Obituaries

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Stuart E. Rosenbaum ’72 PhD, of Hewitt, Tex.; Dec. 14. He taught American philosophy for 40 years at Baylor University and  for many years  was director of Baylor’s graduate program in philosophy, where  he was the key figure in designing its PhD program. He served multiple terms on the Faculty Senate and twice earned Baylor’s Outstanding Faculty Member Award. He led Baylor’s summer program at Oxford for a few years. He retired from the department of philosophy in 2019. He wrote Pragmatism and the Reflective Life (2009); Recovering Integrity: Moral Thought in AmericanPragmatism (2015); and  Race, Justine, and American Intellectual  Traditions (2018). He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Frank L. Mott ’72 PhD, of Bexley, Ohio; Dec. 31. His work in demography led him to Lagos, Nigeria, where he helped develop the Population Center at the University of Lagos. In 1975 he joined the Ohio State University faculty and its Center for Human Resource Research. There he helped manage national longitudinal surveys. He was an internationally respected researcher in demography and recipient of many honors. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Lester J. Libby ’72 PhD, of Quincy, Mass., formerly of Virginia; Dec. 30. He taught at UNC then worked for the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind and the Department of Social Services. He later worked as a research analyst for the federal government in Washington, D.C. He enjoyed reading and drawing and is survived by his wife, Joyce.

Jun, 2021
GS 72

John L. Keedy ’72 MAT (see ’66).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1972, Class of 1966
Jun, 2021
GS 72

James C. Hogan ’72 PhD, of North Haven, Conn.; Jan. 22. He taught elementary and high school science in Sparta, Georgia, until 1966. After obtaining his advanced degrees, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the biology department at Yale and a research associate in pathology at Yale School of Medicine, then took a position at Howard University School of Medicine in 1976. In 1978 he joined the UConn faculty and developed and implemented the Health Science Cluster Program, a summer enrichment program for state high school students. He was also an assistant professor at the UConn School of Allied Health, and became director of minority student affairs. More recently, he was responsible for running the lab for Connecticut’s Department of Public Health. He retired in 2009. He presented at conferences internationally and published in major scientific journals. Notably, he authored an award-winning article entitled  “Lead Poison Prevention in Young Children: A National Tragedy.”  He was the recipient of multiple awards and is included in the second edition of 2000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th Century. He was a founder and past president of the Black Healthcare Professionals Network (Hartford), the Connecticut Chapter of the National Technical Association, and the North Haven Association of Black Citizens. He founded the Immanuel Baptist Church Academy of Math and Science and was the first African American to be elected to the Board of Education in North Haven, Connecticut. He was a member of the band The Carvettes, playing saxophone and clarinet, and Omega Psi Phi. He is survived by his wife, Izola; a daughter; two sons; six granddaughters; a sister; three brothers; and many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 70

P. Dwight Sherman Jr. ’70 PhD, of Johnson City, Tenn.; Dec. 20. In 1968, he began working at Union Carbide Chemical Company in South Charleston, W.Va. He served in various roles, advancing to lead the Union Carbide South Charleston Technical Center site. When he retired, he was serving as Union Carbide’s link to the West Virginia legislature, public, and media as director of public affairs. He retired in 2001. He also held board positions at the United Way of Central West Virginia from 1993 to 2011 and served as vice chairman of the board of directors for MATRIC, a West Virginia-based technology development organization that he helped found. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; two daughters and sons-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Andrew C. Twaddle ’68 PhD, of Columbia, Mo.; Dec. 2, of COVID. In 1971, he joined the University of Missouri with a joint appointment in sociology and behavioral science. He previously served on the faculties of College of the Holy Cross (sociology), Harvard Medical School (preventive medicine), Massachusetts General Hospital (medicine), and the University of Pennsylvania (sociology and community medicine). He also held visiting faculty appointments at Northeastern Univ., University of Western Ontario, various universities in Sweden, and Colby College in Maine. He retired in 2001. He was an avid sailor and amateur photographer, sang in the University of Missouri’s choral union, and enjoyed researching ancestry. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; two daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Sarita Gattis Schotta ’68 PhD, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Aug. 5. She is survived by a sister-in-law and 12 nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Richard C. Drey ’68 MAT, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Jan. 11. He taught for two years at Reading High School and then attended Brown on a National Science Foundation Grant, receiving his master’s in mathematics. Richard then joined the faculty at Northampton Community College and served for 32 years as a professor of mathematics. He was treasurer for the East Allen Twp. Volunteer Fire Dept., coached East Allen soccer, and was a fan of the Cincinnati Reds. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann; two daughters; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 66

Dorothy F. Donnelly ’66 AM, of Providence; Dec. 23. She was an English professor at URI for four decades and chair of the department for 12 years. She was involved with two unions, the URI AAUP full-time faculty union and the URI Part-Time Faculty United. She was cofounder of Changing Lives Through Literature, Rhode Island chapter. In the 1960s, she traveled to Alabama in support of the Civil Rights Movement. She was the recipient of the Woman of the Year award from the URI Association of Professional and Academic Women, the Excellence in Teaching award, and the Rhode Island Labor History Society award for lifelong achievement. She is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
66

Beth Randall Arnold ’66 MAT, of West Chester, Pa.; Dec. 9, of organ failure due to COPD, congenital heart disease, and osteomyelitis. During her career she held several positions, including high school teacher, college career counselor, social worker, and transportation coordinator for the disabled. She was active in her community and volunteered with Friends of Valley Forge explaining colonial history in dresses she’d sewn herself. In later years she joined the P.E.O. Sisterhood, raising money for women in higher education. She enjoyed cooking, traveling, and genealogy. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two grandsons, and a brother-in-law and sister-in-law.

