Obituaries
— Class of 1968

Send your news to class secretary Sally Kusnitz Horn or directly to the BAM at alumni_magazine@brown.edu.

Jun, 2020

Peter B. Rames ’68, of Albuquerque, N. Mex.; Nov. 29, from complications of liver cancer. He worked as a reporter for the Providence Journal, ran a community action agency in Rhode Island, and later, after receiving a JD and  MBA from the University of New Mexico, he practiced law as an independent practitioner. He was most proud of his work for the New Mexico Public Defender's office. He enjoyed baking, playing his guitar, and singing. He is survived by three daughters.

 

Jan, 2020

John S. Satterthwaite ’68, of Spokane, Wash.; Aug. 1, from pancreatic cancer. For 25 years he served in the military before changing careers and entering the financial world. After Officer Training School and pilot training school, he was assigned to train other pilots at Vance AFB (Okla.). He then was stationed at Lackland AFB (Tex.), where he was a supersonic jet trainer. Following that assignment, he was sent to George AFB (Calif.) to serve as a security forces officer that specialized in air base defense. Eventually he was stationed at Dover AFB (Del.), where he flew the largest cargo airplane at that time. In 1981 he and his family moved overseas to Ankara, Turkey to serve at Balgot AFB. In 1983, he returned to the U.S. at Randolph AFB (Tex.) and instructed again. His final assignment led him to Scott AFB (Ill.), where he served as Commander HQ Section Air Mobility Command, then Commandant for the Airlift Operations School, and finally as Deputy Branch Chief AMC Acquisitions for the C-17. He retired in 1993 as a lieutenant colonel. He moved to Spokane and pursued a second career in finance beginning at UPSA & IRA but within a few years moved to Washington Trust Bank Investment Services. He retired from Washington Trust as a vice president in 2014. He spent his free time as a skydiving pilot for Skydive West Plains and enjoyed antique furniture restoration projects, reading, and traveling.  He is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, and four grandchildren.

 

Nov, 2019

Constance Sauer Clark ’68, of Whidbey Island, Wash.; May 17. She had a 30-plus year career at Bell Labs in Holmdel, N.J., before moving to Whidbey Island in 2006, where she became a volunteer for Beach Watchers (now Sound Water Stewards), supporting their website and computer operations. In 2017 she received the Jan Holmes Coastal Volunteer award. She was active at Langley United Methodist Church and enjoyed gardening and solving puzzles. She is survived by her husband, Neal; a son; five siblings; and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Nov, 2019

George W. Berko ’68, of Houston, Tex.; June 16. He was a CPA and began working for Arthur Anderson in New York City. He specialized in the oil and gas industry and worked for several companies throughout his career, including Ultramar Oil & Gas, where he was vice president of finance and worked for a short period of time in Venezuela. He retired in 2014 from Transworld Oil USA. He was an avid scuba diver and enjoyed radio control model airplanes, antique firearms, and hot rod cars. He is survived by a goddaughter and many friends.

 

Sep, 2019

Stephen D. Barbaro ’68, of Austin, Tex.; Mar. 27. He served in the U.S. Army Reserves in New Jersey and later enjoyed a long career as a financial portfolio manager. He was a great supporter of the Austin Opera and served on the community advisory board of Helping Hand Home for Children for several years, where he and his wife started a golf program for children. He is survived by his wife, Polly; two daughters; four grandchildren; a stepdaughter; a sister; and a brother.

 

May, 2019

Russell A. Ekeblad ’68, ’71 PhD, of Portsmouth, R.I. and Jupiter, Fla.; Dec. 12. He was one of the leading U.S. bridge players for the past 40 years, with five major National American Bridge Championship wins and six second place finishes. He earned the rank of Grand Life Master of the American Contract Bridge League. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard and, following his military service, married and founded Kenilworth Creations, a supplier of custom jewelry to women’s specialty stores. He was an active member of his community, served on the board of Moses Brown School, and enjoyed boating, traveling, and playing golf. He is survived by three children and their spouses; two grandchildren; a sister; and a niece.

May, 2019

E. Jerome Batty ’68, of Cumberland, R.I.; Jan. 18, of pancreatic cancer. He had a 45-year career as an attorney with Hinckley, Allen & Snyder in Providence, specializing in real estate law. He was the recipient of numerous professional awards and honors. At Brown he was captain of the football team and a lacrosse All-American. He was a member of both the Brown and Northfield Mount Hermon Athletic Halls of Fame. He is survived by his wife, Gayle Rogers Batty ’71; daughter Jordan Batty ’00; a son and his wife; two grandchildren; brothers William Batty III ’63 and Stephen Batty ’71; sister-in-law, Linda Schmidt Batty ’65 AM; and nephew William Batty IV ’90.

