Obituaries

Sep, 2020
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Joy and Determination
Women’s gymnastics coach Jackie Court led the team through many victories.
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Jackie Court image by Stew Milne
Sep, 2020
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Donald R. Maxson, of Barrington, R.I.; Feb. 13. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1944, worked at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C. for three years, and graduated with a PhD in physics in 1954 from the University of Illinois. He worked at Princeton before joining the Brown faculty as an assistant professor. He worked for 35 years until his retirement in 1994. At that time, he was the only experimental nuclear physics professor on staff at Brown. He enjoyed summering in Wellfleet, Mass., where he sailed his 17-foot Explorer, the first and only sailboat he ever owned. In addition to sailing, he enjoyed reading and listening to Mozart. He is survived by his companion, Nancy Carlson; a stepdaughter; a stepson; four step-grandchildren; and two step-great-grandchildren.  

Sep, 2020
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Charles C.J. Carpenter Jr., of Falmouth, Me., formerly of Barrington, R.I.; Mar. 19. After graduating from Princeton and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he worked at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, in India, at Johns Hopkins and at Case Western Reserve University Hospital in Cleveland. In 1986 he joined the Brown faculty as a professor of medicine and chief physician at Miriam Hospital. He served as director of the Brown University International Health Institute and the Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research. He introduced a program to care for Rhode Island state prisoners with HIV, worked with colleagues in India and the Philippines to reduce the spread of HIV, and chaired a treatment subcommittee to evaluate the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, which took him to several countries in Africa. He retired in 2015. He was president of the Association of American Physicians, chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and co-editor of seven editions of Cecil Essentials of Medicine. He was the recipient of numerous honors, including Brown’s Rosenberger Medal, the 2007 Robert H. Williams Distinguished Chair of Medicine Award from the Association of Professors of Medicine, and the International Antiviral Society–USA Lifetime of Leadership Award in 2012; in 1998, he received the Order of the Sacred Treasure from the Emperor of Japan for his contributions to the U.S.-Japan Cooperative Medical Science Program. He enjoyed fishing, tennis, biking with his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Sally; three sons; seven grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
GS 84

Elizabeth Bowen Chase ’84 AM, of Belfast, Me.; Feb. 5. She taught French at Colby College for two years and directed their Colby-in-Dijon semester abroad program. She left to work at Fleet Bank and returned to Colby in 1998, where she administered financial aid for 11 years. She had a deep interest in Zen Buddhism and attended retreats at Zen Mountain Monastery (N.Y.). She also enjoyed playing the organ and rowing with the Come Boating crews on Penobscot Bay. She was a member of the National Society of Colonial Dames of America. She is survived by her husband, John; a brother and sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
GS 82

Robert C. DeBlois ’82 AM, of Seekonk, Mass.; Jan. 31. After completing his degree at UNH, he began teaching English at Bishop Keough High School in Pawtucket, R.I. and working at Upward Bound, a college prep program for first generation college students. He developed a relationship with Ted Sizer, founder of the Coalition of Essential Schools and the Annenberg Institute for School Reform, and created programs to serve urban kids at risk of dropping out of school. In 1984 he founded SPIRIT, from which grew two schools, Blackstone Academy and UCAP. He served on many local boards and received numerous recognitions including the National Caring Award, the 2000 Rhode Island Middle School Principal of the Year, The Martin Luther King, Jr., Hall of Fame Award, and the 2018 Murray Family Prize. He was a lifelong activist, writer, and student of history and politics. Before his accident (he broke his neck diving into a river, leaving him a quadriplegic), he enjoyed hiking and skiing in the White Mountains, and watching his children develop the same appreciation for skiing, hiking, and nature that he had. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; a daughter; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three brothers; three sisters-in-law, including Paula Pillsbury DeBlois ’89; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
GS 72

Robert T. Glassey ’72 PhD, of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 15, of pancreatic cancer. He joined the math department at Indiana University in 1972 and remained for the next 37 years, a mainstay of the group in partial differential equations (PDE), rising to full professor.  He enjoyed music and could be found playing in chamber ensembles with his children. He also liked to read and bike. He is survived by his wife, Betsy, a daughter and a son.  

Sep, 2020
GS 71

Mary Margaret Hamill ’71 MAT, of Lakeway, Tex., formerly of Boothwyn and Media, Pa.; Mar. 6. She taught at Penncrest High School in Media for 42 years. Proud of her Irish heritage, she traveled to Ireland to find her family, whom she grew close to over many decades of visits. She is survived by a sister and two brothers.

Sep, 2020
GS 71

Patricia M. Euart ’71 AM, ’75 PhD, of Cranston, R.I.; Jan. 30. She taught at Rhode Island College and the Community College of Rhode Island. She published numerous articles, some in the Providence Journal, and a book of poetry. She enjoyed riding her horse and painting. She is survived by a sister.

Sep, 2020
GS 65

John L. Mothershead III ’65 MAT, of Pasa-dena, Calif.; Mar. 1. He taught at Chadwick School, Flintridge Prep, and several Pasadena-area schools prior to joining San Marino’s Southwestern Academy, where he taught and served as dean of students for 45 years. He was president of the Rotary Club of San Marino, California, and involved with the effort to eradicate the polio virus by traveling with the Rotary teams for national inoculation days. He is survived by his wife, Therese, and a son.

Sep, 2020
GS 62

Stephen D. Shatkin ’62 MAT, of Brookline, Mass.; Feb. 8. He was a retired professor at Suffolk University and co-owner of Camp Samoset in Lake Casco, Me. He is survived by many cousins.

Sep, 2020
GS 62

Patricia Reid Eldredge ’62 AM, of St. Paul, Minn.; Jan. 24, from advanced Parkinson’s disease. She was an adjunct professor of both English and graduate liberal studies at Hamline University for 14 years. Before moving to St. Paul, she taught at Earlham College, Michigan State University, Lansing Community College, and Barrington College. Her scholarly articles linking Jungian and post-Freudian psychoanalytic approaches to literature appear in edited volumes and scholarly journals. In retirement, she wrote a mystery novel, The Shadow of Strangers, which her husband intends to publish. She is survived by her husband, Sears; two brothers and sisters-in-law; three nieces; and a nephew.  

Sep, 2020
GS 60

Atle Gjelsvik ’60 ScM, ’62 PhD, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Mar. 13. He was professor emeritus of civil engineering at Columbia, recipient of three Excellent Teacher Awards, and author of scientific journal articles and The Theory of Thin-walled Bars. He worked in ship building and the design of offshore structures, including semi-submersible oil drilling rigs, developing solutions to various problems associated with oil drilling. His research interests included buckling of arches, stability of elasto-plastic columns, design of light gauge beams, minimum-weight design on continuous beams, bone remodeling, plastic design, and suspension bridge cables. His collaborations with the College of Physicians and Surgeons at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center led to advances in the field of orthopedics and joint replacement. He is survived by his wife, Carol Canner Gjelsvik ’59; daughter Annie Gjelsvik ’91, ’03 PhD; a son; and niece Elizabeth Canner ’91. 

Sep, 2020
GS 60

Tomas Feininger ’60 ScM, ’64 PhD, of Quebec, Canada; Nov. 26. An eminent geologist, he first worked in Ecuador, where he founded the department of geology at the Escuela Politécnica Nacional (National Polytechnic School). In 1978 he relocated to Quebec City to become a researcher at the department of geology and geological engineering of Université Laval. He went on to work as a geologist in the department of global physics for the Geological Survey of Canada before returning to teaching as an adjunct professor at Université Laval. At the same time, he initiated and participated in the geological mapping of territories in South and North America, notably in Quebec, and published numerous articles in specialized scientific publications. He served as president of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec from 1993 to 1998. He is survived by his wife, Johanne; three daughters; and six grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
GS 57

Paul A. Tessier ’57 ScM, of Mechanic Falls, Me.; Mar. 26. He served in the U.S. Navy and later transferred to the U.S. Air Force and was a flight surgeon. He operated his own urology office and taught biology. He was a member and treasurer of the Lewiston-Auburn Kennel Club. He is survived by his wife, Karen.

Sep, 2020
GS 53

Maxwell M. Mozell ’53 ScM, ’56 PhD (see ’51).

Sep, 2020
09

Fiona Heckscher ’09, of Washington, D.C.; Feb. 18, after a fall while rock climbing. For the past five years she was an attorney with the U.S. House of Representatives’ Office of the Legislative Counsel, which helps members of Congress write legislation. She earned her law degree from Yale in 2014. She is survived by her parents.

Sep, 2020
07

Elliot B. Quick ’07, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Feb. 19, after a fall. He was a dramaturg and taught theater history and playwriting at the Maggie Flanigan School of Acting and SUNY Purchase.  After Brown, he received his MFA in Dramaturgy and Dramatic Criticism from the Yale School of Drama, where he was the resident dramaturg and associate artistic director for the 2011 Yale Summer Cabaret Shakespeare Festival and the associate artistic director the Yale Cabaret’s 43rd season. He has worked as a literary assistant at Playwrights Horizons and a literary associate at the Yale Rep and was a founding member of the theater company, Piehole. He is survived by his mother, his sister, and many friends.

Sep, 2020
93

John C. Kelleher III ’93 ’07 MD, of Los Angeles; Jan. 26, of brain cancer. At the time of his diagnosis he was completing training at the New Center for Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles. He was a perpetual student. After graduating from Brown, he studied in Nagoya, Japan, and later returned to Brown to study medicine, completing his residency in psychiatry at UCLA. He previously studied acting at the Neighborhood Playhouse in New York City and was a talented cellist and pianist. He is survived by his husband, Greg Okin; a daughter; his parents; three siblings and their spouses; his grandmother; and seven nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1993, MD Class of 2007
Sep, 2020
90

Joel A. Firehammer  ’90, ’99 PhD, of Chestnut Hill, Mass.; Feb. 4. After several years in New York City, he moved to Massachusetts and was director of software engineering at TriNetX, Inc., in Cambridge. He excelled at collaboration in the software design process and relished the excitement of new start-up projects, most notably during his years at DataSynapse throughout the 2000s. He enjoyed cooking and entertaining, cycling, skiing, and spending time on Cape Cod. He is survived by his wife, Elisabeth Preis ’01; three children; his parents; and three brothers and sisters-in-law.

Related classes:
Class of 1990, GS Class of 1999
Sep, 2020
87

John Blassingame Jr. ’87, of New Haven, Conn.; Mar. 21. He taught at Kaplan preparing students for the LSAT test and tutoring college-bound students for the SAT exams. He is survived by his mother, a sister, and aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Sep, 2020
82

Cary M. Hammer ’82, of San Francisco; Jan. 15, after a prolonged illness. He was a computer games consultant and contractor working at Atari, then director of programming at Scholastic Software in New York. After moving to San Francisco he founded his own company, Unexpected Development, focusing on handheld games for Nintendo Game Boy and Sega Game Gear. He enjoyed playing poker, especially Texas hold’em, and entered the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas several times. He was a master-level prankster and enjoyed any opportunity to upturn the conventional. He is survived by his partner, Suzanne Scott; two sons; and his former wife, Nadine Browning.

Sep, 2020
81

Stephen J. DeBlois ’81, of Ballston Spa, N.Y., formerly of Narragansett, R.I; Feb. 25. He was vice president of DeBlois Oil Company for many years and most recently worked as a senior territory sales manager for Citgo Petroleum in the Upstate New York region. He was a family man who enjoyed coaching or spectating at his children’s sporting events, hiking through the mountains of upstate New York, white water rafting, skiing, and playing golf. At Brown he was a member of the hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Diane; his father; four children; three siblings and their spouses; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
75

Lawrence J. Solin ’75, ’78 MD, of Haverford, Pa.; Mar. 3. He was emeritus professor and clinician educator in radiation oncology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He was listed on several Best Doctors in America lists and served on the faculty senate, retiring in 2008. He served on the staff at Jefferson Frankford Hospital, Mercer Medical Center, Germantown Hospital and Medical Center, and was a voluntary faculty member at Thomas Jefferson University. He later joined the staff at Einstein Medical Center, where he served as department chair in radiation oncology. He was a major contributor to the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network, helping to define the standards of care for breast cancer. His work was published in several scientific journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. He was an active leader in the National Cancer Institute Cooperative National Groups and a longtime grantee of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. He is survived by his wife, Leslie Belasco Solin ’80; two daughters, including Jennifer Bensimon ’09; and a granddaughter.