Jun, 2021
GS 64

Elizabeth Ballantine Gardner ’64 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Wellesley, Mass.; Dec. 1. She taught at Queens College in Flushing, N.Y., and Wellesley College before settling into a 50-year career teaching at Pine Manor College, where she also chaired the science department. She endowed a wildlife viewing site at J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida and established a scholarship for nurse practitioners at Newton Wellesley Hospital. Her interest in her mother’s family’s well-documented history led her to oversee the distribution of family papers, objects, and photographs to institutions where they could be used for research by the public. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Catherine Rodgers Myers ’63 PhD, of Wellfleet, Mass.; Jan. 27, of complications from a stroke. After teaching at Bryn Mawr College, she joined the English department of Manhattanville College in 1968, retiring in 2005. Over the years she served as dean of students, dean of faculty, and twice as provost. She volunteered with the Wellfleet Harbor Actors’ Theater, giving lectures introducing productions of the Metropolitan Opera. She volunteered at the Massachusetts Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, and a nephew. 

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Darnell C. McCauley ’63 MAT, of New Haven, Conn., formerly of Providence; Jan. 16. During his senior year at Livingstone College he became the pastor of Stewards Chapel in Rural Hall, N.C. Upon his return to Providence, he served as pastor of A.M.E. Zion Church and was ordained into the Christian Church on Sept. 3, 1953. He obtained further degrees, such as as a bachelor of sacred theology from Boston University and doctor of education from Nova University. His many educational positions culminated in retiring as vice principal at Roger Williams Middle School in 1989. In 1971, the local chapter of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity named him Rhode Island Educator of the Year. He is survived by seven siblings and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Joan C. Kauttu ’63 ScM, of North Canaan, Conn.; June 17, 2020. She taught anatomy to medical school students and then helped her husband run a resort in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. After divorcing, she returned to North Canaan to care for her parents.

Jun, 2021
GS 62

Anthony L. Scotto ’62 ScM, of Narragansett, R.I.; Jan. 2. He taught science and biology at La Salle Academy in Providence. He entered the Brothers of the Christian Schools in 1959. He had teaching and administrative roles at De La Salle Academy in Newport, R.I.; La Salle Military Academy in Oakdale, N.Y.; Bishop Bradley High School in Manchester, N.H.; Christian Brothers Academy in Lincroft, N.J.; and La Salle Center in Oakdale, N.Y.

Jun, 2021
GS 61

Donald E. Miller ’61 AM, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Jan. 6., after a long illness. He was a successful university development officer, raising millions of dollars in funds for both the University of Michigan and Boston University. He was a world traveler and writer, visiting many countries on multiple continents, and had a special connection to the former Czechoslovakia. In 1967, he was a first-hand witness to the Prague Spring and, years later, had the opportunity to interview Vaclav Havel. Throughout the 1990s he lived part-time in Slovakia. He rescued cats and compiled many short stories about his animal companions in a book entitled Callie and Me. He was an avid swimmer and is survived by a sister, a brother, four nieces, and a nephew.

Jun, 2021
60

Barry M. Mitchell ’60 PhD, of Kingston, N.J.; Jan. 26. He was a mathematician whose career included teaching at Columbia University, Bowdoin College, and Rutgers University. He authored two textbooks, Calculus Without Analytic Geometry and The Theory of Categories. He is survived by friends and family in Canada.

Jun, 2021
GS 59

Ann J. Nelson ’59 MAT (see ’56).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1959, Class of 1956
Jun, 2021
GS 58

Donald H. Fortnum ’58 PhD, of Gettysburg, Pa.; Feb. 2. He began teaching chemistry at Ursinus College in 1958. In 1965 he joined the chemistry faculty at Gettysburg College and was appointed a full professor in 1972, when  he was also selected to Outstanding Educators of America. He retired in 2000. At Gettysburg his final exams were filled with challenging equations but also inspiring quotations and jokes served with a table full of snacks, including homemade chocolate chip cookies—his motto being “when the chips are down, down the chips.” A member of the Gettysburg United Methodist Church, he was active in leadership roles and taught Sunday school classes for many years. He enjoyed photography and participating in the Washington Apple Pi and the Keystone MacCentral user’s groups. He is survived by four children and their spouses, four grandchildren, two brothers and their spouses, and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 58

Conrad P. Caligaris ’58 AM, ’61 PhD, of Franklin, Mass.; Feb. 19. He was an economics professor at Northeastern University for 30 years. He had previously taught at Boston College and the University of Maine. He enjoyed spending time at the Franklin Senior Center, where he played cribbage. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, four sons and daughters-in-law, and 13 grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
GS 56

James R. Trew ’56 ScM, of Fayetteville, N.C.; Jan. 25. He worked for Standard Oil Company of Texas as a subsurface geologist before entering the U.S. Air Force as a technical intelligence officer. Following military service, he was associate chief librarian at Space Technology Laboratories in California. In 1962, he began a 36-year career at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., retiring in 1996 as the director of the Library of Congress Integrated Support Services, providing advice on facility planning and collection storage to librarians and archivists throughout the world. He coached football and basketball and enjoyed hiking and camping. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and seven grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
GS 52

Robert Burger ’52 ScM, ’55 PhD, of Cary, N.C.; Nov. 29. He joined the U.S. Navy at 16 years of age during World War II. After the war he graduated from William & Mary College and Brown. As a physicist, he was a pioneer in the emerging field of solid state electronics and worked in the early years of NASA’s Apollo program. He was recruited to North Carolina by the Research Triangle Institute in 1962 and later cofounded the Semiconductor Research Corporation, which was presented the National Medal of Technology by President George W. Bush in 2005. He is survived by his wife, Marian; two children and their spouses; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and four siblings.