Mar, 2019

Susan Hindmarsh Penny ’68, of New Braunfels, Tex., formerly of El Paso; Oct. 25. She was an elementary school librarian in El Paso. She served in many roles to further education and reading as a member of various national and international reading associations, and on committees to further technology in school libraries. In 1996 she received a grant to start a puppetry club for elementary school children to help them vocalize their feelings through puppetry. Upon retirement she moved to New Braunfels, where she was an active member in the community and volunteered at her local church and elementary schools. She enjoyed yoga and water aerobics. She is survived by her husband, Roland; two daughters and their spouses; four grandsons; and four sisters.

 

Mar, 2019

Robert W. King Jr. ’68, of Edmond, Okla.; Nov. 27, after a short illness. He practiced nephrology with Associates in Internal Medicine at St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City. He was also a volunteer faculty member for the OU School of Community Medicine and instrumental in bringing organ transplants to the school. He helped develop the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) and was one of the original founders of LifeShare Oklahoma organ sharing network. In 1998 he moved to New Orleans, La., where he worked as a national medical director for United Healthcare, but returned to Oklahoma City in 2007. He enjoyed being a doctor, teaching, reading, and writing. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three daughters; a son-in-law; and two sisters and their husbands.

 

Jan, 2019

Richard S. Sugarman ’68, of Niantic, Conn.; Aug. 11, of a heart attack. After obtaining a master’s of social work from UConn, he was program director of the adolescent unit at Elmwood Psychiatric Hospital in Portland, Conn., then worked with emotionally disturbed teenagers at the Children’s Center in Hamden, Conn., before opening a private practice in New London in 1978. He lectured and was a former board member of the East Lyme Youth Services Assoc. and was a member of the Jabberwocks. He enjoyed sailing his catamaran, Ocean Gypsy. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a daughter; a sister; a brother-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jan, 2019

David Schorr ’68, of New York City; June 16, of complications of a double aortic dissection suffered while on sabbatical in Bologna, Italy. He taught printmaking, graphic design, book design, typography, calligraphy, and drawing at Wesleyan from 1971 until his death. He often played opera to his students as they worked or read poetry to them. He enjoyed working with writers on illustrated book projects, including providing the illustrations for No Witnesses and Parallel Lives. His book illustrations often accompanied book reviews in the New York Times, Poetry Magazine, and The New Republic. He was a Fulbright Scholar three times: in 1975 to Italy; and in 1998 and 2001 to India. He often returned to India, where he was an adjunct professor at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad, teaching graphic design to Indian students during Wesleyan’s winter break. He was also a fellow at the Tamarind Institute in Albuquerque, working with master printers. His drawings, prints, and painting have been shown in New York at the Mary Ryan Gallery and more recently at the Ryan Lee Gallery. He has also had solo shows in Chicago, Milan, Rome, Naples, Paris, Athens, Toronto, Montreal, Mumbai, New Delhi, Ahmedabad and Copenhagen. His work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Fogg Museum of Harvard Univ., The New York Public Library, The Israel Museum in Jerusalem and The Museum of Modern Art. He is survived by a sister-in-law and a niece and nephew.

 

Nov, 2018

Alan L. Grenier ’68, of Topsfield, Mass.; July 2. He was the founder of the Grenier and McCarron law firm in Danvers, Mass. In addition, he was past president of the North Bay Council Boy Scouts of America and the Danvers Rotary Club and a member of American Legion Post 255. He enjoyed traveling and is survived by his companion, Joyce Volpe; two daughters; two sons-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Nov, 2018

John M. Gaydos Jr. ’68, of Coventry, R.I.; June 28, of prostate cancer. He was a middle school teacher for 38 years. He taught in Iran as a Peace Corps volunteer and later in Ohio and New Hampshire. He was nominated as 1987 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year. After retiring from teaching, he assisted in his wife’s jewelry business and additionally sold rocks and fossils as UoleFossil.com. He enjoyed learning and was active in his community and church. He is survived by his wife, Marian; and three daughters, including Megan Gaydos ’00 and Lindsey Gaydos ’09.

Jul, 2018

David A. Hardy ’68, of Easton, Mass.; Dec. 2, of ALS. He was a former information services manager at New England Medical Center Hospitals. He enjoyed gardening and listening to all kinds of music. He is survived by his wife, Bobbi; two children; and two grandchildren.
 

 

May, 2018

Arthur S. Grossman ’68, ’71 ScM, of Everett, Wash.; Dec. 21, of complications from ALS. He was a family physician for many years in Everett. After retiring, he taught fitness classes at the Everett YMCA and other fitness clubs and volunteered at the local clinic. He was also a volunteer coach and referee for the Washington State Youth Soccer Assoc. He was a member of the Washington State Medical Assoc. and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He enjoyed swimming, running, biking, bridge, and opera. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Vanderwicken Grossman ’70, ’71 ScM; two daughters, including Emily Grossman ’97; a son; five grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

 

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