Related classes:
Class of 1975, MD Class of 1978
Sep, 2020
74

Deborah L. Homsher ’74, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Mar. 16. She won a Wallace Stegner writing fellowship at Stanford University and followed with an MFA in fiction writing from the University of Iowa. She was employed as an adjunct English professor at Ithaca College and during that time, raised a family and published From Blood to Verdict, Women and Guns, and The Rising ShoreRoanoke. In 1995 she was hired as managing editor of publications in Cornell’s Southeast Asia Program, a position she held for 19 years. After developed an enthusiasm for rowing a single shell that lasted for years, and also enjoyed hiking, biking, and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Hugh Egan ’74; two sons, including Kevin Egan ’03; a sister; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
72

James M. L. Williams ’72, of Lewiston, Me., formerly of Princeton, N.J.; Feb. 7, of sudden cardiac arrest. He spent most of his career in the wine business, first in Germany and later in New York and New Jersey. He retired in 2007 as technical services specialist of the Princeton University Library. He was also an avid birder and bird photographer, a 40-year member of New Jersey Audubon Society, and joined the Stanton Bird Club on moving to Lewistown in 2007. He traveled extensively in his birding adventures and enjoyed bowling and playing Scrabble. He is survived by a sister and cousins.

Sep, 2020
72

Daniel M. Babcock ’72, of Yorktown Va.; Dec. 29, after a courageous battle with ALS. After Brown, he graduated from the Dental College of Georgia and established an orthodontic practice in 1978 that continued for 41 years. In recognition of his geology major at Brown he became an environmental conservationist. He was also a self-taught beekeeper, carpenter, and chicken and oyster farmer. He enjoyed skiing, sailing, fishing, crabbing, and traveling. He and his wife visited more than 50 countries and all seven continents. He is survived by his wife, Pearl; two daughters and sons-in-law; a son; and three grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
71

Robert J. Donahue ’71, of Norwood, Mass.; Feb. 15. He taught at Norwood High School for two years before enrolling at Suffolk University Law School. He joined his father’s law practice and together they formed Donahue & Donahue in Norwood. He was on the board of directors at Norwood Bank, a founding member and board member of The Friends of St. Nick, and was active in the Friends of Norwood Hockey and the Norwood Gridiron Club. He also enjoyed playing golf and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; a son; three grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; brother Charles ’65 and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
69

Stephen Strocker ’69, of Tarzana, Calif.; Dec. 21.

Sep, 2020
69

Dante E. Boffi Jr. ’69, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 29. After earning an MBA from URI, he became a leader in mental health innovations for the Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals. He culminated his career at the Rhode Island Department of Administration and was a member of the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; two children; four grandchildren; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
67

William E. Donnelly ’67, of Lansdowne, Va.; Feb. 25, of pancreatic cancer. He earned a law degree from Georgetown Law School and practiced in both the private sector and local government sector. His specialty was land use law. He enjoyed fly-fishing in the Shenandoah, woodworking, and carving. He is survived by his wife, Denise; two sons; and five grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
66

Allan Eberhart ’66, of Grass Valley, Calif.; Mar. 12, of pancreatic cancer. He was a longtime environmental activist in the Northern California foothills. He served for decades on Sierra Club conservation and legislative committees and participated for the Sierra Club in the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. He began and led local environmental organizations, including the collaborative Foothills Water Network. He mentored many of the next generation of environmental activists and in later years was devoted to saving the Bear River from additional dams. He was also a master carpenter who specialized in renovating historic homes in Nevada City and Grass Valley. He is survived by his wife, Alison; a sister; and two nephews.

Sep, 2020
65

Victor J. Field ’65, of Ludlow, Mass.; Jan. 25. He worked as a hospital administrator and then was a founding partner of Keystone Commons, an assisted living facility in Ludlow. He enjoyed traveling to Italy and Ireland and was a New York Giants and Boston Red Sox fan. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses, six grandchildren, and a sister.

Sep, 2020
64

Eric T. Helland ’64, of Divide, Colo.; Jan. 30. In 1967 he graduated from the University of Missouri, Kansas City College of Dentistry. In 1968 he received a Presidential Commission from the Navy and worked as a dentist aboard the USS John F. Kennedy. He moved to Colorado in 1970 and established his dental practice. During 42 years in practice he received many recognitions, including Fellow of the Academy of General Dentistry in 1981 and Fellow of Pierre Fauchard Academy in 1990. He served on the board of Delta Dental of Colorado and assisted in the formation of the Intermountain Dental Society, where he was president for 20 years. He ran several times in the Pikes Peak Marathon and enjoyed being in the mountains, camping, and skiing. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; five children and their spouses; five grandchildren; a great-grandson; two brothers, including Doug ’67; two sisters-in-law; and a nephew.

Sep, 2020
64

Richard K. Goeltz ’64, of New York City; Mar. 23, of cardiac arrest following surgery. He served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1966 to 1972, attaining the rank of staff sergeant. He worked as a financial executive in New York, Chicago, London, Paris, Miami, and Central America. He joined the Seagram Company in 1970, becoming executive vice president and chief financial officer in 1986. In 1992 he moved to London to become a director and chief financial officer of National Westminster Bank, then returned to New York and joined the American Express Company in 1996 as vice chairman and chief financial officer. He also held several nonexecutive directorships, including Freddie Mac and Delta Air Lines. He was active in numerous philanthropic organizations, including the Opera Orchestra of New York, the London Philharmonic Trust, English Chamber Orchestra and Music Society, and the American Academy of Berlin. Additionally, he was a longtime member of the Metropolitan Opera Club and board member of the London School of Economics. He enjoyed collecting 18th Century Worcester and Meissen porcelain, traveling, attending opera festivals, and reading. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ellen, and several family members.

Sep, 2020
63

David A. Wheatland ’63, of Cumberland, Me.; Feb. 13. After earning his PhD from the University of Maryland, he was a professor of chemistry at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me. for six years. He left to become a research chemist for Scott Paper, then dedicated his time to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service mapping the wetlands of New England, as well as volunteering at the greenhouse at the Morrison Center. He was a supporter of the Portland Symphony Orchestra, the Portland Stage Company, and the Portland Museum of Art. He and his wife enjoyed European travel through the Brown Travelers and spent several winters on Sanibel Island, Fla. He also enjoyed reading, bird watching, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Susan; daughter Rebecca Wheatland ’94; son Thomas Wheatland ’91; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren;
and two sisters.

Sep, 2020
63

Dennis R. Redding ’63, of South Yarmouth, Mass.; Jan. 9, of cancer.  He served in the military for 27 years and received the Distinguished Flying Cross, numerous Air Medals, and two Legions of Merit. He was honorably discharged as a colonel in 1989. He was a respected high school football, basketball, and softball official, as well as a college football official. He worked many tournaments and state championship games and volunteered as an umpire for the Cape Cod Senior Softball League for many years. His greatest accomplishment was working as a replay official for the Atlantic Coast Conference, culminating in his selection to officiate the 2017 Cotton Bowl. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four granddaughters; a sister; a brother and sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
63

Paul M. Allen ’63, of Biloxi, Miss.; Mar. 16. He was a gynecologist and obstetrician for more than 30 years and a staff member at Singing River Hospital. He retired in 1998 and joined the staff at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Biloxi, where he would ultimately serve as chief of the medical staff.  At the end of his career, he served as a surveyor for the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care, a position that provided him with an opportunity for travel and to meet new people. He was a glider pilot and was fascinated with foreign languages. He studied Chinese, French, Arabic, and Spanish. He is survived by four sons and their spouses, seven grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and his former wife, Joan Weir Allen.

Sep, 2020
62

Paula Fitzpatrick Budinger ’62, of Monona, Wisc., formerly of Palo Alto, Calif.; Feb. 8. She worked in research labs at Stanford University and the Palo Alto VA Hospital. Years later she earned a degree in interior design at Canada College and  in 1980 moved to the Seattle area, where she worked as a nursing assistant, then an occupational therapy aide at a nursing center for young people with disabilities. She returned to school again and became a medical assistant and worked in several clinics before retiring as a medical transcriptionist in 2007 and moving to Wisconsin. She became an avid quilter and started a blog called Paula B. Quilts. She was a member of the Monona Quilt Group and the Garden Club. She is survived by a daughter, a granddaughter, and a sister.

Sep, 2020
61

Martin Wenick ’61, of Washington, D.C.; May 7, from COVID-19. After Brown he trained as a Foreign Service officer and had a 27-year State Department career that included positions in Washington, D.C., Afghanistan, Czechoslovakia, Italy, and the Soviet Union. From 1970 to 1974 he was stationed in Moscow and became head of the National Conference for Soviet Jewry. After retiring he became executive director of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS) until his retirement in 1998. Under his leadership, HIAS resettled tens of thousands of Soviet Jews, brought the final remnants of Syria’s Jewish community safely to the United States, and helped members of the Baha’i faith escape persecution in Iran, among other initiatives. He is survived by his wife, Alice.

Sep, 2020
61

Alice Guillemette Bransfield ’61, of Raleigh, N.C.; Feb. 4. She was an elementary school teacher for 37 years, most of those years spent in New York City and Fairfax (Va.) County schools. She retired from Forest Edge Elementary in Reston, Va., in 2002. She volunteered with the American Heart Association and enjoyed reading and traveling the world. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law.

Sep, 2020
60

Philip H. Tenenbaum ’60, of Rancho Mirage, Calif.; Feb. 26. He was the founder and sole owner of The Chicago Wine Company, which conducted its first fine wine auction in April 1977, making it only the second company (after Heublein) to conduct wine auctions in the U.S. An avid tennis fan and player, he won two tennis tournaments while serving in the U.S. Navy and in later years was tutored by Dennis Ralston. He is survived by his wife, Susan, and brother Robert ’64.

Sep, 2020
60

David Reissig ’60, of Swanton, Vt.; Mar. 30, from COVID-19. He attended Brown for a year before transferring to UVM. He completed training at the Customs Academy in Washington, D.C., became special agent in charge of U.S. Customs in Rouses Point, N.Y., and worked in the Middle East as a U.S. sky marshal. He went on to serve in the Secret Service; one assignment included providing protection for President Ford. In the ’80s, he was assigned as a special agent to represent U.S. Customs on the security detail for the Lake Placid Winter Olympics. He spent time in Key West, Fla., in charge of a drug task force and later served as the U.S. Customs Representative to Canada for the U.S. Consulate in Montreal. At the end of his career, he became supervisor in charge of the special investigators working out of the U.S. Customs offices in New York and Vermont. He retired after 28 years but continued to work part-time for the Defense Department, the FBI, and the U.S. State Department performing background investigations for another 25 years. He enjoyed time with family, fishing, biking, skating, skiing, and playing pickleball. He is survived by his wife, Ione; two daughters; a son; six grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
60

A. Richard Caputo ’60, of Shavertown, Pa.; Mar. 11, after a brief illness. After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, he served in the Judge Advocate General’s Department of the U.S. Air Force for three years, then joined a law firm that over time became known as Shea, Shea & Caputo. In 1997 he was nominated to the federal bench by President Clinton and served as a federal district judge on the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania for 22 years. He was a member of various community organizations, a founding director of the Luzerne Foundation, director of the Federal Judges Association, and a member of the Third Circuit Committee on Model Civil Jury Instructions. He enjoyed playing golf and had an interest in cars. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary Shea Caputo ’62; two daughters and their spouses, including Lisa Caputo Morris ’86; son A. Richard Caputo Jr. ’88 and his wife, Laurel Reed Caputo ’88; and seven grandchildren, including Albert R. Caputo III ’18 and Jackson R. Caputo ’21.

