Obituaries
— Class Notes - Graduate Studies

Sep, 2018

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’45, ’62 MAT, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 30. She taught science at Hugh B. Bain Middle School in Cranston and was coprincipal of the Mourad Armenian School. She was a longtime member of St. Vartanantz Armenian Apostolic Church and is survived by a daughter, a son, and two siblings.

 

Sep, 2018

Glenn S. Everett ’88 PhD, of Pembroke, Mass.; Apr. 19, after a struggle with leukemia and other health issues. He taught English at Temple Univ. and the Univ. of Tennessee at Martin. He enjoyed photography, singing, playing tennis, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two sons; a sister; a niece; and two nephews. 

Sep, 2018

Rida M. Mirie ’77 ScM, ’80 PhD, of Lowell, Mass.; Feb. 16. He was a mathematics professor at UMass Lowell. He is survived by a daughter.

 

Sep, 2018

Richard G. MacKay ’74 MAT, of West Hartford, Conn.; Apr. 9. He taught in Watertown Public Schools and also worked for the State of Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection. He is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2018

Mary Ogden Trotta ’72 MAT, of Clarksboro, N.J.; Apr. 18. She taught English at Woodbury High School for 30 years. After retiring from Woodbury, she joined the Univ. of Pennsylvania’s Literacy Network, where she devoted her time to professional development with teachers across the country. She enjoyed expanding literacy among children in under-resourced school districts. She is survived by her husband, James; a daughter; a son-in-law; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2018

Marion Lord Kessen ’72 AM, of Branford, Conn.; May 24. She worked in various positions at Yale Univ., conducting research in the department of psychology. She enjoyed bowling and playing bridge and golf. She served as chairman of the Branford Human Rights Council in the 1960s and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by six children, six grandchildren, and a great-grandson.

 

Sep, 2018

Arlene Haas Little ’70 AM, ’73 PhD, of Penacook, N.H.; Jan. 2. She had been a professor of psychology at UMass Amherst, retiring in 2002. She is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, a sister, and a sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2018

Linda Daignault Howell ’69 MAT, of New Bern, N.C.; Mar. 29. After moving to Boston in 1974, she worked for the New England Governors Council. In 1976 she cofounded the Council for Northeast Economic Action, which became an international consulting firm focused on creating opportunities for growth in New England. She later moved to New Bern and focused on historic preservation and gardening as a member of the New Bern Preservation and Historical Society. As a member of the Questers, she worked to raise funds to restore Cedar Grove Cemetery. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, reading, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, Jim; a son; a daughter-in-law; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018

Vittorio A. Bonomo ’69 PhD, of Blacksburg, Va.; Apr. 20, 2017. He began teaching at UC Santa Barbara. He subsequently taught at Virginia Tech in the College of Business for 48 years and was a winner of the William E. Wine Award for Teaching Excellence. He was a financial advisor to two Virginia governors and served on advisory boards for many banks and financial institutions spanning his career. He enjoyed painting, Virginia Tech football, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Jane; a daughter; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018

Fred I. Cooperstock ’66 PhD, of Victoria, B.C.; Jan. 17. He was a physics professor at the Univ. of Victoria. He enjoyed photography, writing, playing badminton, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; a daughter; a son; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018

Marjorie Harvey Purves ’65 AM, of Worcester, Mass.; Mar. 27, of lung cancer. She ran the volunteer program of the palliative care unit at UMass Memorial Medical Center for 10 years. She served on the board of Daybreak, then stepped down to be executive director until the early 1990s. After leaving Daybreak, she worked for the Battered Women’s Coalition in Boston. She was also a mediator for the court system for many years. She sang with the Worcester Choral Society and enjoyed poetry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a grandson, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2018

Gordon R. Williamson ’64 ScM, of Hanover, N.H.; Feb. 15. He worked as an intellectual property lawyer in Boston before joining the staff of Byte magazine in the 1970s. In retirement he founded a nonprofit organization supporting artisans in Rwanda, authored a career guide for young lawyers, and volunteered with the Dartmouth athletics department. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2018

Rozanne Karibian Arzoomanian ’62 MAT (see ’45).

