Obituaries
— Class of 1959

Send your news to class secretary Caryl-Ann Miller Nieforth or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@brown.edu .

Sep, 2020

Anthony I. Morgan ’59, of Southbury, Conn.; Feb. 15. After graduating, he worked in New York City for 40 years as an advertising and market research executive. He was said to have been part of the team that created the slogan “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.” He also taught graduate seminars in marketing and market research at Manhattan College and was published in multiple professional journals. After retiring, he began writing fiction and at age 70 self-published his first novel, Incident at Heidelberg. It was followed by a second novel, When the Sea Shall Give Up Her Dead, and a book of short stories and essays entitled The Book of Morgan. He went on to join the Heritage Village Writers’ Group, where he served as editor for An Anthology of Heritage Village Writers. He was an avid tennis player and competed into his early 80s. He also enjoyed art and architecture and was a fan of the New York Rangers. He is survived by his wife, Mercedes; a daughter; three sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a brother and a sister-in-law.

Sep, 2020

Robert E. Kresko ’59, of St. Louis; Apr. 21, of cancer. After service in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduation from Brown, he entered the real estate business at Bakewell Corp. In 1967, he joined the Trammell Crow Company of Dallas as one of its earliest partners, taking on the responsibility for developments in St. Louis. He assumed the role of managing partner in 1987 and retired in 1990. In retirement, he joined with Peter Krombach and formed Krombach Partners, a real estate company where he continued to work through 2019. He established the Kresko Family Victorian Garden at Missouri Botanical Garden; donated a Chinese Bronze Collection to the St. Louis Art Museum; contributed to the building of the football field at St. Mary’s High School, where he was inducted into the Hall of Fame and given a meritorious service medal; and at Brown established the Kresko Scholarship and the Chapin Newhard Scholarship. He served on several boards over the course of his career and was a Brown trustee emeritus. He is survived by his wife, Dorotha; three children; and four grandchildren.    

Sep, 2020

Joel F. DiPaola ’59, of Brookfield, Conn.; Sept. 11, 2019, of pancreatic cancer. He worked at General Electric Company and while there was awarded two patents. His last role was in academia at Danbury Community College’s chemistry department. From 1959 to 1965 he served in the U.S. Army Reserve. He was a longtime soccer referee, a hiker, and a camper. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; brother Lynn ’62; a sister-in-law; a niece and three nephews.

Sep, 2020

Joel G. Caslowitz ’59, of Worcester, Mass.; Jan. 4. After serving as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, he joined the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine and was promoted to professor in 1997. He served as associate chief of internal medicine and program director of the internal medicine residency at the Boston VA from 1970 to 2000 and as associate program director for the internal medicine residency at Boston Medical Center from 2000 to 2008. His teaching was recognized with numerous awards, including the 1993 Metcalf Cup and Prize, Boston University’s highest teaching award. He retired in 2014. He enjoyed football, tennis, skiing, and sailing with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three children, including Pamela Caslowitz ’83; four granddaughters; and two sisters, including Rita Michaelson ’50. 

Jun, 2020

John S. Tomasini ’59, of New Haven, Conn.; Jan. 18. He retired in 2002 from Polek and Polek Co., where he had worked as a wholesale distributor and warehouse manager. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War. He was an avid Red Sox fan and enjoyed jazz music. He is survived by a cousin.

 

Jun, 2020

Jack J. Rosenblum ’59, of Deerfield, Mass.; Jan. 13. A Peace Corps volunteer in the early 1960s, he was among the first cohort to serve Costa Rica. He worked as a management consultant, first with his own company, River at Sunrise, and later as a principal of the Atlanta Consulting Group. He coauthored the book Managing from the Heart. In retirement he collaborated in teaching workshops on relationship skills with his wife and coauthored a second book titled The 5 Secrets of Marriage from the Heart. He served on the boards of North Star Fund and Wavework. He enjoyed reading, playing tennis, biking, and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Corinne; daughter Currie Saray Dugas ’07; a brother; a niece; and a nephew.