Sep, 2020
60

Richard D. Brown ’60, of West Lake Hills, Tex.; Mar. 5. Following his time in the U.S. Army, he attended the University of Pittsburgh and received his master’s in public administration. He moved to Austin in 1963 and began a long association with the Texas Municipal League, becoming executive director in 1970. Retiring in 1985, he represented many different clients and was routinely named one of the state’s top lobbyists. He served as alderman, mayor pro tem, and mayor of the City of Rollingwood from 1985 to 1995, and was instrumental in devising a bill to create library districts. He is survived by his wife, Jann; a daughter and her spouse; a son; three grandchildren; a stepdaughter and her spouse; a stepson and his spouse; seven step-grandchildren; two sisters; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
59

Anthony I. Morgan ’59, of Southbury, Conn.; Feb. 15. After graduating, he worked in New York City for 40 years as an advertising and market research executive. He was said to have been part of the team that created the slogan “Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.” He also taught graduate seminars in marketing and market research at Manhattan College and was published in multiple professional journals. After retiring, he began writing fiction and at age 70 self-published his first novel, Incident at Heidelberg. It was followed by a second novel, When the Sea Shall Give Up Her Dead, and a book of short stories and essays entitled The Book of Morgan. He went on to join the Heritage Village Writers’ Group, where he served as editor for An Anthology of Heritage Village Writers. He was an avid tennis player and competed into his early 80s. He also enjoyed art and architecture and was a fan of the New York Rangers. He is survived by his wife, Mercedes; a daughter; three sons; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a brother and a sister-in-law.

Sep, 2020
59

Robert E. Kresko ’59, of St. Louis; Apr. 21, of cancer. After service in the U.S. Marine Corps and graduation from Brown, he entered the real estate business at Bakewell Corp. In 1967, he joined the Trammell Crow Company of Dallas as one of its earliest partners, taking on the responsibility for developments in St. Louis. He assumed the role of managing partner in 1987 and retired in 1990. In retirement, he joined with Peter Krombach and formed Krombach Partners, a real estate company where he continued to work through 2019. He established the Kresko Family Victorian Garden at Missouri Botanical Garden; donated a Chinese Bronze Collection to the St. Louis Art Museum; contributed to the building of the football field at St. Mary’s High School, where he was inducted into the Hall of Fame and given a meritorious service medal; and at Brown established the Kresko Scholarship and the Chapin Newhard Scholarship. He served on several boards over the course of his career and was a Brown trustee emeritus. He is survived by his wife, Dorotha; three children; and four grandchildren.    

Sep, 2020
59

Joel F. DiPaola ’59, of Brookfield, Conn.; Sept. 11, 2019, of pancreatic cancer. He worked at General Electric Company and while there was awarded two patents. His last role was in academia at Danbury Community College’s chemistry department. From 1959 to 1965 he served in the U.S. Army Reserve. He was a longtime soccer referee, a hiker, and a camper. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; brother Lynn ’62; a sister-in-law; a niece and three nephews.

Sep, 2020
59

Joel G. Caslowitz ’59, of Worcester, Mass.; Jan. 4. After serving as a captain in the U.S. Air Force, he joined the faculty at Boston University School of Medicine and was promoted to professor in 1997. He served as associate chief of internal medicine and program director of the internal medicine residency at the Boston VA from 1970 to 2000 and as associate program director for the internal medicine residency at Boston Medical Center from 2000 to 2008. His teaching was recognized with numerous awards, including the 1993 Metcalf Cup and Prize, Boston University’s highest teaching award. He retired in 2014. He enjoyed football, tennis, skiing, and sailing with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; three children, including Pamela Caslowitz ’83; four granddaughters; and two sisters, including Rita Michaelson ’50. 

Sep, 2020
58

Jane Horwich Weinberg ’58, of Fair Lawn, N.J.; Mar. 28. She was a teacher in the public school system prior to starting her own SAT tutoring business and helping students reach their college goals over a span of 40 years. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and two grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
58

Martin E. Plaut ’58, of Buffalo, N.Y.; Feb. 17. For four decades he was a professor of medicine at SUNY-University at Buffalo School of Medicine. He taught internal medicine at Buffalo General Hospital and Sisters of Charity Hospital in Buffalo. He was a 50-year member and past president of the Roswell Park Medical Club in Buffalo and a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Disease Society of America. At the time of his death, he was preparing a talk on the novel coronavirus. In addition to scholarly research, he published three novels and The Doctor’s Guide to You and Your Colon. He regularly attended performances at the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and enjoyed visiting art galleries and reading the New York Times. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; two daughters; son Benjamin ’91; two grandchildren; and a brother.

Sep, 2020
58

Fred “Woody” Nordenholz ’58, of WinstonSalem, N.C.; Mar. 7. He began his career at Western Electric and served in various management positions before leaving in 1986 to accept the position of president of the Greater Winston-Salem Chamber of Commerce. In retirement, both he and his wife earned master’s of arts degrees in liberal studies at UNC at Greensboro. He enjoyed reading and had a special interest in American history and politics. He also enjoyed cross country skiing at The Home Ranch in Clark, Colo., which was a special place for him, having arranged for a group of children with cancer and their families to spend a week of healing and equine therapy there. He is survived by his wife, Lillian; two daughters; and a son-in-law.

Sep, 2020
58

Peter C. Charron ’58, of Gulfport, Fla.; Feb. 24. He served two years in the U.S. Air Force followed by a computer position with RCA at Cape Canaveral, then went to IBM, where he worked for 28 years. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four children; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

Sep, 2020
57

Elizabeth J. Webb ’57, of Naples, Fla.; Oct. 20, 2019.

Sep, 2020
57

Richard M. Quinn ’57, of Indianapolis; Feb. 8, after a battle with lung disease. He was the CEO of INDO Advertising and served on two bank boards in Marion, Indiana, then moved to Indianapolis, where he was the owner of The Beer Company and subsequently founded and was president of Cameron Springs Water Company. He was active in his community and served as president of the Brown Club of Indiana and was on the board of the Indiana Repertory Theatre. He enjoyed sailing and exploring and is survived by his wife, Jean; daughter Heather ’86; two sons, including Richard ’84; three daughters-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
57

James F. Buote ’57, of Costa Mesa, Calif.; Dec. 1. He worked at the Xerox Corp. for 34 years and served in the Korean War. He enjoyed reading and antique cars. He is survived by his wife, Glenda; four daughters; a son; 11 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
56

Ruth Fried Schetman ’56, of Glen Mills, Pa., formerly of Wilmington, Del.; Jan. 29. She assisted in the operations of her husband’s dermatology practice, volunteered at Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, and taught reading skills to inner-city children. She enjoyed reading and playing tennis, bridge, and mahjong, but especially spending time at her second home at Rehoboth Beach. She is survived by three sons and their spouses, including Richard ’79 and Bill ’81; and five grandchildren.

Sep, 2020
56

Quentin G. Kraft ’56, of Granville, Ohio; Mar. 24. He had a 36-year teaching career at Denison University in Granville. He retired from Denison in 1997. At age 70 he began writing poetry and titled his collection On Getting Too Damn’d Old: Free Speech Poems for Free Readers. He competed in road races in Ohio including the Columbus Marathon and twice qualified for the Boston Marathon. He enjoyed playing tennis and golf. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a son and daughter-in-law; a sister; five sisters and brothers-in-law; nieces and nephews.

Sep, 2020
56

Robert Ise ’56, of Calabasas, Calif.; Mar. 17, of congestive heart failure. He had a long career working at the Atlantic Richfield Company and later at Lyondell Petrochemical, where he was vice president of marketing. He retired in 1998. He enjoyed gardening and is survived by his wife, Armelle; two daughters; a granddaughter; and brother Richard Ise ’54

Sep, 2020
56

Harry F. DiZoglio ’56, of Johnston, R.I.; Feb. 16. He was a civil engineer for many years and served in the Rhode Island Army National Guard. He is survived by his companion Lucille Waidalowski; a daughter; a son; a grandson; a sister; two brothers; and two sisters-in-law.

Sep, 2020
56

William A. Cooper ’56, of The Villages, Fla., formerly of Wolfeboro, N.H.; Mar. 19, of cancer. He was a member of Brown’s hockey team all four years and went on to be a math teacher and coach hockey, football, and baseball at Trinity-Pawling School in Pawling, N.Y. In 1959 he moved to Connecticut to work as an engineer for Southern New England Telephone, but in 1962 he returned to Trinity-Pawling to serve as chair of their math department, head of the Disciplinary Committee, and coach of the varsity hockey, junior varsity baseball, junior varsity football, and intramural tennis teams until his retirement in 1981. Trinity-Pawling inducted him into its Athletic Hall of Fame in 2003. An appointment as an educational consultant based in Avon, Conn., followed. Concurrently, he began working at the Wolfeboro Camp School as a teacher in 1967 and became head of school in 1977. He retired in 2005 and became a trustee. He enjoyed swimming, biking, sailing, tennis, golf, traveling, and cheering on the Boston Red Sox, Boston Bruins, and New England Patriots. He is survived by a daughter and her spouse, two sons and their spouses, six grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, a sister, four nieces and nephews, and his former wife, Joan Cooper.

Sep, 2020
55

Thomas A. Westbrook ’55, of South Windsor, Conn.; Feb. 24. He operated his family’s manufacturing business and invested in real estate. He was an active member of the East Hartford Rotary Club and served as president in 1974. He was also president of the East Hartford Chamber of Commerce in 1974. He enjoyed family vacations, camping, canoeing trips, and playing the piano.

Aug, 2020
55

Arthur Scott Jr. ’55, of Bristol, R.I.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of sociology at Providence College. He retired in 2005. He also worked as a civilian contractor with the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed running, swimming, and proudly watching the New England Patriots, the Boston Red Sox, and PC basketball teams. He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a son-in-law, three grandchildren, a great-grandchild, and a brother.

Aug, 2020
55

Norman G. Orodenker ’55, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 18. He received his JD from Columbia University in 1958 and was admitted to the Rhode Island Bar. He was a senior partner at Tillinghast, Licht, Perkins, Smith, and Cohen; legal counsel at the Department of Employment Security (1960-1962); chief legal counsel for all Rhode Island departments of state government (1969-1972); chief legal counsel at the Registry of Motor Vehicles (1972-1974); and chief legal counsel of the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (1974-1982). He held numerous leadership roles in community, charitable, and religious organizations. He was recognized for his commitment, dedication, and passion involving social change and justice as a recipient of the NCCJ Humanitarian Award in 1999, the Jewish Federation of Rhode Island Joseph W. Ress Community Service Award in 2004, and the Urban League Humanitarian Award in 2004, and received the Martindale-Hubbell rating AV, which is the highest rating given to attorneys. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and two sisters.

Aug, 2020
55

Harold J. Morick ’55, of Lenox, Mass.; Mar. 27. He was a professor of philosophy at the State University of New York at Albany from 1967 to 2000, specializing in analytic philosophy, Wittgenstein, and Freud. He published three books of philosophy and at the time of his death was editing a selection of essays by Sigmund Freud for a volume about Freud as a philosopher. He is survived by his wife, Jeanette; four daughters; and a granddaughter.

Aug, 2020
54

Caleb R. Woodhouse ’54, of Little Compton, R.I.; Jan. 28. He had a distinguished career teaching history at both the college and high school level for more than 30 years. He enjoyed singing and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Alesandra; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law.

Aug, 2020
54

Nancy Schmidt Sherman ’54, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Feb. 20. She worked at Manufacturer’s Bank until she began her family. She was cofounder of the Angle Tree Garden Club and served as its president. She was an accomplished artist and enjoyed knitting, needlepoint, and playing tennis. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
54

Edward Rowland ’54, of South Hamilton, Mass.; Mar. 11. After serving in the U.S. Army, he moved to Carbondale, Colo., where he taught at the Colorado Rocky Mountain School. He moved to Boston a year later to join Estabrook and Company, where he began a career in the investment business that spanned six decades. In 1971, he joined the board of trustees at The Pingree School in Hamilton, later becoming its chair. An avid sailor, he spent many summers on Cape Cod and was a member of the Cruising Club of America, where he served as commodore from 2005 to 2007. He is survived by his wife, Susie; a daughter; a son; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

Aug, 2020
54

Frank J. Lord ’54, of West Yarmouth, Mass.; Feb. 1. After three years of active duty in the Pacific with the U.S. Navy and 18 years in the Naval Reserve, he retired with the rank of captain. He taught high school world geography in Lexington, attended Boston University to become a guidance counselor, and worked for 38 years as a guidance counselor in both Wellesley and in Duxbury, retiring in 1994. He spent 12 years building houses with Habitat for Humanity and later led his Duxbury church high school youth group to build and repair homes with Rural Missions in South Carolina. During summers he volunteered as a historical tour guide in Duxbury. He joined Mashpee Historical Commission and for decades served as schoolmaster of the One Room Schoolhouse, for which he received a Historical Preservation Award in June 2019. He was appointed to the Mashpee Community Preservation Committee and served as president of the Southport Woodworkers Club and assistant moderator of the Mashpee Men’s Club. He enjoyed historical research and wrote a monthly article about Mashpees’s unique history as a Wampanoag town for the Southport Village Voices. He enjoyed woodworking, swimming, sailing, reading biographies and historical novels, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Betsy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren, and two sisters.