 

Sep, 2018

Robert E. Green Jr. ’56 ScM, ’59 PhD, of Towson, Md. He was an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins Univ. in Baltimore. He is survived by his wife, Sydney; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Sep, 2018

Ryozo G. Kumekawa ’55 AM, of Wakefield, R.I.; Apr. 16. He served as the director of city planning for the City of Warwick (R.I.) from 1958 to 1972. He was then appointed as the executive assistant for Policy and Program Review for Gov. Noel of Rhode Island, serving from 1973 to 1977. From 1977 to 1979 he was the executive director of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors Policy Research Center, and from 1980 until his retirement in 1998, he was the director of the URI Graduate Program in Community Planning. He was honored with the distinguished leadership award by the Rhode Island Chapter of the American Planning Assoc. in 1996 and was elected a fellow in the American Institute of Certified Planners in 2001. He is survived by his wife, Yoshiko; three children; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018

Charles A. Pleasance ’53 AM (see ’50).
 

 

Sep, 2018

Alice Slavin Krafft ’47 ScM, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 23. She was a retired science teacher. She is survived by eight children, 13 grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2018

Richard N. Berry ’41 ScM, ’47 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 26. He was a professor of psychology and brain sciences at Indiana State Univ. from 1947 until his retirement in 1987. He enjoyed following the stock market, gardening, and playing golf. He is survived by a sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.

 

Sep, 2018

Charles A. Pleasance ’50, ’53 AM, of Greenville, Del.; Mar. 18. He was a retired manager of Wescom Inc. in Downers Grove, Ill. During his long career in the telephone industry, he had an interest in the history of the independent telephone industry and self-published a book on the subject in 1989, The Spirit of Independent Telephony. He was a member of the Independent Telephone Pioneer Assoc. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, five grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Reva Angel Stern ’89 AM, of Providence; Feb. 3. She was a retired instructor in continuing education at RISD andmember of Temple Emanu-El. She is survived by daughters Karen Stern Hammarstrom ’88 and Lisa Stern ’89; sons Joel ’91 MD and Alan ’94; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2018

Adam Irgon ’84 ScM, of Princeton, N.J.; Jan. 19. He worked at Telcordia before founding STS Consulting in East Brunswick, N.J. He enjoyed gardening and philanthropic work. He is survived by his wife, Irina; a daughter, Marina Gu ’11; a son; his mother; and two sisters.

 

Jul, 2018

Archie J. Powell ’74 AM, of Roxbury, Mass.; Jan. 30. He worked for the Rhode Island Department of Education until 1981, when he took a position at Brown to become minority affairs officer in the division of biology and medicine. He left Brown to be associate dean of students for minority affairs at Albany Medical College (New York) and later was associate director of admissions at Boston Univ. He was a gifted musician and taught piano, organ, and voice in the Boston area; he performed with the Morehouse College Glee Club and also directed the Boston Orchestra and Chorale choir. In addition to his many memberships, he belonged to the American Guild of Organists and the National Association of Minority Medical Educators, and sat on several boards. He was inducted into the Distinguished Service Chapter of Phi Beta Sigma in 2013. He is survived by two sisters, a half-sister, and a nephew.

 

Jul, 2018

Joan Pollins Feldman ’68 MAT, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of Pawtucket, R.I. She was an art teacher at Shea High School in Pawtucket for more than 20 years. She was a member of the Providence Art Club, the Boca Raton Watercolor Society, and the Artist Guild of Boca Raton. She is survived by two daughters; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Frank L. Ingenito ’67 PhD, of Washington, D.C.; Feb. 14, from progressive supranuclear palsy. He was a scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. He is survived by his wife, Rosalie, and several cousins.
 

