Obituaries

May, 2019
65

Kate Alling Worsley Throop ’65, of Cayucos, Calif.; Jan. 12, following a long illness. In the early 1970s she and her family established and managed Papermill Natural Foods, one of the first locations in Marin County to offer organic produce and groceries. She was a founding member of the Environmental Action Committee of West Marin, which presented her with the Peter Behr Memorial Award for Stewardship of the Land in 2001. She was on the religious education staff of four congregations for 15 years. She was a board member, vice president, and secretary of the Liberal Religious Educators Association and served as the Lifespan Religious Education Director of the Pacific Center District of the Unitarian Universalist Association. In Cayucos she was a board member of the Friends of the Cayucos Library and a volunteer at Cayucos Elementary School. She is survived by her husband, Terry; a daughter and son-in-law; two stepsons and their spouses; six grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
18
Maryori Conde ’18, ’19 MAT
An activist for students of color, she planned to return to L.A. as a teacher
Read More
May, 2019
83

Paul D. Quick ’83, of San Francisco; Nov. 2, of multiple organ failure post heart transplant. He was last employed by the San Francisco Department of Public Health (DPH), Tom Waddell Health Center/Homeless Programs, where he practiced general internal medicine and HIV care. He was the medical co-chair of Project Homeless Connect and had been working to re-establish a Tenderloin adult day health program for the HIV population. Diagnosed with a congenital heart defect at age 1, he underwent open heart surgery at age 5 and was pronounced cured. During his 20s he had abnormal heart rhythms and by age 44 developed progressive congestive heart failure due to a gene deletion. He attended Brown but left in 1981 without a degree and moved to California, where he attended City College and became an emergency medical technician working in the East Bay area. After attending Stanford-Foothill Paramedic Program in 1985, he worked as a paramedic in East Oakland with Allied Ambulance. In 1988 he joined the San Francisco DPH Paramedic Division. He returned to City College part-time while working as a paramedic and in 1991 graduated. He then returned to Brown and graduated in 1993 with a concentration focusing on an interdisciplinary approach to HIV/AIDS, sexuality, and addiction. Back on campus he appeared in two plays, was a contributing writer to the Brown Daily Herald, and served on the Committees for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Issues and Independent Concentration Studies. He was named a 1993 Joslin award winner. He received his MD from UC School of Medicine at Davis in 1997 and trained in primary care internal medicine at Cambridge Hospital/Harvard Medical School from 1997 to 2002. He practiced at St. Anthony Free Medical Clinic in San Francisco before returning to DPH as a physician in 2002, working full-time until his cardiac disease forced him to retire in 2008, when he was placed on the heart transplant list. He was active in politics and the labor movement. He was an organizer for the Service Employees International Union and a member of the Union of American Physicians and Dentists. He was elected to the San Francisco Green Party County Council in 2004 and was a dedicated San Francisco Giants fan. He is survived by cousins, friends, coworkers, and patients whose lives he touched.

May, 2019
73

Felipe M. Floresca ’73, of Chevy Chase, Md.; Nov. 16, of brain cancer. He began his career as a legislative aide to U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy working to enact the Federal Empowerment Zone Act and Community Reinvestment Act. He was later appointed to the Urban Empowerment Council and Vice President’s Task Force on Youth Employment under President Jimmy Carter. He returned to New York in the 1980s, where he worked in the administration of Mayor Ed Koch as Executive Administrator for Rent and Housing Maintenance, NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development. Following this position, he was appointed vice president of the NYC Rehabilitation Mortgage Insurance Corp. and served as a member of the Mayor’s Ten-Year Housing Plan Task Force. In the 1990s he worked with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Washington, D.C. He went on to serve in other positions, such as executive director of the San Francisco Housing Authority, chief of staff for policy for U.S. Labor Secretary Alexis Herman, and director of public engagement for U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan during the Obama administration. Additionally, he worked with the Charles D. Smith Jr. Foundation, Annie E. Casey Foundation, and Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation and was vice president of Emerald Cities Collaborative. In September 2018 he was the recipient of the Joseph M. Fernandez ’85 Award from Brown recognizing his enduring commitment to diversity, inclusion and collaboration. He was a former director of the Brown Center for Students of Color (formerly the Third World Center), a commencement marshal, and twice an alumni speaker. He continuously served Brown throughout the years. He is survived by his wife, Providence; his mother; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
63

John Ford Noonan ’63, of Englewood, N.J., formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Dec. 16, of heart failure. For two years he taught Latin and English and was a basketball coach at Buckley Country Day School in Roslyn, L.I., during which time he began writing plays. His first play, The Year Boston Won the Pennant, was staged in 1969 at Lincoln Center. Productions that followed included Older People (1972) and Getting Through the Night (1976), but it was A Coupla White Chicks, produced in 1980 and starring Eileen Brennan and Susan Sarandon, that became his biggest hit. The play ran for four years, giving opportunity to other actresses, including JoBeth Williams ’70. Later, in Some Men Need Help, he addressed chemical addiction and subsequently adapted it for PBS American Playhouse in 1985. He occasionally wrote for television and in 1984 shared an Emmy Award with Tom Fontana and John Masius for outstanding writing in a drama series for an episode of St. Elsewhere called “The Women.” He continued to be staged regularly into the 1990s and in Talking Things Over With Chekhov (1990), he played one of the roles himself opposite Diane Salinger in an Actor’s Playhouse production in New York. In addition to writing numerous plays and screenplays, he would periodically be seen on screen in such films as Adventures in Babysitting, Flirting With Disaster, and My Divorce. He was a two-time Obie Award winner and received the New York Drama Desk Award and the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. He is survived by a daughter, a son, five grandchildren, a sister, and a brother.

May, 2019
57

Robert H. Ackerman ’57, of Cambridge, Mass.; Dec. 18. He worked in pioneering research in the fields of stroke imaging and prevention, including private patient practice, consulting with private companies, and in educating students and faculty in the field of medicine. He helped in the development of non-invasive modalities for the diagnosis of carotid disease and the use of positron emission tomography in the study of ischemic stroke, and was the program director of the National Institutes of Health funded Interdepartmental Stroke Center at Massachusetts General Hospital. He was an associate professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and a member of their medical school admissions faculty for many years. In the early 1990s he was a distinguished scientist in the department of radiologic pathology of the Armed Forces Institute. In 2013 Massachusetts General Hospital honored him by renaming the MGH Neurovascular Laboratory, which he had founded in 1974 and where he was serving as chairman emeritus, as the R.H. Ackerman Neurovascular Lab. The lab was one of the first non-invasive labs in the country dedicated to using ultrasound to understand blood flow to the brain to identify patients at risk or who have experienced stroke. For many years, he served on several advisory boards and sponsored notable charities, including well known public and private organizations throughout the Boston metro area. An avid rower, he often competed in the Head of the Charles Regatta in Cambridge, as well as other best in class competitions, such as Henley Royal Regatta in England. He enjoyed gardening, writing stories, playing the piano, and traveling. He was a member of the American Board of Radiology, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, the Cambridge Yacht Club, and the Eastern Point Yacht Club in Gloucester, Mass. He is survived by a stepbrother and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
GS 89

David L. Hoffman ’89 ScM, of Menlo Park, Calif.; Dec. 15, of pancreatic cancer. He began his career at Sun Microsystems. His experience in the mobile computing space and in big data computer system design helped startups across Silicon Valley. He made lasting contributions at GetThere, Good Technology, Motorola, and most recently Skyhigh Networks. He traveled and enjoyed learning new languages. For three years he lived in Taiwan and learned Chinese before resettling in California. He had a passion for endurance sports and was proud to have run six marathons, including the 2016 Boston Marathon; Spartan and Tough Mudder races; and the 125-mile Golden Gate Relay. He is survived by his wife Jane and her son; his father; a sister and brother-in-law; and a niece and a nephew.

May, 2019
GS 76

Gale H. Closter Nigrosh ’76 AM, ’85 PhD, of Worcester, Mass.; Nov. 1, from complications of pneumonia and MS. She taught French and linguistics at Clark University for 20 years. When she could no longer stand in front of a classroom, she became coordinator of programs linking public schools to many colleges and universities in the area. That career lasted 25 years. She is survived by her husband, Bob; her mother; a daughter; a son; a granddaughter; a brother and sister-in-law; and a nephew.

May, 2019
GS 72

Shamai Kanter ’72 PhD, of Phoenix, Ariz.; Dec. 27. He was ordained by the Jewish Theological Seminary, was a U.S. Air Force chaplain, and served as Rabbi at congregations in Toronto, Canada; Sharon, Mass.; and Rochester, N.Y., from which he retired. He published his doctoral research Rabban Gamaliel II: The Legal Traditions in 1981. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Jeannette; three children; nine grandchildren; and a brother.

May, 2019
GS 70

Robert J. Tracy ’70 ScM, of Blacksburg, Va.; Jan. 6. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard, he taught at Yale from 1978 to 1986 and then assumed a professorship at Virginia Tech. He was chair of the department of geosciences at Virginia Tech from 2005 to 2008 and was director of the Museum of Geosciences. He was active in the Geological Society of America, the Mineralogical Society of America, and Sigma Xi. He is survived by his wife Patricia; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; a niece; and a nephew.

May, 2019
GS 69

Edward A. Grove ’69 PhD, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Jan. 4, after an illness. He was a faculty member in the University of Rhode Island mathematics department, retiring in 2011 as full professor. During his tenure he published 63 papers and co-authored two textbooks. His areas of research in algebraic topology and finite difference equations have been widely cited. He is survived by two children, including son Edward ’84. 

May, 2019
GS 68

Antonia Helen Donnelly ’68 AM, of Providence; Nov. 4. She taught foreign language at Tolman High School in Pawtucket for many years. She was a competitive ballroom dancer and a supporter of the arts, serving as a docent at the Rhode Island School of Design. She is survived by a sister-in-law and nieces.

May, 2019
GS 66

Richard C. Lessmann ’66 ScM, ’69 PhD, of Narragansett, R.I.; Dec. 22. He was a professor emeritus of mechanical engineering at the University of Rhode Island, where he worked for 39 years before retiring. He enjoyed advising students transitioning into college and in his spare time liked to draw, paint, and do woodworking. He is survived by his wife, Ann; three sons and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

May, 2019
GS 66

Vivian Kogan ’66 AM, ’72 PhD, of Union Village, Vt.; July 17, of breast cancer. She taught French literature and language at Dartmouth College until retiring in 2012. She published and became known for her work on the experimental literature of the author and poet, Raymond Queneau and in 2006 she published The I of History: Self Fashioning and National Consciousness in Jules Michelet, introducing a novel perspective on the historian. She enjoyed traveling with her husband, the arts, and politics. She is survived by her husband, Bernie; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a sister.  

May, 2019
GS 64

Roberts W. French ’64 PhD, of Santa Fe, N. Mex.; Nov. 26. Following service in the U.S. Army, he attended Brown and then taught literature at the University of Massachusetts Amherst for the following 29 years. During his tenure at UMass Amherst he received the University’s Distinguished Teacher Award and published numerous poems, reviews and critical articles on the works of John Milton and Walt Whitman. He was an active hiker and mountaineer throughout his life and, in 1958, he and three companions pioneered a route through the Purcell and Selkirk mountains of British Columbia. Following that, he started guiding professionally with Exum Mountain Guides in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. After retiring from teaching, he remained an avid backpacker. He hiked and supported the formation of Santa Fe’s Dale Ball Trail System. He also contributed to the eighth edition of Day Hikes in the Santa Fe Area. He served on the board of New Mexico Literary Arts and the Santa Fe Arts Commission for the selection of the city’s Poet Laureate, and he wrote a regular poetry column for New Mexico CultureNet. He enjoyed attending the Santa Fe Opera. He is survived by his wife, Jennifer; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and niece Jennifer W. Corbet ’87.