Aug, 2020
54

Laurie Crispin Elliot ’54, of State College, Pa.; Feb. 3. She was an instructional aide for 33 years at the State College Elementary School library. She retired in 2006. She was a member of State College Presbyterian Church and the State College Choral Society. She enjoyed reading and traveling. She is survived by five children and their spouses, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and two great-great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
53

Dorothy Galli Smith ’53, of Westfield, N.J.; Feb. 17. She worked for several years as a social worker. She was an active member of the First Congregational Church of Westfield and enjoyed attending the Community Players and The Metropolitan Opera. She is survived by a daughter and son and their spouses, and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
53

Elliott “Bud” Brown ’53, of Oakland, Calif., formerly of South Orleans, Mass.; Mar. 22, of vascular dementia. After obtaining his master’s and PhD from UConn, he married and moved to France to teach on U.S. Army bases in Verdun and Etain, then moved to Rhinebeck, N.Y. and worked with emotionally disturbed youth at the former Astor Home for Boys. At the end of the ’60s he moved to Worcester, Mass. and counseled low-income children and families at the Worcester Youth Guidance Center, eventually becoming the center’s chief psychologist and head of its family therapist training program. He retired in the late 1990s and moved to South Orleans, Mass., where he became an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House in Chatham, formed the All Worn Out Jug Band, and enjoyed singing until dementia stopped him. He is survived by two daughters, including Dorothy Brown-Martin ’88; a son-in-law; two granddaughters; and nieces and nephews.     

Aug, 2020
53

Horace H. Barker Jr. ’53, of Woodland Hills, Calif.; June 20, 2019. He is survived by his wife, Carol; two daughters; three sons; nine grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
52

Eugene F. Tortolani ’52, of Barrington, R.I.; Feb. 9. After graduation, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a commander of a motor transport battalion in Korea. Upon discharge, he worked in the jewelry manufacturing business for many years before transitioning to a career in commercial real estate. He retired in 2001. He was president of Rhode Island Country Club, the Brown Club of Rhode Island, and the Narragansett Council of Boy Scouts of America. He enjoyed playing golf, tennis, and card games. He is survived by his wife, Lucy Brubaker Tortolani ’55; four children, including daughter Virginia McQueen ’81; and seven grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
52

Marilyn Davison Sanborn ’52, of Falmouth, Mass.; Mar. 24. She earned master’s degrees in education and library science from the State University of New York and Villanova University, then was a teacher and elementary school librarian in New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania. She retired in 1986 and became a founding member, president, and newsletter editor for the Friends of the Falmouth Public Library (FFPL) and a volunteer at the Falmouth Service Center. She enjoyed gardening, writing book and film reviews and travel articles for the FFPL newsletter, and helping with their annual book sale. She is survived by two daughters, three grandsons, a brother, and seven nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
52

Polly Harrington LaLiberte ’52, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 19.  She was a secretary and personal assistant in the Northampton School District, Smith College, and UMass Dartmouth prior to settling in East Greenwich. She was involved in the YMCA, the Girl Scouts of America, and East Greenwich United Methodist Church. She is survived by three children, five grandchildren, a great-granddaughter, a brother, and a sister-
in-law. 

Aug, 2020
52

Paul N. Hovell ’52, of Olympia, Wash., formerly of Phillipsburg, N.J.; Mar. 30. He was a naval aviator from 1952 to 1957, owned and operated the Belvidere Dairy Queen from 1957 to 1964, and was a teacher and administrator in the Phillipsburg school district from 1964 to 1990, retiring as principal of Phillipsburg Middle School. He was a member of the National Education Association, the New Jersey Retirees’ Education Assoc., and the Warren County Retirees’ Education Association, where he was past president. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary; four children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2020
52

Mary “Molly” Williamson Crawley ’52, of Norman, Okla.; Feb. 23. She lived and worked in Vienna and Paris, returned to the U.S. in 1956, married, and moved to Oklahoma. She was actively involved in her community and served on the University of Oklahoma College of Fine Arts Board of Visitors. She enjoyed traveling the world with her husband. She is survived by her husband, Jim; three daughters and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Aug, 2020
52

Patricia Wandelt Barrow ’52, of Evanston, Ill.; Jan. 27. She retired as a mainframe computer programmer at State National Bank of Evanston. She also worked in IT at the Quaker Oats Company, National CSS, and Booz Allen Hamilton. She was a lifelong learner and enjoyed reading and attending the theater and the symphony. She is survived by her husband, Charles; three daughters; and seven grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
51

Maxwell M. Mozell ’51, ’53 ScM, ’56 PhD, of New York City; Mar. 28, from COVID-19. He served in the U.S. Navy in Florida, assigned to study flight and g-forces as part of the nascent space program, then became a distinguished national and international leader in the field of chemosensory research. He was professor emeritus of neuroscience and physiology at SUNY Upstate Medical University and a former dean of its College of Graduate Studies. In 1978 he founded the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, which studies the science behind taste and smell, and was editor of its journal Chemical Sciences. He published 78 peer-reviewed articles and several book chapters, served as chair of the International Commission on Olfaction and Taste, and was the recipient of many prestigious awards. He enjoyed politics, traveling, boating, swimming, playing chess, and wearing bow ties. He is survived by partner Beatrice Farnsworth, a son, four daughters, 12 grandchildren, and 12 great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
51

John B. Mills ’51, of Virginia Beach, Va.; June 6, 2019.  He worked at General Electric for 35 years. At Brown, he was a member of Beta Theta Pi and the varsity football team. He served in the U.S. Navy and enjoyed sailing, skiing, traveling, and square dancing. He is survived by his wife, two children, three stepchildren, a brother, and grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
51

Vincent A. DeConti ’51, of North Providence, R.I.; Feb. 1, after a brief illness. He was an internist with a private medical practice and served on the medical staff at both St. Joseph’s Hospital and Our Lady of Fatima Hospital until his retirement in 1994. He was a member of several local medical societies as well as the American College of Physicians.  He was the recipient of the Unitam Award for Outstanding Contribution to Mankind in 1992. He is survived by his wife, Ann; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
51

P. David Chernov ’51, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Marstons Mills, Mass.; Feb. 8. After graduation, he served in the U.S. Army, attended NYU School of Law, and then was a partner in the National Tax Department at Ernst & Young until his retirement in 1990. He is survived by son Joel ’79 and his spouse; two daughters, including Carrie Chernov ’84; a son-in-law; and six grandchildren, including Allison Chernov ’13 and Evan Chernov ’18.

Aug, 2020
51

Katherine E. Baccaro ’51, of Sierra Vista, Ariz.; Mar. 2. She joined the U.S. Department of Defense and taught U.S. military personnel children in England, Italy, Korea, and Turkey. After retiring, she moved to Arizona and published novels Precipice and Joss and two volumes of short stories, Catscratch Fever and Discombobulated. She also showed her art in two art shows.

Aug, 2020
51

Robert E. Anderson ’51, of Redding, Conn.; Dec. 13. He served in the U.S. Navy and lived two years in Naples, Italy, then began his career in marketing with Procter & Gamble in Ohio. In 1962 he moved his family to Darien, Conn., and joined the William Esty advertising agency in New York. He became executive vice president and member of the board at first Lever Brothers (N.Y.), then R.J. Reynolds in Winston-Salem, N.C. He then became COO and board member at Mattel in Los Angeles. He retired to Key Largo, Fla., where he lived for 30 years while keeping a house in Darien, Conn. His final move was to Redding. He enjoyed fishing, gardening, stamp collecting, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter; and many cousins.

Aug, 2020
50

Edward F. Shea ’50, of Attleboro, Mass.; Jan. 27. After serving in the U. S. Navy and two years with the Massachusetts State Police, he was an electrical engineer for the federal government, retiring from Naval Underwater Systems Center in Newport, R.I. He enjoyed quahogging, solving crossword puzzles, and playing golf. He is survived by six children, 15 grandchildren, many nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
50

Richard T. Reed ’50, of Sarasota, Fla.; Jan. 16. He joined Pinkerton’s in 1952 as an investigator and assistant manager, retiring in 1982 as senior vice president of operations. He enjoyed reading and playing golf and bridge. He is survived by four children, 10 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, and two brothers. 

Aug, 2020
50

Donald L. Holroyd ’50, of York, Pa.; Mar. 27. He taught English in Rhode Island schools and then from 1954 to 1956 was an education counselor at Clark Air Base and an instructor at the University of the Philippines. From 1957 to 1966, he was chair of the English department at Florida State University. As a teacher of English as a Second Language, he received Fulbright grants to teach in Italy, Syria, and Japan. He spent two sabbatical years teaching in Israel and China. From 1968 to 2009, he taught English at York College of Pennsylvania. Many of his poems were published in haiku magazines, including his collection Full Circle, which was published in 2016. He was a member of the National Council of Teachers of English, the York County Literacy Council, Haiku Society of America, and Bread for the World. Phi Beta Kappa. He was also a member of First Presbyterian Church of York, where he served as an elder and adult education teacher. He attended 23 Road Scholar programs in the U.S. and Canada. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; a daughter; a son; three grandsons; a great-grandson; three nieces; and a nephew.

Aug, 2020
50

Stanley L. Held ’50, of Pittsford, N.Y., and Palm Beach, Fla.; Jan. 29.  He began his merchandising career at A&S, then moved to Rochester, N.Y., where he spent the rest of his career at McCurdy's & Co. He taught retailing business at Rochester Institute of Technology and was a supporter of the Rochester Philharmonic. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and enjoyed traveling, sports, and the arts. He is survived by his wife, Kay; six children and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.  

Aug, 2020
50

Lucinda Danziger Gregory ’50, of Dorset, Vt., formerly of Brookfield, Conn.; Feb. 24. Her diverse entrepreneurial pursuits included working as a medical illustrator in New York City in the 1950s, as a manager for Avon Products in the 1960s, cofounding Uni/Search executive placement service in Connecticut, and co-owning The Chocolate Barn in Vermont for more than 35 years. She was a talented artist and enjoyed rug hooking, sewing, and cooking. She volunteered with Meals on Wheels and was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and Dorset Church. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law and a son and daughter-in-law.

Aug, 2020
50

Anthony V. D’Amario ’50, of Dedham, Mass.; Nov. 5. He served in the military police during World War II and later worked for the greater part of his career in Boston. He enjoyed gardening. He is survived by three children, including son Peter ’81; eight grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2020
50

Roxbury Hyde Crystal ’50, of Charlottesville, Va., formerly of Longmont, Colo.; Mar. 24, from complications of melanoma. She moved to California to continue her education in music. She married and then moved to Longmont, where she raised a family, taught private piano lessons, played organ for St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, directed the choir for the First Congregational Church, managed the Longmont Symphony Orchestra, and played percussion for the orchestra. At mid-life she earned a masters’ degree in education from the University of Northern Colorado and taught elementary school at the Colorado Academy in Denver. She was active in the Longmont Chapter of the Wednesday Music Club, the American Association of University Women, and the League of Women Voters. In retirement she enjoyed traveling, sailing, and biking around Europe. She is survived by three children, including daughter Charlotte Crystal ’77; six grandchildren; two sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
49

Joanne Worley Rondestvedt ’49, of Cheshire, Conn.; Mar. 15, from complications of COVID-19. She worked with troubled teens at Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute in San Francisco before moving to Connecticut in 1974. She was a lifelong flutist and enjoyed orchestral music. She played first flute with the Hamden Symphony Orchestra and she also played with Orchestra New England. She was a member of Spring Glen Congregational Church and the Spring Glen Garden Club. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by a sister, nieces, and nephews.