 

Jul, 2018

David L. Berube ’65 MAT, of Bluffton, S.C.; Feb. 7, of bone cancer. He was a retired high school history teacher. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Janice: a daughter; two sons; two granddaughters; a sister; and a brother.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Richard A. Derrig ’64 ScM, ’70 PhD, of Providence; Feb. 8. He was president of OPAL Consulting LLC, which he established in 2004 to provide research and support to the property-casualty insurance industry. Prior to forming OPAL, he was a senior vice president at the Automobile Insurers Bureau and a vice president at the Insurance Fraud Bureaus, both of Massachusetts. He taught graduate and undergraduate mathematics at Villanova Univ. and Wheaton College. He wrote several prize-winning papers and lectured to professional groups, law enforcement personnel, and U.S. and foreign trade organizations. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and attending Brown football, basketball, and hockey games. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter, Tess Rossi ’20.

 

Jul, 2018

John H. Abel ’64 MAT, ’66 PhD, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 27. He was a professor of cell and molecular biology and chairman of the biology department at Lehigh Univ. He also held professorships at New York Medical College, Colorado State Univ., the Univ. of Bonn in Germany and the Univ. of Tennessee. He had been involved with NASA early in his career, especially with the Gemini program. He enjoyed golf, photography, and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, five grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Charles E. Dyke ’62 AM, ’66 PhD, of Plumstead, Pa.; Feb. 21. He taught philosophy at Temple Univ. for 50 years. Some of his publications include The Evolutionary Dynamics of Complex Systems and How Nature Speaks: The Dynamics of the Human Ecological Condition. For two years he taught at Temple’s campus in Rome, Italy. In retirement he turned to sculpture and exhibited his work at the Tinicum Arts Festival. He also enjoyed gardening. He is survived by his wife, Linda; two sons and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Earl W. O’Dell ’58 ScM, of Morris Plains, N.J.; Mar. 3. He was a research physicist at Allied-Signal in Morristown and a World War II veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, two daughters-in-law, a son-in-law, and five grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2018

Joseph T. Mullhaupt ’58 PhD, of Warwick, N.Y.; Feb. 21. He was a research chemist employed with Linde Division of Union Carbide in Tonawanda, N.Y. During his more than 45-year career with Linde, he coauthored at least six technical papers and was an inventor on nine patents. He was active in his church, serving as a cantor. He is survived by a daughter, four sons, three daughters-in-law, and seven grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Robert D. Hall ’58 AM, ’60 PhD, of Sudbury, Mass.; Jan. 24. He was a staff scientist in the neurosciences research program at MIT, later at the Worcester Foundation, and retired from Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. He became an avid runner in his 50s and joined the Concord Runners. He ran several Boston Marathons and the annual Mt. Washington road race into his 80s. He served on numerous boards and enjoyed traveling, the symphony, and the theater. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; a daughter; two sons; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Astrid Bottis Kromayer ’51 AM, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 19. She began teaching Spanish at Lehigh Univ. in 1951. From 1958 to 1963 she taught at Moravian Academy and later at Moravian College (both in Bethlehem), teaching both Spanish and French courses. She retired in 1992 as a recipient of the Lindback Foundation Award for distinguished teaching. She enjoyed animals and helping at the nonprofit Animals in Distress. She is survived by her husband, Peter; two daughters; and their spouses.

