Obituaries

Sep, 2019
69
Ken McDaniel ’69
Walkout leader and champion for low-income students in STEM
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Photo of Ken McDaniel ’69 with others on stage at his 50th reunion
Sep, 2019
80
Tony Horwitz ’80
Finding the American story that lies between red and blue
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Photo of Tony Horowtiz ’80 Puliter Prize winning author Farewell
Sep, 2019
FAC

 Andrew Browder, of Providence; Mar. 24. He joined the Brown faculty in 1960 and spent most of his life teaching mathematics with a specialty in functional analysis. In 1963 he was awarded a Miller Fellowship to UC Berkeley and in the early 1970s he spent two years at the Mathematical Institute in Aarhus, Denmark. He retired from Brown in 1998. He published many papers and his books include Introduction to Function Algebras and Mathematical Analysis: An Introduction. He was an avid photographer for years and focused on structural beauty of both industrial and natural subjects. In retirement he took courses on writing poetry, joined a local group of fellow poets called The Loft, and composed several poems. He is survived by his wife, Anna; three daughters, including Laura Browder ’84; and four grandchildren.

Sep, 2019
MD 79

Alan R. Cote ’79 MD, of Barrington, R.I.; May 5. He operated his ophthalmology practice in Fall River, Mass., for 32 years. He was a black belt in Taekwondo and enjoyed visiting baseball parks with his children and taking nature walks with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Leslie; five children; two grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 00

John Wicinas ’00 AM, of Irwin, Pa.; Apr. 7. He was an adjunct professor of English and history at Westmoreland County Community College. He was a Fulbright Scholar to Lithuania in 2000 and a member of Delta Chi. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, two brothers and sisters-in-law, an uncle, five nieces, and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 87

Richard P. Manning ’87 AM, of Providence, formerly of Flint, Mich.; Apr. 6. He worked for 30 years as an archivist for Brown’s Department of Modern Culture and Media. He was former codirector for the French Film Festival and was involved with the Africana Film Festival, the Providence LGBTQ Film Festival, and many others. He enjoyed sports statistics and sporting facts. He is survived by a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 74

Curtis B. Norwood ’74 ScM, of Wakefield, R.I.; Apr. 21. He was a research scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency’s laboratory in Narragansett, R.I. He retired in 2003. He enjoyed camping, woodworking, poker, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Lesley; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; a granddaughter; a sister and brother-in-law; and a sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 72

Richard W. Nopper Jr. ’72 ScM, of Wilmington, Del.; Apr. 11. After his first job at the U.S. Air Force geophysical lab, he went on to become an officer in the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army Reserves, a senior research scientist in exploration research and development at Conoco, a senior research associate in engineering and central research and development at DuPont, and he retired from The Chemours Company. He was a musician and enjoyed playing in several jazz bands. He also sang in his church choir and was a member of the Madrigal Singers. He enjoyed reading, photography, traveling, and languages. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; two daughters and their spouses; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; his mother; and three sisters.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 70

Charles W. Higginbotham ’70 PhD, of Lexington, Mass.; Apr. 2, from complications of Parkinson’s. He worked in the field of academic computing for GT&E and as a consultant to several universities, including the University of Alaska Fairbanks. In 1979 he joined the faculty of Rensselaer Hartford and retired as associate professor in 1996. He was a member of First Church of Christ Congregation in Middletown, Conn., where he sang for many years in the senior choir. He was a fan of the Boston Red Sox and enjoyed sailing, skiing, tennis, crossword puzzles, and genealogy. He is survived by his wife, Louise; a daughter; a son, Andrew ’97; three grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 68

Aloke K. Das ’68 ScM, of Warwick, R.I.; Apr. 14. He was a quality control engineer for Cherry Semiconductor Corp. and North East Safety Training Co. before retiring. He enjoyed sports and cultural activities and was an avid fan of tennis. He also enjoyed Bengali and English literature and Bengali cuisine. He is survived by a son, three sisters, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 58

Lawrence M. Washington ’58 PhD, of Weybridge, Vt.; Apr. 23. He began teaching at Kings College in 1950 and subsequently taught at Gettysburg College, Bowdoin College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Hamline University, and Upsala College before spending the last 20 years teaching at UMass Dartmouth, together with his wife, and running a successful German degree program. He and his wife published the textbook A Preview of German Literature in 1969. He was a veteran of World War II, in which he served as a translator. He is survived by six children, 16 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, and a brother.
 

 

Sep, 2019
GS 57

Charles E. O’Rourke ’57 ScM, of Brookline, Mass., formerly of New Canaan, Conn.; Apr. 17. He had been a longtime employee of Union Carbide Corp. and Carbtrol, Inc. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and is survived by his wife, Marilyn; five sons; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
GS 56

Warren P. Roque ’56 AM, of Providence; Apr. 12. He taught in the Providence public school system for 20 years and was a school principal in Richmond and Coventry, R.I., for 12 years. After serving as an educator, he worked for the U.S. Post Office. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and a communicant of St. Mark Church in Cranston, R.I. He enjoyed reading and writing stories and poetry. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three sons and their wives; a daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren; two sisters; and three brothers.

 

Sep, 2019
94

Richard E. Salisbury ’94, of Austin, Tex.; Apr. 28. He began his law career in corporate law and moved on to complex civil litigation. After clerking for a federal magistrate judge in Florida, he worked in private practice in Dallas and later spent ten years as an assistant attorney general at the Texas Attorney General’s Civil Medicaid Fraud Division. He enjoyed the opera, skeet shooting, and yoga. He is survived by Elizabeth, mother of his twin daughters; his parents; a sister and brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
83

Jonathan R. Spencer ’83, of Arlington, Va.; May 13. He was an attorney. He served as general counsel of the Museum of Science Fiction in Washington, D.C., was vice president and associate general counsel of Verisign, general counsel of Shenandoah Telecommunications Company, and associate general counsel of Cable & Wireless Communications. He is survived by three brothers, two sisters-in-law, and 10 nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
77

Grady E. Lake ’77, of Elmhurst, Ill.; Aug. 13, 2018. He was vice president of Liberty Bank for Savings in Chicago. He enjoyed fishing, gardening, traveling, playing hockey, and cooking. He is survived by his fiancé Sandra Heinz; a daughter; a son; three stepsons; two grandchildren; and two sisters.
 

 

Sep, 2019
77

John H. Berardi ’77, of South Attleboro, Mass.; Apr. 15, after a brief illness. He worked for Narragansett Wire Company for many years and was a real estate agent since 1989, most recently with Century 21. He is survived by his father, a brother and sister-in-law, and two nieces.

 

Sep, 2019
75

Guy H. Tuttle ’75, of Atlanta; Mar. 28. He was an award-winning art director and production designer for Atlanta film and television for more than 30 years. In 1985 he launched Special Projects to provide art direction, set design, construction services, and prop rentals for television, motion picture, and commercial productions. He cofounded Televent, LLC in 1988 to offer design, management, planning, and technical production. He served as art director for Greenleaf and Step Up, was production designer for The House Next Door, and oversaw production and management of Turner Broadcasting’s Annual Trumpet Awards for 13 years. Since 2002 he worked with Habitat for Humanity. He was a member of the Art Directors Guild, National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, and he served on several boards. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; two sisters; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2019
68

Stephen D. Barbaro ’68, of Austin, Tex.; Mar. 27. He served in the U.S. Army Reserves in New Jersey and later enjoyed a long career as a financial portfolio manager. He was a great supporter of the Austin Opera and served on the community advisory board of Helping Hand Home for Children for several years, where he and his wife started a golf program for children. He is survived by his wife, Polly; two daughters; four grandchildren; a stepdaughter; a sister; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
66

Paul F. Clements ’66, of Bloomington, Minn.; Mar. 15. He was a founding partner in MultiMedia Inc., a media production company based in Minneapolis that he guided for 50 years. He enjoyed reading, traveling, scuba diving, skiing, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Kristine; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother, Tim ’73.
 

 

Sep, 2019
63

Robert M. Adams ’63, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Apr. 29. He served in the U.S. Army and then earned an MBA from the Wharton School of Business. He started his career at Chase Manhattan Bank and in 1972 joined Loeb, Rhoades & Co. In 1977 he moved to EF Hutton overseeing financial institution transactions and the development of tax exempt mortgage revenue bonds. In 1984 he cofounded Adams Cohen & Associates and Adams Cohen Securities. He later worked with Tower Realty Trust; Keefe, Bruyette & Woods; and BAH Holdings, LLC. He enjoyed competitive sailing and downhill skiing. He is survived by his wife, Anita; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two stepchildren; two step-grandchildren; a niece; and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
61

Robert Lussier ’61, of Pecos, N.Mex.; Apr. 19. He served four years in the U.S. Navy and then studied for five years with noted musician C. Alexander Peloquin. In 1963 he moved to New York City to pursue an acting career and in 1969 moved to Los Angeles, where he continued his career in theater, film, and television. In 1986 he entered the Pecos Benedictine Monastery and studied for the priesthood at St. John’s Seminary in California. In 1992, he received a master of divinity and a master of arts in religion and was ordained into the priesthood on Dec. 19. He traveled extensively conducting seminars, retreats, workshops, and parish missions. In Pecos, he was involved with retreat programs, and the music ministry and was assigned formation director and novice master. He also served at St. Francis Cathedral in Santa Fe and ministered at the Carmelite Monastery and Cristo Rey parish. He is survived by eight nieces and nephews, as well as many friends.

 

Sep, 2019
61

Edward K. Forbes ’61, of Kennebunkport, Maine, formerly of Wellesley, Mass.; Apr. 26. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he worked in medical sales. He enjoyed thoroughbred racing and automobiles. He is survived by his wife, Martha; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a nephew.

 

Sep, 2019
60

Richard M. Galkin ’60, of Boca Raton, Fla.; Apr. 18, after a long illness. He oversaw Time Inc.’s entry into ownership of cable systems in the 1960s, including Sterling Manhattan Cable Television, where he served as president during the formation of HBO. After leaving Time Inc., he established the cable franchises for Providence, North Providence, and Pawtucket, R.I. He maintained an ownership position until its sale to Times-Mirror Corp. in 1985. He was instrumental in the creation and management of Comsat’s disruptive new venture Satellite Television Corp. For more than 30 years he served on the board of trustees and directors of The Royce Funds, as well as being chairman of its audit committee. In semi-retirement, he served as chairman of the City of Boca Raton Telecommunications Advisory Board for nearly 20 years and as president of the Boca Raton Marina Yacht Club. He established a scholarship at Brown in his father’s name, the Joseph Galkin 1931 Family Scholarship. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a brother; and three nephews, including Justin Sanders ’04.
 