Aug, 2020
49

William H. Hubbard II ’49, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Feb. 3. He was retired from Bethlehem Steel Corporation’s credit department in New York City. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, a junior champion sailor, and a volunteer for years at St. Luke’s Hospital. He is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
49

Helen Loughlin Herlitz ’49, of Alexandria, Va., formerly of Irvington, N.Y.; Feb. 4.  She was a homemaker and longtime member of the Thursday Club in Irvington, the Junior League of Westchester (N.Y.), and the Garden Club of America. She is survived by her husband, Fred; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
49

Rose Jamiel Falugo ’49, of Cooper City, Fla., formerly of Attleboro, Mass.; Feb. 7. She was a teacher before she and her husband opened a bedding business in 1969, now run by their son. She enjoyed traveling with her husband and being with family. She is survived by her husband, Jay; four children; eight grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and three sisters.

Aug, 2020
48

Barbara Lanz Whiton ’48, of Manchester, Conn.; Feb. 21. She was a substitute teacher at East Hartford High School for 19 years before her retirement. She was a longtime active member of Center Congregational Church in Manchester and enjoyed gardening and sewing. She is survived by her husband, Albert; a son and daughter-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
48

Austin B. Thompson ’48, of Westborough, Mass.; Mar. 11. He was a manufacturer representative for several different companies throughout his career. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II and was a member of the Masonic Lodge in Williamstown. He is survived by a daughter and her partner; son Austin B. Thompson III ’75 and daughter-in-law Dorothy Harvey Thompson ’75; four grandchildren, including Nathanael Thompson ’01 and Ethan Thompson ’04; and five great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
48

Frank M. Precopio ’48, of Lansdale, Pa.; Feb. 13. After earning a PhD in chemistry from Yale, he joined the General Electric Company in their research facility in Schenectady, N.Y., working on wire and cable coatings. In 1955 he filed a patent for peroxide cured polyethylene, which later became known as crosslinked polyethylene and revolutionized the wire and cable industry. He left GE after 15 years and became the director of research at Amchem Products in Ambler, Pa. The company developed several significant products under his direction and eventually he became president, serving as vice president and general manager after Amchem was acquired by Henkel Corp. He retired in 1990.  Having helped his son purchase Summers Laboratories’s line of dermatological pharmaceuticals, he joined Summers Labs as research director. He retired from Summers Labs in 2017. He is survived by his wife, Rita, and two sons. 

Aug, 2020
48

Joseph A. Poor ’48, of Rumford, R.I., formerly of Ironwood, Mich.; Feb. 23. He had a 54-year career in engineering that began with work in Minnesota and continued in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan, before moving to Rumford. He was a U.S. Army veteran of World War II and enjoyed fishing, bowling, and playing golf. He is survived by four children and a grandson.

Aug, 2020
48

Irving E. Miller ’48, of Miami Beach, Fla.; Mar. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps, he began brokering tracts of land and eventually moved into many areas of real estate, including hotel/motel, housing, and subdivision development. He enjoyed playing golf, antique shopping, and collecting beer steins. He is survived by Amalia Miller; five children, including son Roger ’89; three stepchildren; 17 grandchildren, including grandson Cody Simmons ’10, ’11 ScM; seven step-grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
48

Donald R. Gray ’48, of Glen Rock, N.J.; Feb. 5. He was a retired assistant vice president of Chubb & Son in New York City and a retired captain in the U.S. Naval Reserve. He was on active duty during the Korean War. He was a member of the Naval Cryptologic Veterans Association and the Knights of Columbus, and served on the Pastoral Council and other ministries of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. He is survived by his wife, Joan; five children and their spouses; 14 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren. 

Aug, 2020
47

Phyllis Markoff Homonoff ’47, of Shrewsbury, Mass., formerly of Warwick, R.I.; Feb. 7. She worked at Jewish Family Services before marrying and founding Harold’s Furniture in Rhode Island, which she and her husband operated for 50 years. She supported several Rhode Island civic organizations and charities and particularly enjoyed coffee ice cream. She is survived by three children and their spouses, including son Marvin ’71; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
47

John L. Dixon ’47, of Tuscaloosa, Ala.; Feb. 28. He worked at Downingtown Ironworks in Exton, Pa., for 10 years before moving to Tuscaloosa to open Southern Heat Exchanger, Inc., which is now one of the largest designers and manufacturers of heat exchangers in the world. He was an avid reader and lifelong learner. After retiring from Southern Heat, he studied photography at the University of Alabama and earned a bachelor of fine arts degree. He chaired several committees within his church and volunteered with Meals on Wheels. He was also a docent at the former Westervelt-Warner Museum of American Art. He enjoyed sailing, gardening, and traveling. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy aboard a minesweeper. He is survived by his wife, Ruth; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
46

John E. Lombardo ’46, of Orleans, Mass.; Feb. 1, after a brief illness. He spent his entire career at the Traveler’s Insurance Company, retiring as a vice president in 1988. He enjoyed performing in local community theater, stamp collecting, bird watching, jazz music, fishing, and playing bridge. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II. He is survived by sons John ’76, Michael ’79, Jeffrey ’84, and their spouses; five grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and three siblings, including Joseph Lombardo ’43.

Aug, 2020
46

Roger S. Hoff  ’46, of Newtown, Pa., formerly of Trenton, N.J.; Feb. 18. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, where he received the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, he worked in the insurance industry. He later had a long career with the Department of Labor, State of New Jersey, as a labor economist and manager. He was active with the Old Mill Hill Society in Trenton and the Men’s Club at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, and supported the Edinburg Historical Society (N.Y.).  He enjoyed dancing, hunting, trap-shooting, fishing, gardening, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Katharine; three children, including son James ’74; two stepsons; and two step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2020
46

Eva Bello Grant ’46, of Glen, N.H.; Jan. 26. She worked in the catalog department of the Hamilton Smith Library at UNH and for the North Conway Public Library and Granite State College, and served as librarian for Kennett High School. She enjoyed skiing and playing tennis and golf. She is survived by three children and their spouses, three granddaughters, and a great-grandson.

Aug, 2020
45

Patricia McKanna Ratigan ’45, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 12.  She worked as an accountant for Price Waterhouse during the war, later taught English at the University of Idaho, then worked for a newspaper in Denver, before marrying and settling in East Greenwich. After raising a family, she worked at the East Greenwich Pendulum as an editor and at Typesetting Services in Providence, where she specialized in proofreading German and French language articles. She enjoyed reading, knitting, and playing bridge. She is survived by a daughter; four sons, including Daniel ’86; 15 grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
45

Walter P. Gunn Jr. ’45, of Longmeadow, Mass.; Feb. 28. His college education was interrupted by the war, during which he served in the U.S. Army. He was discharged with the rank of staff sergeant and awarded the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He returned to Brown and upon graduation worked in the lumber industry. In 1967, he and his father started the Garelco Sales Company, a lumber wholesaler and wood packaging company located in East Longmeadow. He was a past member of Colony Club of Springfield and the Longmeadow Country Club. He enjoyed fly-fishing, cross-country skiing, sailing, and playing golf. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law and a granddaughter.

Aug, 2020
44

Grace Costagliola Perry ’44, of Greenville, R.I.; Mar. 13. She lived in Thousand Oaks, Calif., for 40 years before returning to Rhode Island. While in California, she worked as a medical lab technician. She enjoyed quilting and traveling and is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2020
44

Marjorie Greene Hazeltine-Wolfe ’44, of Lancaster, Pa.; Feb. 29. She moved to Lancaster after graduating and was involved in community affairs in addition to raising a family. In 1970 she moved to Cape Cod and worked as an administrative assistant to the principal of Cape Cod Technical High School and as a real estate agent, while performing and teaching piano, primarily at the Cape Cod Conservatory of Music. She eventually returned to Lancaster and volunteered in the literacy programs at Lafayette Elementary School and Manor Middle School, served on the board of the Women’s Symphony Association of Lancaster, helped found the Pennsylvania Academy of Music, taught piano at Carter & MacRae Elementary, and gave recitals on piano and harp at Willow Valley Communities. She enjoyed gardening, sailing, traveling, and playing tennis and golf. She is survived by two daughters; a son; a stepdaughter; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; her brother Kenneth Greene ’42; and niece Jocelyn Greene ’74.

Aug, 2020
43

Arlene Rome Ten Eyck ’43, of East Providence, R.I.; Mar. 1. She worked for a short time as a social worker before joining the staff at Bradley Hospital. For six months she was a teacher assistant at Moses Brown School and then returned to Bradley Hospital to be director of education. She later worked at several schools in Massachusetts as an educational therapist but returned to the East Providence public school system and remained there for nine years. During summers she worked as a summer camp counselor and enjoyed being a Cub Scout den mother. She was a trustee for the Ann Ide Fuller Library in East Providence and cofounder of the East Providence Friends of the Library. She was an active member of her Pembroke class and served as class secretary, treasurer, and reunion committee chairman, initiating several off-year class luncheons. Additionally, she established the Rose Low Rome Poetry Prize, followed by the David Rome Prize, and the Arlene R. and Peter H. Ten Eyck Prize at Brown. She held several titles as a member of the Mediator Fellowship in Providence and was active with the R.I. Chapter of Mensa for more than 25 years. She enjoyed reading, antique collecting, cooking, gardening, and playing bridge. She is survived by her husband, Peter.

Aug, 2020
42

Margaret Marlborough Matthews ’42, of Millbury, Mass.; Feb. 5. She taught English and then became the media librarian at Millbury High School. She was active in the community and was a member of the Millbury Historical Society, the Millbury Women’s Club, and Millbury Embroiderers Guild. She is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2020
FAC

F. Donald Eckelmann, of Brevard, N.C.; Dec. 7. He began his academic career in 1957, when he joined the Brown faculty as an assistant professor in the department of geologic sciences, and later rose to the rank of professor and served as chair of the department and as Dean of the College. Subsequently he was a faculty member at the University of Georgia and George Mason University. In 1985, he was appointed professor and academic dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Ohio University, from which he retired in 1994. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and six grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
FAC

A. Hunter Dupree, of Cambridge, Mass. and Squirrel Island, Me.; Nov. 30. He received his master’s from Harvard in 1947 and completed his doctoral thesis on the life and work of Asa Gray, the leading American botanist of the nineteenth century, in 1952 while teaching history at Texas Technological College. In 1953, he became a research fellow at the Gray Herbarium at Harvard to continue his work on Asa Gray. His planned biography was interrupted when the National Science Foundation selected him to lead a research project on the history of science in the federal government. Sponsored by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, his findings were published in the 1957 book Science in the Federal Government: a History of Policies and Activities to 1940. On completion of the book, he devoted more time to his research on Gray and in 1959 published Asa Gray, 1810-1888. He joined the history department at UC Berkeley in 1956. During his tenure at Berkeley, he held various administrative posts, including assistant to the Chancellor and director of the Bancroft Library. He was a firsthand witness to the Free Speech Movement of 1964. Throughout the 1960s he held numerous advisory posts with the federal government and scientific institutions. He was a member of the Library of Congress Committee, was a consultant to the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Science and Public Policy (COSPUP), and drafted its report, Federal Support of Basic Research in Institutions of Higher Learning (1964). He was on the NASA Historical Advisory Committee and Atomic Energy Commission Historical Advisory Committee, and he also served on the House of Representatives panel on Science and Technology, where he gave advice on the role science and technology could play in addressing critical national and global problems. He became the George L. Littlefield Professor of History at Brown in 1968 and he began to write extensively on the social history of measurement. Later he served a year as one of the first group of fellows of the National Humanities Center. In the 1970s, he held positions in numerous professional organizations, including the Smithsonian Council (1975-85) and secretary of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1973-76), where he had been elected a Fellow in 1967. He was an advisor to both the National Science Foundation and National Endowment for the Humanities and a trustee of the Museum of American Textile History (1978-89). He retired from Brown in 1981 yet remained active in academic life. He served as a consultant on the National Academy of Science’s committee on Government-Uni-
versity Relationships in Support of Science. He was Scholar in Residence at Southern Oregon State College in 1983 and Visiting Professor of the History of Science at the University of Minnesota in 1984. He was a member of the Research Advisory Committee for the National Air and Space Museum (1986). In recognition of his many professional achievements, he was the recipient of the New York Academy of Sciences President’s Award (1976) and the History of Science Society Sarton Medal (1990). He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 55

Leon Steinberg ’55 ScM, of Memphis; Dec. 17. After graduating from Brown, he joined the University of Pennsylvania as a teaching assistant. In 1961, he earned his PhD in number theory at Penn. In 1957, he joined the Univac division of Sperry Rand and in 1961 published The Backboard Wiring Problem: A Placement Algorithm, a quadratic assignment problem known as “The Steinberg Wiring Problem” or “ste36a.” Ste36a was based on the design of a Univac computer and analyzed how to wire together 34 computer components on a 9 by 4 grid using the shortest possible wiring scheme. His algorithms produced a reasonable, but not exact, solution that Univac used at the time. Ste36a became a legendary challenge problem in computational optimization and efforts to solve it resulted in algorithmic advances applicable to the design of computer chips and present-day project management and scheduling software. In 2001, a professor at the University of Iowa and researcher at Microsoft Corp. finally solved ste36a, making it one of the longest open problems in computational optimization. Steinberg remained at Sperry Univac in various capacities until 1986. He enjoyed travel and classical music. He is survived by his wife, Marcia; a daughter; and a sister.