 

Jul, 2018

Aldo S. Lehmann ’41 PhD, of Fallbrook, Calif.; Nov. 24. He joined Shell Development Co. as a chemist in 1946 and held several managerial positions in the company, retiring after 31 years. During World War II he worked for the U.S. Department of the Navy on special assignments, including the Manhattan Project. An avid traveler, he visited numerous countries and every state in the United States. He was a member of the American Chemical Society, American Petroleum Institute, Alpha Chi Sigma, Phi Beta Kappa, and Sigma XI. He enjoyed camping, hiking, fly-fishing, hunting, and horseback riding. He is survived by two sons, two grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

James W. Hanner ’58, ’62 MAT, of Amherst, Mass., formerly of Arcadia, Calif.; Feb. 8. He was a retired financial consultant. He enjoyed singing in the Valley Light Opera and the Hampshire Choral Society. He also enjoyed watching the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Martha; a daughter; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

Jul, 2018

Joyce Williams Warren ’57, ’60 AM, of Roslyn Heights, N.Y.; Dec. 17. She was a professor of English and director of Women’s Studies at Queens College in New York. She was the author of The American Narcissus: Individualism and Women in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction; Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman; and Women, Money, and the Law: Nineteenth-Century Fiction, Gender, and the Courts, as well as the children’s book A Mouse to Be Free. She served on her local library board and was active in environmental and community organizations. She is survived by her husband, Frank ’57 AM, ’62 PhD; four children, including Catherine Warren ’88, and their spouses, including Anthony R. Loumis ’99; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2018

Bruce B. Chick ’50, ’53 ScM, of Rumford, R.I., and West Dennis, Mass.; Mar. 9 of cancer.While working towards his master’s degree at Brown, he worked in the metals research laboratory and was appointed assistant director of the lab in 1953. This led to a career in ultrasonic testing and the formation of two companies; Matec Inc., where he was president until it was sold in 1983, and RITEC Inc. in Warwick, R.I., where he was chairman. He wrote or cowrote numerous papers related to the specialized field of ultrasonic measurements and was coauthor of the text book Ultrasonic Methods in Solid State Physics. He held two patents for ultrasonic instruments. While at Brown as an undergrad, he was an announcer for WBRU for four years and after graduating became a faculty advisor and later served as president of the advisory board until 1983. He was a member of many organizations, including the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Society of Nondestructive Testing, The East Providence Historical Society, the East Providence Development Commission, and Sigma Xi. In 2015 he and his wife were elected copresidents of the Brown Class of 1950. Additionally, he was a senior warden at the Church of St. Michael and All Angels in Rumford. He is survived by his wife, Caroline Decatur Chick ’50; daughters Deborah Chick Burke ’77 and Nancy Chick Hyde ’80; and six grandchildren, including Nathan Hyde ’17 and Sara Hyde ’17.

May, 2018

John P. Cook ’64 AM, of Bath, Pa.; Dec. 22. He performed fieldwork in the Canadian Yukon Territory and Alaska’s Onion Portage and investigated the prehistory of Healy Lake in Alaska before beginning work at the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1968. There, in addition to a full teaching schedule, he was eventually in charge of all archaeological surveys and excavations north of Glennallen, before and during construction of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, and he directed salvage excavations at Amchitka Island. In the early 1970s he cofounded the Alaska Anthropological Assoc. and in the mid-to-late 1970s he pioneered the use of x-ray fluorescence and instrumental neutron activation analysis testing the possibility of determining prehistoric trade routes. In 1980 he began working at the Bureau of Land Management, where for nearly two decades he was in charge of investigation and management of cultural resources in the trans-Alaska pipeline corridor and interior Alaska lands controlled by the U.S. Army and Air Force. He was involved with several organizations, including the Alaska State Historical Commission, the Fairbanks Borough Commission for Historic Preservation, the Canadian Archaeological Assoc., and the Society for American Archeology. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two sons, including Timothy ’96 AM; a stepson; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and former wife, Nancy Wolens Cook ’60, ’64 MAT.

May, 2018

Norma Peters Cariglia ’90 AM, of Hanover, Mass.; Dec. 5, after a long illness. She is survived by four daughters, a stepdaughter, three grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

Alan F. Arcuri ’71 PhD, of Absecon, N.J.; Nov. 20. He taught political science at Stockton (N.J.) University, where he was instrumental in establishing the prelaw program and served as prelaw adviser. In addition, he was the academic coordinator of the Educational Opportunity Fund Summer Program, a guest lecturer at the State Police Training Academy and a core member of a high school-college cooperative program. He enjoyed playing squash. He is survived by his wife, Kris.