 

Sep, 2019
60

Robert E. Casey ’60, of Stonington, Conn.; Apr. 13. He worked at Bankers Trust for one year and then served, until 1964, in the U.S. Navy, achieving the rank of lieutenant. After obtaining his MBA from Rutgers, he worked as a CPA for Lybrand in Hartford and San Francisco until 1970, when he moved to work as vice president and controller for National Life in Montpelier, Vt. In 1978 he moved to Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company in Hartford, where he attained the role of senior vice president and retired in 1994. He was active in his community and served on several boards. He enjoyed playing bridge, golf and tennis. He is survived by his companion, Neeltje Udo; two sons and daughters-in-law; a stepson; three grandsons; five nephews, a niece; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
59

Carolyn Mayo Mansell ’59, of Palo Alto, Calif.; Apr. 3, after a brief illness. After staying home and raising her children, she began a career in real estate with Wright & Co. and quickly became the top producer in Los Altos. In 1984 she founded Mansell & Co. and was later recognized by the Los Altos Board of Realtors as “Top Achiever for 10 Consecutive Years.” Over the decades she mentored other agents and pioneered many practices now considered standard in the industry. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, a sister, and a brother-in-law.
 

 

Sep, 2019
59

Richard A. Cleary ’59, of Cumberland, R.I.; May 1. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked at New England Life Insurance Company in Boston and later was a Naval Intelligence agent in Newport, R.I., from 1963 to 1967. For 21 years he worked as a special agent for the FBI and then until 2003, as a self-employed investigator/consultant. At Brown he was a member of the men’s varsity hockey team and later was an active member and past president of the Brown Hockey Association. He played until the age of 78 and for several years was invited to play in the Charles Schulz Snoopy’s Senior World Hockey Tournament. He also enjoyed playing softball, tennis, and golf. He is survived by four daughters, three grandchildren, a sister, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
59

Richard J. Beland ’59, of Poquoson, Va.; May 10, from Parkinson’s disease. He served in the U.S. Air Force for 30 years, retiring in 1989. He spent years training students to fly, briefly interrupted by a tour in Vietnam, where he flew 290 combat missions. For four years following, he served as an advance agent for support and security for Air Force One, serving under Presidents Carter and Reagan. He then did a four-year tour to Germany. He was a member of the NATO Flight Safety Group. In retirement he served as a lector and usher at Langley Chapel, was a member of the Peninsula Pathfinder Volksmarch Club, and was chairman of the Board of Zoning Appeals in Poquoson for 18 years. He enjoyed traveling with his wife, Sonya, who survives him. Other survivors include two sons, a daughter-in-law, a grandson, a sister and brother-in-law, a niece, a nephew, and an uncle.

 

Sep, 2019
58

Thomas B. Bigford ’58, of Williamsburg, Va.; Apr. 11. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for Procter & Gamble in Cincinnati, followed by management positions with Carnation in Los Angeles, Ogilvy & Mather in New York, and Ketchum Advertising in San Francisco. He is survived by his wife, Annie; a daughter; a son-in-law; a grandson; two sisters; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
57

Robert M. Press ’57, of Houston; Apr. 22. He and his wife owned and operated Lorandi Optical in Houston until they sold the business in 1998. He enjoyed traveling, playing golf, and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Lorraine; two daughters; a son-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
56

Gretchen Reiche Terhune ’56, of Falmouth, Maine, formerly of Darien, Conn.; Apr. 24, of a stroke. From 1983 to 1994, she was the executive director of the Darien United Way and Community Council. Always active in volunteer activities over the years, she had been a district chair of the Darien Representative Town Meeting, the director of volunteers at Darien High School, and a director of the Fairfield County Pembroke College Club. She is survived by her husband, Richard; three sons; three daughters-in-law; six grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
56

Bruce W. Lovell ’56, of Agawam, Mass., formerly of Enfield, Conn.; Apr. 13. He was employed with Aetna Life Insurance for 28 years before retiring and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He enjoyed Austin-Healy racing, boating, model railroading, and watching his children’s and grandchildren’s participation in sports. He is survived by three children, four grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Sep, 2019
54

James M. McSherry ’54, of West Falmouth, Mass., formerly of Charleston, S.C.; Apr. 9. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he began working at E.R. Carpenter Company in Richmond, Va., and later at West Virginia Pulp and Paper Company, which eventually became Westvaco. He retired in 1994 as vice president of the Kraft Division in Charleston. He was a member and former commodore of the Chapoquoit Yacht Club in West Falmouth and the Lions Club of Charleston. He enjoyed family summers on Chapoquoit Island and is survived by his wife, Joanne Webster McSherry ’53; four sons, including Peter ’78; 11 grandchildren; a sister; a brother; sister-in-law Joan Edgley Webster ’58; brother-in-law Gordon Webster ’54; and niece Alison Webster ’83.

 

Sep, 2019
54

S. Thomas Gagliano ’54, of Red Bank, N.J.; Apr. 13. He joined the law practice of Potter and Fisher, Long Branch, in 1960 and became senior partner of the firm, which later became Gagliano, Tucci, Iadanza & Reisner, representing municipal governments, land use boards, and authorities. In 1991 he became of counsel at Giordano, Halleran & Ciesla, then senior vice president for corporate and legal affairs at EPS Corporation. Active in county politics, he was elected to the Borough of Oceanport Council in 1967, became County Surrogate for a five-year term, and served in the New Jersey Senate for three terms beginning in 1977. He rose in leadership ranks to hold the post of minority leader of the Senate, as well as ranking member of the transportation and communication committees. He was instrumental in forming what is now New Jersey Transit, to which he would later be appointed executive director. In 1991 he formed the Jersey Shore Partnership. He was a member of the Amerigo Vespucci Society of Long Branch; served on the board of East Jersey Savings and Loan; was a founding member of the Ironbound Bank; a founder and board member of Future Vision Cable, which became part of Comcast; and a member of the legislative committee of Meridian Health Care. He is survived by his wife, Maria; four children, including son John ’85; and 11 grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
54

Loring W. Chadwick ’54, of Leesburg, Fla.; Apr. 26. He was a music teacher for 28 years in the Cumberland, R.I., school system. He cofounded the Cumberland-Lincoln Community Chorus and served as codirector for 12 years. He was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1958 and served at various locations throughout Rhode Island. After moving to Ocala, he joined the Church of the Advent, assisting as the director of music.

 

Sep, 2019
53

Mary Bromage Topper ’53, of Dayton, Ohio, formerly of Stuart, Fla.; May 2. She was an accomplished seamstress and enjoyed knitting, playing golf, and fly-fishing. She is survived by four children, including daughter M. Kathleen Walworth ’76 and her husband, James W. Walworth ’76; 12 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; sister Elizabeth Van Schenck ’56; and nieces and nephews.

 

Sep, 2019
53

Kendall R. Richardson ’53, of Needham, Mass.; Apr. 7. He began his teaching career in Glastonbury, Conn., and was awarded a John Hay Fellowship at Harvard. In 1968 he began teaching history at Needham High School, retiring in 1993. He was well-known for wearing a carnation in his lapel every day. He enjoyed traveling to the former USSR with students and was a contributor to From Russia to USSR: A Narrative and Documentary History. He was an avid reader and book collector and is survived by his wife, Betty; two daughters; and seven grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
53

Amelia Stern Revkin ’53, of North Branford, Conn.; Apr. 25. She was a social worker in Rhode Island and an active member of the League of Women Voters before starting a family. With a master’s degree in political science from URI, she began teaching courses in political science and history at East Greenwich High School, R.I. In 1984, after years of helping her students, she obtained a Doctor of Education degree from Boston Univ. and became a guidance counselor and college admissions counselor. For several decades she was active with the BAA, including interviewing prospective students. In her early retirement she settled in Stuart, Fla., and volunteered at the public library. After moving back to her Branford retirement community, she played a key role in evaluating Silver Pen Award scholarship entries, served on resident committees, and acted as an informal mentor and counselor whenever she could provide support. She is survived by her husband, William ’50; daughter Diana Revkin ’83; sons Andrew ’78 and James ’81 MD; four grandchildren; brother Michael Stern ’57; niece Barbara Revkin ’70; and nephew Richard Stern ’88.

 

Sep, 2019
53

William H. Miller ’53, of Needham, Mass., formerly of Cambridge, Mass.; Mar. 21. He served in the Korean War, followed by a 50-year career as a certified public accountant in Boston. He is survived by his partner Dee Dee Wilcon; four children and their spouses, including daughter Cathy Miller Schlosberg ’80 and her husband Jeremy Schlosberg ’80, son Scott Miller ’81, and daughter Marcy Miller Schaffir ’87 and her husband Jonathan Schaffir ’87, ’90 MD; and 11 grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
52

Richard A. Goeben ’52, of Niantic, Conn., formerly of Winnetka, Ill.; Apr. 9. He worked as a sales manufacturer representative for Grenville Davis Company in Chicago from 1958 to 1979 and then for 14 years with Cleary Sales Associates in Northfield, Ill., as a vice president. He retired to Connecticut in 1993. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.
 

 

Sep, 2019
52

John P. Finlay ’52, of Ipswich, Mass.; Apr. 28, due to complications of a fall. He was a retired senior vice president of Lindenmeyr Munroe in Peabody, Mass. He was a member of various trade organizations, among them the National Paper Trade Association and the New England Paper Merchants Association. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. In addition to enjoying singing with the Boston Saengerfest Men’s Chorus, which performed twice at the Royal Albert Hall in London, he also enjoyed spending time with family at his cottage in Cape Cod and later at his ski house in New Hampshire. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; two great-grandsons; a brother and sister-in-law.