Jun, 2021
GS 50

Werner R. Britsch ’50 ScM (see ’49).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1950, Class of 1949
Jun, 2021
GS 82

Christina Crosby ’82 PhD, of Middletown, Conn.; Jan. 5, of pancreatic cancer. As an undergraduate she attended Swarthmore College, wrote a column called The Feminist Slant for the student newspaper and helped found Swarthmore Gay Liberation. At Brown, she was part of a socialist feminist caucus that focused on such issues as domestic violence. She and the caucus established a hotline for battered women and in 1976 founded Sojourner House, a domestic violence agency based in Providence. She worked in Wesleyan University’s English department and became a central part of the University’s women’s studies program, which she helped establish as a major and later helped redesign as feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. She received Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 1994 and in 2003 the University faculty elected her chair of the department. She published the novel The Ends of History: Victorians and “the Woman Question” (Routledge, 1990) and after a 2003 bicycle accident that left her paralyzed, she published A Body, Undone: Living on After Great Pain (NYU Press, 2016). Her BAM essay, “Others Stop Looking,” appeared in November/December 2016. She is survived by her partner Janet Jakobsen.

Jun, 2021
GS 49

Jeffrey J. Bowe ’49 AM, of Boston; Feb. 3. He worked at Air Force Cambridge Research Center, where he served as part of the Semiconductor Advisory Group with senior representatives selected from throughout the industry and government to review and approve all government semiconductor research contracts, while also advising the President’s office on the latest industry developments. He joined Sperry (Conn.) in 1959 as director of research, specializing in silicon integrated circuits, before accepting a position with Radio Corporation of America in 1962 to oversee the development of thin film transistors. In 1966 he was offered a position with NASA overseeing its Electronic Research Center in Cambridge, where his team used newly developed mathematical statistical analyses to test the efficiency, stability, and reliability of the integrated circuits designed for use in the Apollo space program. After NASA’s Cambridge location closed in 1970, he joined the Department of Transportation Systems. He retired from the DOT in 1978 and began teaching at Bunker Hill Community College in Charlestown and was invited to spend a semester teaching physics at Technical University of Budapest in 1987. He retired from Bunker Hill in 1998. He published more than 150 articles and held a dozen patents. He is survived by his wife, Marion; six children and their spouses; 17 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
21

Maximilian Y. Lenail ’21, of Palo Alto, Calif.; Jan. 29. He was to graduate from Brown in May 2021 with a concentration in neurobiology, and planned on applying to medical school and becoming a physician. Max had worked in several research labs at Stanford Medicine and for the neuroscience company Inscopix. He participated in many service trips to Central America with the Menlo Church and will be remembered as a peacemaker and for his extraordinary kindness and generosity. He was an exceptional athlete and outdoorsman and had a passion for rock-climbing. He was also a glassblower and chef. He is survived by his parents, grandparents, a brother, two aunts and an uncle. 

Jun, 2021
11

Andrew Migneault ’11, of Bellingham, Mass.; Jan. 25. He obtained his master’s in agronomy at the University of Florida while doing research on sugar cane with USDA in Florida. At the time of his death, he was working on his PhD at the University of Melbourne working on plant genetics. He is survived by his parents and a sister. 

Jun, 2021
94

Paul C. Bozzuto ’94, of Alpharetta, Ga.; Jan. 28. He was employed at KeyBank in Cleveland, Ohio, then joined Franklin Templeton in California before working for the Federal Reserve in Virginia. In 2006, he moved to Alpharetta to be the leader of Invesco’s Continuous Improvement Division. A former member of Brown’s baseball team, he played, coached, and umpired baseball games, as well as coaching youth basketball. He is survived by his wife, Megan; three sons; two brothers; and numerous family members. 

Jun, 2021
89

Greg S. Hallisey ’89, of McLean, Va.; Aug. 7, 2020, following a two-year battle with renal cell carcinoma. After working in Washington for the House Banking Committee, he earned his MBA at Dartmouth College’s Amos Tuck School of Business. He had a business career in strategy and finance at Citibank, Yum Brands, LG&E, Eaton Manufacturing, and Raytheon. His passion was playing and refereeing water polo. He is survived by his wife, Cece; three daughters; his mother; three siblings and their spouses; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
86

David W. Griego ’86, of Providence; Jan. 6. He taught legal math for many years to pre-law students at The Princeton Review and was head of the math department of Squared School Academy of Mathematics in Providence, a school for students gifted in math. A chess prodigy, he won numerous state and national titles in his teens, including New England Co-Champion, ranked third in the U.S. in the 18-and-under category, and was a National Master at age 15. While at Moses Brown School, he led the team to three Rhode Island High School crowns and earned the title of FIDE Master. He was a talented flute player, a member of Mensa and Intertel, and superintendent for the Sunday School of Saints Sahag & Mesrob Armenian Church. He is survived by his parents, a sister, and two nephews.

Jun, 2021
79

Terrence M. Dunn ’79, of New York City; Jan. 18. He graduated from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and was a founding partner of the law firm Einbinder and Dunn. He was an active member of the ABA Forum on Franchising. He wrote a self-published novel, Out Beyond the Verrazano, and maintained an active blog where he posted thoughtful and heartfelt reflections. He was an avid runner and completed several half-marathons. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a daughter; a son; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece and nephew. 