May, 2019
GS 62

Henry C. Kelly ’62 PhD, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Jan. 2. In 1964 he joined the Texas Christian University chemical department faculty and remained until his retirement in 1998. He taught chemistry and advanced levels of inorganic chemistry, research in chemical reaction kinetics, and the study of mechanisms of reactions. He also directed research and served as a mentor for both graduate and undergraduate students. He collaborated with colleagues in England and Canada while on sabbatical leaves and spent two summers lecturing in chemistry at the Universidad de las Américas in Puebla, Mexico. He co-authored several papers with students and faculty. He served as director of the honors program at TCU for seven years and chaired the TCU department of chemistry for six years. He was a member of the American and British chemical societies, New York Academy of Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Sigma Xi. He enjoyed traveling with his wife before her passing and is survived by three children and their spouses including Luanne K. Cullen ’83 AM, and three grandchildren.

May, 2019
GS 61

J. George O’Keefe ’61 PhD, of Greenville, R.I.; Dec. 23. He was a professor of physics at Rhode Island College for 31 years. He retired in 1994. He was a member of several organizations and clubs, including the Smithfield Sportsmen’s Club, Saltwater Anglers and Gloucester Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; two sons; two granddaughters; two sisters and a brother.

May, 2019
GS 48

Howard S. Young ’48 PhD, of Kingsport, Tenn.; Nov. 27. He joined Tennessee Eastman Co., a division of Eastman Kodak Co., in 1948 and held executive appointments until retiring as director of research laboratories in 1989. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, a 75-year member of the American Chemical Society, and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Catalysis Society, Sigma Xi, and Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by seven children, ten grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. 

May, 2019
90

Heather M. Gray ’90, of Rochester, N.Y.; Jan. 22, of ovarian cancer. She was a self-employed life coach, a marketing consultant and a lifelong learner. She is survived by her father, two sisters and their spouses, and six nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
89

Nicole Cingiser ’89, of Norwalk, Conn.; Nov. 12, of breast cancer. She took a semester-long sabbatical from Brown to work as an intern at The Children’s School in Stamford, Conn., where she returned to teach after graduation. Her tenure at the school lasted 29 years and she developed curriculum, assessment strategies, professional development practices, and technology integration. She is survived by her parents, Marjan and Michael Cingiser ’62, Brown basketball Hall of Famer and former Brown men’s basketball coach; two sisters, including Karen Cingiser ’85; a brother; a sister-in-law; two brothers-in-law; five nieces; and a nephew.

May, 2019
87

Amy P. Chang ’87, of Saratoga, Calif.; July 21, of cancer. She graduated from UC Hastings College of the Law and started her legal career as a corporate attorney at McCutcheon Doyle. She also raised a family and helped run a family business. As a citizen activist, she spearheaded educational school choice for Chinese American students in the landmark case Ho v. SFUSD in San Francisco and then promoted economic development in Oakland as an urban planner for the City of Oakland. She was an active member of the Saratoga Federated Church and enjoyed travel, Thai food, the redwood trees of California, and time spent with family. She is survived by her husband, Harrison Chow; three sons; two sisters; and an aunt.

May, 2019
86

Dawn Clements ’86, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; Dec. 4, of breast cancer. She was an artist and educator based out of Brooklyn and represented by Pierogi Gallery. She is known for her large-scale panoramic drawings and paintings using multiple sheets of crinkled paper. In addition to her numerous gallery exhibitions, her work was included in the 2010 Whitney Biennial and is in permanent collections at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art (NYC), the Tang Museum (Saratoga Springs, N.Y.) and the Saatchi Collection (London, England), among other institutions. She taught classes in fine arts at the Rhode Island School of Design, Maryland Institute College of Art, California Institute of the Arts, Brooklyn College, and Princeton University. She received many awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship in Fine Arts in 2012, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation Fellowship in 2013, and the Joan Mitchell Foundation Fellowship in 2015. She is survived by her mother and three brothers.

May, 2019
83

Marlene G. Brown ’83, of West Windsor, N.J.; Oct. 26, of breast cancer. After earning a JD from Rutgers Law School-Newark, she worked at the accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche and later clerked for Judge Lawrence Lasser, presiding judge of the New Jersey Tax Court. Following the clerkship, she had a long career with the State of New Jersey Division of Law, most recently as senior deputy attorney general and section chief. She argued several significant cases before the New Jersey Supreme Court and served as a fellow with the National Association of Attorneys General U.S. Supreme Court Fellowship Program in Washington, D.C. She was active with Congregation Beth Chaim, serving as sisterhood president, was a board member of the Central Jersey Youth Orchestra, and was an active volunteer and fundraiser for the Breast Cancer Resource Center. She enjoyed music, the theater, swimming, and traveling. She is survived by her husband, David; two sons; her parents; a sister and brother; and two nieces.

May, 2019
77

Daniel Laurent ’77, of Herndon, Va.; Nov. 27. After completing his internship and residency in Washington, D.C., at the Georgetown University Medical Center and the George Washington University Hospital, he opened a urology practice at Reston Hospital in 1987 and practiced for 31 years. He served on the Reston Hospital Board of Trustees for 23 years and was board chair for eight years. He enjoyed cooking, driving fast cars, traveling, and music. He is survived by his wife, Peggy; two sons; sister Carell Laurent ’78; a brother; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
76

Edith Andrews Tobin ’76, of San Francisco; Jan. 23, of complications from a brain tumor. While at Brown, she was a member of the women’s track team and spent a summer working on an archaeological dig. After graduation, she traveled the world and visited six continents. A fixture in society columns, she sometimes was a guest and sometimes was a host but always was involved in the greater good. Some of her gala beneficiaries were the Edgewood Center for Children and Families and the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic. She worked as a docent for the Asian Art Museum in 2015 and served on several boards, including Grace Cathedral. She enjoyed time spent at Lake Tahoe and hiking. She is survived by her husband, Joseph; a daughter; two sons; her mother; and two brothers.

May, 2019
74

Olafur Gislason ’74, of Jamestown, R.I.; Oct. 3, following a prolonged illness. He worked in seafood sales for most of his life. In 1989 he cofounded Southstream Seafoods, where he served as vice president until retiring in 2017. During his tenure, the company grew to be an industry leader in seafood importing and sales. He was an accomplished bassist and guitarist, who played with numerous rock bands. He was an active member of the Brown Club of Rhode Island and served as president of BASC. He was also active in the Jamestown Community Theater and Boy Scouts of America. He is survived by his wife, Katherine; a daughter; a son, Stefan ’06; a brother and sister-in-law; a nephew and nieces.

May, 2019
72

Thomas L. Misuraca ’72, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Jan. 9. He was a law partner at Garan Lucow Miller P.C. in Detroit, practicing product liability law, medical malpractice, and insurance defense. He retired in 2016. He was a member of the Michigan Bar Assoc. and the Detroit Athletic Club. He enjoyed sailing and biking and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Maria; two daughters and sons-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law; and six grandchildren.

May, 2019
71

William P. Morrow Jr. ’71, of Worcester, Mass.; Dec. 15. He worked as an appraisal specialist for Modern Manufacturing in Worcester before retiring. He was an avid Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots fan and enjoyed time at the beach. He is survived by his wife, Diane, and her son; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother; and nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
70

J. Erik Hart ’70, of Jacksonville, Fla.; Aug.3, from a lengthy illness. After serving in the U.S. Navy, he returned to Providence and unexpectedly fell into a career as an arts manager. He attended the Institute in Arts Administration at Harvard and for more than 15 years worked with companies in Rhode Island, New York, Louisiana, Ohio, North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Florida. In 1985 he was a cofounder and executive director of the Miami City Ballet. In 1987 he was offered the opportunity to manage downtown’s historic Florida Theatre and served as the theatre’s executive director and president for 25 years. He retired from the theatre in 2013. He is survived by his wife, Gayle; three sons; two grandchildren; and a sister.

May, 2019
70

Judith Covey Carson ’70, ’85 PhD, of Skokie, Ill.; Jan. 6. She worked as a software designer/architect at Anchor HMO, Comdisco, the Bradford Exchange, and the Acxiom Corp. Always concerned for others and the less fortunate, she was active in helping organizations that promoted social justice. She was a gifted piano player and enjoyed exploration and learning. She is survived by her husband, Thomas ’75 AM, ’77 PhD; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; two sisters; a brother; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1970, GS Class of 1985
May, 2019
69

Douglas H. Ward ’69, of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.; Dec. 30, unexpectedly while hiking. He graduated from Albany Law School in 1973 and went on to become an assistant attorney general in New York focusing on environmental law. In 1995 he founded the environmental legal practice of Young/Sommer LLC. He was an active member of the Saratoga community and served on several boards, including Saratoga PLAN and the Saratoga Rowing Assoc. He was an avid hiker, rower, tandem biker, and backcountry skier. He also built wooden boats and was a tier stone wall builder. He is survived by his wife, Cory; four daughters; five granddaughters; two sisters; and two brothers.

May, 2019
68

Russell A. Ekeblad ’68, ’71 PhD, of Portsmouth, R.I. and Jupiter, Fla.; Dec. 12. He was one of the leading U.S. bridge players for the past 40 years, with five major National American Bridge Championship wins and six second place finishes. He earned the rank of Grand Life Master of the American Contract Bridge League. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard and, following his military service, married and founded Kenilworth Creations, a supplier of custom jewelry to women’s specialty stores. He was an active member of his community, served on the board of Moses Brown School, and enjoyed boating, traveling, and playing golf. He is survived by three children and their spouses; two grandchildren; a sister; and a niece.

Related classes:
Class of 1968, GS Class of 1971
May, 2019
68

E. Jerome Batty ’68, of Cumberland, R.I.; Jan. 18, of pancreatic cancer. He had a 45-year career as an attorney with Hinckley, Allen & Snyder in Providence, specializing in real estate law. He was the recipient of numerous professional awards and honors. At Brown he was captain of the football team and a lacrosse All-American. He was a member of both the Brown and Northfield Mount Hermon Athletic Halls of Fame. He is survived by his wife, Gayle Rogers Batty ’71; daughter Jordan Batty ’00; a son and his wife; two grandchildren; brothers William Batty III ’63 and Stephen Batty ’71; sister-in-law, Linda Schmidt Batty ’65 AM; and nephew William Batty IV ’90.

May, 2019
67

Judith Wolder Rosenthal ’67, ’71 PhD, of Edison, N.J.; Jan. 4. She taught biology at Kean University in Union, N.J., for more than 35 years and served as an administrator in 1995. She received a master’s degree in bilingual education in 1995 and at the time of her death was studying to become proficient in Yiddish and working on publishing her third book,  Early Jewish Women Lawyers c.1900. She was involved with the Washington State Jewish Historical Society and was a member of a Spanish language book club. She was a collector of indigenous and tribal masks and enjoyed traveling the world. She is survived by a daughter, two sisters, and a brother.