Jun, 2020

Mark A. Moynahan ’59, of Rockville, Md.; Jan. 4. His skills in electronics and radio communications led him to a career that spanned the globe. In 1954 he was employed by Page Communications in Goose Bay, Labrador, and Thule, Greenland. From 1957 to 1965 he worked for RCA in a position that moved him to Japan and then Germany. In 1965, he joined the National Security Agency and in 1969, he moved his family to Alice Springs, Australia, where he served as a mission director at Pine Gap. He returned to Maryland in 1972 and continued his work at NSA until retiring in 1988. He was active for more than 70 years in amateur radio and set up net control stations for emergencies and provided radio service during the 1950 hurricane. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Signal Corps and a member of the American Radio Relay League, Garrett County Amateur Radio Emergency Club, and Maryland Emergency Phone Net. He is survived by his wife, Denise; four daughters; 12 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

 

Jun, 2020

Cornelius A. Bottomley ’59, of Plymouth, Mass.; Jan. 11, from complications of pancreatic cancer. He started the company New England Investment Properties, where he bought, sold, and built nursing homes. He was a former executive director of Massachusetts Federation of Nursing Homes. He started a nursing home administrator continuing education company, continued his entrepreneurial spirit establishing a Medicaid reimbursement consulting company, then purchased and managed investment properties. He continued working until he was 80. He was active in his community and a member of Plymouth Kiwanis Club for more than 40 years and the Bass River Yacht Club. He enjoyed sailing, swimming, skiing in Vermont, and spending summers on Cape Cod with family. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2020

Richard E. Nelson ’59, of Madison, Conn.; Oct. 25. He began his career at Dun & Bradstreet before becoming a commercial banker. He spent 25 years at Union Trust and five years at Webster Bank. While at Union Trust, he held numerous senior positions, including leading the bank’s commercial lending activities in the greater New Haven area. He was proud of his many civic and charitable involvements, including as president of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, board member of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, chair of the board of directors of the New Haven Chamber of Commerce, director of the Ronald McDonald House of southern New England, and president of the Brown University Club of New Haven. He enjoyed golfing and was an active competitor in recreational softball and basketball and a fan of the Boston Red Sox. He also liked gardening, especially at his summer home in Chatham, Mass. He is survived by three sons and their spouses, including Peter ’81; six grandsons; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020

William F. Wenning Jr. ’59, of Sewickley, Pa.; July 31.  He was employed with Ceramic Color and Chemical Company for 64 years and served as president of the company for 40 of those years.  He is survived by his wife, Judith; a daughter; a granddaughter; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2020

Joanna Kellogg Uhry ’59, of New York City; Aug. 26, from complications of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Joanna was a teacher at Calhoun School in New York City for many years. While there she developed an interest in learning disabilities and enrolled in a master’s program at Teachers College. She went on to earn two master’s degrees in education at Columbia Univ. She was a faculty member at Teachers College until she joined the faculty at Fordham University, where she served as a leader in preparing teachers at the Graduate School of Education for more than 20 years. The focus of her years of research was on understanding how to teach children to read, especially children with dyslexia. She authored numerous publications, including Dyslexia: Theory and Practice of Instruction and Finger-Point Reading in Kindergarten: The Role of Phonemic Awareness, One-to-One Correspondence, and Rapid Serial Naming. She was the director for the Advanced Certification Program in Literacy and the Initial Teacher Certification Program, and coordinator of the Childhood Education Program. In addition, she mentored doctoral students and served as chair of the division of curriculum and teaching for four years. In retirement she was awarded professor emeritus status at Fordham. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, painting, making ceramics, weaving, and had a passion for photography and directing family plays and home movies. She is survived by her husband, Alfred Uhry ’58, four daughters, including Emily Rhea ’83; eight grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Nov, 2019

Alvin L. Stern ’59, of Sun Lakes, Ariz.; May 17, following his struggle with leukemia. After graduating from ROTC at Brown, Al spent the next three years serving in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant and chief engineering officer on destroyers. After the Navy, he was admitted to New York University Law School. Upon graduation, he joined maritime law firm Poles, Tublin & Patestides in New York and went on to have maritime law related positions for the rest of his career. An active Brown alum, he was president of the Brown Club of Cape Cod and served as commencement marshal during his 50th reunion. He is survived by his wife Ann; his daughters Keelan Bodow ’89 and Leslie Stern ’93; sons-in-law Jonathan Bodow ’92 and Andrew Abramowitz ’92; four grandchildren; and brother-in-law Ross Harris ’73.