Jun, 2020
GS 51

John Rockett ’51 ScM, of Peterborough, N.H.; Dec. 30, after a short illness. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from MIT, he obtained his master’s degree from Brown and his PhD from Harvard. He performed aerodynamic research for the MIT Aeroelastic Laboratory from 1950 to 1954 and in 1957 joined Pratt & Whitney, where he worked on jointly sponsored research with Harvard on compressor stall. He organized the Pratt & Whitney laboratory in applied physics in East Hartford and was chief of fuel cell technology from 1963 to 1966. His interest in combustion led him to work for the Factory Mutual Engineering Assoc., where he served as director of basic research before joining the National Bureau of Standards in 1968. His work there included studies on flame spread, fire induced convective air movement in buildings, and applied research on the prediction of growth and spread of building fires, which led to consulting with the NIH into the biological effects of smoke inhalation, flame retardant clothing, work on mine safety, and many other applications. He became chief of the office of fire research and safety at the Bureau of Standards, charged with the implementation of a series of fire research and safety acts, which resulted in the improved fire standards we have in many areas today. He later moved on to forensic work in fires. His continuing work with Harvard on fire simulation computer modeling led him to conduct forensic work on the Morton Thiokol plant explosion in Utah. He inspected container fires, subway systems in Europe, hull fires on ships, and air crashes. He retired at age 80 and obtained his qualification as a ski instructor. He continued to instruct until the age of 85 and skied well into his 90s. He was a member of the International Association for Fire Safety Science and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Abby; two children; and four grandchildren.

Jun, 2020
GS 98

Amy K. Morrissey-O’Rourke ’98 AM, ’99 MAT, of Jamaica Plain, Mass.; Dec. 12. She taught English at Brookline High School for more than 15 years. Previously she taught in both the Wellesley and Burlington school systems. As a teacher, she enjoyed engaging with teens and was a passionate advocate for LGBTQ students, students of color, and young people facing all manner of disadvantages. She is survived by her husband, Matthew, two sons, her mother, a sister, a nephew, her  mother-in-law, and two brothers-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 96

Jane Wolley ’96 AM, of Waltham, Mass., formerly of New York and Rhode Island; Dec. 24. She was employed for several years by the Jacobs Company as a data technician. She enjoyed classical music and string quartets, and was an active member of the First Lutheran Church.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 82

Warren Meck ’82 PhD, of Durham, N.C.; Jan. 21. He joined the faculty at Duke University as an associate professor in 1994 and was made full professor in 2001. He authored more than 200 academic articles and two books, Functional and Neural Mechanisms of Interval Timing and Introduction: The Persistence of Time, both published in 2003. He was recognized for research on subjective time perception in humans and how time influences human and animal behavior. He is survived by his wife, Christina Williams.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 74

Marvin S. Goodfriend ’74 AM, ’80 PhD, of Pittsburgh; Dec. 15, of cancer. He was a professor of economics at Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business. He spent 25 years prior as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, including director of research. He served as a visiting scholar at various global monetary authorities, including the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank. From 1984 to 1985, he served as a senior staff economist for President Ronald Reagan’s Council of Economic Advisers. He was nominated to the Federal Board of Governors by President Trump in 2017, though the full Senate did not confirm him and his nomination lapsed. He was a member of the Shadow Open Market Committee and an avid jazz guitarist. He is survived by his wife, Marsha; a stepson; and a sister.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 66

Judith A. Brown ’66 MAT, of Providence and Cranston, R.I.; May 5. She was a teacher in the Warwick Public System for her entire career, and served as English Department Head at Warwick Veterans Memorial High School from 1972 to her retirement in 1984. She was a member and lector at St. Peter Church in Warwick, and in retirement worked part-time in the parish office. She is survived by a brother and a nephew.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 65

Lawrence A. Retallick ’65 ScM, of Mayfield, Heights, Ohio; Jan. 1. He taught at both the college and high school level, ultimately running several schools for at-risk youth for the Urban League of Cleveland. He served for many years as the assistant executive director of the Cleveland Urban League, finishing his professional career with the United Way of Greater Cleveland. He was an avid sports fan and a gun hobbyist and enjoyed assembling replica model cars. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a sister, and nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 64

Francis H. Barron ’64 ScM, of Raleigh, N.C.; Dec. 9. He attended the U.S. Army Infantry Officer basic course, graduating in 1964 as a second lieutenant. After serving two years of active duty as an intelligence officer at Edgewood Arsenal in Maryland, discharged with the rank of captain, he earned a doctorate in operations research at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in 1970. He began a career at the University of Kansas, where he worked from 1970 to 1982, rising to the rank of professor. He then worked as a professor and department chair at the University of Alabama from 1982 to 2000. He was published in numerous journals and a consistent contributor to the Subjective Probability Utility and Decision Making Conference. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, M.K. Sibylle Janssen Barron ’64; a daughter, three sons, nine grandchildren, two sisters, and a brother.

 

Jun, 2020
GS 62

John E. Hubbard ’62 MAT, of Tucson, Ariz.; Dec. 29. He was a professor at SUNY Brockport, where he taught Earth Sciences for more than 30 years. In the summers he enjoyed research positions at scientific laboratories throughout the county and conducting workshops to train young science professors in hydrology. He spent 11 summers in the Rocky Mountains teaching students at Pingree Park, the Colorado State University Forestry Field Camp. In retirement he spent summers in the Adirondack Mountains and winters in Tucson. He enjoyed hiking, reading, playing tennis, and traveling, especially to national parks. He is survived by his wife, Rhoda; three children; eight grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a brother; and two sisters-in-law.

Jun, 2020
02

Erik S. Fleming ’02, of Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.; Jan. 1, of appendix cancer. He received his PhD in public health in 2014 from Walden University and started his career at Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, where he was a systems analyst and assistant professor. His research focused on technology for disease management and prevention in underserved communities. He was the recipient of national awards for his professional achievements. At Brown he ran track and played rugby. He is survived by his wife, Starr; a son; his parents; and many aunts and uncles.

 

Jun, 2020
01

Douglas A. Costello ’01, of Austin Tex.; Nov. 17. He was pursuing an acting career. After moving to Austin, he studied Meisner method acting at In The Moment Studio and worked with independent filmmakers. He appeared in many of their films, as well as in stage and street theatrical performances. He did commercial work, including a local What-A-Burger commercial, and he worked as a server in several restaurants, including Sao Paulo and Vespaio. He enjoyed hiking, body-surfing, and playing soccer. He is survived by his parents, a brother, a niece, and aunts, uncles, and cousins.

 

Jun, 2020
99

Amy B. Crane-Phillips ’99, of Alexandria, Va.; Dec. 14. She was director of compliance at Shapiro & Brown law firm in Manassas, Va. She previously worked at State Street Corporation in Boston. At Brown she was a cheerleader and a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She enjoyed jet skiing, impromptu beach trips, spending time with family and friends at the Delaware shore, and visiting Rhode Island. She is survived by her husband, Vince; her mother; her father, Danny Crane ’75; a father-in-law; a sister-in-law; two nieces; and several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

 

Jun, 2020
94

Michael J. Poorman ’94, of Scottsdale, Ariz.; Jan. 17, after a year-long battle with acute myeloid leukemia. He spent 25 years working in Internet technology sales, initially as a rep and eventually as an executive. He worked with such companies as U.S. Robotics, Cisco, EMC, Emware Technologies, AppDynamics, and Oracle. His fondest memories were times spent with his football brothers and his founding of the Brown-Fish Company Alliance. He is survived by his wife, Sara; three daughters; a son; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2020
90

Barbara A. Agresti ’90, of Evanston, Ill.; Dec. 6, of cancer. After graduating from Brown, she worked at the Public Interest Office at Harvard Law School. She followed that work in a position in Washington, D.C., where she served as one of the founding program officers at the then newly formed Corporation for National Service, the federal agency that helped launch the AmeriCorps national service program. She later worked in New York City as the vice president of grant coordination for the Echoing Green Foundation. She married in 1998 and moved to Evanston and raised a family. She enjoyed spending summers in Rhode Island with her family. She is survived by her husband, Henry; three sons; two sisters; and brother Ernest Agresti Jr. ’87.

 

Jun, 2020
81

William E. Cunningham ’81, of Santa Monica, Calif.; Jan. 3. He was a professor of medicine and public health at UCLA. He graduated from UCSF School of Medicine in 1987 and completed his internal medicine residency training at UCLA, where he was selected into the 1991 cohort of the UCLA Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar Program and completed a master’s in public health from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health before joining the faculty in both the Schools of Medicine and Public Health. He was a leader in addressing racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities among vulnerable populations living with, or at risk of, HIV. Most recently he was working to improve HIV care for HIV+ men and transgender women released from Los Angeles County Jail. He held several titles, including director of the UCLA Clinical Translational Science Institute Summer Fellowship Program, codirector of the Investigator Development Core for the NIA-funded Resource Centers for Minority Aging Research, director of the Training Core for the NIMHD-funded Project Export, and associate director of the UCLA Robert Wood Johnson/National Clinical Scholars Program at UCLA. For 15 years he served as a reviewer for the American Journal of Public Health. In addition, he taught graduate level courses on racial disparities and health and led efforts to recruit underrepresented minority trainees to all UCLA educational programs. He was a member of several professional associations and scholarly societies, including the American Medical Association and the International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care. He authored numerous peer-reviewed publications and, at the time of his death, was a principal investigator for three research grants. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; and two sons.

 

Jun, 2020
84

Pamela A. Gross ’84, of Carpinteria, Calif.; Dec. 14, of multiple organ failure caused by systemic lupus erythematosus. She fought the disease to the best of her ability and was a support group leader, peer counselor, and advocate for the many people who were suffering from illness. She enjoyed helping others, ancestry research, and traveling. She is survived by her mother, a sister, a stepsister, two stepbrothers, an aunt, and many cousins.

 

Jun, 2020
78

Peter N. Lycurgus ’78, of Saratoga, Calif.; Dec. 12, after a battle with multiple sclerosis. He worked at Apple Computer and is survived by his wife, Ginny; two children, including son Timothy ’15; and a brother.

 

Jun, 2020
74

H. Wayne Carver ’74, ’77 MD, of Old Saybrook, Conn.; Dec. 26. He did his forensic training at the Cook County medical examiner’s office in Chicago. He went on to become the chief medical examiner of the State of Connecticut and served with distinction for 24 years. He strove to be impartial to both the prosecution and defense when called to testify, while showing compassion to families. At Brown he played drums in the marching band and played in three orchestras. He enjoyed cooking and is survived by his wife, Deborah DeHertogh ’74, ’77 MD; two sons; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1974, MD Class of 1977
Jun, 2020
72

Mark J. Rosen ’72, ’75 MD, of Great Neck, N.Y.; July 3, 2019. His distinguished career in pulmonary and critical care medicine spanned more than four decades. His research and administrative accomplishments at New York City and Long Island hospitals were many. Over the course of his career he was director of critical care at Mount Sinai Hospital, director of pulmonary medicine and critical care at Beth Israel Hospital, and chief of pulmonary critical care and sleep medicine at North Shore University Hospital. During his tenure with the American College of Chest Physicians, he served as president, medical director, and director of global education and strategic development. He was the recipient of numerous awards. He played guitar and his bands played at parties and special events at Brown from 1968 to 1975. He is survived by his wife, Lenie; two daughters; and three grandchildren.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1972, MD Class of 1975
Jun, 2020
72

Anne C. Mazonson ’72, of Rockville, Md; Jan. 14, after a 12-year struggle with ovarian cancer. She taught music at elementary schools in Massachusetts and at Moses Brown School in Providence. In 1987, she graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School, where she was elected to Alpha Omega Alpha. After that she was a psychiatrist in the Bethesda-Rockville area for 30 years. She was a longtime member of Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation in Bethesda, where she read Torah and sang in the choir. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a daughter, a son, and sister Martha Scarborough ’78.