 

Sep, 2019
51

Claire Fitzpatrick Luther ’51, of Elkhart, Ind.; Apr. 24. She was a founding member of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Elkhart and an active member of the community. She enjoyed playing golf and tennis, traveling, and solving crossword puzzles. She is survived by four daughters, five grandchildren, and two sisters, including Virginia Fitzpatrick Bainton ’49.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Henry P. Reynolds Jr. ’50, of Duxbury, Mass.; Apr. 14. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, he attended Brown and studied mechanical engineering. He had a long career with U.S. Rubber/Uniroyal. In retirement, he was active in the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Woodbridge, Conn., where he served as commander and later was a board member and chaplain for the Duxbury Post 223 American Legion. He enjoyed speedboat racing, skiing, sailing, yoga, bowling, tennis, gardening, and mountain climbing. In addition, he bicycled many Pan Mass Challenge Sturbridge to Provincetown rides and enjoyed a 23-mile ride with his family through Duxbury on his 90th birthday. He is survived by two daughters, including Anne Ward ’82; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; 10 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
50

William C. Munroe Jr. ’50, of Lincoln, Mass.; Apr. 22. He was an attorney and a retired lieutenant of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two daughters; a daughter-in-law; seven grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Robert F. King ’50, of Buffalo, N.Y.; May 10. He was a sales executive in the food industry. After retiring, he was the equipment manager for the Canisius College basketball team. He is survived by four children and their spouses, four grandchildren, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
50

John A. Dillingham ’50, of Southwick, Mass., formerly of Westfield, Mass.; May 12, after battling Parkinson’s disease. He was employed by Old Colony Envelope Co. from 1950 to 1987 as auditor and treasurer and later was vice president and controller of Hammermill Paper Co., now International Paper. He also worked for Healy-Pease Funeral Home as business manager in the Westfield and Northampton locations. He served on many committees and was a former treasurer of the YMCA of Greater Westfield, former treasurer and trustee for Westhills Home Health Care, treasurer of Pine Hill Cemetery, trustee of Westfield Athenaeum and Westfield Academy, and a member of the Westfield Historical Society. He was an active member of First Congregational Church of Westfield, where he served as a deacon and past chairman of invested funds. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and both the Naval and Coast Guard Reserves. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; four children; a stepson; and eight grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
50

Anne Lord Arnold ’50, of East Marion, N.Y.; Apr. 8. She served in the Canadian Women’s Army Corps until she was old enough to transfer to the U.S. WAVES, then entered Brown after being discharged. After graduation, she accepted a position with American Metal Co., followed by the Creole Petroleum Co. in New York City, working as a librarian/cataloger. In 1964 she began working as a school librarian at Greenport School and retired in 1986. She enjoyed collecting giraffes from around the world. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, three grandchildren, a great-grandson, and a sister.
 

 

Sep, 2019
49

Joan Dixon Keller ’49, of Westwood, Mass., formerly of Atlanta; Apr. 18. After college, she joined the junior executive training program of Filene’s department store in Boston. In 1967 she moved to Florida and later to Atlanta, where she lived for 40 years, before returning to New England in 2017. She participated in the Junior League, garden clubs, and the Colonial Dames. She enjoyed reading, swimming, tennis, golf, and playing bridge. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, and six grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
48

A. Sheffield Reynolds ’48, of Warwick, R.I.; Apr. 12. He worked for 45 years at Rhode Island Hospital Trust National Bank before retiring as senior vice president of commercial lending. He later worked for three years as a consultant for Bank Boston. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. A Mason for 64 years, he was the recipient of an Exemplary Service Medal from Adelphoi Lodge in 2005 and served the Masonic Grand Lodge of Rhode Island as grand master in 1978. He was a member of the Rhode Island Shriners and elected Potentate in 1989. He was also a member of the Scottish Rite Valley of Providence and a recipient of the Honorary 33rd Degree. He is survived by two children, seven grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
49

William Seamans ’49, of Spofford, N.H.; Apr. 21. He began working at CBS News as an editor for the morning radio news, then moved to the evening news as an editor and writer for Walter Cronkite, which earned him an Emmy. In 1963 he joined ABC News as a correspondent and producer. He spent 22 of his years at ABC as Tel Aviv bureau chief, covering the Gulf War and receiving a second Emmy for the news special Nightline in the Holy Land, as well as Overseas Press Club awards for radio reporting on the invasion of Cyprus in 1974 and for a television documentary on Yitzhak Rabin. He retired to Spofford in 1991 and shared his expertise through commentary and editorials for Vermont Public Radio and the Keene Sentinel. He donated his working papers and other related materials to the Mason Library at Keene State College. He was a member of the Writers Guild, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, the Overseas Press Club of America, the National Press Club, and the Foreign Correspondents Association. In his personal life he enjoyed playing tennis and golf, target shooting, and attending summer performances at the Peterborough Players. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, and a niece.

Sep, 2019
46

William L. Yeager ’46, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Unadilla, N.Y.; May 5. He was president and owner of Tieco-Unadilla Corp. and active in his local community serving on several boards. He served in the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
46

Richard J. Tracy ’46, of East Providence; May 2. After earning a degree in mechanical engineering at Brown through the Navy ROTC program, he was commissioned in the navy and served in the Korean War as chief engineer of the USS Watts until 1953. He returned to Providence and worked at General Electric as a sales engineer and after a 22-year career at GE, he joined Taft Pierce Mfg. in Woonsocket, where he worked as vice president of sales and marketing until the company was sold in 1984. In 1986 he joined the Small Business Association of New England as the Rhode Island chapter representative until retiring in 1999. He was a Brown trustee from 1972 to 1977 and a recipient of the Brown Bear Award for outstanding alumni service. He enjoyed singing and was a member of the University Glee Club and St. Margaret’s Choir for many years. He also enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Esther Bouchard Tracy ’46; four children, including daughter Marianne Tracy ’79 and sons Robert ’76, Edward ’81, and Kevin ’85; and eight grandchildren, including Kaitlyn Tracy ’14 and Brian Tracy ’21.

 

Sep, 2019
46

Robert Nason ’46, of Dresden, Me.; Apr. 6. He was an artist and teacher. He taught art at the junior and senior high school levels and later was an instructor in design at Simmons College and instructor in drawing and painting at the Cambridge Center for Adult Education. His work has been displayed at galleries and colleges in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York and Maine. His final exhibit in 2018 was at Rising Tide Community Market in Damariscotta, Me. He created original works in every type of traditional and experimental media. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by three children, 12 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, three former wives, a niece and two nephews.
 

 

Sep, 2019
46

Richard L. Lapan ’46, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of Warren and Wickford, R.I.; Apr. 29. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he worked for the Veterans Administration Providence regional office until his retirement in 1981. In addition to being an Eagle Scout, he was treasurer for Central Fire Co., commander of American Legion Post 11, usher for St. Mary of the Bay, Warren School Committee chair, and an AARP driving instructor. He enjoyed woodworking, telling jokes, playing golf, genealogy, and the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by two sons, six grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren.

 

Sep, 2019
46

Jose M. Delgado ’46, of Marion, Mass.; Apr. 14. A physician/psychiatrist, he was most proud of developing The Professional Counseling Center, a multidisciplinary mental health center in New Bedford, Mass., still in operation today. He was retired from St. Luke’s Hospital medical staff. He was certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and was a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, the American Psychiatric Assoc., and the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; and two brothers.

 

Sep, 2019
45

Bernard H. Herman ’45, of Clearwater, Fla.; Apr. 11. He practiced law in New Bedford and Fall River, Mass., serving as counsel to the Fall River School Department. He ran mayoral and congressional campaigns, and was an active member of Temple Beth El, and an accomplished photographer. After moving to Cape Cod in 1978, he continued to practice law until he became an assistant district attorney in Bristol County. In that capacity, he spoke to children and seniors about such issues as racial and religious tolerance, protecting themselves from abuse, and wrote plays for children to help illustrate the lessons. He received numerous commendations from the governor, religious leaders, law enforcement, business owners, and public officials. He also attended clown school and conducted seminars for the medical profession on the crucial role of humor in healing. He entertained and empowered people to embrace life with humor well into his 90s. He was a member of both the Massachusetts and Fall River bar associations, the Massachusetts Trial Lawyers Assoc., and the New England Law Institute. He is survived by his wife, Pat; two daughters; and a son-in-law.

 

Sep, 2019
40

Herbert G. Nahas ’40, of Hanover Township, Pa.; Apr. 6. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army as an intelligence officer assigned as an interpreter to Gen. Dwight Eisenhower’s staff in Algeria prior to being ordained to the priesthood on May 29, 1949. He was first assigned to St. George parish in Danbury, Conn., where he remained until 1951; he was later assigned to St. Mary’s Antiochian Orthodox Church in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., from which he retired in 1986 after 35 years. In 1961, he was elevated to the rank of archpriest with the title of exarch. During his tenure at St. Mary’s, he oversaw a campaign to build a new church, rectory, and parish hall; they were completed in 1968. He founded Father Nahas’s Senior Citizens and was involved in many local groups, including the United Way, the American Heart Assoc., the Boy Scouts of America, and the Masonry. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Sep, 2019
38

Samuel H. Rubin ’38, of Redding, Conn.; Sept. 28, 2018. He was a physician who rose to become dean and provost of New York Medical College before retiring. He served as a trustee and member of the executive committee of the Associated Medical Schools of New York and New Jersey, as a fellow of the American College of Physicians, and as a member of the New York Academy of Sciences. He was also a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and is listed in American Men of Medicine and Who’s Who in the East. He is survived by his wife, Audrey; son, David ’71; two daughters-in-law; five grandchildren, including Elizabeth Clements ’00, ’02 AM; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
STU

William Povell ’20, of Baltimore; Jan. 25. He was a computer science concentrator who also served as an undergraduate teaching assistant in CS, helping to develop course materials and assisting fellow students in data fluency, software engineering, and computer systems courses. He was a mentor to high school students through Brown’s Google IgniteCS chapter. He is survived by his parents, Maryann Povell and Gregory Neumann ’91 ScM, ’93 PhD; a sister; and a brother.
 

 

Jul, 2019
FAC

Mary Bertucio Arnold, of Washington, D.C.; Dec. 19. She began teaching at the Univ. of North Carolina and in 1966 joined the faculty at Brown, where she would spend the remainder of her professional career. Her hospital appointments included director of pediatric endocrinology at Rhode Island Hospital and chairman of the department of pediatrics at Roger Williams General Hospital. Among her many committee memberships and administrative appointments, she was a founding member of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society and served on the board of trustees at Providence Country Day School, as well as on the corporation of St. Andrew’s School. She was promoted to associate professor of pediatrics at Brown in 1974. She authored more than 15 publications in prestigious peer reviewed journals and she participated in several multicenter clinical research studies. She was an active member of the American Medical Women’s Association and in 1996 was named the Rhode Island Medical Women’s Association Woman Physician of the Year.  She is survived by three sons and their spouses; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 01

Kevin Oliveira ’01 MAT, of East Providence, formerly of McDonough, Ga.; Mar. 17. He taught at Clark University in Atlanta, Ga., and was an active member of the performing arts community, having performed in venues such as the Green Room Actor’s Lounge in Atlanta. He is survived by his wife, Rosemary; five daughters; five grandchildren; his mother; a sister; and three brothers.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 75

Janet M. Sharistanian ’75 PhD, of Lawrence, Kans.; Feb. 6. She taught courses on American literature, emphasizing American poetry and American women writers, most notably Willa Cather and Edith Wharton, at the University of Kansas. Supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), she directed five summer institutes focused on these and other American women writers. She developed an independent women’s studies program at the university and between 1979 and 1983 served as the director of Kansas University’s Research Institute on Women. In 1983 the University of Southern California invited her to direct a Theme Year in Gender and Scholarship. She taught courses focused on the literature and history of World War I during the 1990s, and the last NEH summer seminar she codirected was on the history and literature of the Great War. She was named Outstanding Teacher in 1974 at the University of Kansas and received the Burlington Northern Foundation Faculty Achievement Award and the Outstanding Woman Teacher Award. She was inducted into the University of Kansas Women’s Hall of Fame.
 