Jun, 2021
79

Brian J. Buckley ’79, of Worcester, Mass.; Dec. 25, after a long battle with progressive supranuclear palsy. A former member of Brown’s crew and rugby teams, he graduated from Suffolk University Law School and he was an assistant district attorney in Worcester County and an associate at Seder and Chandler. In 1989, he and his father John started the Buckley Law Firm. In 1997, Brian joined Fletcher Tilton PC and practiced law for the next 25 years. He dedicated his time and leadership talents to many local organizations, including the Worcester Public Library, Massachusetts Bar Association, Worcester Regional Research Bureau, St. John’s Food for the Poor, and Worcester Jewish Community Center. He was also involved with the Brown Club of Worcester, the Judicial Nominating Council Executive Committee, and the Worcester Civic Center Commission. He is survived by his wife, Ann Marie; three children; sisters Martha Rizzoli ’80 and Eirinn J.B. Campaniello ’89; a brother-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
77

Sylvia E. Shortt ’77, of Athens, Ga.; Dec. 17, after a brief illness. After Brown, she earned a master’s degree and became a counselor at West Georgia College, now known as the University of West Georgia. She was an adviser to its International Student Program, expanding the program, and retired as associate director of International Services and Programs in December 2012, then served as a volunteer alumni coordinator for the UWG Alumni Association. She was instrumental in developing the American College Counseling Association and served as the organization’s president, treasurer, and conference chair. She was involved in many professional organizations and won numerous awards and recognitions. In retirement she became a member of Athens Rotary. She is survived by her partner Robin Mullinix; a daughter, and several cousins.

Jun, 2021
74

Gary E. Wilcox ’74, of Wilmette, Ill.; Feb. 15, of metastatic melanoma. After Brown, he attended Dickinson School of Law and became a prosecuting attorney in Delaware County. Following a move to Chicago, he worked as a litigator with Peterson, Ross, Schlerb & Seidel, and later with Hardt & Stern. He enjoyed playing squash and tennis, competing in—and winning—numerous squash tournaments through the Racquet Club of Chicago. He also enjoyed auto racing, fishing, and music, and had a deep love of art, cultivating his own artistry in both photography and pottery. He is survived by his wife, Julie; three children; a sister; a brother; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2021
73

Alan Mansfield ’73, of New York City; Jan. 11. After receiving his JD in 1978 from Duke University School of Law, where he was editor of the Duke Law Journal, he was a member of the executive committee at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, where he had also served as cochair of global litigation practice. He joined the firm in 1994 and his legal practice spanned more than 42 years. His work centered around complex civil litigation, constitutional law, and white-collar criminal litigation matters. He represented clients in diverse industries in litigation matters ranging from product liability and corporate and securities to defamation and fraud. He was involved in many professional organizations and was a life fellow of The American Bar Foundation, a fellow of The New York Bar Foundation, and a mediator in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He was a trustee of Lexington School for the Deaf/Center for the Deaf and a member of the board of directors at Mobilization for Justice, a provider of free legal assistance to low-income New Yorkers, serving as a chair from 2006-2008. His recognitions included being listed in the Best Lawyers in American Commercial Litigation and in Super Lawyers magazine. He is survived by his wife, Susan, and two sons, including Daniel ’15 MPH. 

Jun, 2021
73

Charles G. Dyke ’73, of San Francisco; Dec. 2. He was a writer and a musician and is survived by a sister, four step-siblings, and four nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
72

Richard E. Whikehart ’72, of Philadelphia; Nov. 3. He spent many years of research in clinical psychiatry and was department head of psychiatry at Abington Hospital in Philadelphia, along with operating a private psychiatric practice.

Jun, 2021
70

Mark P. Pasek ’70, of Houston; Feb. 15, from heart disease. He completed his master’s in biochemistry at the University of Chicago in 1973 and his PhD in biochemistry in 1975. Between 1975 to 1979, he was an American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard before being hired by Biogen, SA in 1979. For the next two years, he worked in Biogen SA’s recombinant DNA laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. By 1981, U.S. regulators allowed Biogen to do its research in the United States and he returned to Cambridge, Mass., where he helped open Biogen, Inc.’s new Cambridge lab and became Biogen’s senior scientist until 1991. His lab was awarded the Presidential Medal of Science and Technology in 1998 by President Clinton “for the development of hepatitis B vaccines, the first vaccines using recombinant DNA technology.” He was awarded four patents and he authored several publications. He is survived by a daughter, a son, his mother, and brother David ’76. 

Jun, 2021
70

Robert A. Clifford ’70, of Walpole, Mass.; Jan. 19, from COVID. He taught for 38 years at Norwood High School. At Brown, he was a member of the hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Marie; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three stepchildren and their spouses; a sister; two brothers, including Thomas ’68; six grandchildren; and a niece and nephew. 

Jun, 2021
69

 Joseph P. Woodford ’69, of Fairfax, Va.; Dec. 6. After Brown, he continued his postgraduate studies at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. During his time serving in the Navy, he was honored with numerous commendations, medals, and ribbons for his meritorious service. He retired in 1996. Following his retirement, he became the senior advisor to the Northern Virginia Association of Rocketry and volunteered in schools. He is survived by his wife, Consuela; three children; two grandchildren; and five siblings.