 

Nov, 2019

John M. Hatch ’59, of Lancaster, Pa.; May 21, of cancer. He was the director of purchasing for Howmet Aluminum (now Arconic Mill Products). He served as president of the board of directors at Easter Seals, where he introduced the “Buck-A-Cup” and “Rubber Duckie Race” fundraising campaigns to the Lancaster area. In 1982 he was presented with the A Brace for an Ace award by the Pennsylvania Easter Seal Society for outstanding volunteer service. He was also a hospice volunteer and an active member of Community Fellowship Church, where he served as an elder. He is survived by his wife, Louise; three sons; two daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Wyndham Eaton ’59 of Derby, N.Y.; July 18, after a long illness. After graduating, he joined the family business, Eaton Equipment, a distributor of outdoor lawn and garden equipment and golf course supplies. He headed the company from 1978 to 1995. He served as president of Queen City Industrial Park from 1986 until his death, was president of the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce in 1970, past president of Wanakah Country Club and Ellicottville Ski Club, and a former member of the board of directors of First Federal Savings and Loan of Hamburg. At Brown he was captain of the men’s hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Wendy; two sons; two daughters; 11 grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019

Carolyn Mayo Mansell ’59, of Palo Alto, Calif.; Apr. 3, after a brief illness. After staying home and raising her children, she began a career in real estate with Wright & Co. and quickly became the top producer in Los Altos. In 1984 she founded Mansell & Co. and was later recognized by the Los Altos Board of Realtors as “Top Achiever for 10 Consecutive Years.” Over the decades she mentored other agents and pioneered many practices now considered standard in the industry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a sister, and a brother-in-law.
 

 

Sep, 2019

Richard A. Cleary ’59, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked at New England Life Insurance Company in Boston and later was a Naval Intelligence agent in Newport, R.I., from 1963 to 1967. For 21 years he worked as a special agent for the FBI and then until 2003, as a self-employed investigator/consultant. At Brown he was a member of the men’s varsity hockey team and later was an active member and past president of the Brown Hockey Association. He played until the age of 78 and for several years was invited to play in the Charles Schulz Snoopy’s Senior World Hockey Tournament. He also enjoyed playing softball, tennis, and golf. He is survived by four daughters, three grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019

Richard J. Beland ’59, of Poquoson, Va.; May 10, from Parkinson’s disease. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 30 years, retiring in 1989. He spent years training students to fly, briefly interrupted by a tour in Vietnam, where he flew 290 combat missions. For four years following, he served as an advance agent for support and security for Air Force One, serving under Presidents Carter and Reagan. He then did a four-year tour to Germany. He was a member of the NATO Flight Safety Group. In retirement he served as a lector and usher at Langley Chapel, was a member of the Peninsula Pathfinder Volksmarch Club, and was chairman of the Board of Zoning Appeals in Poquoson for 18 years. He enjoyed traveling with his wife, Sonya, who survives him. Other survivors include two sons, a daughter-in-law, a grandson, a sister and brother-in-law, a niece, a nephew, and an uncle.

 

Jul, 2019

George W. Ullrich ’59, of Hingham, Mass.; Feb. 8, following a brief illness. While at Brown he played lacrosse and was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He served in the U.S. Navy with various Seabee units, completing service as a lieutenant. He additionally received a master’s degree in civil engineering from MIT. During his career he served as COO of American Science and Engineering, was president of Gaggenau USA, and retired as COO of AES Corp. in Peabody, Mass., where he ran their international construction business. He was a longtime member of the Hingham Yacht Club and enjoyed sailing, skiing, morning walking groups, and spending time with grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Amy Lautman Ullrich ’61; daughter Nicole Ullrich ’90; two sons, including David ’87 and his wife, Anja Ullrich Wehde-Siniscalco ’88; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and two nieces.
 