Related classes:
Class of 1967, GS Class of 1971
May, 2019
67

Robert M. Reymers ’67, ’68 ScM, of Cary, N.C.; Dec. 18. After graduating with a master’s in engineering, he joined Westinghouse Nuclear, then EDS Nuclear, which then launched a 45-year career with Impell Corp. He worked in sales and marketing as senior business development manager. He enjoyed sports, especially rugby and tennis, and was a rock guitarist, jazz enthusiast, and singer with his local Doo Wop Club. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

Related classes:
Class of 1967, GS Class of 1968
May, 2019
66

Robert E. Manchester ’66, of Richmond, Va.; Jan. 15, from complications of a brain hemorrhage. He received a law degree from the University of Colorado Law School in 1969 and partnered with several law firms and lawyers throughout his career. At the time of his death he was a sole practitioner at Manchester Law Offices. He enjoyed the game of rugby as a player and as a coach until his mid-thirties. He is survived by his wife, Judith; two children, including Jessica Lubitz ’98; four grandchildren; two sisters; brother John ’74; two sisters-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
65

Steward R. Crane ’65, of Greenville, S.C.; Dec. 21. He was a CPA and partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers. He retired in 1985. He enjoyed playing golf and was a founding member of Highlands Country Club in North Carolina. He is survived by his wife, Joanne; two daughters and their spouses; six grandchildren; and a brother.

May, 2019
64

Richard J. Goetsch ’64, of Chagrin Falls, Ohio; Jan. 19. He received a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School in 1967 and was managing counsel for BP. He practiced antitrust and commercial law in both Cleveland and Chicago and retired in 2008. He enjoyed reading, traveling, working on a new construction or landscaping project, and classical music. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; daughter, Sallie Goetsch ’89; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and two grandchildren.

May, 2019
64

Mary Jo Dieckhaus ’64, of Newport, R.I., formerly of New York City; Jan. 14, of cancer. After graduating she went on to a career in public and investor relations in New York City. Following positions at Burson-Marsteller and Gavin Anderson and Co., she formed her own company, DD & W Ltd., which provided investor relation services for international companies and organizations. She retired to Newport in 2008 and was a volunteer at the Redwood Library and the Newport Historical Society. She is survived by a sister; two nieces, including Ann Waugh ’86; and a nephew.

May, 2019
64

James C. Deveney Jr. ’64, of Manchester-by-the-Sea, Mass.; Jan. 10, of cancer. Following service in the U.S. Coast Guard, he began a lifelong career in education, teaching and coaching at Lawrence Academy in Groton, Pingree School in South Hamilton, and Buckingham, Browne & Nichols School in Cambridge. His discipline was mathematics. An avid golfer, he won multiple golf club championships and competed in United States Golf Association New England and Massachusetts State events. At Brown he was captain of the golf team and a member of the hockey team. He was a trustee of the former Governor Dummer Academy and president of the Hickory Shafts, a distinguished group dedicated to the traditions of golf. He is survived by his wife, Sharon, and a sister.

May, 2019
63

Elizabeth Walker Rotter ’63, of San Francisco; Nov. 26. She was a self-employed writer. In 1976 her first novel, a Regency romance, was published. She continued to write more than 30 Regency and contemporary romances. In 1998 she started e-book publishing with Belgrave House and added a second web address, Regency Reads, a year later. The sites continue under the management of her son and daughter-in-law. She volunteered for more than 20 years at UCSF and was a devoted feminist and progressive. She enjoyed traveling the world. She is survived by her husband, Paul; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and a son-in-law. 

May, 2019
63

Marc S. Levine ’63, of Hartford, Conn.; Oct. 16, after a long illness. He received a law degree from Georgetown University Law Center, where he was associate editor of the Georgetown Law Journal. He left general practice in 1972 to specialize in real estate and founded Marc S. Levine Real Estate Interests. He expanded the availability of affordable housing in Hartford, worked on revitalizing downtown Hartford, created ArtSpace Hartford, and restored the classic Sage Allen building. He enjoyed spending time with family and is survived by his wife, Tammy; five children and stepchildren, including son Gregory ’90 and daughter Abby Levine ’93; and nine grandchildren.

May, 2019
63

John G.C. Banks ’63, of Westwood, Mass.; Dec. 16, from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. He worked as a reporter and photographer for Mansfield News, then as a television reporter for the NBC affiliate. Later he became the anchor of the 6 pm news, followed by the position of news director. In 1982 he began his 25-year career as a stockbroker with Tucker, Anthony & R.L. Day. He served on several boards, including the Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse Stage and the Red Cross. He was a former member of the Jabberwocks and continued to sing in choirs after graduation. He was a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He is survived by his wife, Julia; a daughter and her husband; a son and his wife; five grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

May, 2019
62

Gary A. Richardson ’62, of Naugatuck, Conn.; Oct. 31, after a lengthy illness. A Naugatuck native, he lived most of his adult life in the San Francisco Bay area where he was a sales executive and outdoor enthusiast. He is survived by a daughter; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and three nieces.

May, 2019
62

Philip J. Schwarz ’62, of Richmond, Va.; Dec. 15. He became a professor of history at Virginia Commonwealth Univ. in 1972 and served as chairman of the Department of History. He won several teaching awards, was the author of six books, and served on the Richmond Slave Trail Commission. He is survived by his wife, Janet; two children; two granddaughters; and two siblings.

May, 2019
60

Robert E. Nadeau ’60, of Little Compton, R.I.; Dec. 26. After graduating from Tufts Medical School and completing his residency at Dartmouth, he served as a captain and general internist in the U.S. Air Force from 1966 to 1969 stationed in Spangdahlem, Germany. He further trained in psychiatry at the University of Rochester (N.Y.), where he remained as associate clinical professor of psychiatry. He continued in private practice and teaching until retiring in 2009. He was a member of the American Psychiatric Assoc. and at Brown was a member of the varsity golf team and Delta Upsilon. He enjoyed driving his tractor and working in his woodshop. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Tillinghast Nadeau ’61; four children and their spouses, including Elizabeth Nadeau ’83, Dana Nadeau ’85, and Robert Nadeau ’96; eight grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
60

Alan C. Laymon ’60, of Mantoloking, N.J.; Jan. 29. He had a career in advertising media sales at Young & Rubicam and later at CBS Sports. While at Brown he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and began playing bridge and competing in many tournaments. He served on the Mantoloking Borough Council for 10 years and enjoyed swimming and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; and four grandchildren.

May, 2019
60

Peter Kallas ’60, of Wilmington, N.C.; Jan. 12. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps as a captain at the Communications School in Camp Pendleton, Calif., he began a career in international banking, retiring as vice president of the Bank of New England in Boston. He traveled to more than 40 countries during 26 years in the industry and provided consulting services through the International Executive Service Corps to banks in Russia in 1993. While living in Colorado he served on the Denver World Affairs Council and the Institute for International Education Fulbright scholarship committee  and presented at the Aspen Institute and University of Colorado on world affairs. While living in Plattsburgh, N.Y., he volunteered with Friends of Point Au Roche and Kiwanis International and was a literacy volunteer. He is survived by his wife, Mara; three children; seven grandchildren; and wo brothers.

May, 2019
60

Donne Hansen Forrest ’60, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Jan. 7. She worked in publishing for more than 40 years. She retired as director of subsidiary rights for Penguin Random House in 2015. She is survived by two sons; two grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and a sister.

May, 2019
60

James G. Conzelman Jr. ’60, of Wilton, Conn., formerly of St. Louis, Mo. Jan. 7. He worked in various positions over the course of his career, including project specialist with First National Bank of St. Louis, vice president of institutional sales at the brokerage firm of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, vice president of the US–USSR Trade and Economic Council, and executive director of the Association of Executive Recruiting Consultants. In early 2000 he began volunteering at the Bridgeport Rescue Mission and the Jewish Home for the Elderly of Fairfield County, and from 2006 to 2016 he volunteered at the Connecticut Hospice in Branford, Conn. He was an accomplished athlete and coached his grandsons’ youth football program. He also enjoyed cooking and music. He is survived by three children and eight grandchildren.

May, 2019
59

David B. Schaffer ’59, of Blue Bell, Pa.; Nov. 4. He was the retired director of pediatric ophthalmology at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia. He was an accomplished medical photographer and co-authored textbooks that included his medical photos. He did volunteer work at the Philadelphia Zoo in 1999 and served as president of its Docent Council from 2014 to 2016, earning recognition awards for his leadership roles. He was a gourmet chef and a scuba diver and enjoyed taking wildlife photos. He is survived by his wife, Sandy; a daughter; a son; and a brother, Lewis ’56.

May, 2019
58

Catharine Calvo ’58, of Providence; Dec. 5. For 15 years she taught young school children, creating a unique classroom environment while she pursued her theatrical hobby. She guided the development of the Parents Cooperative School in Narragansett, R.I. She was a founding member of the Trinity Repertory Company and worked with the company as a lighting director for two and half years. She was a house manager at Providence Performing Arts Center, vice president of the board, on the production committee of Barker Playhouse, and spent more than 50 years with summer stock and community theater around New England. She experienced every aspect of theater and enjoyed set construction and technical elements. She is survived by a sister and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
57

Marva Dates Belt ’57, of Phoenix, Md.; Dec. 9, of cancer. She was a retired librarian of Enoch Pratt Free Library. She was active in civil rights issues and was a member of the Maryland Congress of Racial Equality. After retiring from the library, she commuted daily to Moorland Spingarn Research Center at Howard University and researched the enslaved people and Native Americans of Northumberland County, Va. She also did research for the play Having Our Say, based on the book by Bessie and Sadie Delany,  and edited Dr. Roland McConnell’s book, History of Morgan Park. She is survived by her husband, Stephen; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; niece Karen Dates Dunmore ’86; and three nephews.

May, 2019
56

Charles R. Flather ’56, of Coronado, Calif.; Dec. 25. He retired from the U.S. Navy in 1982 after 26 years of service. He went on to work for several years at Computer Sciences Corporation as a systems analyst and then he and his wife opened and ran two retail stores in Seaport Village. He was an avid tennis player and past president of the Coronado Tennis Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; three children; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and sister  Beverley Edwards ’69.

May, 2019
55

Margot Wood Morgan ’55, of Old Saybrook, Conn.; Jan. 23. She was a retired Old Saybrook High School English teacher. She was secretary of the Old Saybrook Board of Education from 1992 to 1994 and chairwoman from 1994 to 1995. She enjoyed time spent each summer in Maine. She is survived by her four children and four children from her second marriage, including John Morgan ’81 MAT; a grandson; and a great-grandson.

May, 2019
55

Paul H. Letiecq ’55, of Albion and Holley, N.Y.; Nov. 7. He served as the pastor of the Holley Presbyterian Church for ten years. He later served as pastor of the Universalist Church of Middleport for more than 20 years. He was a member of Planned Parenthood, past president of the Cobblestone Society, and active with the prison ministry at the Orleans and Groveland Correctional Facilities. He enjoyed playing tennis, gardening, and supported NPR and the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. He is survived by three sons and their spouses; two brothers; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
54

David F. West ’54, of Bremen, Me., formerly of Harrington Park, N.J.; Nov. 24. He began working in life insurance sales prior to owning his own agency. He was active in the Bremen community and was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He is survived by two sons and their spouses and six grandchildren.