Jun, 2021
68

Michael F. Maznicki ’68, of West Warwick, R.I.; Jan. 7. He had a long career in banking. At Brown he was a three-sport athlete. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He played with various semi-fast pitch softball teams for many years and was inducted into the West Warwick Wizards Hall of Fame. An avid golfer, he was a longtime member of West Warwick Country Club and Cranston Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021
67

Paul R. Peller ’67, of Menomonie, Wisc.; Feb. 15. He was a retired workplace inspector with the State of New York. He was an avid reader and liked to crochet. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law and a niece. 

Jun, 2021
67

Mollie E. Harris Farmer ’67, of Kingston, Pa.; Jan. 9. After Brown, she continued her studies at the Université de Poitiers in Tours, France. She began her teaching career at College Misericordia and later joined the faculty of King’s College as adjunct instructor in the department of foreign languages and literature. In 2001, she became director of King’s College Study Abroad Program, a position she held until her retirement in 2014. She volunteered for many years, focusing mainly on the arts and tutoring, and was named Volunteer of the Year by the Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. She is survived by a daughter, a son, three grandchildren, her mother, three siblings, and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
66

John L. Keedy ’66, ’72 MAT, of Louisville, Ky.; Dec. 25, of complications related to COVID and Parkinson’s. After graduation, he took a position at the Punahou School in Hawaii as a Latin teacher, taught Latin at private schools in the States, traveled to Europe, Mexico, and North Africa, and then started his own roofing and painting business. In his 30s he returned to graduate school and then taught history at public schools in Massachusetts. He later worked as a school administrator, then as an associate professor of education at West Georgia College. He later became an associate professor at North Carolina State University and retired as a full professor at the University of Louisville. He researched, published, taught, and directed many doctoral dissertations throughout his career. He enjoyed playing tennis and sailing. He is survived by his companion Karen Gordon; a daughter; a sister; a brother; and his former wife, Cathy Meine.

Related classes:
Class of 1966, GS Class of 1972
Jun, 2021
66

Frederick Bopp III ’66, of Downingtown, Pa.; Dec. 22. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1966 to 1970, which included time served in Vietnam. He received his master’s and then his PhD in geology from the University of Delaware in 1973 and 1980. He was the senior geologist and vice president of the geosciences department at Roy F. Weston Inc. in West Chester, Pa., from 1979 to 1996, and retired in 2015 as a geological consultant. He enjoyed singing in the United Methodist Church of West Chester Chancel Choir and the Chester County Choral Society. He also enjoyed cooking and reading. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two children; and a grandson.

Jun, 2021
66

Francis W. Bogaczyk ’66, of Austin, Tex.; Jan. 4, from complications of bladder cancer. He worked at IBM for one year before being drafted into the U.S. Army. He returned home and continued at IBM, retiring after 30 years. He is survived by his wife Sandra; a daughter; a son; and a grandson. 

Jun, 2021
65

Mark I. Tafeen ’65, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Mar. 29, 2020. 

Jun, 2021
63

William McManus ’63, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Jan. 30, of COVID. He pursued a doctor of dental surgery degree from Columbia University and received the Ella Marie Ewell medal for proficiency in dentistry. He was a captain in the U.S. Army in the dental corps during the Vietnam War, then moved to East Hampton and practiced general dentistry from 1970 to 2006. He was president of the dental staff at Southampton Hospital and a member of the New York Academy of Dentistry. He also served as president of the East Hampton Lion’s Club. He retired to Vero Beach and enjoyed fishing, clamming, hunting, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two daughters; and three grandsons. 

Jun, 2021
63

Martha A. Wise Chattin ’63, of Gardner, Mass.; Feb. 13, of COVID. After earning a master’s degree in social work from Boston College, she embarked on a 20-year career providing care and counsel to people experiencing homelessness, mental illness, and developmental disability, as well as to prisoners, veterans, and the elderly. She enjoyed singing and piano playing and was a music teacher, an organist, and choir director at the Phillipston Congregational Church. For several years she worked with her husband at the Fernald School for the Developmentally Disabled, later named the Templeton Developmental Center, where they led a choir and Christian service for residents. She is survived by four sons and their spouses, eight grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter. 

Jun, 2021
62

John R. Simpson Jr. ’62, of Dalton, Pa.; Jan. 20. He attended the Yale School of Drama before starting his acting career at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minn. He worked at many national repertory theaters, appeared in several Broadway productions, including Find Your Way Home and Sly Fox, and played a judge on Law & Order for more than 10 years. He was a member of Psi Upsilon, Actors Equity Association, SAG-AFTRA and the Clemo Hunting and Fishing Club and served as president of the Cherry Ridge Corp. He enjoyed telling stories and cooking. He is survived by his partner Dawn M. Richards; two daughters, including Phoebe Simpson Bean ’93; a stepson; four grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
62

G. Arthur Padmore Jr. ’62, of Cary, N.C., formerly of Wilmington, Del., and Monrovia, Liberia; Jan. 7. After graduating from Brown, he returned to Liberia and obtained his law degree from the University of Liberia. Because of his lifelong love of music, he became a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and cofounder of the WAVE, a popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time. He also hosted the popular jazz radio show, Music for Moderns. Before leaving the country in 1980, he owned and operated a law practice and was general manager of Liberia Amusements Ltd. Once in the U.S., he settled in Delaware and sold insurance. Eventually, he served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for 15 years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the public advocate for the State of Delaware. He retired in 2010 and moved to Cary. He is survived by his wife, Pairlene; three daughters and their spouses; and four granddaughters.