 

Jul, 2019
GS 73

Gerald M. Miller ’73 AM, of Oxford, Ohio; Feb. 16, of cancer. He was a professor of economics at Miami University in Oxford, recognized by his peers and students as a best teacher, and honored as the recipient of the 1996 A.K. Morris Award. During summer breaks from teaching, he returned to New York and worked in various positions, including counselor and co-director at Camp DeBaun. In 1974 he was initiated into Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity as a faculty advisor for the Miami chapter. He served the fraternity in several different capacities on a local and national level for more than 44 years. He served as chapter advisor as well as director of the chapter’s house corporation and also served as National Scholarship Chairman, chairman of the SAM Foundation Scholarship Committee, and director of the SAM Foundation. After retiring from Miami University, he remained on several advisory committees, including the Cliff Alexander Office of Greek Life, and received a Proclamation of Outstanding Faculty/Staff on Oct. 6, 2018. He is survived by his husband, James Pater; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 70

Mark B. Moffett ’70 PhD, of North Kingstown, R.I., formerly of Waterford, Conn.; Mar. 14. He was a physicist for the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in New London and Newport and later was an assistant professor of ocean engineering at URI. For the majority of his career he worked as a civil servant for the U.S. Navy and secured four patents in designs for sonar systems for the government. He was a member of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers, Sigma Xi, and a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America. He served on the board of trustees for the Waterford Public Library. An avid musician, he was in numerous community bands, quartets, and various ensembles. He was a longtime member of the Westerly and Lafayette Bands and a founding member of the Waterford Community Band. He enjoyed exercising, swimming, running, and the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; three daughters and their spouses; a son and his wife; nine grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 65

Robert G. Goulet ’65 AM, ’69 PhD, of Brockton, Mass.; Dec. 29. He began his teaching career at Stonehill College in 1968 and continued there as a professor of English and film studies for 44 years. In addition to teaching, he initiated a faculty theater at Stonehill, where he produced and directed. Stonehill awarded him the Louise F. Hegarty Excellence in Teaching Award in 2002. In retirement he continued to work with students through the Boston Seminar Series. He is survived by a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; and four nieces.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 64

John J. DeLuisi ’64 MAT, of Boulder Colo.; Feb. 26. He spent most of his career at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder. With NOAA he traveled the world collaborating with international atmospheric scientists and organizations. He was considered an expert in the study and investigation of the interaction of solar radiation with the Earth’s atmosphere and initiated and developed the U.S. SURFRAD network, which has become NOAA’s longest running and most successful surface radiation network. He also mentored many young scientists. He was a U.S. Navy Korean War veteran and is survived by five children; nine grandchildren; a sister; a sister-in-law; and 12 nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 59

William C. Owen ’59 MAT, of Homosassa, Fla., formerly of Rockville, Md.; Mar. 20. He taught at schools in Indianapolis and Lafayette, Ind., prior to working as an attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., for 23 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and is survived by his wife, Joan Castronovo Owen ’58; two children and their spouses; and four grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
GS 57

Karl P. Banach ’57 AM, of Osprey, Fla., formerly of Cheshire, Conn.; Mar. 5. He joined the Southern New England Telephone Co. after graduation and retired in 1987, after a successful career in management. After retiring, he became a financial consultant. Music was a passion and he played trumpet in marching bands while in school and later professionally. He enjoyed traveling the world. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by a daughter, Karla Banach ’84; a son; and a grandson.
 

 

Jul, 2019
GS 54

Eugene P. Goldberg ’54 PhD, of Tavares, Fla.; Feb. 15. He was a professor at the Univ.of Florida and a research chemist. As a research chemist at General Electric in the 1950s, he was a co-inventor of Lexan polycarbonate, served as associate director of the Borg-Warner Research Center in the 1960s, and then spent nearly a decade as director of Xerox’s Chemistry Research Laboratory in Webster, N.Y. In 1975 he joined the Univ. of Florida faculty as the biomedical engineering program of distinction professor, helping establish one of the first academic biomaterials programs. He was awarded more than 100 U.S. and foreign patents and published more than 300 technical peer-reviewed papers about organic and polymer chemistry and biomedical materials science. He was recognized by the National Science Foundation as a faculty mentor for minority graduate students. Over the years he was the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including Florida Scientist of the Year in 1987. He was named the Genzyme Professor for Biomaterials Science & Engineering in 1999 and was a fellow of the American Institute for Medical & Biological Engineering and the International College of Fellows for Biomaterials Science & Engineering. He served on several science, engineering, and biomedical advisory boards and more than a half-dozen technical journal editorial boards, in addition to regularly testifying as an expert witness concerning the safety of implanted biomaterials. He was an invited speaker at technical conferences around the world and held visiting appointments at academic and technical institutions in Israel, the U.S.S.R., and Japan. He enjoyed SCUBA diving, traveling, sailing, music, and family reunions. He is survived by two sons and their wives; seven grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
GS 47

Luther M. Foster ’47 PhD, of Corvallis, Ore.; Feb. 21. He was chief of the physical chemical division at Alcoa Research Laboratory and later a manager in semi-conductor chemistry at T.J. Watson Research Center of IBM, from which he retired in 1981. He authored 60 research studies in scientific journals and was a contributing author of seven standard reference texts. He additionally served on the NASA committee for evaluation of Skylab satellite experiments, was a moderator of the Westinghouse KDKA radio public service series Chemistry and You, and was president of the Pittsburgh Chemistry Club. He enjoyed working with fused glass art in retirement and exhibited his work in galleries in the Northwest. He is survived by two daughters and two sons.
 

 

Jul, 2019
GS 46

George Springer ’46 ScM, of Newton, Mass.; formerly of Bloomington, Ind.; Feb. 18. He was professor emeritus of mathematics and computer science at Indiana Univ. His career began as an instructor of mathematics at MIT, leading to his appointment as assistant professor of mathematics at Northwestern Univ. He then moved to the University of Kansas and served as associate professor, then professor of mathematics. He concluded his academic career as professor of computer science at Indiana University in 2003. He also worked in administration at Indiana University, serving as mathematics department chair, associate dean for research and development, and as acting dean of research and graduate development. In 2012 the University’s School of Informatics honored him with its Distinguished Service Award. He was a Fulbright lecturer and visiting professor of mathematics at the University of Münster; taught as a visiting professor at Mackenzie University of São Paulo; and was a Fulbright lecturer and visiting professor at both the University of Würzburg and Imperial College London. In addition to teaching, he served as a consultant and examiner for the North Central Association of Colleges and Universities. He also worked for 14 years as a consulting editor for McGraw-Hill Book Company and a year as program director of the division of mathematical sciences of the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. He authored several publications, including textbooks Introduction to Reimann Surfaces and Scheme and the Art of Programming. He was a member of the American Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, and Sigma Xi. He enjoyed hiking, cycling, canoeing, sailing, photography, and the theater. He is survived by three children and their spouses; two grandsons; and a brother and sister-in-law.

 

Jul, 2019
15

Andrea Argenio ’15, of Darien, Conn.; Mar. 9, after a 10-year battle with an incurable rare cancer.  After graduating from Brown, he lived in London for a year then returned to work as an analyst at Bridgewater Associates in Westport, Conn. His most recent project was a fundraising campaign to support research into finding a cure for rare cancers. He was an avid traveler, skier, snorkeler, and scuba diver. He was also an accomplished pianist. He had begun work on a memoir outlining his medical journey that his family plans to complete in his honor. He is survived by his life partner, Olivia; his parents; grandparents; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
04

Jessica Morrison ’04, of South Lyon, Mich.; Feb. 8. She worked at Materialise, a 3D printing company, as a marketing analyst identifying trends and creating systems and processes to drive productivity and performance. Previously, she created a series of inspirational flash cards, Sanity Cards, used to promote a positive outlook on life. She was a staff writer for the BDH while at Brown and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. She enjoyed building ceramic bird baths and is survived by her husband, Tom; her mother; and many friends.

Jul, 2019
88

Evan J. Schrier ’88, of Issaquah, Wash.; Feb. 23. He was diagnosed in 2012 with frontotemporal dementia. After graduating from Brown, he joined Microsoft in Seattle as a software engineer. He enjoyed rafting, skiing, mountain biking, hiking, and reading. But most important to him was time spent with his family. He is survived by his wife, Allyson; two sons; his mother; a sister; and a stepfather.

 

Jul, 2019
85

John Y. Song ’85, ’86 MAT, of Minneapolis, formerly of Baltimore; Feb. 27, of pancreatic cancer. He was an internist and bioethics professor at the University of Minnesota. He founded Phillips Neighborhood Clinic, which for years he ran as a free medical clinic for the uninsured and underinsured out of a South Side church basement. His research focused on end-of-life care and homelessness. He produced several publications defining the end-of-life care concerns among homeless persons. At the time of his death he was focusing on another misunderstood population: prisoners. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer; two daughters; his father; and a sister.
 

 

Related classes:
Class of 1985, GS Class of 1986
Jul, 2019
84

Miles B. Schuman ’84, of Calgary, Canada; Mar. 1. He spent many years as a family physician in Rankin Inlet in Nunavut, Canada. Fluent in four languages, he traveled the world to bring healing to victims of torture and children orphaned by war. He wrote editorials and scholarly articles on the subject. He counseled refugees and documented torture for the Canadian Centre for Victims of Torture and the Clinique Accueil Santé in Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, and Thailand. He also served as an expert witness in cases on persecution and torture. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his mother, two sisters, and four nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
84

Rachel H. Blumenfeld ’84, of Knoxville, Tenn.; Feb. 17. At Brown she was a member of the women’s softball team, winning the Ivy League Championship in 1982 and named All-Ivy Conference Softball Team Honorable Mention in 1984. After graduating, she moved to Memphis and attended the University of Memphis School of Law, where she was appointed editor-in-chief of the Law Review. Her legal work began in private practice at Gardere Wynne in Dallas, and shortly thereafter she worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 6 Office of Regional Counsel. In 1994 she moved back to Tennessee and began a career with the U.S. Department of Energy that would span more than 20 years. She started as an attorney advisor in the Oak Ridge Operations Office of Chief Counsel and at the time of her death, was serving as the General Counsel of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. She is survived by two brothers and nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
83

Vishwas A. Narurkar ’83, of San Francisco; Feb. 1. He was chief of the dermatology division and assistant professor of dermatology at UC Davis, where he helped to develop laser technology for laser hair removal. Additionally, he established the Bay Area Laser Institute and joined the practice of Dr. Kathy Fields. He lectured at national and international scientific and medical meetings for 20 years and expanded his career into areas of clinical research, participating in over 50 clinical trials in lasers and injectables. In 2005 he cofounded Cosmetic Boot Camp, a pre-eminent meeting for aesthetic core physicians. Phi Beta Kappa. He enjoyed traveling and lecturing and is survived by his partner, Mike Hirner.