May, 2019
54

Douglas L. Turner ’54, of Springfield, Va., formerly of Buffalo, N.Y.; Nov. 4, after a long illness. He was a rower in the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games. In 1957 he joined Buffalo’s Courier Express, advancing as Albany bureau chief, financial editor, city editor, executive editor, and Washington bureau chief. After the Courier closed in 1982, he joined the Buffalo News and was bureau chief from 1982 to 2007. At Brown he participated in varsity crew, sang with the Jabberwocks, and was a member of Beta Theta Pi. For most of his life he was a deacon, elder and trustee of First Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, but converted to Catholicism in 1988 and immersed himself in Catholic literature. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Associated Press Managing Editors Assoc. He was also a governor of the National Press Club and a member of the Gridiron Club, an elite journalism society. He is survived by a daughter, two sons, and 10 grandchildren.

May, 2019
54

William F. Peace ’54, of Rockport, Me.; Dec. 21, after a short illness due to ALS complications. While at Brown, he played football, was president of Delta Upsilon, co-chairman of the Brown Community Fund, and was an active member of the Class Council and Brown Keys. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Army’s Counter Intelligence Corps. He began a career at Procter & Gamble and later moved to real estate, where he worked for the majority of his career. He received many honors over the course of his professional life, including Realtor of the Year (Hartford, Conn.) in 1983. Residing in Simsbury, Conn., for 35 years, he dedicated countless hours to his community and was honored as Town Citizen of the Year in 1973 by both the Jaycees and the Simsbury Chamber of Commerce. Following his retirement, Bill and his wife settled in Rockport, where he continued his volunteer efforts and was recognized as Volunteer of the Year by the Chamber of Commerce (Camden/Rockport) in 2005. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Patti; two children and their spouses; and three granddaughters.

May, 2019
54

Edith Veit Johnstone ’54, of Rutland, Vt.; Dec. 6. She taught art in elementary schools and china painting to two groups of adults in Killington, Vt., for 14 years and then became self-employed painting china and eggs for retail shops. She is survived by three children, including Anne Johnstone ’79; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
54

Doris Eisenberg Epstein ’54, of Bradenton, Fla.; Dec. 25. After marrying and moving to San Diego, she worked as a social worker for two and a half years. She eventually moved to Ames, Iowa, where she earned a master’s in library science and worked for 20 years as a media specialist for the Ames Community Schools. She was an active member of the Ames Jewish Congregation and its Interfaith Council. In 2005 she retired to Bradenton and became a member of the Sarasota-Manatee Chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; two grandsons; brother Benjamin Eisenberg ’51; a sister-in-law; and niece.

May, 2019
53

Richard A. Pollack ’53, of Santa Monica, Calif., formerly of Roseland, N.J.; Nov. 21. Before retiring, he was a partner at the financial firms of Loeb Rhoades & Co., Steinhardt Partners, and Weiss Pollack Capital Management. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, past president of the board of trustees at Bloomfield College, and active in the New Jersey Chapter of the UJA. He is survived by his wife, Rona; two sons, including James ’81; two grandchildren; and a sister.

May, 2019
53

Charles A. DeAngelis ’53, of Westwood, Mass.; Jan. 29. He worked as a structural engineer at Stone & Webster in Boston and as a senior engineer at Factory Mutual Research in Norwood, Mass., before retiring. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and served in the Korean War. He was a Boston sports fan, especially the Red Sox, and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
52

Richard L. Sherman ’52, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Dec. 31. He spent more than 25 years writing for local papers, including the Attleboro Sun Chronicle, Pawtucket Times, and the Providence Journal. He also hosted a news show on WARA radio and was editor of The New Leader. Following his career in journalism, he joined the corporate world working in corporate communications for The Foxboro Company and was director of public relations at Raytheon Company. He was an accomplished athlete both in high school and at Brown as a member of the men’s baseball team. He was also an avid New England sports fan and helped to produce the first Patriots yearbook. A lifelong resident of North Attleboro, he served on the North Attleboro School Committee, the Millennium Celebration Committee, and the Historical Society and as a trustee of Richards Memorial Library. He authored a bicentennial publication, North Attleboro, An Affectionate History, and produced a monograph on Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Schmidt Sherman ’54; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and four grandchildren.

May, 2019
52

Martin J. Badoian ’52, of Sharon, Mass.; Oct. 27. He was a retired teacher and head of the math department at Canton (Mass.) High School. He was the recipient of the 1977 Teacher of the Year award given by the Massachusetts Board of Education and the 1985 Presidential Award from the National Science Foundation. At Brown he was a member of both the basketball and baseball teams. He is survived by daughter Leslie Badoian ’89; a son; five grandchildren; and a brother.

May, 2019
52

Beatrice Gilden Dworman Abowitt ’52, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Jan. 6. She worked at Sears for 23 years and was a homemaker. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, and a grandson.

May, 2019
51

John M. Wood ’51, of Janesville, Wisc., and Delray Beach, Fla.; Jan. 25. He lived in Milwaukee working at the Plankinton Hotel for a short time before moving to Janesville, where he managed the Monterey Hotel until it was sold in 1963. He then took over the lease of the Tap Room restaurant in Delray and ran it until he changed careers and became an investment advisor. He returned to Janesville and in 1966 opened the Robert W. Baird office. He was named vice president in 1969 and managed the branch until his retirement in 1997. He was an active member of the Janesville Chamber of Commerce. He was a gifted piano player and enjoyed attending concerts and musical theater performances. An avid tennis player, he was instrumental in the building of the Janesville Country Club tennis courts. In retirement he enjoyed traveling and cruising. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters; two sons-in-laws; and four grandchildren.

May, 2019
51

Shirley Gorlick Ebenstein ’51, ’68 MAT, of Boca Raton, Fla., formerly of West Hartford, Conn.; Oct. 9. She was a retired reading and math specialist at a learning center in Hartford. For 50 years she worked alongside her husband as an officer and director of the family company, Capital Commercial Properties. She enjoyed reading, especially biographies, and traveling and cruising. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a daughter; son, Douglas ’75 and his wife; and two granddaughters, including Lori Ebenstein ’17.

Related classes:
Class of 1951, GS Class of 1968
May, 2019
51

Kenneth W. Dehertogh ’51, ’55 AM, of Cumberland, R.I.; Nov. 2. He was employed as a science teacher for the Providence School Department for 22 years. He was also the owner of several successful businesses. He enjoyed singing at the German club in Pawtucket, R.I., and at the Warwick Senior Center. He is survived by six children, including daughter Deborah Dehertogh ’74, ’77 MD; nine grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Related classes:
Class of 1951, GS Class of 1955
May, 2019
50

Harry S. Westcott ’50, of Needham, Mass.; Dec. 31. He was a retired Rhode Island teacher and principal and had served as president of the Rhode Island Education Assoc. Later in his career he served as superintendent of school districts in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. He was a U.S. Army World War II veteran and recipient of the Bronze Star and French Legion d’Honneur. He traveled extensively and enjoyed studying people and their environment. He is survived by his wife, Gerd; four children; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

May, 2019
50

Howard K. Page ’50, of Eden Prairie, Minn.; Nov. 5. He worked for the Ford Motor Company in Detroit before, in 1972, moving his family and business to Dassel, Minn., where he lived until the 1980s. He was an entrepreneur with a passion for business; he founded Crest Electronics, founded and operated Greenwood Enterprises, and founded the Old Depot Railroad Museum in Dassel. He was a member of Toastmasters, the Dassel History Center and a Masonic Lodge member. He is survived by three daughters and their spouses, eight grandchildren, and six great-grandchildren. 

May, 2019
50

Laurence N. Gross ’50, of Atlanta; Jan. 16. He spent 10 years in the advertising field in New York City before joining his father-in-law’s dress manufacturing business. After taking over the business and running it for a little less than two years, he closed his father-in-law’s company and opened a company under his name. In 1975 he founded UltraSport, Ltd., producing a line of women’s and men’s tennis apparel that included velour warm-up suits. He enjoyed playing squash and tennis and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; five children, including daughter Jennifer Gross ’89; and 11 grandchildren.

May, 2019
50

Arthur D. Foster ’50, of Foxfield, Colo.; Dec. 18. He served in the U.S. Air Force and received the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal for his service before returning home to join the family business, Manifold Supply Co. in Brooklyn, N.Y. Once the company sold, he and his family moved to Colorado. He was active in the Lions Club of Denver, where he took on a leadership role as head of the board of Savio House, a nonprofit dedicated to the safety and wellbeing of children and families. In 1997 he was the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement Award from Savio House. He was also an active supporter and advocate for The American Cancer Society, the American Heart Assoc., and the Colorado Ballet. He enjoyed flying as a private pilot, playing golf, and rooting for the Broncos. He is survived by three children, eight grandchildren, and a great-grandchild.

May, 2019
50

Robert C. Dunham ’50, of Denver; Nov. 12. He owned and operated his own construction and remodeling business for more than 50 years. He is survived by his wife, Sandra; three sons; a stepson; 11 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; sister Susan Dunham Coffey ’63; and nephew Timothy Dunham ’86.

May, 2019
50

Edward Dewey ’50, of Victoria, N.C.; Dec. 11, after a short illness. He had a career managing manufacturing businesses in several locations around the U.S. and in England, including five years at LeBlond in Mariemont, Ohio. He was a U.S. Navy Korean War veteran. During his time at Brown he played baseball, football, and ice hockey. He enjoyed fishing, played hockey into his 50s, and golfed into his 80s. He played at all of the British Open venues during his years in the U.K. and was Club Champion at Hyde Park Country Club in Cincinnati in the early 70s. He is survived by his wife, Claire; three children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and brother Richard ’51.

May, 2019
49

Jeannette Silberman Roth ’49, of Davie, Fla., formerly of South Dennis, Mass., and Providence; Jan. 14. She was a social worker for the State of Rhode Island before starting a family. She later tutored students of all ages in math. She enjoyed reading and is survived by a daughter and a son.

May, 2019
47

Richard Morris ’47, of Cumberland, R.I.; Dec. 14. He entered the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Mass., in the fall of 1947 and received his Master’s of Divinity in 1950. He served at All Saints Episcopal Church until 1952, when he became the first rector of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in North Syracuse, N.Y. In 1965 he accepted the position of rector at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Lakewood, Ohio, where he remained for 20 years. In 1985 he retired from parish ministry and moved to Pittsboro, N.C., and was interim rector at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Raleigh. In his retirement he also became a liturgical consultant to churches. He returned to New England in 1999 and became an active member of Church of the Advent in Medfield, Mass. Working with the church’s vestry, he oversaw the construction of a columbarium to honor the ministry of the parish’s founding rector, his grandfather, Rev. Guy Wilbur Miner. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie; six children, including Jonathan ’78; 20 grandchildren, including Margaret Thorsen ’15, ’19 MD; eight great-grandchildren; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
47

Harry B. French ’47, of Gladwyne, Pa.; Dec. 7. He worked as an investment banker in Philadelphia. During that time, he discovered a struggling company that developed a handheld searchlight. The company became Streamlight Inc., founded in 1973 and now in its 46th year. In 1994 he was made chairman of the company. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed boating, skiing, Dixieland jazz music, and watching sports. He is survived by his wife, Phyllis; four children; and seven grandchildren.

May, 2019
47

Jean Hansen Biggs ’47, of Oak Park, Ill., formerly of Kingsville, Tex.; Jan. 16. She was a retired library director. She held professional positions in Dartmouth College Library, North Carolina Law Library, the Presbyterian Pan American School of Kingsville, and the First Presbyterian Church of Georgetown. She enjoyed reading and is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, and two granddaughters.