 

May, 2018

Brian Taylor ’70 PhD, of Algonac, Mich.; Jan. 5. He retired from General Motors after 35 years. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; five children; seven grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

May, 2018

Wilson C. Obi ’68 ScM, of East Orange, N.J.; Aug. 16. He is survived by his wife, Chinwe; three sons; three grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

May, 2018

 Erik Erginer ’66 ScM, ’69 PhD, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Oct. 31. After graduating, he returned to Istanbul to complete mandatory military service. He was discharged with the rank of lieutenant in 1972. In 1974 he returned to the United States and worked as an engineer. He held two U.S. patents for forging die design and for turbine processes. After retiring, he briefly taught high school, volunteered at the Shepherd’s Center of Greater Winston-Salem, and in 1991 helped found the Winston-Salem chapter of Women Against War. He is survived by his children; his grandchildren; a sister-in-law; a niece; and his former wife, Linda Holgate.

 

May, 2018

Arthur S. Grossman ’68, ’71 ScM, of Everett, Wash.; Dec. 21, of complications from ALS. He was a family physician for many years in Everett. After retiring, he taught fitness classes at the Everett YMCA and other fitness clubs and volunteered at the local clinic. He was also a volunteer coach and referee for the Washington State Youth Soccer Assoc. He was a member of the Washington State Medical Assoc. and the American Academy of Family Physicians. He enjoyed swimming, running, biking, bridge, and opera. He is survived by his wife, Virginia Vanderwicken Grossman ’70, ’71 ScM; two daughters, including Emily Grossman ’97; a son; five grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

 

Apr, 2018

MacGregor Robinson ’96 MAT, of Pawling, N.Y.; Sept. 4, of liver cancer. He worked as an English teacher and housemaster at the Berkshire School (Mass.), and as an admissions professional and student adviser at The Gunnery (Conn.). He also worked at Trinity-Pawling School (N.Y.); and at King’s Academy in Madaba, Jordan. He is survived by two brothers, two sisters-in-law; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018

Robert A. Johnson ’71 PhD, of Acton, Mass.; Nov. 4. He taught physics at Bucknell Univ. and later did consulting work. He was a member of the American Physical Society, the International Solar Energy Society, and the Federation of American Scientists. He was an Acton selectman and served on various town committees. He enjoyed playing bridge. He is survived by a son, a daughter-in-law, a grandson, two sisters, and his former wife, Elizabeth Comstock.

Apr, 2018

David Gullet ’70 AM, of Ashland, Ore., formerly of Oakland, Calif.; Oct. 11. He worked for the city of Oakland as a supervisor, area manager, park/recreation manager, and assistant director. He retired in 2004. He enjoyed gardening, photography, and traveling to state and national parks. He is survived by his wife, Christina, and two children.

Apr, 2018

Charles R. Jungwirth ’70 MAT, of Riverside, R.I.; Jan. 3, 2017. He was a biology teacher at Roger Williams Univ. for more than 25 years and also served as ombudsman. He is survived by his wife, Veretta; a daughter; two grandsons; two sisters; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2018

John D. Harper ’69 PhD, of Calgary, Canada; Oct. 24. A geologist, he worked across the globe and made significant contributions to petroleum geoscience and hydrocarbon exploration during his 50-year career. He was a professor at Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland and director of the Geological Survey of Canada, and he worked with Alconsult International and ConocoPhillips in Texas. He volunteered with the Canadian ski patrol system for 40 years, and was involved in various other community organizations. He is survived by his wife, Cathy; two sons and their spouses; and two grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