 

Jul, 2019

Edward T. Sampson ’59, of Newburgh, N.Y.; Feb. 27. He served several years of active duty in the U.S. Coast Guard and upon discharge worked for publishing houses. He had a passion for hiking and over the course of his lifetime hiked many local mountains, including Bear Mountain, Mounts Beacon and Breakneck, and the Adirondacks, Catskills and Sierra Nevada mountains. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew

Jul, 2019

Clark A. Sammartino ’59, of Providence; Feb. 5. After graduating from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, he became an assistant clinical professor there. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon for 27 years, he retired from his practice and subsequently founded Blue Fin Capital, an investment advisory firm, with partners Mars Bishop ’59 and Rich Carolan ’58. Over the many years as a health care professional he served as chief and director of oral and maxillofacial surgery at Rhode Island, Roger Williams, and St. Joseph’s/Our Lady of Fatima hospitals. He was also past president of Rhode Island Dental Association and diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. He published scholarly articles in various medical journals, including the Journal of the American Dental Association, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He was a catalyst in the formation of Rhode Island’s Donated Dental Services, which provides dental care to needy and disabled Rhode Island residents. He was former chairman of Rhode Island Health and Educational Building Corporation; former board president of Saint Mary’s Home for Children; and former president of the American Cancer Society (R.I. division). He enjoyed early morning swims, body surfing, the Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots, and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Carole; four children and their spouses, including daughter Catherine Sammartino Berg ’86; eight grandchildren; and seven nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019

Donald G. Mayhew ’59, of Vineyard Haven, Mass., formerly of Bowie, Md.; Feb. 5. He briefly taught math in New Jersey before moving to Bowie to work as a digital computer systems analyst for the Federal Aviation Administration. After retiring in 1983, he and his wife moved to Massachusetts. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and served as an officer and board member of the Dukes County Historical Society, worked many hours for the NAACP, was on the original Land Bank Committee, and served on the Tisbury Board of Health. He enjoyed biking, writing droll poetry, and helping others with their computer systems. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter and son and their spouses; two granddaughters; a brother and sister-in-law; nieces and nephews; and three cousins.

 

Jul, 2019

A. Robert Bellows ’59, of Lexington, Mass.; Mar. 15. He was a retired ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialist. After graduating from Brown, he attended Boston University Medical School followed by a two-year residency in internal medicine. In 1965 he moved to Tripoli, Libya, where he served for two years in the U.S. Air Force. In 1967 he attended Yale, completing a four-year ophthalmology residency, and then moved to Haiti to work at L’Hôpital Albert Schweitzer for six months. He returned to the Boston area, completed a glaucoma fellowship at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and joined Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, specializing in glaucoma and cataract surgery. During this time, he wrote many scientific articles in a variety of peer reviewed journals and held leadership positions in national and international ophthalmologic organizations. He was a member of numerous academic societies, including the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the Massachusetts Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons, the American Association of Ophthalmology, and the American College of Surgeons. He is survived by his wife, Jean; a daughter; two sons, including Matthew Bellows ’90; a daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019