May, 2019
46

Seymour I. Port ’46, of Cranston, R.I.; Jan. 13. He was a self-employed manufacturers’ representative in the costume jewelry business. He served as a naval officer in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters during World War II and was a member of Touro Fraternal Assoc., the Masons, and the Jewish War Veterans. He enjoyed traveling and dancing with his wife before her passing. He is survived by daughter Rhonda Port Walker ’75 and her husband, and granddaughter Allison Walker ’12.

May, 2019
46

Esther Monti Bello ’46, of Providence; Jan. 22. She was head of the North Providence High School math department for many years before retiring. She is survived by three children, five grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and niece Diane Monti-Markowski ’78.

May, 2019
45

Norma Macbeth Sturges ’45, of Casper, Wyo.; Nov. 30. At Brown she was captain of the archery team and played on the varsity basketball team and the bowling team. During World War II she worked in a munitions factory. She was regarded as a fiber artist of the unique American craft art of braided rugs and taught her technique for decades. Her book The Braided Rug Book: Creating Your Own American Folk Art was published in 1995, revised in 2000, and rewritten in 2006. She was one of the founders of the Rocky Mountain Rug Braiders Guild in Colorado and was instrumental in getting the Casper Rug Braiders Guild started. Her art was exhibited at the National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper. In 2012 she received a mentorship grant from the Wyoming Arts Council Folk and Traditional Arts Program to teach advanced braiding techniques. In 2014 she was a recipient of the Wyoming Arts Council Governor’s Arts Award. She is survived by two daughters, seven grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

May, 2019
45

Joan Costello Devlin ’45, of Coventry, R.I.; Jan. 10. She was a director of social workers for the State of Rhode Island for more than 30 years before retiring. She enjoyed bird watching and tending to her own dog and cats. She is survived by her goddaughter.

May, 2019
44

William W. Nash ’44, of Warwick, R.I.; Apr. 22, 2018. He had a career in business management and consulting for 65 years. He retired as vice president of manufacturing and assistant general manager of United Wire and Supply Company of Cranston, R.I. He served on several corporate boards in addition to acting as a business consultant affiliated with the Small Business Development Center at Bryant and Johnson & Wales universities. A U.S. Army veteran of World War II, he was also a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society for the Advancement of Management, the Providence Art Club, the Netopian Club of Providence, the Wickford Art Assoc., Delta Upsilon, and St. Luke’s Church in East Greenwich, R.I., where he served as treasurer and vestryman. He traveled extensively and visited more than 60 countries, as well as every state in the U.S. He enjoyed camping, hiking, swimming, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy; two daughters; a son and his wife; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; and a sister.

May, 2019
43

Elizabeth Long Byers ’43, of Lancaster, Pa.; Jan. 8. She worked at Murray Insurance Agency in Lancaster before starting a family and later volunteered in the business office of the former St. Joseph Hospital. She enjoyed traveling and playing bridge, reading, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. She is survived by a daughter and son and their spouses, three grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

May, 2019
42

Judith Kennedy Johnson ’42, of Oakland and New Vineyard, Me.; Nov. 4. She had a family farm and used the wool from her sheep to make hand-knitted designs; she also drew and created watercolor landscape paintings. A skilled gardener, she was a founding member of the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Assoc. and UpCountry Artists. She played the mandolin and enjoyed sharing her collection of music from all over the world with friends and family. A dedicated Democrat, she served as an Oakland Selectman during the 1960s. In 1992 she was a founding benefactor for the New Vineyard Public Library. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two grandsons, and a granddaughter.

May, 2019
40

Dorothy Daw Powers ’40, of Venice, Fla., formerly of Berkeley Heights, N.J.; Nov. 24. She worked as a school nurse in Berkeley Heights for many years before working for the State of New Jersey evaluating nursing home compliance for Medicaid. She was an early member of the Stoney Hill Players and active in its development. She is survived by three sons, including William R. Powers Jr. ’66; 10 grandchildren, including William R. Powers III ’93; and 21 great-grandchildren.

May, 2019
39

Robert F. Barker ’39, of Ocala, Fla., formerly of New Jersey and North Carolina; Jan. 27. He worked for many years as a plant engineer at Curtiss-Wright Corp. in Fairfield, N.J. He enjoyed gardening and, for a short time while living with his son in North Carolina, was able to fulfill his dream of farming the land. In 2017 he moved to Florida with his daughter. He is survived by a daughter, three sons, 14 grandchildren, and 19 great-grandchildren.

May, 2019
37

Mary Stanton Palmer ’37, of Saint Augustine, Fla., formerly of Storrs, Conn.; Jan. 2. She was a retired Tolland (Conn.) librarian. She was a member of the League of Women Voters and the Connecticut Library Assoc. She enjoyed traveling the world, cooking, knitting, and playing bridge. She is survived by a daughter, a son, two grandsons, a brother, and several cousins, nieces and nephews.

May, 2019
36

Evelyn Seder Heller ’36, of Webster, Mass.; Sept. 30, at 104 years of age. She was a devoted community member who served on several boards, including the Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Brandeis Univ., Webster Public Library, and Hubbard Regional Hospital in Webster. She was past president of the Sons of Israel Congregation in Webster and past president of the Webster Chapter of Hadassah. Named Webster Woman of the Year, she received a community service award from the Massachusetts State Legislature. Additionally, she founded a play-reading group and enjoyed playing bridge and cooking. She is survived by two daughters, including Sue Heller ’60 and her companion; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Mar, 2019
GS 74

Fredric J. Spar ’74 AM, ’80 PhD, of Princeton, N.J.; Dec. 22. He was an elementary school teacher before completing his PhD at Brown, where he studied Chinese history and spent a year in Taipei, Taiwan, at the Stanford Center. He later worked as a communications consul- tant at Kekst & Co. in Manhattan for 36 years. He served on several environmental and edu- cation boards, including the Watershed Insti- tute, Friends of Princeton Open Space, New York City Audubon Society, and was also chair of Friends of the Rogers Refuge. He enjoyed birding, skiing, tennis, hiking, shing and rooting for the Boston Red Sox. He is survived by his wife, Winifred Hughes Spar ’73 AM, ’76 PhD; two sons; a sister and brother-in-law.

Mar, 2019
GS 63

Richard S. Allen ’63 AM, of Trumbull, Conn.; Dec. 16, 2017. He was a professor of English and director of creative writing at the Univ. of Bridgeport from 1968 to 2001. He was an acclaimed public speaker and poetry reader. He led poetry workshops and seminars and served as a judge for various competitions and selection committees in Connecticut. In 2010 he was named Connecticut’s poet laureate. He published in premier journals, including Poetry, the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, Hudson Review, and New Criterion, as well as in scores of national anthologies. He won numerous awards, including a Pushcart Prize, the Robert Frost prize, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and Ingram Merrill Poetry Foundation. His collection, Present Vanishing: Poems, received the 2009 Connecticut Book Award for Poetry. He was a member of the Academy of American Poets and the Modern Language Assoc. He is survived by his wife, Lori; a daughter; and son.

Mar, 2019
53
Joseph L. Tauro ’53
His decisions transformed countless lives, in the courtroom and beyond
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Judge Joseph L. Tauro ’53
Mar, 2019
FAC

Aaron Wold, of Providence; Oct. 3. In 1963 he joined the Brown faculty and was the Vernon K. Krieble Professor of Chemistry until his retirement in 1992. He has written two books and published more than 300 papers in the field of solid state chemistry. He raised more than 550 orchids in his greenhouse and was a longtime member of the Rhode Island Orchid Society. After retiring from teaching, he volunteered with the Jewish Eldercare of Rhode Island creating music programs and traveling to several nursing homes throughout Rhode Island playing music for the residents. He is survived by his wife, Patricia; three children; and four grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

Peter Wegner, of Providence; July 27, following a brief illness. At the University of Cambridge he worked on the Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator computer, the first practical general-purpose stored program electronic computer. In 1954 he briefly worked in the computer science department of Manchester Univ. before visiting Israel for an academic year. He returned to England in 1955 and was hired by Prudential Insurance to develop actuarial software. He left Prudential in 1956 for CAV Aerospace, where he worked on airline programming. He then held a position at Penn State Univ., where he spent two years before moving to MIT to work on the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service Project. In 1960 he moved to the mathematical laboratory of Harvard, helping faculty with their programming requirements, but he returned to England in 1961 to take on a lectureship at the London School of Economics, teaching economists about computing. He spent three years there before returning to the U.S. to be assistant professor in the mathematics department at Penn State. In 1969 he joined the Brown faculty and spent the rest of his career at Brown. In March 2017 he received a recognition award celebrating his sustained and dedicated work as editor of the Brown University Faculty Bulletin. He wrote or co-edited more than a dozen books on programming languages and software engineering. His most recent book, Interactive Computation: The New Paradigm, was published in 2008.

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

Patricia Heard Symonds ’79, ’84 AM, ’91 PhD, of Providence; Nov. 6. While her youngest children were still at home she enrolled at Brown through the RUE program to obtain her degrees in anthropology. She also played on the varsity women’s tennis team as an undergrad. With support from her husband, she did extensive research in the late 1980s in a Hmong village in northern Thailand. Her ethnographic study Calling in the Soul; Gender and the Cycle of Life in a Hmong Village was later published as a book by the University of Washington. She joined Brown’s faculty in 1992 as an adjunct associate professor in the anthropology department. During her tenure she taught courses in her areas of expertise and mentored several students who remained close friends and colleagues. She is survived by her husband, Alan Symonds ’04; six children; three grandchildren, including Marco A. Steinsieck ’08; two great-granddaughters; and a brother.
 

 

Related classes:
FAC, Class of 1979, GS Class of 1984
Mar, 2019
FAC

Mark B. Schupack, of Providence; Sept. 27. He taught at Brown from 1959 to 1999, serving as chairman of the economics department, dean of the graduate school, and vice provost. He also served as chairman of the Graduate Record Exam Board and was appointed to the R.I. Consumer’s Council by then Governor John Chafee. Additionally, he was a docent at the Rhode Island School of Design Art Museum and co-author of Tech Model Railroad Club of MIT: The First Fifty Years. He enjoyed classical music, photography, and model railroading. He is survived by his wife, Helaine; a daughter and son and their spouses; and three grandsons.  

 

Mar, 2019
FAC

William C. Crossgrove, of Providence; Nov. 29. He joined the Brown faculty in 1962 and rose through the ranks to become professor of German Studies and Comparative Literature. He taught a wide variety of courses in German language, literature, civilization, and culture, including interdisciplinary topics such as world agriculture and the history of hunger. The latter led to his co-editing Hunger in History. He spent sabbaticals in Germany working on medieval manuscripts in university libraries. He retired from Brown in 2003 and soon after was appointed administrative director of the George A. and Eliza Gardner Howard Foundation, a position he held until 2016. With a strong commitment to social justice, he was a member of the Committee on Racial Equality and the American Civil Liberties Union and was actively involved in local environmental issues. He also was a docent at Roger Williams Park Zoo. He is survived by his wife, Lo; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and two sisters.
 