Herbert G. Sutter ’69 PhD, of Canton, Ohio, formerly of Staten Island, N.Y.; Nov. 14. He taught at Union College; did research on nuclear waste in the Maryland/Washington, D.C., area; and was a consultant, but his real passion was helping people. While in Maryland, he served as a counselor and elder at Northgate Community Church and later was pastor at a church in Germantown, Md. After moving to Ohio, he was active at Canton First Friends Church, where he was an elder and taught classes, mentored young married couples, and headed up the emergency relief and food pantry ministry. He is survived by his wife, Norma; two children; four grandchildren; and five adopted grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

John H. Spang ’67 ScM, ’71 PhD, of League City, Tex.; Nov. 9. He was a geology professor at the Univ. of Calgary, and then at Texas A&M, from which he retired. He was active in the American Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, U.S. Power Squadrons, America’s Great Loop Cruisers’ Assoc., and Sigma Xi. He is survived by his wife, Terry; a son; a daughter-in-law; grandchildren; a brother; and a sister-in-law.

Apr, 2018

Mark E. Connelly ’51 ScM, of Concord, Mass.; Oct. 15. He had a long career as a researcher at MIT and worked on hybrid computing, air defense, aircraft simulation, air traffic control, and mass transit. He advised numerous graduate students on their research. He was an active member of the Concord Sailfishing Group and played tennis, cribbage, and bridge. He also enjoyed reading the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and books on economics, history, and political science. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and is survived by two daughters, a son, two daughters-in-law, two sons-in-law, 12 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Apr, 2018

James Melius ’70, ’72 MMS

Architect of aid for 9/11 first responders
 

“For most occupational or environmental illnesses, what treatment do we have?” Dr. James Melius ’70, ’72 MMS told the Niagara Sunday Gazette in the late 1980s. As director of the New York Department  of Health’s division of occupational health and environmental epidemiology, he was leading the cleanup of Forest Glen, a Niagara Falls neighborhood that became a Superfund site.  “Our best treatment,” Melius insisted, “is to stop exposure.” 

Melius, who died January 1 of cardiac arrest at his home in Copake Falls, N.Y.,  had a decades-long career as a strong advocate for workers’ health and safety, with an emphasis on prevention. His repeated testimony before Congress was key to the passage of the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, which authorized billions of dollars for the medical care of first responders. “The failure of the government to properly inform and protect these people from these exposures added substantially to their health risks,” Melius testified in 2009.

As an international expert on workplace medicine, Melius was part of the cohort of U.S. experts sent to Bhopal, India, in 1984, to investigate the poisonous gas leak at the Union Carbide pesticide plant, considered one of the world’s worst industrial disasters. From 1994 until his death, Melius served the Laborers’ International Union of North America (LIUNA). “Jim was a true working class warrior,” said LIUNA general president Terry O’Sullivan, in a tribute. 

James Malcolm Melius was born on June 16, 1948, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, and raised in nearby Copake Falls, New York. At Brown, he studied biology and managed the varsity hockey team. In a letter to the BAM from 1972, Melius’s last year in the six-year medical science program,  he and fellow members of the Brown Medical Student Society made a forceful argument that Brown should start a medical school, both to enhance the University and to improve health care in Rhode Island. 

The son of a farmer and a first-grade teacher, Melius showed concern for the working class even before the start of his career. “Quality medical care is a right rather than a privilege which must be made equally available to all people,” he and his classmates wrote in the BAM.

Melius received his MD from the University of Illinois School of Medicine and his doctorate of epidemiology from the University of Illinois School of Public Health.  

Starting with a residency in occupational medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, Melius’s career was focused on reducing the number of workers killed, injured, or exposed to dangerous substances on the job. “He had an early sense of wanting to do good and remain connected to working class people,”his son Jeremy Melius told the New York Times in early January. “He had a strong sense of service.”