 

Jun, 2020
72

Beverly W. James ’72, of Pittsburgh; Jan. 23. She served as associate minister to the Pittsburgh Presbytery and a minister of the Word and Sacrament in the Presbyterian Church for 39 years. She began her service as a mission volunteer in Thailand teaching English as a second language for five years before she entered the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. She was the moderator of the Pittsburgh Presbytery for two terms, in addition to being an adjunct faculty member at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, the University of Pittsburgh, and La Roche College. She was also an accomplished violinist and avid reader and enjoyed spending time at the beach with her family. She is survived by two daughters, a granddaughter, two brothers, and nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2020
71

John Jeffery Reinke ’71, of Grand Rapids, Mich.; May 27, of a stroke. After obtaining his MBA from the University of Michigan, he used his skill sets in careers at Eastman Kodak in Rochester, N.Y.; Whirlpool in Benton Harbor, Mich.; and American Seating and National Heritage Academies in Grand Rapids. He taught probability, statistics, and project management as an adjunct professor at Central Michigan University, Indiana University at South Bend, Notre Dame, and Davenport University. He retired in 2013 and volunteered at a local elementary school for five years. He also interviewed prospective Brown students for 30 years. He enjoyed playing the piano, singing in the church choir, traveling throughout the United States, and spending time with family at their lake cottage in Michigan and their beach villa in Florida. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; three sons;
and nine grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
71

Dorothy Hutchins Forman ’71, of Pittsburgh; Dec. 23, after a long battle with lung disease. She was a professional visual artist in Pittsburgh for 40 years and a member of the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Society of Artists, and the Pittsburgh Women’s Critique Group. She was a longtime member of Hamilton Presbyterian Church, where she sang in the choir and participated in Bible study. She enjoyed traveling, gardening, playing tennis, and going to galleries, museums, and the theater. She is survived by her husband, Robert ’70 ScM; two sons; a grandson; a sister-in-law; and a brother-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020
68

Peter B. Rames ’68, of Albuquerque, N. Mex.; Nov. 29, from complications of liver cancer. He worked as a reporter for the Providence Journal, ran a community action agency in Rhode Island, and later, after receiving a JD and  MBA from the University of New Mexico, he practiced law as an independent practitioner. He was most proud of his work for the New Mexico Public Defender's office. He enjoyed baking, playing his guitar, and singing. He is survived by three daughters.

 

Jun, 2020
66

Vincent O’Reilly ’66, of Cumming, Ga.; Dec. 15. He had a successful career in sales at both IBM and ComputerLand followed by a career as a real estate agent. He served in the Rhode Island National Guard and was a charter member of the Knights of Columbus, where he was a past grand knight for more than 18 years. He was actively involved with St. Brendan the Navigator Catholic Church and is survived by his wife, Jo Lynne; four children; ten grandchildren; two sisters;
and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2020
60

Stephen P. Dretler ’60, of Natick, Mass.; Jan. 9, of Parkinson’s disease. He was a professor at Harvard Medical School and a pioneer in the field of urology at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he practiced for more than 40 years. During his long and distinguished medical career he changed the way kidney stone disease was treated. He was an innovator in the use of lithotripsy and lasers to treat disease in less invasive ways and a lifelong inventor who collaborated with engineers to develop groundbreaking medical instruments that are in use today worldwide. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He enjoyed spending time at his seasonal home on Martha’s Vineyard, reading, antiquities, jogging and playing golf. He is survived by three sons and daughters-in-law, eight grandchildren, a sister and brother-in-law, a brother and sister-in-law, nieces, and nephews.

Jun, 2020
66

Richard J. Casabonne ’66, of Newton, Mass.; Dec. 16, after a period of declining health. He was a substitute art teacher working in the Boston public school system while earning his master’s degree. After receiving his degree, he worked as a media specialist for public school systems and began to work as a sales and marketing specialist for audio visual companies. He had a long career in the educational publishing industry working at Random House, Grolier Publishing, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, while maintaining a consulting business providing strategic planning and business development services. He served a term as president of the Association of Educational Publishers and was inducted into its Hall of Fame in 2012. He is survived by his wife, Carol; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; two granddaughters; four sisters-in-law; two brothers-in-law; and seven nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2020
66

Judith Rasmussen Brown ’66, of Rochester N.Y.; Dec. 15. She taught high school social studies in Camden, N.Y. She is survived by her husband, Jerome; five children; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Jun, 2020
63

Fred R. Sanders ’63, of Santa Maria, Calif.; Dec. 24, of congestive heart failure. He taught high school English and choreographed plays before moving to Hawaii, where he was the general manager of the Liberty House stores. After moving to Santa Maria, he worked at Radco Products, a solar manufacturing business. He was active in the community and served as president of the Santa Maria Rotary Club from 1999 to 2000 and supported the Santa Maria Valley Humane Society and the Santa Maria Philharmonic. He is survived by his wife, Judy; a daughter and son-in-law; a sister and brother-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020
63

Merril W. Ruck ’63, of Aurora, Colo.; Sept. 6. He had a long career in the U.S. Navy. After retiring from the Navy in 1997, he served as a senior administrator and in July 2005 became the executive director of the Naval Postgraduate School Foundation in Monterey, Calif., until 2013. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Jun, 2020
63

James N. Roitman ’63, of Berkeley, Calif., formerly of Providence; Mar. 12, 2019. After obtaining his PhD in chemistry at UCLA, he worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture at their western regional research center in Albany, Calif. He retired in 2005. He was a car enthusiast who enjoyed traveling to vintage car events in California, good wine, and snorkeling in tropical waters. He is survived by his wife, Esther; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; sisters Barbara Roitman Holt ’67 and Deborah Roitman Venator ’70; brother-in-law Richard Holt ’67; and two nephews, including Alexander Holt ’01.

 

Jun, 2020
63

John A. Mohler ’63, of Tucson, Ariz.; Dec. 28, of Parkinson’s disease. He worked in banking and radio prior to becoming a corrections program officer and teaching college courses with Cochise College and at the Correctional Officer Training Academy. He volunteered with Prison Ministries and retired after more than 20 years with the Arizona Department of Corrections. He is survived by his wife, Becky; seven children; and 19 grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
62

John J. Monnes ’62, of Westbrook, Conn.; Dec. 27, of dementia. He spent his entire business career with Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; four children; three stepchildren; and 18 grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
62

Henry Biller ’62, of Warwick, R.I.; Dec. 30. He was a professor of clinical psychology at URI, where he taught for more than 30 years. He authored many books and was a passionate baseball fan. He is survived by his partner, Suzette, and her daughter; five sons, including Jonathan ’85 and Kenneth ’86; eight grandchildren, including Conor Biller ’12; a sister Euda Fellman ’54; and nephew Richard Fellman ’80.

 

Jun, 2020
61

Edward B. McLaughlin ’61, of Vero Beach, Fla., and Manhattan; Jan. 4. He began his career in the Manhattan office of Smith Barney prior to joining H.N. Whitney, Goadby & Co. He was recruited by the firm of Jesup and Lamont, where he was eventually promoted to partner. He was profiled several times in newspapers and magazines, including Barron’s, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Florida Trend. He left Wall Street and moved to Easton, Conn., where he founded Southport Associates and later Saugatuck Associates, managing money for family and friends. In 1975 he moved to Vero Beach and opened Victorian Accents, an antiques store. Also, while in Vero Beach, he served as chairman of the board of Atlantic Communications and Citrus Broadcasters, Inc., as well as the Wahlstrom Foundation, the VNA Foundation Board, and treasurer of Coast Wine Festival Board. He established the McLaughlin Charitable Foundation, which supported local charities in Vero Beach, Connecticut, and Virginia. He was a longtime member of the Sons of the American Revolution and a fan of the New York Giants, the New York Rangers, and UConn’s women’s basketball team. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; two children; six grandchildren, two great-granddaughters; a sister; and a cousin.

 

Jun, 2020
61

Eldon A. Hiebert ’61, of Deland, Fla.; Dec. 7, from complications of Parkinson’s disease. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for Sanders Associates in New Hampshire, then moved to Pasadena, Maryland, where he founded an engineering company that specialized in automated control systems. He retired to Deland and enjoyed spending time sailing on his 36-foot wood sloop Stardust through the Intracoastal into the Caribbean to the Turks and Caicos. He is survived by several cousins and friends.

 

Jun, 2020
60

Roger P. Sacilotto ’60, of Warren, R.I.; Jan. 2, of a long illness. He worked as a chemist at the Geigy Chemical Co. in Cranston, R.I., and later for the Philip A. Hunt Chemical Corp. in Lincoln, R.I. He served as treasurer and vice president of the Enrico Caruso Society in Manville, R.I. He enjoyed boating, camping, fishing, traveling, and sports. He is survived by his wife, Mona; four children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2020
59

John S. Tomasini ’59, of New Haven, Conn.; Jan. 18. He retired in 2002 from Polek and Polek Co., where he had worked as a wholesale distributor and warehouse manager. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War. He was an avid Red Sox fan and enjoyed jazz music. He is survived by a cousin.

 

Jun, 2020
59

Jack J. Rosenblum ’59, of Deerfield, Mass.; Jan. 13. A Peace Corps volunteer in the early 1960s, he was among the first cohort to serve Costa Rica. He worked as a management consultant, first with his own company, River at Sunrise, and later as a principal of the Atlanta Consulting Group. He coauthored the book Managing from the Heart. In retirement he collaborated in teaching workshops on relationship skills with his wife and coauthored a second book titled The 5 Secrets of Marriage from the Heart. He served on the boards of North Star Fund and Wavework. He enjoyed reading, playing tennis, biking, and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Corinne; daughter Currie Saray Dugas ’07; a brother; a niece; and a nephew.

Jun, 2020
59

Mark A. Moynahan ’59, of Rockville, Md.; Jan. 4. His skills in electronics and radio communications led him to a career that spanned the globe. In 1954 he was employed by Page Communications in Goose Bay, Labrador, and Thule, Greenland. From 1957 to 1965 he worked for RCA in a position that moved him to Japan and then Germany. In 1965, he joined the National Security Agency and in 1969, he moved his family to Alice Springs, Australia, where he served as a mission director at Pine Gap. He returned to Maryland in 1972 and continued his work at NSA until retiring in 1988. He was active for more than 70 years in amateur radio and set up net control stations for emergencies and provided radio service during the 1950 hurricane. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Signal Corps and a member of the American Radio Relay League, Garrett County Amateur Radio Emergency Club, and Maryland Emergency Phone Net. He is survived by his wife, Denise; four daughters; 12 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

 

Jun, 2020
59

Cornelius A. Bottomley ’59, of Plymouth, Mass.; Jan. 11, from complications of pancreatic cancer. He started the company New England Investment Properties, where he bought, sold, and built nursing homes. He was a former executive director of Massachusetts Federation of Nursing Homes. He started a nursing home administrator continuing education company, continued his entrepreneurial spirit establishing a Medicaid reimbursement consulting company, then purchased and managed investment properties. He continued working until he was 80. He was active in his community and a member of Plymouth Kiwanis Club for more than 40 years and the Bass River Yacht Club. He enjoyed sailing, swimming, skiing in Vermont, and spending summers on Cape Cod with family. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
58

Frank D. Young ’58, of Kennett Square, Pa.; Jan. 17. He attended Brown and ran track for one year before transferring to the U.S. Naval Academy. He had a varied career as a naval officer, field training engineer, high school math teacher, and computer programmer. He was an avid runner, active in his community, and volunteered with several organizations, including the Freeport Historical Society and the Nassau County Math Teachers Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Carol Ann; two daughters and sons-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

 

Jun, 2020
58

Henry E. Jakubiak ’58 of Glen Cove, N.Y.; Nov. 14, of cancer. He had a career as an economist for the International Monetary Fund. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; a son; and two sisters.