 

Jul, 2019
80

Morris V. Johnson ’80, of San Francisco; Dec. 26. He began working as a lead developer for several artificial intelligence start-ups in the Bay Area. After teaching in Germany for a period of time, he began his own consulting business and eventually became a lead developer at Audacity, an open-source digital audio application software. He played keyboard at several San Francisco venues over the past 20 years, including performances with his own Vaughn Johnson Trio. He is survived by a brother, sister-in-law, niece, and nephew.

 

Jul, 2019
75

Marilyn J. Dawson ’75, of New York City, formerly of Washington, D.C.; Feb. 2, of cancer. After graduation she moved to Washington, D.C., and began working for an international aid and development organization. A few years later she started working at the United Nations, and because of her fluency in four languages, she had multi-year assignments in Brazil, Jamaica, the Philippines, and Africa. After years of working abroad, she was assigned to the U.N. headquarters in New York City, where she remained until retiring. She volunteered at Calvary Baptist Church and later Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. She studied and painted and enjoyed museum visits, yoga, and travel. She is survived by her life partner, Marvin Dutton; her mother; two brothers; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2019
74

Carolyn Spiro-Silvestri ’74, of Norwalk, Conn.; Feb. 17, after a brief illness. She pursued a career in modern dance prior to becoming a psychiatrist. She spent many years in private practice and co-authored with her twin sister, Pamela ’75, Divided Minds: Twin Sisters and Their Journey Through Schizophrenia in 2006. She is survived by her husband, Sal; a daughter; a son; a grandson; two stepsons; three siblings, including Pamela ’75; and four nieces and nephews.

 

 

 

Jul, 2019
73

Chew S. Shannon ’73, of Memphis; Feb. 26. He was a retired engineer. For seven years he worked as a telephone engineer at South Central Bell and for 33 years he worked as a street lighting engineer at Memphis Light, Gas and Water. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; a daughter; three sons; seven grandchildren; a brother; and a niece.

 

Jul, 2019
67

Nancy L. Goodwin ’67, of Cambridge, Mass.; Jan. 5. A recently retired architect, she helped further the institutional and commercial commitment to both preservation and the expanding role of women in the design and construction field. After graduating from Brown, she spent a year in Nevada as a VISTA volunteer and then attended the graduate architecture program at MIT. She gained several years of work experience with architectural firms, including Stull and Lee, prior to joining Finegold Alexander Architects in Boston in 1977, where she became the first female principal. With a focus on historical renovation, she was most proud of her conversion of a former historic Cambridge police station into the Alice K. Wolf Municipal Center—a project which received a Preservation Award from the Cambridge Historical Commission. Her numerous projects included Harvard University, Vassar and Bryn Mawr colleges, Milton Academy, Berkshire School, Eliot School in Boston, and projects at Brown, including the Andrews Courtyard project on the Pembroke Campus. She had served as chairman of the Mid Cambridge Neighborhood Conservation District Commission since 2009, having been a member since 1999, and she was one of the first architects at Finegold to achieve LEED certification (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). She received numerous awards, including the 2014 Paul Tsongas Award honoring Women in Preservation from Preservation Mass. She enjoyed reading, museums, and classical concerts. She is survived by a sister, brother Don ’57, two stepchildren; and two nephews.

Jul, 2019
69

Stephen Wormith ’69, of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, formerly of Sarnia, Ontario; Mar. 28, after a four-year battle with cancer. At Brown he was a member of both the football and hockey teams and after graduation played for the Montreal Alouettes the year they won the Grey Cup. Following hockey, he received his PhD in psychology from the University of Ottawa and held various positions in the criminal justice system at both the provincial and federal level. He then went on to the University of Saskatchewan, where he was a professor and director of  forensic behavioral science and justice studies. He traveled the world for many years for the Canadian Government helping with bettering the criminal justice system in Canada. He is survived by his wife, Amelita; a daughter; two sons; a sister; and brother Paul ’74.

 

Jul, 2019
67

Thomas C. O’Keefe ’67, of Natick, Mass.; Feb. 11. He was a practicing attorney for more than 40 years and in 1983 established the law office of O’Keefe & Gale in Natick. He enjoyed fishing, boating, the New England Patriots, and a good cigar. He is survived by his fiancée and partner of 24 years, Claudia Greene; daughter Megan O. Mano ’98; two sons, including Daniel ’97; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
67

Colby L. Burbank III ’67, of Mooresville, N.C.; Mar. 10. He had a career in finance at Westinghouse and was a senior vice president with Barclays Bank and SunTrust Bank. He volunteered at Mooresville Soup Kitchen and served as  board member/treasurer. At Brown he was a member of the track and field team and Phi Delta Theta. He enjoyed spending time with family and attending children/grandchildren sporting events. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three sons and their spouses; seven grandchildren; a sister; two brothers; and 15 nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
66

Richard F. Woodward ’66, of Chatham, Mass.; Mar. 8. He was a certified public account and who practiced in Orleans, Mass., for the last 22 years. He is survived by his wife, Penny; three stepchildren; four grandchildren; a brother; and two nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
65

George C. Upper Jr. ’65, of Palm Coast, Fla., formerly of Attleboro, Mass.; Mar. 12. He taught in the Attleboro public school system before going into sales and then advancing to an accounting career, from which he retired. He sang in the choir of St. Mark’s Church in Foxborough, Mass., where he also wrote, directed, and performed in several musicals as fundraisers for the church. He volunteered at The Literacy Center of Attleboro tutoring non-native speakers in English and later in kindergarten classes at Flagler County Schools in Palm Coast, and he volunteered with AARP assisting people with their tax forms. He was a Freemason and grand master of St. Alban’s Lodge in Foxborough. He is survived by his wife, a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

 

Jul, 2019
63

Gordon R. Weihmiller ’63, of Annandale, Va.; Mar. 27, of pancreatic cancer. He was a retired U.S. Navy lieutenant commander, naval weapons systems professional, and foreign policy expert. He served in Vietnam and later was a NROTC instructor at Princeton. He served in the Office of the Chief of Staff of the Defense Intelligence Agency and subsequently served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Upon his retirement from the navy he was a doctoral candidate at Georgetown Univ., where its Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at its School of Foreign Service engaged him to examine Cold War diplomacy at summit meetings. His analysis, U.S.-Soviet Summits, was co-published by the Institute and the University Press of America in 1986 with a follow up study published in 1987. He was the recipient of numerous medals of honor and enjoyed volunteering in his community and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two sons and their spouses; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
63

V. Annette Grant ’63, of Housatonic, Mass., formerly of New York City; Feb. 1. She was a book reviewer and general cultural reporter for Newsweek, a feature writer for Mademoiselle magazine, and in 1971 joined Seventeen as a features editor. In 1977 she joined the New York Times, where she was editor of the Living Section, which emphasized food, cooking, style, and entertainment. She resided in the Berkshires for the past 25 years and was a generous supporter of the arts and local agriculture. She is survived by her husband, Jonathan Baumbach, and four stepchildren, including Nico Baumbach ’98.

 

Jul, 2019
63

John W. Arata Jr. ’63, of Marblehead, Mass.; Feb. 5. After receiving his law degree from Boston University, he served as a legislative attorney for the Federal Aviation Administration in Washington, D.C., and was appointed to the Massport Board of Directors in 1983. He practiced law in Boston for more than 30 years, primarily as an environmental attorney, and was a founding partner at Perkins, Smith, Arata & Howard. In 1997 he moved to D.C. to become president of a specialized environmental risk management consulting firm at Howrey & Simon. He then directed national business development at AIG Environmental. In recent years he was the founder and president of Carbon Finance Strategies, LLC, and enjoyed being a developer of large solar installations. At Brown he was a member of the varsity football team and the club lacrosse team. He enjoyed jazz music, history, and his Sicilian heritage. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and three grandsons.

 

Jul, 2019
62

David M. Rust ’62, of Columbia, Md.; Feb. 12, from complications of Parkinson’s. He was a pioneer in the field of solar physics. His 40-year career included posts at Mount Wilson Observatory in Calif., Sacramento Peak Observatory in New Mexico, American Science and Engineering in Boston, and Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. In 1983 he joined Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Lab, where he worked until his retirement in 2007. His career was distinguished by breakthrough advances in both experiment and theory. He considered the Flare Genesis Project in Antarctica the pinnacle of his professional career and the greatest adventure of his life. Flare Genesis obtained unique data on the early magnetic evolution of solar activity. He enjoyed sailing the Chesapeake, hiking the Rockies, and spending a year in Paris. He was an avid art collector and also enjoyed the opera. At Brown he was yearbook photographer and editor. He is survived by his wife, Gail; a daughter; a son; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
61

James B. Mullen Jr. ’61, of Watertown, Conn.; Feb. 27. He had a long and successful career in the insurance business starting at Travelers and culminating as president and CEO of H.D. Segur, Inc., insurance agency in Waterbury, Conn. He was committed to improving his town and served as chairman of the Watertown Town Council and the Watertown Board of Education for more than 10 years. Throughout the last 50 years he held leadership positions on the Economic Oversight Board, Southbury Training School, Watertown Jaycees, Watertown Young Republicans, and YMCA board of directors. For the past 20 years, he and his wife turned their attention to building Southwind Farms, where they raised alpacas and opened their farm to school children and families, spreading awareness and interest in the animals. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed being surrounded by the chaos of his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Penny; six children and their spouses, including Jay B. Mullen III ’91; Joyce Mullen ’84 and her husband Todd Stephenson ’84, ’88 AM,’93 PhD; 19 grandchildren, including Lucy Stephenson ’13 and Benjamin Stephenson ’13; a sister; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and two nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2019
61

Raymond R. Balkus ’61, of Providence; Mar. 30. He was a retired Providence school teacher and retired presiding judge at the former Lincoln Greyhound Park. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard and enjoyed bowling and playing golf. He is survived by a sister, two nieces, and a nephew.
 