Melius improved occupational health practices in New York  long before he spelled out to Congress what hadn’t been done properly after 9/11 and what the procedure should be in future disaster response. In 1980, after an explosion and fire at the Chemical Control Corp. chemical storage site in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Melius got the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, where he’d worked previously, to come in and do medical evaluations of the firefighters. “It was one of the first times that firefighters were evaluated after a major incident,” a longtime former official of the International Association of Fire Fighters told the Times. “And that continues today.” 

Just months before his death, Melius coauthored an op-ed in the New York Daily News calling a monument for 9/11 first responders a moral imperative. “For them,” he wrote, “9/11 and its aftermath is still a daily battle.”

—Louise Sloan ’88

Feb, 2018

Mary D. Provost ’67 MAT, of Myrtle Beach, S.C., formerly of Blackstone, Mass.; Aug. 27. She taught at Blackstone High School and then North Smithfield High School (R.I.), where she was honored for 28 years of service to the North Smithfield school system. She was selected for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics. She volunteered as a religious educator and a Eucharistic minister at St. Theresa’s Catholic Church in Blackstone and was an active member of the Blackstone School Committee. She is survived by her husband, Edward; seven children and their spouses; 12 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and seven siblings.

Feb, 2018

Robert G. Sherer Jr. ’67 AM, of Little Rock, Ark.; Aug. 22. He taught part-time at North Carolina State and Tulane and had professorships at Stetson Univ. (Fla.), Alcorn State Univ. (Miss.), and Wiley College, (Tex.). Active in the civil rights movement, he participated in the March on Washington, where he heard Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. give his “I Have a Dream” speech. After moving to Little Rock, he served on the boards of the Arkansas Museum, the Univ. of Arkansas History Institute, and the Arkansas United Methodist Conference History board. He also taught at the Unity Sunday School and helped the Reconciling Ministries Network. He is survived by his wife, Carol; a daughter; a son; two grandsons; a niece; and a nephew.

Feb, 2018

Hubert E. Harber Jr. ’68 MAT, of Southampton, Pa., formerly of West Chester, Pa.; Sept. 25. He was a professor of astronomy at West Chester Univ. He published several articles in Sky & Telescope and Science News in the 1970s and was the author of an astronomy and stargazing guide for the Boy Scouts of America. He was a member of the Bucks County Radio Control Club, where he flew, displayed, and discussed hand-built model planes. He also enjoyed building model trains and sailing ships. He is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons; three stepsons; and three granddaughters.

Feb, 2018

Olga K. Ingelse ’68 MAT, of Rockville, Md.; Aug. 31. She was a professor of Spanish at the Community College of Rhode Island until her retirement. She is survived by two nieces and four nephews.

Feb, 2018

Iris Weidenfeld Falck Donnelly ’71 MAT, of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 12. She spent most of her career with the Providence school system as a bilingual kindergarten teacher and many years as a bilingual special education resource teacher. She also taught high school French and Spanish in Smithfield (R.I.) and Johnston (R.I.). In retirement, she volunteered at Sophia Academy, a school for young women from underserved communities in Rhode Island, and with adult literacy programs. She was a talented photographer. She is survived by her husband, Charles; two children; and a grandchild.

Feb, 2018

Penny S. Pickett ’71 AM, ’73 PhD, of Washington, D.C.; Sept. 11, after a long illness. She worked for the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). She was hired in 1980 as a journeyman editor helping the GAO communicate its findings to Congress and the public. She previously was part of the research team at the Folger Institute of Renaissance and 18th Century Studies in Washington, D.C. She also worked as a proofreader for U.S. News &World Report and for a time taught English literature at Georgetown.