Jun, 2021
62

A. Michael Honer ’62, of Asheboro N.C.; Feb. 9. He was an engineer in manufacturing and quality control. He had a private pilot’s license and owned his own airplane and logged more than 2,200 hours in the air traveling throughout the U.S. He was involved in amateur radio for 65 years and also enjoyed metal working, photography, and motor camping. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021
62

Archie Q. Frost ’62, of Gwynn, Va.; Feb. 14. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he worked in sales and retired from Tredegar Industries, formerly known as Crown, Cork & Seal. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; a son; a stepson; five grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
62

David B. Casey ’62, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Dec. 10. He received his master’s degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Business in 1964 and served as an administrator and chief financial officer for the Rhode Island Department of Health for 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; six children and their spouses, including son Christopher ’03; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.

Jun, 2021
62

Nelson P. Bowsher II ’62, of Washington, D.C.; Jan. 4, of complications from COVID. While at Brown he was co-editor-in-chief of the Brown Daily Herald and worked as a reporter for the Providence Journal. In 1966 he moved to Washington, D.C., to write for Congressional Quarterly and the National Journal. In his professional life he advocated for affordable housing and community-based economic development. He worked for NeighborWorks, served on the boards of national nonprofits, and volunteered with local housing groups. After retiring, he became a master gardener and volunteered at the Polly Hill Arboretum on Martha’s Vineyard and at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He is survived by his wife, Sally Steenland; son David Bowsher ’95; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
61

Nicholas B. Willard ’61, of Wayland, Mass.; Feb. 5, of Parkinson’s. Following graduation, he began a career in printing and packaging. He was the national account sales manager and plant manager with Container Corporation of America, president of Rand Whitney Corporation, and president of NS Converters. He was active in the Wayland community, serving on the personnel board and economic development committee. He enjoyed solving the New York Times crossword puzzle, playing golf and tennis, and following the Red Sox and Celtics and Patriots. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three daughters; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
61

John N. Tine ’61, of Kitty Hawk, N.C.; Dec. 28. After Brown, he began working with C&P Telephone, later finishing his career with Bell Atlantic in Rome, Italy. He retired to Kitty Hawk in 1993. He was a member of Delta Phi fraternity and enjoyed golfing, skiing, and traveling. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and a sister.

Jun, 2021
61

Robert W. Streett ’61, of Clayton, Mo.; Feb. 13. He was an entrepreneur, lifelong learner, and world traveler. After graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and rose to the rank of First Lieutenant. He sang in the August Opera Festival Chorus and was a member of the Missouri Choral Society. He served on the boards of Central Institute for the Deaf and the French heritage organization Les Amis and was a member of the vestry of the Church of St. Michael and St. George. He is survived by his wife, Liza; two daughters; five granddaughters; and two brothers, including Ken ’58.

Jun, 2021
61

Charles F. Rood ’61, of Tucson; Dec. 26. As an engineer, he had careers that led him to practical applications in big companies, managing a federal project, and finally financial advising with a certified financial planner designation. He served in the U.S. Navy and he enjoyed sailing with his wife. He was a former president of the YMCA and a board member of the United Way and the American Silver Museum in Connecticut. He is survived by his wife, Shane.

Jun, 2021
61

Sandra Nelson Roberts ’61, of Chelmsford, Mass.; Jan. 4. She worked for Northern Essex Community College in the 1980s and was the director of its Center for Business and Industry until her retirement in 1998. She was president of the Open Gate Garden Club for many years and enjoyed painting landscapes, reading, music, and singing. She is survived by her husband, David; a son, a son-in-law; a granddaughter; and a sister.

Jun, 2021
61

Keith C. Humphreys ’61, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Feb. 8. After graduation, he served in the U.S. Navy as a supply officer on the USS Jupiter in Japan. He then served as a Naval Reserve officer for 30 years, retiring with the rank of captain. He had a career in retail banking and commercial real estate in Newport, R.I. and Fall River, Mass., and was a community volunteer. He enjoyed woodworking and train travel through China, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. He is survived by his wife, Maris; three children; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
61

Nancy Ferguson Downer ’61, of Billings, Mont.; Dec. 13, of complications of dementia. After moving to Billings in 1976 and receiving a master’s degree in counseling from Montana State University Billings, she counseled students for many years. She was passionate about helping junior high and high school students to overcome personal difficulties and strive for advanced education. She was active in her church and sang in the Billings Chorale for more than 30 years. She also enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, Larry; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
60

Wilber L. Stadele ’60, of Belle Mead, N.J.; Dec. 26, of cancer. Like his father and grandfather before him, he worked in the church organ industry. In his lifetime, he installed more than 2,500 organs for churches, homes, and events. One of his proudest career highlights was setting up the organ for Pope Benedict XVI’s 2008 Papal Mass at Yankee Stadium. When not designing and installing organs, he enjoyed restoring antique furniture, collecting art, and making improvements to his historic farm. At Brown he wrote for the Brown Daily Herald. He is survived by six children, including daughter Marjorie Stadele ’87; 12 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and sister Marjorie Stadele Aamodt ’51 ScM.