 

Jul, 2019
60

Carl A. Wattenberg Jr. ’60, of St. Louis, Mo.; Mar. 27. He was senior vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary at Mark Twain Bancshares for 24 years. He was the director of several national and state chartered banks over the course of his career. He also served as director and general counsel for the St. Louis Jr. Chamber of Commerce, with the Jaycees, and as treasurer of Laumeier Sculpture Park. After retiring from banking, he was of counsel with the law firm of Kodner Watkins, as well as advisory director for Citadel Trust Services. He served in the U.S. Army as an intelligence officer and later in the U.S. Navy as a JAG for seven years. He enjoyed gardening, investing, and world travel. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; two children; three stepchildren; and 10 grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
60

John A. Tisdale ’60, of Peabody, Mass.; Feb. 18. He was a junior engineer at Block Engineering; he matriculated to Bell & Howell Communications as a senior engineer in instrumentation; moved to RCA, which became General Electric; and then to Martin Marietta, where he was a test production engineer. He retired in 1994. He enjoyed singing as a part of the Protestant choir at Brooksby Village, served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, and was a member of the Glacier Society. He also served as a historical guide at the Buckman Tavern in Lexington and was an avid collector and procurer of HO scale railroading. He enjoyed hiking, canoeing, sailing, history, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Thelma; siblings; and nieces and nephews.
 

 

Jul, 2019
59

George W. Ullrich ’59, of Hingham, Mass.; Feb. 8, following a brief illness. While at Brown he played lacrosse and was a member of Phi Kappa Psi. He served in the U.S. Navy with various Seabee units, completing service as a lieutenant. He additionally received a master’s degree in civil engineering from MIT. During his career he served as COO of American Science and Engineering, was president of Gaggenau USA, and retired as COO of AES Corp. in Peabody, Mass., where he ran their international construction business. He was a longtime member of the Hingham Yacht Club and enjoyed sailing, skiing, morning walking groups, and spending time with grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Amy Lautman Ullrich ’61; daughter Nicole Ullrich ’90; two sons, including David ’87 and his wife, Anja Ullrich Wehde-Siniscalco ’88; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and two nieces.
 

 

Jul, 2019
59

Edward T. Sampson ’59, of Newburgh, N.Y.; Feb. 27. He served several years of active duty in the U.S. Coast Guard and upon discharge worked for publishing houses. He had a passion for hiking and over the course of his lifetime hiked many local mountains, including Bear Mountain, Mounts Beacon and Breakneck, and the Adirondacks, Catskills and Sierra Nevada mountains. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law; two nieces; and a nephew

Jul, 2019
59

Clark A. Sammartino ’59, of Providence; Feb. 5. After graduating from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, he became an assistant clinical professor there. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon for 27 years, he retired from his practice and subsequently founded Blue Fin Capital, an investment advisory firm, with partners Mars Bishop ’59 and Rich Carolan ’58. Over the many years as a health care professional he served as chief and director of oral and maxillofacial surgery at Rhode Island, Roger Williams, and St. Joseph’s/Our Lady of Fatima hospitals. He was also past president of Rhode Island Dental Association and diplomate of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. He published scholarly articles in various medical journals, including the Journal of the American Dental Association, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. He was a catalyst in the formation of Rhode Island’s Donated Dental Services, which provides dental care to needy and disabled Rhode Island residents. He was former chairman of Rhode Island Health and Educational Building Corporation; former board president of Saint Mary’s Home for Children; and former president of the American Cancer Society (R.I. division). He enjoyed early morning swims, body surfing, the Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots, and spending time with his grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Carole; four children and their spouses, including daughter Catherine Sammartino Berg ’86; eight grandchildren; and seven nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
59

Donald G. Mayhew ’59, of Vineyard Haven, Mass., formerly of Bowie, Md.; Feb. 5. He briefly taught math in New Jersey before moving to Bowie to work as a digital computer systems analyst for the Federal Aviation Administration. After retiring in 1983, he and his wife moved to Massachusetts. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and served as an officer and board member of the Dukes County Historical Society, worked many hours for the NAACP, was on the original Land Bank Committee, and served on the Tisbury Board of Health. He enjoyed biking, writing droll poetry, and helping others with their computer systems. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter and son and their spouses; two granddaughters; a brother and sister-in-law; nieces and nephews; and three cousins.

 

Jul, 2019
59

A. Robert Bellows ’59, of Lexington, Mass.; Mar. 15. He was a retired ophthalmologist and glaucoma specialist. After graduating from Brown, he attended Boston University Medical School followed by a two-year residency in internal medicine. In 1965 he moved to Tripoli, Libya, where he served for two years in the U.S. Air Force. In 1967 he attended Yale, completing a four-year ophthalmology residency, and then moved to Haiti to work at L’Hôpital Albert Schweitzer for six months. He returned to the Boston area, completed a glaucoma fellowship at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and joined Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, specializing in glaucoma and cataract surgery. During this time, he wrote many scientific articles in a variety of peer reviewed journals and held leadership positions in national and international ophthalmologic organizations. He was a member of numerous academic societies, including the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the Massachusetts Society of Eye Physicians and Surgeons, the American Association of Ophthalmology, and the American College of Surgeons. He is survived by his wife, Jean; a daughter; two sons, including Matthew Bellows ’90; a daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
58

Edward D. Onanian ’58, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Apr. 1. His career was spent at the U.S. Department of Labor in Washington, D.C., focusing on labor management relations. Some career highlights included initiating a program for global economic conferences in Paris; being part of an official delegation to Israel led by the U.S. Secretary of Labor; and representing the U.S. in the Geneva economic conferences. He was an active member of the Armenian church and is survived by his wife, Zvart; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandsons; and a brother.

Jul, 2019
58

Lawrence T. Kocher ’58, of Windsor, Calif.; Mar. 16, of complications of Parkinson’s disease. After receiving a master’s degree in education at Harvard, he began his teaching career in Madison, N.J. He moved to California in 1961 and taught at Woodside High School until 1963. He received a master’s degree in history from Stanford and taught at San Carlos High School until 1982. His passion for history earned him a Fulbright Scholarship to India to study in 1967. Upon his retirement, he became a docent at the Immigration Station on Angel Island and a docent at de Young Museum in San Francisco. He became a master gardener and drove for Meals on Wheels, in addition to attending Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Sonoma State Univ. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; a son; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
59

Philip J. DiSaia ’59, of Santa Ana, Calif.; Sept. 27. He completed a medical degree at Tufts and his residency at Yale, then continued in military service as Lt. Commander in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps, and completed his gynecologic oncology fellowship at MD Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute in Houston, Tex. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of Genoa, Italy, after being granted an audience with Pope John Paul II. In 1976, he became chair for the department of obstetrics and gynecology at UC Irvine, where he established one of the preeminent institutions dedicated to women’s health. In addition to becoming a nationally recognized residency program, the department flourished with the establishment of four clinically directed and research-driven divisions in gynecologic oncology, maternal-fetal medicine, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, and urogynecology. His research focused on the immunology of tumor biology, the safety of estrogen replacement therapy among breast and endometrial cancer survivors, and the development of less disfiguring surgical approaches for vulvar cancer. He authored numerous clinical papers and textbooks, including Clinical Gynecologic Oncology, which is the most widely read textbook in the subspecialty and is currently in its ninth edition. He had been an associate editor of Gynecologic Oncology and Endocrine Therapy and Hyperthermia Oncology and served on editorial advisory boards of many other journals in his field. He served the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) in various roles for 30 years, including as an examiner in the certification process for specialists and subspecialists. He was a founding member of the Foundation for Excellence in Women’s Healthcare. In addition, he was a mentor to ABOG directors and volunteers. His international reputation resulted in appointments as special lecturer at the Univ.  of Tokyo (1989), visiting professor at the Univ. of Buenos Aires (1990), the Camillo Golgi Professor at the Univ. of Brescia (Italy) in 1991, and special lecturer to the Italian Society of Ob/Gyn in Genoa (1992). His numerous memberships included the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American College of Surgeons, the American College of Radiology, American Society of Clinical Oncologists, the American Radium Society, the Society for Gynecological Investigation, and the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society. He was the recipient of several awards, including the UC Gold Medal, and was named the nation’s Cancer Fighter of the Year in 2004. He is survived by his wife, Patti; four sons and their spouses; and numerous grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
58

Neal B. Mitchell ’58, of Northbridge, Mass.; Apr. 8. After graduating from Brown, he received a graduate degree in structural engineering from MIT and was awarded a fellowship to work with engineers and architects including Pier Luigi Nervi in Italy, Eduardo Torroja in Spain, and Manuel Rocha in Portugal. He held teaching positions at RISD, Tufts, Cornell, and Harvard. At the time, he was the youngest assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design at the age of 29 and then the youngest full professor on the Harvard College Faculty, where he started a technology laboratory that achieved an international reputation in teaching innovation and structural engineering. He served on three different Presidential Committees that studied aspects of education in the U.S. In the early 1970s he founded a consulting company that developed a series of management and engineering computer programs that became widely used around the world and marketed by IBM. The firm worked on many industrial and military programs, from the development of the General Motors subsidiary Saturn to the Penguin Missile Program for NATO, as well as many large building and civil engineering projects worldwide. He was recognized as a world leader in program management and lectured worldwide to major Fortune 500 corporations. In 2007 he was the recipient of the Brown Engineering Alumni Medal in recognition of his contribution to the engineering profession. He generously supported undergraduate summer research at the School of Engineering through the Neal B. Mitchell ’58 Award – Systems Thinking Project. He was involved in local government and lent his expertise to several local building, planning, and construction projects. He also helped to develop and teach a systems engineering course to high school students. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by his wife, Kristin; a daughter; two sons; two daughters-in-law; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Michael L. Wilder ’57, of Victor, N.Y.; Mar. 25. He worked at Pfaudler, Inc., prior to owning and operating Rando Machine Corp. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed history, reading, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; three children and their families; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Robert Saltonstall Jr. ’57, of Rancho Mirage, Calif., formerly of Concord, Mass.; Apr. 2. He had an accomplished career that included president of The O’Day Company (Mass.), general manager of Waterville Valley (N.H.), vice president for operations at Harvard and associate dean for operations at Harvard Medical School. He also headed Harvard’s United Way Campaign and was president of and member of the board of directors at the Dance Umbrella in Boston. An avid collector of ceramic contemporary art, he volunteered at the Palm Springs Art Museum for more than 10 years. At Brown he was a member of the varsity hockey team and after Brown enjoyed sailing, winter skiing, and traveling the world experiencing new cultures. He is survived by his wife, Jane; four children; eight grandchildren, including Caroline Saltonstall ’13, Elizabeth Saltonstall ’15, and Ryan Chace ’20; two sisters, including Nathalie Forbes ’62; a brother; and former wife, Elizabeth Chace ’59.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Richard W. Miller ’57, of Orleans, Mass., formerly of Westwood, Mass.; Mar. 13. After graduation he served in the U.S. Air Force as a second lieutenant and assistant provost marshal in charge of 200 military policemen. He left the service in 1960 but remained in the U.S. Air Force Reserve with the rank of captain. He located to Boston and opened his own insurance agency, which he ran for 35 years. As a mortgage broker and real estate appraiser, he represented several banks and insurance agencies. He continued his ties to Brown as president of the Brown Club of Boston and enjoyed interviewing prospective students. He volunteered in Westwood, serving on multiple town boards and as a youth sports coach. After relocating to Orleans, he became active in the community. He enjoyed swimming, running, and playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; five children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a great-grandson; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Mary Patten Lafferty ’57, of Silver Spring, Md.; Mar. 22. She was a former systems analyst at NIH in Bethesda. She was an avid bridge player and enjoyed world travel. She is survived by six daughters, four grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Joseph DuPont Jr. ’57, of Tucson; Apr. 6. He worked for his father’s trucking company, DuPont Express, as well as for Narragansett Brewery until graduating from Brown. He then entered the U.S. Air Force and enjoyed a 28-year career as a pilot. He served in both Korea and Vietnam and was awarded several combat medals from both the U.S. and the Republic of Vietnam. He retired in 1985 as a lieutenant colonel from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and worked at Loews Ventana Canyon Resort for 12 years. He enjoyed solving crossword and Sudoku puzzles, reading mystery books, and trips to Hawaii, France, and Italy with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; three children; and a granddaughter.