 

Mar, 2019
MD 87

Marie Anne Johantgen ’87 MD, of Olympia, Wash.; Nov. 16. She was an obstetrician/gynecologist in Olympia. In 2009 she started the local chapter of Dining for Women, an organization that raises money to support women’s health and safety worldwide. She made multiple medical trips abroad to help those with medical needs in Haiti, Peru, Kenya, Rwanda, and India, and volunteered locally for the Olympia Free Clinic and Rotary Club. She was the recipient of the 2017 Women of Achievement Award from the Olympia YWCA. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a son; a stepson; her parents; five siblings; and a niece.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 90

Derrick S. Best ’90 AM, of Syracuse, N.Y.; Feb. 22, 2018. During his tenure at the Univ. of Maryland, he was an academic advisor for the African-American Studies Program, an admissions counselor, and director of student affairs for the College of Arts and Humanities. At Drexel Univ. in Philadelphia he served as the assistant dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Later he returned home to Syracuse to join the family real estate business working as a multi lines representative, where he remained until he became too ill to work. He was a 14-year member of Kappa Alpha Psi and is survived by his parents, a sister, and several family members.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 85

Paul D. Tolbert ’85 AM, of Indian Hills, Colo.; Aug. 2. In Denver he worked initially at Tattered Cover Book Store, then moved to become bookstore manager at Community College of Aurora and then at Arapahoe Community College, where he worked for more than 20 years. He composed and recorded his own music, performed in bands, and enjoyed cooking, playing Scrabble, and solving crossword and Sudoku puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Laura; two sons; two sisters; a brother; and many extended family members.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 82

Steven J. Keable ’82 MAT, of Dover, N.H.; Oct. 27. He taught in Salzburg, Austria, and toured Europe before returning to the U.S. to attend law school. He began his law career working as a prosecutor at Rockingham County in Exeter, N.H., and was later promoted to Deputy County Attorney. After working as a prosecutor for 20 years, he founded an independent law practice and worked until his retirement in July 2018. He was a fan of the New England Patriots and the Boston Celtics. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a son; his mother; a sister; a brother; a sister-in-law; a brother-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 73

Marlene C. Browne ’73 AM, ’76 PhD, of Mitchellville, Md.; Dec. 1. She was an English teacher at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis and retired in 2009 as director of the Writing Center. She was an accomplished violinist and played in various local concert symphonies. She is survived by a brother, a sister-in- law, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 69

William T. Kiley ’69 PhD, of Fairfax, Va.; Nov. 12. He taught in the department of mathematics at George Mason University. He was completely engaged in the University and assisted in creating recreational activities for faculty that included a duplicate bridge club, a hiking club, a gourmet group, and group vacations. He was a patron of the GMU Center for the Arts and cheered on the GMU athletes. In retirement he took classes, enjoying the opportunity to learn from expert colleagues about topics that had intrigued him over the years. He is survived by his wife, Evelyn.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 69

Stanley I. Grossman ’69 PhD, of Acton, Mass.; Dec. 23. He taught at McGill University in Montreal before joining the University of Montana’s mathematics department faculty in 1972. In 1994 he retired and relocated to London, England, where he was a research associate at University College London for several years. Over the course of his career, he wrote college level mathematics textbooks and served as a director of Rocky Mountain Traders, Ltd, and Bloomsbury Innovations. He is survived by a daughter and two sons.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 67

Judith Naughton Mitchell ’67 AM, of Providence; Dec. 2, from myelofibrosis. She joined the faculty of Rhode Island College in 1972 and retired from teaching as professor emerita, though she continued as an adjunct for several years in retirement. During her years as RIC she taught a range of courses, wrote for publications and professional journals, presented papers at numerous conferences, and provided workshops for teachers and other educators in Rhode Island and throughout New England. From 1990 to 1999 she held a joint appointment in secondary education, where she was instrumental in the training of student teachers. She was the recipient of the 1987 Paul Maixner Distinguished Teaching Award for Arts and Science. She retired from RIC and was called to the ministry. In 1992  she was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood. In 1993 she was the rector of The Church of the Advent in Pawtucket, R.I., followed by the position of rector of St. Matthew Church in Barrington, R.I., where she served for 10 years. After Barrington she was Priest in Charge of Saint John the Divine in Saunderstown, R.I. She retired due to health issues, but returned to be Vicar of St. James Church in North Providence and Priest in Charge at All Saints Memorial Church in Providence before her death. She is survived by her husband, Raymond; five children; three grandchildren; her parents; and five siblings.

 

Mar, 2019
GS 64

John M. Walker ’64 AM, ’67 PhD, of Lincoln, Neb.; Nov. 19. He taught philosophy at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and then at Nebraska Wesleyan University from 1969 until his retirement in 2002. He was the author of What the Hoops Junkie Saw: Poems, Stories, and Reflections on the Passing Scene. He was a long-time traveler with the Nebraska Arts Council Touring Artists program and performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. He also founded the independent music label Prairie Dog Music, featuring recordings by regional artists. He is survived by Dena Zimmer; a daughter; a son; two granddaughters; and a sister.

Mar, 2019
GS 50

Maurice J. McDowell ’50 PhD, of Media, Pa.; Nov. 18. He worked at DuPont from 1950 to 1983. After retiring from DuPont, he worked as a consultant in New Hampshire and Trinidad. He later joined the International Executive Service Corps as a volunteer. He and his wife enjoyed assignments through IESC to Thailand, Morocco, and Egypt. He was an avid gardener, a volunteer at Riddle Memorial Hospital, and a member of the Upper Providence Planning Council. He swam daily up to age 92 and won more than seven gold medals in the Delco Senior Games. He is survived by four children and their spouses, and three granddaughters.

Mar, 2019
12

Lucas Guangsheng Li ’12, of Singapore; Aug. 8. He was a development partner at ICT Media and a member of Omicron Delta Epsilon. He is survived by his father.

Mar, 2019
99

Monte D. Bryant ’99, of Attleboro, Mass.; Aug. 9. He retired after many years as a steelworker for various area businesses and worked at Brown until retiring in 2010. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and enjoyed sailing, fishing, playing guitar, and spending time with family. He is survived by three children, six grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
92

Edward D. Preston ’92, of Winchester, Mass.; Nov. 17, of pancreatic cancer. He was the first CEO of The Achievement Network, a nonprofit focused on closing the achievement gap through data-driven instruction. He grew the organization from serving seven to serving more than 260 schools, while winning several awards for innovation. His career also included executive positions at Education First, Care.com, and the Decision Resources Group. Earlier he was the founding director of the Cincinnati chapter of Summer Bridge, now known as Breakthrough, to address inequities in education. In 2014 he was named a Fellow of the Pahara and Aspen Institute for his impactful work in education and consulting. Active in his community, he was a founding director and board chair for the Edward W. Brooke Charter School and an active member of the Smugglers Notch Ski and Snowboard Club. He enjoyed skiing, mountain biking and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Beth; three children; his parents; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
89

Katharine Willrich Nordahl ’89, of Westwood, Mass.; Aug. 15. She spent many years in leadership positions within MassHealth ranging from directing the MassHealth managed care program to designing the Senior Care Options program. She also served as an assistant commissioner for the Massachusetts Division of Health Care Finance and Policy, where she led the agency’s work monitoring the impact of the state’s health reform law and analyzing health care cost trends in the Commonwealth. Lastly, she worked at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation directing the Massachusetts Medicaid Policy Institute. In 2016 she was honored with the Boston Center for Independent Living’s Marie Feltin Award for her work advancing innovative Medicaid policy in Massachusetts, and she was again honored in 2018 by the Massachusetts House of Representatives for a lifetime of dedicated public service. She is survived by her husband, Erik; two sons; her father and stepmother; and three brothers and their families.  

 

Mar, 2019
86

Carolyn M. Robinson ’86, of Washington, D.C.; Oct. 14, 2017, from pneumonia exacerbated by pulmonary arterial hypertension. She was a programmer analyst at ABT Associates for 21 years. She was known for her pop music knowledge and abiding support for D.C.’s sports teams. She is survived by her spouse, Angela E. Taylor ’87; a son; two brothers; two nieces; and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
79

Robert Deschene ’79, of North Attleboro, Mass.; Aug. 13. He worked for many years in the private banking sector before obtaining a law degree from the Univ. of Maine School of Law in 1990. After law school, he worked as a judicial law clerk at the Maine Supreme Judicial Court in Portland and followed with a federal court clerkship at the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit in Boston. He is survived by four siblings and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
71

Stephen A. Williamson ’71, of Danvers, Mass.; Nov. 24, as a result of stroke complications. He worked for several companies as a management consultant and eventually worked independently until his retirement. For many years he served on the Danvers School Committee and was active in local issues. He enjoyed coaching his children in soccer and following their sporting endeavors, and was able to enjoy his granddaughter playing soccer for a few years. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and two sisters.

 

Mar, 2019
70

Robert G. Zapffe ’70, of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Nov. 22, from complications of diabetes. He retired in 2008 after 33 years of service with the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. He was an active legislative liaison with the Oklahoma Corrections Professionals and served as Oklahoma Jaycees criminal justice coordinator. He enjoyed hunting crows and shopping estate sales. He is survived by his wife, Sylvia; a daughter and son-in-law; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and two nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
70

Amy Johnsen-Harris ’70, of Providence; Oct. 18, after a long illness. She moved to San Francisco after graduation and worked as an administrative assistant in the philosophy and English departments at the University of San Francisco. In 1972 she returned to Rhode Island and held various positions, including driving a school bus and working for Planned Parenthood of Rhode Island and as a freelance photographer. She then became a librarian and served in that capacity at the Providence Public Library, Ponaganset High School, Hugh B. Bain Middle School, and Cranston High School East. She was a flutist, pianist, and advocate for animal rights, human rights, and the environment. She enjoyed traveling, especially to national parks. She is survived by her son, Bart Johnsen-Harris ’12; a sister; brother, Dan Johnsen ’72; and her former spouse, Mark Harris ’70.
 

 

Mar, 2019
68

Susan Hindmarsh Penny ’68, of New Braunfels, Tex., formerly of El Paso; Oct. 25. She was an elementary school librarian in El Paso. She served in many roles to further education and reading as a member of various national and international reading associations, and on committees to further technology in school libraries. In 1996 she received a grant to start a puppetry club for elementary school children to help them vocalize their feelings through puppetry. Upon retirement she moved to New Braunfels, where she was an active member in the community and volunteered at her local church and elementary schools. She enjoyed yoga and water aerobics. She is survived by her husband, Roland; two daughters and their spouses; four grandsons; and four sisters.

 

Mar, 2019
68

Robert W. King Jr. ’68, of Edmond, Okla.; Nov. 27, after a short illness. He practiced nephrology with Associates in Internal Medicine at St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City. He was also a volunteer faculty member for the OU School of Community Medicine and instrumental in bringing organ transplants to the school. He helped develop the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) and was one of the original founders of LifeShare Oklahoma organ sharing network. In 1998 he moved to New Orleans, La., where he worked as a national medical director for United Healthcare, but returned to Oklahoma City in 2007. He enjoyed being a doctor, teaching, reading, and writing. He is survived by his wife, Jeanne; three daughters; a son-in-law; and two sisters and their husbands.