Philip J. DiSaia ’59, of Santa Ana, Calif.; Sept. 27. He completed a medical degree at Tufts and his residency at Yale, then continued in military service as Lt. Commander in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps, and completed his gynecologic oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in Houston, Tex. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of Genoa, Italy, after being granted an audience with Pope John Paul II. In 1976, he became chair for the department of obstetrics and gynecology at UC Irvine, where he established one of the preeminent institutions dedicated to women’s health. In addition to becoming a nationally recognized residency program, the department flourished with the establishment of four clinically directed and research-driven divisions in gynecologic oncology, maternal-fetal medicine, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, and urogynecology. His research focused on the immunology of tumor biology, the safety of estrogen replacement therapy among breast and endometrial cancer survivors, and the development of less disfiguring surgical approaches for vulvar cancer. He authored numerous clinical papers and textbooks, including Clinical Gynecologic Oncology, which is the most widely read textbook in the subspecialty and is currently in its ninth edition. He had been an associate editor of Gynecologic Oncology and Endocrine Therapy and Hyperthermia Oncology and served on editorial advisory boards of many other journals in his field. He served the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) in various roles for 30 years, including as an examiner in the certification process for specialists and subspecialists. He was a founding member of the Foundation for Excellence in Women’s Healthcare. In addition, he was a mentor to ABOG directors and volunteers. His international reputation resulted in appointments as special lecturer at the Univ.  of Tokyo (1989), visiting professor at the Univ. of Buenos Aires (1990), the Camillo Golgi Professor at the Univ. of Brescia (Italy) in 1991, and special lecturer to the Italian Society of Ob/Gyn in Genoa (1992). His numerous memberships included the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Radiology, American Society of Clinical Oncologists, the American Radium Society, the Society for Gynecological Investigation, and the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society. He was the recipient of several awards, including the UC Gold Medal, and was named the nation’s Cancer Fighter of the Year in 2004. He is survived by his wife, Patti; four sons and their spouses; and numerous grandchildren.

 

May, 2019

David B. Schaffer ’59, of Blue Bell, Pa.; Nov. 4. He was the retired director of pediatric ophthalmology at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia. He was an accomplished medical photographer and co-authored textbooks that included his medical photos. He did volunteer work at the Philadelphia Zoo in 1999 and served as president of its Docent Council from 2014 to 2016, earning recognition awards for his leadership roles. He was a gourmet chef and a scuba diver and enjoyed taking wildlife photos. He is survived by his wife, Sandy; a daughter; a son; and a brother, Lewis ’56.

Mar, 2019

James Teixeira ’59, of Riverside, R.I.; Nov. 20, after a brief illness. He taught Spanish and Portuguese at Middletown High School, R.I. He traveled extensively, collected coins, stamps, postcards, and antiques, and enjoyed the theater. He is survived by his wife, Maria; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; seven nieces; and a nephew.  

 

Mar, 2019

Aaron Seidman ’59, of Brookline, Mass.; July 3. He had a career as a software developer, trainer, and web designer, with a great interest in art. He created his works in a wide variety of media, experimenting with new techniques. He was involved in community affairs and is survived by his wife, Ruth Kertzer Seidman ’60; sons Daniel ’88 and Joshua ’90; two daughters-in-law, including Jocelyn Guyer ’90; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; brother-in-law David Kertzer ’69; sister-in-law Susan Kertzer ’70; nephew Seth Kertzer ’98; niece Molly Kertzer ’95; and cousins Pam Gerrol ’87, Elizabeth Braswell ’93, and Ari Johnson ’04.

 

Mar, 2019

Orrin M. Colley ’59, of Duxbury, Mass.; Dec. 4. He owned and operated C.H. Marsh insurance agency in Marshfield, Mass. He was an avid golfer and New England sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Helen; three daughters; six grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Mar, 2019

John F. Bennett ’59, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Nov. 16. He was president of Adobe Building Center prior to starting his own business in 1981, Color-Rite Building Supply, which sold to Rinker Building Materials in 1995. He was on the board of the Construction Association of South Florida for 32 years in addition to several other boards. He was instrumental in the creation of the Construction Executives Assoc. He is survived by four children, seven grandchildren, and six siblings.
 

Jan, 2019

Margo Aramian Ragan ’59, of Doylestown, Pa.; July 31. She was a homemaker and community volunteer. She enjoyed time spent on both coasts with her children and grandchildren. She is survived by her husband, Thomas; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jan, 2019

William D. W. Grimes ’59, of Rumney, N.H.; Aug. 10, after a brief illness. He served 31 years in the U.S. Air Force. Before retiring from active duty in September 1990, he commanded several organizations related to special projects and was instrumental in the success of the Big Safari program, which is responsible for the acquisition, modification, and worldwide logistic support of special-purpose weapon systems for the United States Air Force. He re-entered government service in October 1990 as deputy to the assistant to the Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC) Commander for Special Projects. He earned major awards and decorations, including the Legion of Merit Air Medal with 14 Oak Leaf Clusters, the Air Force Association 2002 Civilian Senior Manager of the Year, and a “Peace Mate” award from the Royal Australian Air Force. He served as an Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Ad Hoc Member, was inducted into the Big Safari Hall of Honor in San Antonio, Tex., and was named an honorary U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sergeant. He enjoyed traveling to six out of seven continents with his wife, gardening, fishing, hunting, woodworking, jigsaw puzzles, and practical jokes. He is survived by his wife, Judy Darling Grimes ’61; three daughters; four grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2018