 

Jul, 2019
57

Abbie Mustermann Paterson ’57, of Ludlow, Vt.; Mar. 25, after a short illness. She is survived by a daughter.
 

 

Jul, 2019
56

May N. Stone ’56, of Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., formerly of New York City; Dec. 21. She was employed in the membership department of the Museum of Modern Art prior to obtaining a master’s degree in library science and a master’s in historical preservation, both from Columbia University. She went on to be a reference librarian at Avery Architectural Library of Columbia University.
 

 

Jul, 2019
56

Gilbert Pemberton II ’56, of Rumford, R.I.; Feb. 21. He worked for more than 45 years for Bell Atlantic, New England Telephone, and then Verizon. He was also an amateur softball umpire with the Blackstone Valley Umpires Assoc. for more than 40 years, serving as the treasurer for many of those years and umpiring in a World Softball tournament. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Marines. He served two terms as governor and treasurer of the Rhode Island Society of Mayflower Descendants and was a member of Emmanuel Church in Cumberland and St. Stephen’s in Providence. He enjoyed cooking, sporting events, and telling long stories. He is survived by his wife, Margaret E. Thomas ’79; three sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
56

Kenneth C. Morley ’56, of Lebanon, N.H., formerly of Alpine, N.J.; Feb. 23, of cancer. He was a retired physician. He served in the U.S. Navy as a naval medical officer from 1961 to 1964. From 1964 to 1972 he was employed as a surgeon at Englewood Hospital and Medical Center. In 1972 he moved to Vermont and joined Mt. Ascutney Hospital and Health Center and additionally joined an existing surgical practice at Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont, N.H. He was known to make house calls to many who appreciated his services. After retiring from medicine in 1999, he moved to Lebanon and began a second career as a volunteer member on the Lebanon City Planning Board. He enjoyed summers on Goose Pond in Canaan, N.H., building model wooden boats, and creating Lionel train layouts. He is survived by seven children; nine grandchildren; a sister; two stepbrothers; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
56

John H. Jeffers ’56, ’63 MAT, of Melbourne, Fla.; Feb. 18. He was a science teacher, department head, and coach at Berkeley Preparatory School in Tampa for more than 20 years. Later in his career he was head of Holy Trinity Episcopal School and also worked at Brevard Learning Clinic in Melbourne. He was active in his community and enjoyed camping, sailing, lapidary work, and silversmithing. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; son, David ’82 and his wife; and granddaughter Rachael Jeffers ’12 AM.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1956, GS Class of 1963
Jul, 2019
55

Joseph F. Granger Jr. ’55, of Matthews, N.C.; Mar. 10. His career was spent in the employee benefit and insurance industry and he retired as senior vice president at Marsh & Company. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a fourth degree Knight of Columbus. He spent 25 years as a member of the Eastern Association of Intercollegiate Football Officials and enjoyed playing tennis and cheering for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter; a son; and five grandchildren.

Jul, 2019
54

Joan Schlosser Taber ’54, of Barrington, R.I.; Mar. 18. While raising a family, she was involved with civic organizations, taught preschool at St. John’s Day School, volunteered at Encore clothing boutique, was a summer camp director at Bayside Family YMCA, and served as an officer for Barrington Junior Women’s Club. She enjoyed playing tennis and needlework. She is survived by four children.
 

 

Jul, 2019
54

George S. Morfogen ’54, of New York City; Mar. 8. An actor whose career spanned Broadway, film, and television, he was most recognizable as Bob Rebadow in the HBO series Oz. He appeared in more than 12 television series, including St. Elsewhere, Sherlock Holmes, Kojak, Blood Feud, and Deadly Matrimony. He also appeared in numerous films, including What’s Up, Doc?, Daisy Miller, They All Laughed and She’s Funny That Way. His Off-Broadway credits were numerous and his latest stage production was Traveling Lady at Off Broadway’s Cherry Lane Theatre in 2017. For 17 seasons he was resident actor at The Williamstown Theatre Festival and was an instructor in acting at HB Studio. He is survived by his husband, Gene Laughorne, and two nieces.
 

 

Jul, 2019
54

Helen Deuell Carter ’54, of Goshen, N.Y., formerly of Fort Myers, Fla.; Nov. 20. She worked as an advertising copywriter at Bonwit Teller  in New York City, and after marrying, raised a family. She is survived by three sons.

 

Jul, 2019
53

Elaine Mathewson Pereira ’53, of Wakefield, R.I.; Mar. 1. She was a retired elementary school teacher. After retiring from teaching she enjoyed researching her family history and genealogy. She was a proud member of the Society of Mayflower Descendants and the Roger Williams Family Assoc. She was an avid birdwatcher and gardener. She is survived by two daughters, a son, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
53

Kenneth G. Knowles ’53, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 9. He served in the U.S. Navy and retired from the U.S. Naval Reserve as a lieutenant commander. He then completed his residency in orthopedic surgery at Rhode Island Hospital and opened a private practice in Cranston and Pawtucket. He was affiliated with Rhode Island Hospital, St. Joseph Hospital, and Pawtucket Memorial Hospital. He retired in 1995. He was past president of the Rhode Island Orthopaedic Society and enjoyed model boat building and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Sally; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and sister Joyce Williams ’58.

 

Jul, 2019
53

Barbara Fitzsimmons Hower ’53, of Middletown, R.I., formerly of Darien, Conn.; Feb. 5. She taught English in North Brookfield, Mass.; Newport, R.I.; and Brooklyn, N.Y. She also worked as a comparison shopper at Sears, was a research analyst at the American Petroleum Institute in New York City, was an office manager and marketing assistant at a landscape architecture firm in Greenwich, Conn., and was an administration director at Stamford Art Assoc. She was active in the Junior League and YMCA and sang in two Gilbert and Sullivan productions while living in Connecticut. She is survived by her husband, Condit; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
53

Carolyn Harbordt Holden ’53, of Prairie Village, Kans.; Feb. 2. She worked at Hallmark Cards and was involved with the Children’s Relief Association at Children’s Mercy Hospital. She was also treasurer of the Richard Cabot Medical Clinic and an active member of the Junior League of Kansas City and St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, two granddaughters, a sister-in-law, three nieces, and a nephew.
 

 

Jul, 2019
53

Joan Turner Hastings ’53, of Spring Arbor, Mich., formerly of Shaker Heights, Ohio; Mar. 15. She was a homemaker and volunteer. She is survived by three children; six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Jul, 2019
53

William H. Burgoon ’53, of Williamsburg, Va.; Feb. 12. He was a lifelong employee of the Chase Manhattan Bank in New York and was a vice president and division executive prior to this retirement in 1990. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by his wife, Suzanne; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and two nieces.

 

Jul, 2019
52

Elizabeth Whipple Jourdan ’52, of Windsor, Conn.; Apr. 5. She was a secretary at Hartford Hospital until her retirement in 1988. She enjoyed cooking and is survived by her husband, Donn; five children; and nine grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
52

Frederick B. Gifford ’52, of Norton, Mass.; Mar. 1. He worked for 37 years with Amica Insurance, retiring as a claims executive and having earned the professional designations of Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter and Chartered Life Underwriter. He was a member of Evangelical Covenant Church in Attleboro and served as Church Chairman, Stewardship Chairman, and head usher. As a trumpet player from the age of eight, he performed with many musical groups, most recently with The Rhode Island Shriners Brass Band and The Providence Civic Orchestra of Senior Citizens. He sailed on Narragansett Bay and for more than 40 years was a member and past Commodore of the East Greenwich Yacht Club. A Mason, he belonged to the Scottish Rite, Rhode Island Shrine, The Grotto, Royal Order of Jesters, and Royal Order of Scotland. He skied for more than 60 years and ski patrolled for 11 years as a member of the National Ski Patrol. He was a competitive pistol shooter and a member of the Varnum Continentals Pistol team for seven years. He had achieved the Sharpshooter designation with the National Rifle Association. He was a life member of the Squantum Association in Rhode Island and served as their historian for many years. He also enjoyed playing golf and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. He is survived by his wife, Jean; two daughters; a son-in-law; Jean’s two children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Jul, 2019
51

Paula Skellet Pendleton ’51, of Deephaven, Minn.; Jan. 24. She was a homemaker who enjoyed nature, the arts, and weaving. Over the years, several of her weavings won blue ribbons for woven textiles at the Minnesota State Fair. She is survived by five children, four grandchildren, and sister Carla Huntting ’53.

Jul, 2019
51

William R. Moran ’51, of New York City; Feb. 6, after a short illness. He worked as a patent attorney for Union Carbide in New York City. He is survived by a brother and seven nieces and nephews.