 

Mar, 2019
66

Kenneth S. Muldoon ’66, of Needham, Mass.; Nov. 29. He was an attorney in a small Manhattan law firm and also practiced with the Legal Aid Society of Minneapolis and VISTA. After a time practicing law, he changed his career and became a journalist. He was an associate editor of the Star-Ledger in Newark, N.J., before moving to Massachusetts to join the Harvard Business Review. Following that he was senior writer and editor for New England Mutual Life Insurance Co. and edited a newsletter for Tufts Univ. He was a member of Chorus Pro Musica for more than 20 years, serving on its board and as its president. He performed with the chorus at Symphony Hall, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, and the Boston Garden. He also performed with the Betty Singers, who brought comfort through music to the infirm and ailing. He volunteered for Generic Ministry supporting the homeless and tutoring high school students and adults. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a son; two stepdaughters; an exchange daughter; two sisters; six grandchildren, several nieces and nephews; and his former wife, Freda Bein.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Allan T. Walsh ’65, of Philadelphia; Oct. 2. After graduate school he pursued a career in real estate development in the Southeastern and Middle Atlantic regions. At Brown, he played goalie on the men’s soccer team and was named first team All-Ivy and All-New England. He was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame in 1976. He is survived by a sister and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Roger B. Hirschland ’65, of Washington, D.C.; Aug. 18, of amyloidosis. At Brown he worked with Dr. J. Louis Giddings at Onion Portage, a major archaeological site in northwest Alaska. After Brown he spent two years in Sierra Leone in the Peace Corps., and upon his return he studied another year at Brown before entering the Navy’s Officer Candidate School in Newport. He was commissioned and deployed to the Mediterranean. He taught for eight years at the Gordon School in East Providence and eventually became vice-headmaster. Later he worked for two years in the newsroom of the Providence Journal and then joined the staff of the National Geographic Society, where he wrote and edited books and the children’s magazine, World, for eight years. For the next 14 years, he wrote and edited geography materials for students and teachers nationwide. He worked for many years on the National Geographic Society’s style committee and served as a guide and lecturer on several National Geographic excursions to Australia, New Zealand, and Europe. He also wrote a book for National Geographic in 1987 titled Animals and Their Babies. Upon retirement from National Geographic he went to work at the headquarters of the Peace Corps as an editor of teaching materials for schools across the country. He continued to edit the series Journeys in Film until the end of his life. He was a collector of model cars, trucks, fire engines, and deer antlers. Additionally, he founded a monthly newsletter for fellow car and truck enthusiasts, Capitol Miniature Auto Collectors Club Journal, and single-handedly wrote and edited most of the articles. He is survived by his wife, Sharon; a sister; a brother, Edward ’70, ’70 AM; and 10 nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
65

Edwin Farnworth ’65 of Pasadena, Calif.; Oct. 21.
 

Mar, 2019
64

Elnora Beth Livezey ’64, of Inwood, Calif.; July 9. After college she worked for two years with the civil rights movement as a field worker with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, where she initiated a Head Start program and participated in the march from Selma to Montgomery. She earned a law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1969 and was selected to serve as assistant editor on the Law Review. After law school she worked for a year for the nonprofit Center for Constitutional Rights in New York City, where she participated in the defense of the “Chicago Seven.” She later joined a pioneering law collective in Los Angeles, where she litigated some of the first Title VII cases to go to trial following the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. She moved to Shasta County, Calif., in 1979 when hired by Dugan Barr to work at his law firm handling civil lawsuits. In 1985 she became a partner in the firm of Barr, Newlan & Sinclair, but resigned in 1988 to open an independent law practice. A year later she was selected Commissioner by the Judges of the Shasta County Municipal Court. She retired in 2004. In retirement she volunteered legal expertise, was involved in a local dance group, and enrolled in Timeless Wisdom Training. She is survived by three sisters, nieces and nephews, and many friends.

Mar, 2019
64

Robert G. Bidwell ’64, of Reston, Va.; Oct. 20. He retired as special assistant to the deputy assistant secretary of the Department of Energy. He coached Reston youth soccer and basketball and enjoyed playing golf, fly-fishing, scuba diving, reading, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Sue; three sons; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Jerry Rhine ’60, of Greenwich, Conn.; Aug. 12, after a long illness. He was a commercial real estate broker and is survived by his wife, Jennifer; a daughter; a son; and a brother, Donald ’57.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Robert W. McCourt ’60, of Short Hills, N.J.; Oct. 26. He worked for 43 years in various management positions at Public Service Electric & Gas Co. in Elizabeth, N.J., planning the electrical infrastructure of Newark Liberty International Airport and the redevelopment of Liberty State Park and Ellis Island. He specialized in electromagnetic field issues management, environment, health, and safety concerns. He provided expert advice on electromagnetic field issues to the general public and media and was a proud member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He worked to raise funds for various international Catholic organizations, churches, and schools. He also enjoyed woodworking, gardening, and reading, especially books about World War II by Samuel Eliot Morison. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a son-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
60

James M. Bower ’60, of Providence; Oct. 16. He was an educator for more than 50 years, including a year at Colegio Franklin Delano Roosevelt, The American School of Lima, Peru. For several years he served as head of charter schools throughout Massachusetts and for 15 years was headmaster of Dedham Country Day School. His career concluded with a 15-year involvement with The San Miguel School in Providence, where he taught English and geography, was director of admissions, and coached baseball and chess. He served on the boards of both the Genesis Center and Hamilton House in Providence, and Family Service of Rhode Island. He enjoyed spending summers at his house in Maine with family and friends, sailing, and playing golf and tennis. He is survived by his wife, Kathleen; a daughter; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; a brother, Richard ’56, and nieces Amy Bower ’81, Sally Maenner ’84, and Emily Maenner ’16.

 

Mar, 2019
60

Ann Erpenbeck Bottelli ’60 of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Summit and Newark, N.J.; Aug. 21. She was an accounting director at Prudential Insurance in Newark. She traveled widely for Prudential sharing accounting principles with regulators and industry colleagues. She also worked independently as a graphic designer developing her own business as a practicing artist and calligrapher while raising a family in Summit. She was a longtime volunteer with the Junior League of Summit and served on the board of directors for the New Jersey Center for the Visual Arts. She enjoyed playing tennis and trail walking. She is survived by her husband, Richard; a daughter; three sons; and two daughters-in-law.
 

 

Mar, 2019
59

James Teixeira ’59, of Riverside, R.I.; Nov. 20, after a brief illness. He taught Spanish and Portuguese at Middletown High School, R.I. He traveled extensively, collected coins, stamps, postcards, and antiques, and enjoyed the theater. He is survived by his wife, Maria; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; a sister; a brother; seven nieces; and a nephew.  

 

Mar, 2019
59

Aaron Seidman ’59, of Brookline, Mass.; July 3. He had a career as a software developer, trainer, and web designer, with a great interest in art. He created his works in a wide variety of media, experimenting with new techniques. He was involved in community affairs and is survived by his wife, Ruth Kertzer Seidman ’60; sons Daniel ’88 and Joshua ’90; two daughters-in-law, including Jocelyn Guyer ’90; five grandchildren; a sister; a brother; brother-in-law David Kertzer ’69; sister-in-law Susan Kertzer ’70; nephew Seth Kertzer ’98; niece Molly Kertzer ’95; and cousins Pam Gerrol ’87, Elizabeth Braswell ’93, and Ari Johnson ’04.

 

Mar, 2019
59

Orrin M. Colley ’59, of Duxbury, Mass.; Dec. 4. He owned and operated C.H. Marsh insurance agency in Marshfield, Mass. He was an avid golfer and New England sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Helen; three daughters; six grandchildren; and a sister.
 

 

Mar, 2019
59

John F. Bennett ’59, of Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Nov. 16. He was president of Adobe Building Center prior to starting his own business in 1981, Color-Rite Building Supply, which sold to Rinker Building Materials in 1995. He was on the board of the Construction Association of South Florida for 32 years in addition to several other boards. He was instrumental in the creation of the Construction Executives Assoc. He is survived by four children, seven grandchildren, and six siblings.
 

Mar, 2019
58

John P. Hopkins ’58, of Goshen, N.H.; Nov. 13. After teaching at Northeastern Univ. and at a private school in Great Barrington, Mass., he moved to Goshen in 1964 and taught English at Stevens High School in Claremont, N.H. In 1972 he changed career paths and opened a plumbing and heating business. He was also a volunteer firefighter for more than 50 years, a selectman, a school board member, and a budget committee member. He is survived by six children, eight grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and several nieces and nephews.

Mar, 2019
57

Richard D. Thomson ’57, of Nantucket, Mass.; Nov. 22. He worked in advertising, specializing in marketing, and was known for his work with Procter & Gamble, General Mills, Ford, Unilever, Marlboro, Coca-Cola, and Oscar Mayer. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and is survived by his wife, Marilyn; three sons, including Peter ’89; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Mar, 2019
57

Leonard S. Ridley ’57, of Springville, Utah, formerly of Fairhaven, Mass.; Oct. 18. After earning a master’s degree at Boston University’s School of Social Work, he was employed in child protective services and the Rodman Job Corps Center in New Bedford, Mass. In 1968 he established a residence in Connecticut and initially worked as executive secretary on a special governor’s committee assisting in the development of a multi-faceted children’s service department. Subsequently, he worked as a psychiatric social worker at an experimental child guidance center in Hartford’s inner city. He concluded his career as a supervisor at a Connecticut psychiatric hospital for adolescents in Meriden, Conn., in 1992. He enjoyed painting, writing, and blogging poetry. He is survived by his wife, Janet; four sons; five grandchildren; and several stepchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
57

Lois Kaufman ’57, of Fullerton, Calif.; Nov. 22, of squamous cell sarcoma. She was a retired teacher and homemaker. She is survived by her husband, K. Richard Kaufman ’57; two sons; and two grandchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
56

Arnold H. Kritz ’56, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Apr. 16. After receiving his PhD in physics from Yale, he spent several years in the research industry before joining the faculty of Hunter College in 1969, where he later served as chair of the department of physics. He was recruited to the department of physics at Lehigh Univ. and served as its chair from 1991 to 1998. At the same time, he led his own research program at Lehigh on nuclear fusion. He also led large multi-institutional collaborations that included research centers across the world. For many years he was a visiting research fellow at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and held several visiting appointments at major laboratories in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Denmark, and Germany. He served on the International Advisory Committee for the Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory in China and for four years he worked at the U.S. Department of Energy in charge of the modeling and simulation branch of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. He was named a Fellow of the American Physical Society and published numerous articles and wrote two books, including Introduction to Problem Solving. In 2005 a two-day Symposium on The Future of Integrated Modeling was held in celebration of his 70th birthday. He was an active member of the Jewish communities in which he lived and was a board member of the Jewish Federation. He volunteered with the Boy Scouts of America and enjoyed hiking, camping, skiing, traveling, gardening, and playing duplicate bridge. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; two sons, including Barry ’84 ScM; two daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

 

Mar, 2019
56

Thomas E. Hazlehurst ’56, of Wakefield, R.I.; Nov. 17. He was president and CEO of Potter Hazlehurst, an advertising public relations firm in East Greenwich, R.I. He was an avid sailor, having served in the U.S. Navy, was president of the Narragansett Bay Yachting Assoc., founding secretary of Save the Bay, commodore of the East Greenwich Yacht Club, a trustee and fleet captain of the New York Yacht Club, fleet captain of Cruising Club of America, chairman of the Newport to Bermuda Race, and a member of the Rhode Island State Yachting Committee. He was a finalist for selection in sailing in the 1956 Olympics. He was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame and the Intercollegiate Yacht Racing Hall of Fame. He is survived by three daughters, six grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren.
 