 

Jun, 2020
58

John Downes ’58, of Bridgeport, Conn.; Aug. 8, 2019, after a short illness. He was the author of many books and was a financial consultant and writer whose career encompassed banking, corporate and public finance, and investor relations. His books included Dictionary of Finance and Investment Terms, The Barron’s Finance and Investment Handbook, and Investing and Personal Finance: Thriving in Today’s Investment Landscape. In addition to being a follower of current events and an avid reader, he was also a jazz pianist. He is survived by daughter Anne Downes Whelan ’91; two grandchildren; four sisters; nephew Hugh Nicholson ’88; and his former wife, Katherine Downes.

 

Jun, 2020
58

Judith Applegate ’58, of Princeton, N.J.; Dec. 3, after a long illness. She ran a successful antiques business in Massachusetts and Connecticut before returning to New Jersey in 1994. She held various adjunct teaching positions throughout her career, most recently with the Cooper-Hewitt Museum graduate program, the Bard Graduate Center, and the Fashion Institute of Technology. Her professional career in the arts included work as an assistant curator with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; director of education and chief curator at the deCordova Museum (Mass.); director of New York’s Place des Antiquaires; vice president of Citibank Art Advisory Services; and director of Litchfield County Auctions (Conn.). Returning to New Jersey, she enjoyed helping with the Master Gardeners of Mercer County and continued to run her own art and antiques appraisal business before retiring in 2016. She is survived by a daughter, two grandchildren, a niece, and two nephews.
 

 

Jun, 2020
57

Valmore A. Pelletier ’57, of Albany, N.Y.; Jan. 7. After graduating from Albany Medical College in 1963, he served in Vietnam as a captain in the U.S. Army, commanding a mobile army surgical hospital unit. Upon return from Vietnam, he worked in private practice as a neurosurgeon in Albany. He is survived by his wife, Leslie; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
57

Lee E. Norton Jr. ’57, of Virginia Beach, Va.; Dec. 9. He was a commander in the U.S. Navy, a naval aviator, and an OPS officer on the USS Independence. He received several awards for his distinguished military service, including the Meritorious Service Medal with Gold Star, Navy Commendation Medal and National Defense Service Medal. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters; a son; eight grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.

 

Jun, 2020
57

Virginia Kelly Mortimer ’57, of Simsbury, Conn.; Dec. 23. She worked at Southern New England Telephone before starting a family. In 1967, she and her husband founded the Periodical Corp., a printing and publishing company in West Hartford, Conn. She retired in 1994. She worked with her husband, both professionally and on many charitable projects, including recruiting and shipping medicine, hospital equipment, books and supplies for Episcopal schools and medical facilities in the (Palestine) Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem. She volunteered for the Evangelism Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut importing olive wood crosses from Bethlehem and selling them to American Christian churches. In 1985 she founded the Barnabas Foundation, a private, nonprofit foundation that makes gifts primarily for Christian endeavors. She was a lifelong knitter and enjoyed making prayer shawls for people in hospitals and nursing homes. She is survived by her husband, Laird; a daughter; and a grandson.

 

Jun, 2020
56

Arthur Weddell ’56, of Stanton, Calif.; Feb. 25. He was an aircraft design engineer of military aircraft and worked for Northrop Aircraft for 30 years. He owned and operated Sandbar Sporting Dogs kennel, which consisted of breeding, training, and showing Brittany spaniels and Labrador retrievers. He enjoyed hunting upland game and waterfowl and was also a licensed falconer. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law.

 

Jun, 2020
57

Daniel G. Siegel ’57, of Providence; Dec. 18. He was the proprietor of M&S Rare Books and M&S Press of Providence and an icon in the book collecting world for more than 50 years. He retired in March 2019. He was a member Brown’s Library Advisory Council, a board member on the Friends of the Library, and a long and dedicated supporter of special collections at Brown. He twice received Brown University Library’s highest honor, the William Williams Award, once as an individual for his generous gifts to special collections and once as a 2012 member of the Library Advisory Council for its support of the renovation of the John Hay Library. To honor his generous support to the library throughout his life, Brown has established The Daniel G. Siegel Fellowship. The focus of his most recent gift was American literature, American history, and the history of science, but it also encompassed a broad range of other subjects. He served as president of Common Cause of Rhode Island for many years. He was an avid sprinter who competed in masters track events both locally and around the country until his late 70s. He is survived by his companion, Sheila Hughes; two sons; two daughters-in-law; three grandchildren; sister Judith Siegel Novak ’55; niece Lindsey Arenberg ’86; and nephew Andrew Arenberg ’84.

 

Jun, 2020
56

Richard L. Thompson ’56, of Brewster, Mass., formerly of Providence, and Westfield, Mass.; Nov. 19, after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating from Yale Law School, he began working as an associate for the Providence law firm of Tillinghast, Collins, and Tanner. In 1963 he moved to Westfield and became a corporate lawyer for the then Stanley Home Products company, specializing in labor and real estate law. He became an assistant secretary of the Corporation. Following his retirement, he moved to Brewster on Cape Cod and joined his wife in her antique business, Bayberry Antiques. He was a member of the Cape Cod Antiques Dealers Association for many years and a longtime member of the First Congregational Church of Harwich, where he had served as a trustee. He enjoyed skiing in Vermont and traveling to Puerto Rico, the Bahamas, and Williamsburg, Va. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jun, 2020
56

Donald S. Cohen ’56, of Pasadena, Calif.; Jan. 9. He was one of the first faculty members recruited for Caltech’s newly formed applied mathematics program in 1965, earning tenure in 1971. His research covered a variety of topics, including early work in the theory of reaction-diffusion equations and later on nonlinear differential equations, pattern formation, stability, and bifurcations that had a significant impact on mathematical biology and chemical engineering. At Caltech he was a popular teacher who received awards for undergraduate teaching excellence in 1979, 1987, and 1998. In 2000, he was awarded the Richard P. Feynman Prize for Excellence in Teaching. He served as the executive officer of applied mathematics from 1988 to 1993 and was chair for the Division of Engineering and Applied Science in 1990. He also served as chairman of the faculty from 1983 to 1985 and from 1986 to 1987 he chaired the faculty advisory committee of the Caltech Board of Trustees. In 1998 he was named Charles Lee Powell Professor of Applied Mathematics. He retired in 2003. He was a member of numerous organizations, including the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the American Mathematical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. From 1993 to 1995, he was the director of the Center for Nonlinear Studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is survived by his wife Natalie and daughter Susan Cohen ’89, ’91 AM.

 

Jun, 2020
55

Gordon E. Perry ’55, of Barrington, R.I., formerly of Westport, Conn.; Dec. 9. At Brown he was a member of the ROTC for the U.S. Navy and upon graduation served two years in the Navy, becoming a lieutenant and chief gunnery officer. From 1958 to 1993 he worked in the insurance/pension business for Mutual of New York. He retired as vice chairman and a member of the board of trustees. He moved to Rhode Island in 1996. He was an active supporter of Brown athletics and served as president of the Brown Football Association and president of the Brown University Sports Foundation. He especially enjoyed watching his sons and grandsons play Brown football. He is survived by eight children and their spouses, including son Scott ’92; 12 grandchildren, including Robert Hughes ’17, Alexander Hughes ’20, and William Perry ’22; a great-grandson; and two sisters.

 

Jun, 2020
55

William S. Penhallow ’55, of Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 15, after a prolonged illness. He was a professor of physics and astronomy at URI for 35 years. Early in his career he conducted research at the Naval Underwater Sound Laboratory. He also taught and conducted research at Brown, Wesleyan University, and Indiana University. He served as director of the URI Quonochontaug observatory and was one of the founders and first directors of the Frosty Drew Observatory in Ninigret Park, Charlestown. He was a lifelong member of Skyscrapers, the Amateur Astronomical Society of Rhode Island, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Association of Variable Star Observers. As a member of the New England Antiquities Research Association, he made groundbreaking discoveries concerning the solar, lunar, and stellar alignments in the Newport Tower in Tower Park, Newport, R.I. He also served as chairman of the Chariho and Charlestown school committees and was the Charlestown Town Moderator. He was a Mason, past master at the Franklin Lodge and past high priest at Unity Chapter. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a brother; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jun, 2020
55

Harvey J. Ades ’55, of Cutler Bay, Fla.; May 19, 2019. He established The Harvey Ades Family Foundation to continue his parents’ tradition of philanthropy. He is survived by his wife, Rebecca; six children; six grandchildren; a sister; and two brothers.

 

Jun, 2020
55

Jeannette Sheridan Adams ’55, of Hilton Head Island, S.C.; Oct. 30. She was a volunteer at Hilton Head Hospital, a member at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, and a stalwart of the golf community at The Sea Pines Country Club. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses.

Jun, 2020
53

Robert L. Radcliffe ’53, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Jan. 27. He was a sales engineer for Miller Box Co. of Warwick, R.I. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War and remained in the U.S. Navy Reserve, rising to the rank of Commander. He enjoyed reading, traveling, technology, and playing golf. He is survived by three children, three stepchildren, seven grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and one step-great-grandchild.

 

Jun, 2020
53

Sally Wilcox O’Day ’53, of Jupiter, Fla.; Jan. 5. She worked at Small Joys in Bedford, N.Y., and volunteered at the Folk Art Museum in New York City. She was a lifelong golfer and enjoyed playing in Chappaqua, N.Y.; Scituate, Mass.; and Jupiter. She is survived by four daughters, two sons-in-law, two grandchildren, two great-granddaughters, two sisters, and several nieces and nephews, including Mark O’Day ’77.

Jun, 2020
52

Benjamin McKendall ’52, of Mountain View, Calif.; Jan. 11. He worked as the dean of admissions and student affairs at Occidental College, Reed College, and SUNY Old Westbury and was an administrator at the College Board’s Palo Alto office. Throughout his career he was a leader in advancing diversity and inclusion in American universities and participated in the civil rights movement. During the summer of 1964 he ran the communications center of the Council of Federated Organizations in Jackson, Miss., and in 1973 he took a position at San Jose State University, from which he retired 21 years later as associate vice president of student services. He earned his private pilot’s license and enjoyed traveling widely. For 21 years he was a docent at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He enjoyed photography, storytelling, and river rafting. He was survived by his wife, Patty; seven daughters; a stepson; grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and his brother, David ’54.

 

Jun, 2020
52

Nancy Cleveland Kimon ’52, of Mattapoisett, Mass., formerly of Mendham, N.J.; Jan. 16. She volunteered with many causes and was active in her community. She was a member of the Christian Women’s Club of Cape Cod and the Mattapoisett Woman’s Club and for 13 years was a trustee of the historic Sandwich Glass Museum. In 1991 she assisted in restoring the Carriage House at the Congregational Church in Mattapoisett. She is survived by a daughter.

Jun, 2020
51

Neil Donavan ’51, of Laguna Beach, Calif.; Nov. 5.

 

Jun, 2020
51

Charles F. Clarke Jr. ’51, of Lake Forest, Ill.; Jan. 1. He served as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After he left the military, he began a career in Chicago real estate at Arthur Rubloff & Co., where he became vice president in 1963. He was recruited by Sudler & Co. in 1965, a firm known for its residential property management in Chicago. This led to managing and leasing the new John Hancock Center building and later work on Water Tower Place. He continued to work in commercial brokerage at Sudler for 39 years. He served on the boards of the Mid City Bank, Verado Energy Inc., the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Catholic Charities, Barat College, Onwentsia Club, and Lake Forest Hospital. He was mayor of Lake Forest from 1990 to 1993. He enjoyed the outdoors, horseback riding, fishing, skiing, camping, hunting, and especially traveling to Telluride, Colorado, where he purchased a ranch. He also enjoyed trips to Eastern Europe, Ireland, Asia, Africa, South American, Australia, and New Zealand. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor; three sons; a daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces
and nephews.

 

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