 

Jul, 2019
51

Albert E. Mink ’51, of North Scituate, R.I. and Venice, Fla.; Feb. 9. He had a long career as an educator and principal in the Providence School Department, was a visiting professor at Rhode Island College Graduate School, and was adjunct faculty with the New England Institute of Technology. He was also a junior high school basketball, football, and baseball coach. Among the professional organizations he belonged to were the National Association of Secondary School Principals, the Rhode Island Association of Secondary School Principals, Rhode Island Council of Teachers of English, and Rhode Island Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. He was also a member of the Boy Scouts of America and involved with Yawgoo Scout Reservation for more than 40 years, retiring as reservation director. He was active in his community and enjoyed fishing, gardening, swimming, woodworking, and music. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three sons; two daughters-in-law; and three grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
51

David P. Leys ’51, of Middletown, R.I.; Apr. 2. He had a 50-year career as president and owner of Leys Century Store, the family business his father started in 1912. Additionally, he served as president and chairman of the board of trustees of BankNewport, was a lifelong parishioner and trustee for St. Mary’s Church, served on the board of trustees and was interim CEO of The Preservation Society of Newport County, was president of the Newport County Chamber of Commerce, volunteered on the Middletown Beach Commission, ran the Newport Downtown Merchants Decoration Committee, and was the longest serving volunteer fireman on the Newport Fire Department, having served with distinction for more than 50 years. He helped re-establish the Newport Fireman’s Relief Assoc. and was recognized for his service to the community as a recipient of the Newport Daily News Community Service Award and Jefferson Award for volunteer service from WJAR Channel 10 in 2017. He enjoyed sailing and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Judy; six children and their spouses; 15 grandchildren; and brother Bill Leys ’50.

 

Jul, 2019
51

Harry Hake III ’51, of Cincinnati; Jan. 23. He was a third generation Hake architect who joined Harry Hake & Partners in 1954, became sole proprietor in 1968, and retired from architecture in 1978. In 1979 he donated sketches and drawings of hundreds of projects completed by the firm to the Cincinnati Historical Society Library. He was a member of several boards and president of the University Club in Cincinnati. He enjoyed gardening, fishing, hunting, and golf. He is survived by his wife, Albina; a daughter; two stepsons; five granddaughters; one great-granddaughter; a sister; and two nephews and a niece.
 

 

Jul, 2019
51

Duncan C. Gray ’51, of Great Falls, Va.; Jan. 29. He worked for various engineering firms in New York and Washington, D.C., and in 1962 opened his own business, Duncan C. Gray Consulting Structural Engineer. He later partnered with Arthur Heinzman, forming the firm Gray & Heinzman. He was a member of the American Concrete Institute and the American Consulting Engineers Council, and a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and was in the Naval Reserve until 1955. At Brown he was co-captain of the swim team and elected to the Athletic Hall of Fame in 1977. He built and sailed a 31-foot sailboat on the Chesapeake Bay and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Maxine; three children; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
51

Arthur Barnes ’51, of Twinsburg, Ohio; Mar. 18. He did his anesthesia residency at Huron Hospital in East Cleveland, where he later ran the residency program. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and then continued his career at the Cleveland Clinic in 1976, where he was vice chair of the division of anesthesiology from 1977 to 2001 and chair of general anesthesiology from 1987 to 1994. He taught as residency director in anesthesiology and was medical director of the School of Nurse Anesthesia at the Cleveland Clinic until his retirement in 2001. He enjoyed traveling, gardening, bicycling, and playing bridge and chess. He is survived by his wife, Audrey Marsh Barnes ’53; five children and their spouses; 13 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
50

Luciano A. Zompa ’50, of Ventnor, N.J.; Feb. 12. He was a salesperson for Sun Ray Drugs, he delivered Coca-Cola, and he was a Prudential Insurance agent before owning and operating the Providence Hotel on Georgia Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J. In retirement he worked part-time as a clerk at area race tracks. He served in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. He is survived by his wife, Rose; four children; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Jul, 2019
50

Margot Mendes Oppenheimer ’50, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Jan. 19. She was an interior designer for many years and active in her community. She served on the boards of the Cotswold Assoc. and the Greenburgh Nature Center. She enjoyed cooking, traveling, and playing tennis and golf. She is survived by a daughter; a son, Peter ’79; daughter-in-law Suzanne Dunn Oppenheimer ’80, ’91 PhD; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
50

Henry A. Niven ’50, of Tucson; Apr. 3. After graduating, he went to India to train for work in the precious stone business. Following four years of worldwide travel, he made an industry change to the office furniture business in Washington, D.C., eventually becoming the president and CEO of Commercial Office Furniture Company in Lanham, Md. He retired in 1987. He later was a certified financial planner with American Express and retired for a second time in 2016. He was a U.S. Navy World War II veteran, vice president of the Brown Club of Washington, and vice president of the Washington Home for Foundlings. He enjoyed jazz music, collecting jazz records, and playing the saxophone. He is survived by three daughters; a son; a daughter-in-law; two sons-in-law; and five grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
50

Berton McCarroll ’50, of Glen Ellyn, Ill.; Mar. 30. He worked for Brown & Sharpe Mfg., Fram Corp., and Facet Enterprises, where he was vice president. He is survived by two daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
50

Barbara Adler Katzander ’50, of New York City; Mar. 8, of cancer. She worked at the New York Times as a staff writer until leaving to raise a family. She resumed her journalism career as editor and publisher of International Art Market and as owner of White House Press printing. She supported students enrolled at The Juilliard School and musicians at Young Concert Artists. She was devoted to the Young People’s Chorus of New York City, which honored her with the Humanitarian Award in 2012. She is survived by three children and four grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
50

George A. Davis ’50, of Sarasota, Fla., formerly of New York City; Mar. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army, he began a marketing career in the cosmetics industry working for Revlon, Givenchy, and Vitabath. He later had a second career assigned to special projects at the New York law firm of Kaye, Scholer, Fierman, Hays & Handler. In 2004 he moved to Glenridge on Palmer Ranch in Sarasota and became a member of the Glenridge Singers and president of the Advisory Council. He also chaired the Art and Décor Committee, where some of his own needlework pieces were displayed. He enjoyed the theater, the ballet, and music. He is survived by a cousin.
 

 

Jul, 2019
50

Stephen F. Burke ’50, of Exeter, N.H.; Jan. 20. He had a long and varied career in insurance and financial planning with an office in Boston and also in Portland, Me. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed traveling and playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Lucy; two sons; and five grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
49

David A. Turnquist ’49 of Aurora, Colo., formerly of Narragansett, R.I.; Sept. 23, of bile duct cancer. During his career he worked as an engineer with fire protection system companies in New Jersey, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, including Grinnell Fire Protection in Newington, Conn. He retired in 1992. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a former member of the Verandi (the Rhode Island unit of the American Union of Swedish Singers). He enjoyed traveling and spending time with family on Salt Pond in Narragansett. He is survived by three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and brother Nelson Turnquist ’60.

 

Jul, 2019
49

Kenneth B. Nanian ’49, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Mar. 7. He was a cardiologist at Rhode Island Hospital for 40 years. In addition to his medical societies, he was president-elect of the Rhode Island Society of Internal Medicine, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, and a member of Kappa Sigma. He enjoyed sailing, skiing, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Pat; three sons, including David ’83; three grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
46

Julianne Heller Prager ’46, of Saint Paul, Minn.; Feb. 9. She earned her doctorate in organic chemistry from Cornell Univ. and began her career at 3M, where she worked for more than 27 years as a polymer and fluoroxy chemist, ending her career as executive director of 3M’s Corporate Technical Planning and Coordination. At the time of her retirement she was the senior ranking woman at 3M. She was an advocate for women in the sciences, a mentor and guide for women at 3M, and an active participant of the Minnesota Chapter of the American Chemical Society. In 1971 she was the first female elected to chair 3M’s Technical Forum, which engaged in a variety of outreach, including starting the Visiting Technical Women Program in St. Paul, developing a Teachers Working Science and Technology summer internship, and mentoring high school students through its Science Training Encouragement Program. In addition to outreach, she helped foster a program at 3M called the Genesis Project, which rewarded innovation. She also developed several patents and wrote numerous published articles. She was honored in 1986 as the recipient of the Minnesota Chapter of the American Chemical Society Award for her outstanding contributions to chemical research. She was a trustee emeriti and a member of Sigma XI and is survived by a sister, Janet Heller Gourley ’53, and several cousins.

Jul, 2019
49

Phyllis J. Morton ’49, of Perrysburg, Ohio; Feb. 20. She was the founder of Abundant Life of Perrysburg and Abundant Life II, an elderly housing authority for which she received a national award from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. She was a court appointed special advocate for children for more than 35 years. In retirement she volunteered with several organizations until a few months prior to her passing, including Perrysburg Area Historic Museum and Advocates for Basic Legal Equality. She was the recipient of numerous awards, including the Mayor’s proclamation of Phyllis Morton Appreciation Day, 2012 Distinguished Citizen of Perrysburg Award, and a Virginia Secor Stranahan Citizenship Award from the League of Women Voters, a 2013 Jefferson Award honoring her for her positive efforts, the 2015 Access to Justice Community Advocacy Award, and the 2018 Bentley Historic Preservation Award. She enjoyed traveling to all seven continents and was a member of Zoar Lutheran Church in Perrysburg, where she organized monthly preparation and serving of meals at a homeless shelter in Toledo and helped build a home through Habitat for Humanity. She is survived by two daughters; four sons; 14 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
49

Doris Anderson Landau ’49, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 27. She worked in the U.S. Navy Department, then later at the Department of State until marrying and starting a family. She was interested in architecture and the preservation of America’s historic buildings and for many years volunteered at the National Building Museum. She enjoyed figure skating and ice dancing and skated until the age of 87. She is survived by her husband, Sherman; a daughter; a son; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Jul, 2019
49

Howard J. Kennedy ’49, of Rockville, Md.; Jan. 9. He was a retired director of engineering at ARINC Research Corp. in Annapolis and active in the St. Jude’s Choir and the Rockville Men’s Chorus. He is survived by three children; 11 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Jul, 2019
49

Claire Davis Harrison ’49, of Wrentham, Mass.; Mar. 10. She taught music at Plainville Elementary School until retiring in 1989. She was both a cub scout den mother and a girl scout leader and enjoyed reading.
 

 

Jul, 2019
49

Allan R. Bellows ’49, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Feb. 9. After working at Amica Insurance for two years, he joined the family mortuary business of D.W. Bellows & Son in Pawtucket. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps, past president of National Selected Morticians, past president of the Rotary Club of Pawtucket, past chairman of the advisory board of the Salvation Army of Pawtucket, a trustee of the Boys & Girls Club of Pawtucket, a member of the Rhode Island Funeral Directors Association and of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, where he served as senior warden. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter; a son; eight grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Jul, 2019
48

Louis J. Pugliese ’48, of Providence; Mar. 21. He was a draftsman for companies before founding Providence Design Associates. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He enjoyed painting and exhibiting his work in a variety of community settings. He is survived by three daughters; a son; nine grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; and a sister.

 

Jul, 2019
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Joseph C. Lepanto ’48, of Bryn Mawr, Pa.; Feb. 22. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and moved to Philadelphia in 1966, where he worked as a senior partner with the law firm of Mesirov, Gelman, Jaffe, Cramer & Jamieson until his retirement. In addition, he served as chair of the Business Law Section, as a member of the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Bar Institute and was a member of the National Association on Bond Lawyers. He is survived by five children; grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

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