 

Mar, 2019
55

David V. Yale ’55, of Wallingford, Conn.; Oct. 31. He worked at Pratt & Whitney before moving to Prudential Insurance in sales and lastly to Nationwide Insurance in claims management, where he remained until his retirement. At Brown he played varsity football and was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed playing golf. He is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
55

Alice Emmert Ward ’55, of Wellesley, Mass.; Oct. 29. She worked for many years as a chemist at Dow Chemical in Midland, Mich., and at Ciba Labs in Summit, N.J. She later taught in the computer labs in local schools, including Wellesley Middle School. She was a Girl Scout leader, Boy Scout den mother, soccer coach, and longtime supporter of Wellesley youth athletic programs. Following retirement, she was active with the Wellesley Council on Aging. She enjoyed spending summers at Big Island Pond in Derry, N.H., with family and friends. She is survived by a daughter, a son, a daughter-in-law, a son-in-law, four grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
55

Henry Juncker III ’55, of Gloucester, Mass.; Oct. 11. He taught in the Marblehead Public School system for more than 50 years. He was an active member of the Annisquam Village Church, where he served as a clerk, Sunday School teacher, and choir member. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, he was also a longtime member of the Chorus North Shore. He is survived by his wife, Judith Lamb Juncker ’58; three children and their spouses; six grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother-in-law.

 

Mar, 2019
56

Walter J. Weber Jr. ’56, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Oct. 18, after a brief illness. He joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 1963 as a professor in the departments of civil and chemical engineering. He was internationally known for his contributions to the field of environmental science and engineering, in particular the development of new and advanced technologies for treatment of water and wastewater and for water pollution control. He was the recipient of numerous awards and honors during his tenure at the Univ. of Michigan. He was named a Diplomat in the American Academy of Environmental Engineers in 1975, elected to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 1985, and named the Gordon M. Fair and Earnest Boyce Distinguished University Professor of Environmental and Ecological Sciences and Engineering in 1994. The International Science Index recognized him as the fifteenth most highly cited and quoted scientist in the world, seventh in the United States. He authored or coauthored more than 200 technical publications and mentored many engineering students and PhD students. He was a member of many professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, American Institute of Chemical Engineers, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Water Works Assoc., Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, International Association on Water Pollution Research and Control, and the Water Pollution Control Federation. He was a devoted Michigan football fan who served on the University of Michigan Athletic Advisory Board. He enjoyed traveling, yard work, and the Jersey Shore. He is survived by Iva Corbett; four daughters; six grandchildren; and a brother.

Mar, 2019
54

Vieri Guy Volterra ’54, of Boston; Nov. 16. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and graduating from Boston Univ. School of Law, he started an independent law practice in New Bedford, Mass., where he went from criminal defense attorney to public defender, assistant district attorney, and finally counsel to the mayor. For the next 27 years he was a Massachusetts judge in the Taunton District Court first, and then for 20 years with the Massachusetts Superior Court. After retiring from the court, he joined his brother’s law partnership and set up an independent neutral mediation practice. In 2009 he left the practice and joined Senior Partners for Justice/Volunteer Lawyers Project of the Massachusetts Bar Assoc. to represent indigent civil litigants in family law disputes. He was vitally engaged in issues of oppression and conflict in the U.S. and internationally. In 2002 he received the Law and Justice Award from the Commission for Social Justice, Sons of Italy in America, and in 2012 he received the Victor J. Garo Public Service Award from the B.U. School of Law. He enjoyed reading and is survived by his wife, Melanie; two children; a grandson; a brother, Max ’57; a sister-in-law; a niece and a nephew.

 

Mar, 2019
54

Barbara Hobart Mitten ’54, of Paradise Valley, Ariz.; Oct. 6. She was a homemaker and in charge of local junior tennis tournaments. She volunteered at the Maricopa County Courthouse and served on several boards, including the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation. She enjoyed being active and did aerobics as well as playing tennis and golf. She is survived by three children, two grandchildren, and a sister.

 

Mar, 2019
53

Winthrop V. Wilbur Jr. ’53, of Yarmouth Port, Mass.; Oct. 20. He owned and operated Airport Motors and Central Cape Dodge in Hyannis for more than 40 years. He represented New England for the National Lincoln-Mercury Dealer Council and the Dodge Division President’s Council and was also past president of the New England Lincoln-Mercury Dealer Assoc. and the New England Dodge Dealer Assoc. He was past commodore of the Hyannis Yacht Club, past president of Oyster Harbors Club and former chairman of the Town of Barnstable Finance Committee. He was a 65-year member and former treasurer of the Federated Church of Hyannis and a 50-year member and past master of the Howard Lodge AF&AM in South Yarmouth. He enjoyed sailing and competing in the Cruising Class Racing Division of the Hyannis Yacht Club and cruising the Bahamas and East Coast with his family. He retired in 1998 and began traveling with his wife throughout the U.S., Mexico, and Canada in their motorhome. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; two daughters; son David ’77; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; and a great-grandson.

 

Mar, 2019
53

Carl O. Rodin ’53, of Portage, Ind.; Nov. 18. He was an attorney in private practice for more than 45 years. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army, a charter president of the Portage Jaycees, and a member of Portage First United Methodist Church and the Portage VFW. He is survived by a son and his wife, eight grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Mar, 2019
53

James H. Carey ’53, of Manchester, Vt.; Oct. 23. He began his career with Chase Manhattan Bank in 1955 before moving to First Empire Bank New York in 1968. He rejoined Chase as an executive vice president in global corporate banking from 1976 to 1987, managing the bank’s finance and marketing activities for major clients worldwide. Following his time at Chase, he held senior positions at GFTA Services Corp. and Briarcliff Financial Associates, later joining Berkshire Bank as president, CEO, and founding director from 1989 to 1992. From 1993 to 1995 he served as CEO and treasurer of National Capital Benefit Corp. He retired in 2014 as director of Air Transport Services Group. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and served on several boards, including The Midland Co., The Cowen Group, the U.S. Fund for UNICEF, and the American Museum of Fly Fishing. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; daughter Jane Carey Weaver ’79; three sons, including George ’84 and David ’90, ’91 ScM; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and seven grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
52

Samuel W. Keavy ’52 of Barnstable, Mass.; Nov. 4. After serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II and graduating from Brown, he had a career as an IBM manager. During retirement he pursued his love of antiques as an antique dealer and appraiser. He enjoyed traveling, baseball, poker, and crossword puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Jean; four children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Martha Brinton Mermier ’51, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Nov. 14, of Parkinson’s disease. She tutored children and adults in reading while her own children were young, then returned to school to obtain a master’s degree in social work. She spent most of her career as a psychiatric social worker working with severely mentally ill patients at Ypsilanti Regional Psychiatric Hospital, retiring in 1989. In 1993 she published Coping with Severe Mental Illness; Families Speak Out. She enjoyed traveling all over the world and climbed Mont Blanc in Europe, hiked the 100-mile Tour de Mont Blanc, trekked in Nepal in her 60s, and hiked the Milford Track in New Zealand. She also enjoyed opera and attending performances at the Santa Fe Opera in New Mexico, Michigan Opera Theater, and the Metropolitan Opera House in New York. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, two granddaughters, a brother, and nieces and nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
51

William R. Maloney ’51, of Charlotte, N.C.; Nov. 13. He had a 34-year military career in the U.S. Marine Corps. He served with distinction on assignments in Korea, Vietnam, Okinawa, the Mediterranean, and Hawaii; taught at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis; served as a commanding general; and was deputy chief of staff for Manpower for the Marine Corps headquarters in Washington, D.C. He received numerous citations, awards, and medals for his service and retired in 1985 with the rank of lieutenant general. After retiring from the Marine Corps, he worked for the National Soft Drink Assoc. (now the American Beverage Assoc.) until 1998. During his tenure, he was appointed vice president of operations and president of InterBev, at the time one of the largest trade shows representing the beverage industry. He also continued his dedication to the military through volunteer commitments. He enjoyed reading and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, a son-in-law, and three grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Philbrick W. Dodge ’51, of North Sandwich, N.H.; Oct. 29. He worked for the Ford Motor Co. for 17 years before purchasing White’s Garage, a Ford dealership in West Ossipee, N.H. In addition to White’s Garage, he built White Mountain Subaru in West Ossipee, then relocated it to Conway, N.H. He served on the vestry of St. Andrew’s Church and enjoyed singing and playing hymns on the piano. He also enjoyed swimming, hiking, running, and playing tennis. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Frank Bednarczyk ’51, of Lewiston, Me., formerly of Warminster, Pa.; Oct. 21. He was a mechanical engineer for manufacturing company SKF in Philadelphia and in 1974 moved to Lewiston to work for Philips Elmet Corp. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran and a member of the Polish National Alliance. He is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a sister.

 

Mar, 2019
51

Graham D. Andrews ’51, of Newtown Square, Pa.; Oct. 26. For many years he was a financial advisor for Merrill Lynch in Philadelphia and Wayne, Pa. He was active in politics and served as commissioner of the Fourth Ward of Radnor Township. He was an elder, trustee and deacon at various times at Wayne Presbyterian Church and was active on several boards, including St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children and the Delaware County Medical Society Public Health Fund. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Navy. He was a proud Philadelphia Flyers season ticket holder and enjoyed spending time on the water with family. He is survived by his wife, Jean; three daughters, including Margaret Andrews Rosecky ’86; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a brother; a niece and two nephews.

 

Mar, 2019
50

Lea Guyer Gordon ’50, of Litchfield, Conn.; Sept. 19. She was employed for more than 30 years as a researcher, reporter, and editor at Newsweek and Time magazines and Time Life Books. She later worked at Meriwether Press and Macmillan Publishers as a nonfiction editor and then as a senior freelance editor at Reader’s Digest. In retirement, after taking courses in appraising antiques and decorative arts, she began working as a self-employed fine arts appraiser and became a member of the Appraisers Association of America.

 

Mar, 2019
50

Peter G. Fradley ’50, of New Paltz, N.Y., formerly of Westport, Mass., and Barrington, R.I.; Oct. 23, after a short illness. He was a retired editorial writer for the Providence Journal specializing in civil rights, health, and education. He also wrote an outdoor column for the ProJo’s Sunday Leisure magazine. In 1982 he was the first prize recipient for editorial writing awarded by the New England Associated Press News Executives Assoc. While at Brown, he wrote for the Brown Daily Herald and was a member of Phi Delta Theta. From 1976 to 1980 he was a member of the BAM board of editors. A veteran of the U.S. Army, he is survived by his wife, Joan; two daughters; son Kenneth ’76; two grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
 

Mar, 2019
50

Clifford J. Colville Jr. ’50, of Scarborough, Me.; Nov. 21. He worked briefly in banking, then was hired in 1952 as director of admissions for Nasson College in Springvale, Me. He held that position for 12 years and as a side business opened an Arthur Murray Dance studio. In the mid-1960s he changed careers and worked as a financial consultant and stockbroker with Clayton Securities of Portland. He retired in 1996. A longtime member of the North Parish Congregational Church in Sanford, he sang in the choir for 40 years and served as a deacon, a trustee, and on several church committees. He was past president of the Sanford Rotary and the Sanford-Springvale YMCA. He is survived by a son, two grandchildren, and a brother.

 

Mar, 2019
49

Carl R. Ostroff ’49, of Canton, Mass.; Oct. 28. He was the former president of Abrams Bros., Inc, a carpet distributor in Natick, Mass. An avid Boston Red Sox fan, he passed away peacefully minutes after watching the Red Sox win the 2018 World Series. He also enjoyed traveling and his friendships with his Pi Lambda Phi fraternity brothers. He is survived by two sons, including Michael ’76; two daughters-in-law, including Joanne Topol ’77; and four grandchildren, including Alexander Ostroff ’14.

 

Mar, 2019
49

Helvi Olen Moyer ’49, of South Windsor, Conn.; Nov. 11. She retired from The Travelers Insurance Co. in South Windsor in 1983 as assistant manager. She is survived by her husband, Robert A. Moyer ’50; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

 

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