Feb, 2018

Jeanne Elizabeth Hansen Kugler ’76 MAT, of New Bedford, Mass.; Aug. 16. She taught English at Bristol Community College. She also worked as a freelancer for the university presses of  both Harvard and Yale, as well as some New York publishing houses. In retirement she enjoyed painting, gardening, and walking on the beach and in the woods. She is survived by four children, including a daughter, Anne Kugler ’90; a son, Richard ’99 PhD; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

Feb, 2018

Henry J. Halko ’49 AM, ’57 PhD, of Charlton, Mass.; Sept. 24. He was a history professor at Simmons College for 37 years. He retired in 1990. He enjoyed gardening, spending time with family, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzles. He is survived by a brother and several nieces and nephews.

Feb, 2018

Simon Ostrach ’49 ScM, ’50 PhD, of Pepper Pike, Ohio; Oct. 2. He was a distinguished professor emeritus of engineering at Case Western Reserve Univ. and retired director of NASA’s National Center for Space Exploration Research. A pioneer in microgravity research, he designed experiments that flew aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1995. He authored more than 150 articles and papers in scientific and engineering journals. He was instrumental in establishing new engineering schools at Rowan Univ., Florida A&M, and Florida State Univ. He was listed in many publications, including Who’s Who in Aviation History and American Men of Science. As a lecturer, he was the recipient of numerous awards and was a member of several educational societies, including the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. He also served as a consultant to many national companies and was an NCAA licensed wrestling official. He enjoyed skippering a sailboat out of Edgewater Yacht Club and driving Corvettes. He is survived by his wife, Margaret; four children, including his son, Stefan ’69; five grandchildren, including Lillian Ostrach Toborek ’07, ’08 ScM, and Sarah Ostrach ’10; and one great-grandchild.

Feb, 2018

Arthur A. Ebenfield ’50 AM, Falmouth, Mass.; Oct. 7. He worked for the CIA as an analyst in Washington, D.C., for 25 years and consulted with a variety of defense firms from his home in Falmouth after retiring from the CIA. He volunteered and assisted in the chaplain’s office at Falmouth Hospital for 16 years. He enjoyed reading and playing golf. He is survived by five children, three stepchildren, five grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Feb, 2018

Joan Wilcox Cass ’52 ScM, of Enfield, Conn., formerly of Weathersfield, Vt.; Sept. 15. She was a member of the Enfield Congregational Church for more than 50 years and volunteered with many organizations. She enjoyed gardening, knitting, and reading. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a sister.

Feb, 2018

Gordon J. Eaton ’59 PhD, of Dresher, Pa.; Sept. 7. He was a professor of science at Barrington College (R.I.), the Univ. of Lagos in Nigeria, and Delaware Valley Univ. He also held a research position at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. He was a veteran of World War II, having served in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he received five Battle Stars. He is survived by his wife, Trudy; three children and their spouses; a daughter-in-law; eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Rebecca Hughes Malm ’60 AM, of Ashland, Ore.; Aug. 13, of a brain bleed. She taught dance, performed, and choreographed with a local semiprofessional company. Later she became a certified practitioner of the Feldenkrais Method of Movement Education and maintained a successful practice for 25 years. She was an activist for civil rights and was involved in Unitarian Universalist congregations. She enjoyed the arts, painting, sculpting, photography, and travel. She is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and a granddaughter.

Feb, 2018

William P. Ziemer ’61 PhD, of Waupaca, Wisc., formerly of Bloomington, Ind.; Aug. 5, of Parkinson’s. He served in the U.S. Army before joining the Indiana Univ. mathematics faculty. He retired in 2003. He lectured internationally and published four mathematics textbooks. For many years he was managing editor of the IU mathematics journal. He served a term as associate dean of the graduate school and in 1996 received Indiana Univ.’s Distinguished Faculty Award. He enjoyed singing with the Bloomington Chamber Singers and as the bass voice of the local barbershop quartet, the Bloomingtones. He sailed competitively, racing in local and regional Thistle class regattas, and enjoyed playing tennis and squash. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; two daughters; a son; and six grandchildren.

Feb, 2018

Caroline King Barnard Hall  ’66 AM,  ’73 PhD (see ’60).

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