Jun, 2021
60

Benjamin V. Lambert ’60, of New York City; Jan. 31. He worked selling fabrics in Manhattan’s garment district before landing a job at a mortgage firm. In 1967 he founded Eastdil with the idea of bringing an investment banking approach to real estate brokerage. Eastdil Secured is known for iconic and record-breaking deals including the purchase of Irvine Ranch and sales of the GM building, Embarcadero Center, and Helmsley portfolio. Beyond his involvement with Eastdil, he was an adviser to several corporate boards and organizations, including the Irvine Company and Hilton Hotels Corporation. He was also a founder and chairman of the Harlem Day Charter School and a member of Brown’s board of trustees. He is survived by his wife, Linda; daughters Alexa Lambert ’85, Lauren Lambert ’88, and Hilary Lambert ’91; two sons-in-law; stepson Oliver Lloyd ’03; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren, including Jack Parker ’18 and Grace Parker ’21; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
60

Carlton F. Andrus ’60, of Alexandria, Va.; Feb. 7. After graduating, he moved to Washington, D.C., spent five months on the staff of Sen. Everett M. Dirksen, and became active in the D.C. Young Republicans, serving as their treasurer in 1965. Following work on the 1968 election and 1969 inauguration of President Richard M. Nixon, he joined the former Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and worked for seven years in a variety of legislative positions, then as a legislative assistant to Senators Harry F. Byrd and Robert C. Byrd. In 1981 he transferred to the Government Accountability Office, retiring in 2006 as deputy budget officer. He sang in three church choirs and in 2008 joined the Mt. Vernon Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, the Harmony Heritage Singers, and served as its president. He participated in the Meals-On-Wheels program and was active in the Alexandria chapter of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association, where he held leadership positions including president. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; four daughters and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; a sister; and a brother. 

Jun, 2021
59

Judith Cohen Zacek ’59, of Newton, Mass.; Jan. 22. Prior to her retirement in March 2020, she served as community relations manager at the Arc of Massachusetts for 16 years, and also served as the administrator for Advocates for Autism of Mass. from their inception in 2004. She previously owned a travel agency, was passionate about politics and the arts, and enjoyed British dramas on PBS and Jeopardy! She is survived by a daughter. 

Jun, 2021
59

Richard J. Ramsden ’59, of Lyme, N.H. Dec. 20. After a career on Wall Street and serving as a White House Fellow during the Nixon administration, he moved on to education finance as the founding executive director of the Consortium on Financing Higher Education in Hanover, N.H. From 1977 to 1982 he was vice president for administration and finance and then senior vice president and CFO at Brown, and from 1983 to 1994 he was president and CEO of Kinship Corp. He served on many boards, including as trustee and chair of the Investment Committee of Phillips Exeter Academy; trustee of the Nature Conservancy in R.I. and N.H.; trustee of Montshire Museum of Science (Vt.); director and chair of the Investment Committee of the Lumina Foundation (Ind.); and as a trustee of American University in Bulgaria. He enjoyed sailing and traveling and is survived by three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren, including grandson David Rabin ’14; and a sister. 

Jun, 2021
59

Elizabeth Forstall Keen ’59, of Davenport, Fla.; Jan. 15. She worked for U.S. Steel in Pittsburgh, Crown Publishers in Avenel, N.J., and Dow Chemical in Midland, Mich. Active in her local church, she served as chair of First Presbyterian’s Mission Committee, volunteered at the food pantry, and participated in countless mission projects such as a respite care ministry for families of children and adults with special needs and a migrant farmworkers ministry. She is survived by her husband, Donald; three children and their spouses; six grandsons; a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
59

Theodore F. Dietter ’59, of Newtown, Conn.; Jan. 14. He worked for the state of Connecticut, culminating his career as head of programming for the Department of Developmental Services (DDS). A founding member of the Connecticut Special Olympics, he also started the New Milford High School hockey program and led the team to the school’s first state championship in 1992. He was a cofounder of Wesco Sporting Goods. He was active in assisting the homeless community, ran the New York City Marathon, jogged every day for 21 years, was an avid fisherman, and belonged to the Newtown Fish and Game Club for 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; six children; 13 grandchildren; and two brothers. 

Jun, 2021
59

H. Corbin Day ’59, of Birmingham, Ala.; Jan. 10. After obtaining an MBA from the Wharton School, he began his career at Goldman Sachs & Co. in New York City, making partner in 1971. He relocated to London with his family in 1974 to lead the opening of Goldman’s London office, where he served as first managing director. He continued to be involved with the mergers and acquisitions team at the New York office until his retirement in 1986. He relocated to Alabama in 1987 and began the transition of leadership of the family business, Jemison Investment Company. He was actively involved in community organizations and served on numerous corporate boards. He enjoyed the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, playing golf, and fly-fishing. He is survived by his wife, Kim; a daughter; a son; seven grandchildren; a great-grandson; and a sister.

Jun, 2021
58

Judith Lamb Juncker ’58, of Limerick, Me.; Feb. 11. She worked in the Gloucester Public Schools teaching second grade at Veteran’s Memorial School until her retirement. She also worked at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor. She was an active member of the Annisquam Village Church, a librarian at the Annisquam Village Library, and a member of the Chorus North Shore, Annisquam Sewing Circle, and Maine Mineralogical Society. She is survived by three children and their spouses; six grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
57

Carolyn Urquhart Shively ’57, of Van Nuys, Calif.; Jan. 4. Upon graduation, she studied as a Woodrow Wilson Scholar at King’s College London, then settled in California and worked at UCLA. In later years she became an avid birder, amassed a large collection of books, and volunteered for many years at the Sherman Oaks Library.

Jun, 2021
57

Mercedes Hutchison Quevedo ’57, of Providence; Dec. 16, of complications of COVID. She taught in Naperville, Illinois, and Springville, New York, and then returned to Providence, where she taught at the Gordon School before retiring in 1997.

