. He later joined his wife in co-founding a corporate and government communications consultancy, where he consulted on health management and policy. Throughout his life he advocated for social justice issues; his most recent cause was sanctuary for refugees, which led to him joining the Good Neighbors Capitol Hill Refugee Resettlement Project. He sang in the Capitol Hill United Methodist Church choir and was an avid fan of the Washington Nationals baseball team. He is survived by his wife, Carol, and a brother.
 

 

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