Charles M. Trammell III ’59, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Apr. 14. He was a junior officer in the U.S. Navy and later an instructor at the Navy’s nuclear prototype at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory site in New York. In 1967 he joined Public Service Electric and Gas Co. in Newark, N.J., and assisted with the licensing of the company’s Salem Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey. He joined the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in Bethesda, Md., in 1975 and was a licensing project manager for numerous nuclear facilities. He retired from NRC in 1993. He was a member of the West River Sailing Club and served as commodore in 2002. He enjoyed playing the flute, piano, and clarinet. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children; and six grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2018

Carroll Trainor Stein ’59, of Sedona, Ariz., formerly of Chicago; Mar. 11. She taught English and social studies in Chicago, was a residential fellow at the Univ. of Chicago, and then raised a family. She later returned to teaching and was a professor at Washburn Univ. in Topeka, Kans. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’59; two daughters, including Leah Kimmet ’98; a son, Adam ’93; and six grandchildren.

 

May, 2018

Dana G. Willard ’59, of York, Me.; Jan. 5, after a brief illness. He worked for High Voltage Engineering in Boston and then for the Willard-Daggett Fish & Lobster Co. in Portland, Me. He returned to Massachusetts in 1978 and worked in the software industry until retiring from Lucent Technologies in 2001 and moving to York. In retirement, he painted and volunteered, helping with shoreline profiling and with educational programs at the Laudholm Farm in Wells, Me. He spent winters at Amelia Island, Fla. He is survived by two sons, two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

May, 2018

Lewis Roberts Jr. ’59, of Stratham, N.H.; Jan. 12. He was director of the Thompson School of Applied Sciences at UNH before he became dean of UNH Manchester. He and his wife created the nonprofit Mill Pond Center for the Performing Arts in Durham, N.H. In retirement, he enjoyed woodworking and helped found the Common Table Ministry at St. John’s Church in Portsmouth, N.H. He is survived by his wife, Judy Bell Roberts ’62; two daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; five grandchildren; and a brother.

 

May, 2018

Hope Owen McMahon ’59, of Portland, Me.; Dec. 21. She taught art in K–12 school districts in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Arizona, and Maine. She retired from the Brunswick (Me.) School Department in 2000. She is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, and two nieces.

 

May, 2018

Joan Cobb Boyce ’59, of Eugene, Ore., formerly of Flagstaff, Ariz.; Dec. 6. She was a homemaker and volunteer for the Flagstaff Summer Festival, where she regularly sang in the Flagstaff Oratorio Choir. In Eugene, she volunteered every year with the Oregon Bach Festival. She enjoyed hiking, camping, and visiting family in Rome, Me. She is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, and a brother.

 

May, 2018

Sheila McHale Bailey ’59, of Chattanooga, Tenn.; Dec. 22. She was a substance abuse counselor for the Council for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Services in Chattanooga, where she also helped establish a halfway house. She was a member of the Tennessee Assoc. of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors. She enjoyed swimming and entertaining. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, and three nieces.

 

Feb, 2018

William B. Thompson ’59, of Philadelphia; June 27, of cancer. He joined Philadelphia’s Coordinating Office of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Programs in 1973 and retired in 2004 as deputy director. In 1964 he joined the Peace Corps as a member of the public health group, serving in Malawi for three years. He went on to lead volunteers in Somalia as assistant director for three years, returning to the United States in 1973. While in Africa he hiked Mount Kilimanjaro twice. In retirement he joined the Friends of the Wissahickon as a volunteer building projects in Wissahickon Valley. He was a lifelong weightlifter and coached novice weightlifting. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; and a sister.

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