Jun, 2021
57

Robert G. Hellstrom ’57, of East Hampton, Conn.; Jan. 15. He was an underwriter for Phoenix Mutual Life for more than 30 years. He served his country as a member of the Connecticut Air National Guard and was a longtime member of the Belltown Car Club and the editor of their newsletter. He is survived by a cousin, two nieces, and a nephew.

Jun, 2021
57

Don. F. Goodwin ’57, of Grantham, N.H.; Jan. 12, of pancreatic cancer. After Brown, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy. After three years he transitioned to the U.S. Naval Reserves, served for 20 years, and retired as a commander. He had a long career as a financial executive with National Grid, New England Power Company, and its subsidiaries Narragansett Electric and Massachusetts Electric. While working at Narragansett Electric, he earned an MBA from URI. For many years, he helped local community theaters by building sets and continued his support of them wherever he lived. He was active with the National Ski Patrol. He is survived by his wife, Susan; four daughters; and grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
57

Richard A. Chagnot ’57, of Fort Myers, Fla., formerly of Franklin, Mass.; Jan. 17. He had a career in sales and retired from the office products division at IBM. He was an avid golfer. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four children; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
56

W. Bradford Schultz ’56, of Kingstown, N.H., formerly of Allentown and Lafayette Hills, Pa.; Jan. 8. After service in the U.S. Army, he moved to Washington, D.C., where he worked in a series of technology companies. From that experience he and four of his best friends created their own computer consulting company, Macro Corporation, near Philadelphia. The company grew to be a leading international corporation in the energy industry. He was an avid reader, historian, social justice advocate, and athlete and enjoyed creating green peaceful spaces and gardens. He is survived by six children, including son Neil ’76, and many grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
56

Gerald G. Norigian ’56, of Warwick, R.I.; Oct. 17. He was a retired attorney. He is survived by his wife, Lillian.

Jun, 2021
56

Ann J. Nelson ’56, ’59 MAT, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Dec. 12, of Alzheimer’s. She taught high school English in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York before moving to Colorado Springs in the late 1960s and working at Mitchell High School as a high school counselor for many years. Following her call to ordained ministry, she studied at Bishop’s School of Theology in Denver, then attended the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She was ordained a priest in the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado on June 27, 1985, and finished her counseling career at Coronado High School in Colorado Springs while assisting as part-time priest at Grace and St. Stephen Church. She accepted a call to serve St. Andrew Episcopal Church (Colo.) and was a rector there for several years. Upon retirement she joined the Episcopal Chapel of Our Saviour, Colorado Springs, where she also sang in the choir. She is survived by cousins. 

Related classes:
Class of 1956, GS Class of 1959
Jun, 2021
56

David S. Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn. and Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 31, of Parkinson’s disease. He married a few months after graduating and settled in the Hartford, Conn. area. Engineer by day and law student by night, upon graduation (first in his class), he established what would be the first of several patent law firms. Not only a patent attorney, he was also a named inventor on at least five patents, a fact of which he was quietly proud. David and Linda were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera, and he was honored to share the Met stage with Luciano Pavarotti one evening. His Bouillabaisse was celebrated around the world, as was his warmth and generosity. He enjoyed his family and the R.I. shore, where he had a beach home for 35 years, and where he looked forward to spending most of the summer with visits from his children, and grandchildren. He was a father figure to his younger siblings, mentor to younger attorneys, including his son, and dear friend and trusted advisor to many. He gave great toasts, was unabashed in his enjoyment of life, and set a spectacular example for those following him.He is survived by his wife, Linda Kessler ’56; son  Douglas ’81; daughter Sarah ’89; and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
56

Jerome S. Cline ’56, of New Bedford, Mass.; Jan. 18. He spent his career in corporate sales. In retirement, he volunteered as a docent for the Washington National Cathedral and more recently as a docent at the New Bedford Whaling Museum. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran and is survived by a daughter, four sons, five grandchildren, two sisters, and six nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
56

George Boulukos ’56, of Freeport, N.Y.; Jan. 23, from a blood infection. Following graduation from Brown, he owned and operated Nick’s Marina in Merrick, N.Y., a business he and his brother built from a fishing station to a fully operational marina. He was involved with the Boy Scouts of America for 80 years and was the recipient of their Silver Buffalo Award for distinguished service. He worked on several programs for the Scouts on a local, district, and national level, as well as with the Greek scouting program (Eastern Orthodox Committee on Scouting), which he chaired for many years. He was an avid sailor, raced in the Long Island Regatta many times, and held the title of Commodore of the Port Washington Yacht Club. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; two children; and two grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
55

Emeline Green Gay ’55, of Tiverton, R.I.; Feb. 4. She dedicated her life to education. In her later years, she enjoyed playing golf with her good friend Sheila, traveling the world with her college roommate Brenda Brown Rew, and going to the casino with her son Jeff. Most of all, she loved spending time with her grandson Conor and became affectionately known as “Mamaw” to his group of friends, with whom she spent countless weekends playing poker. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, a grandson and his wife, a brother and sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2021
54

Wilhelm F. Zantow ’54, of Orleans, Mass.; Jan. 9, of pancreatic cancer. He enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and taught electronics at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois. He was recruited by IBM in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., then worked at Raytheon Corp. in Sudbury, Mass., finishing his career in Kaiserslautern, Germany, and Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His proudest achievement was his design of the core rope memory for the Apollo 11 mission to the moon. He retired to Cape Cod in 1992 and began a new career building small boats and cabinets. He was a mentor and sponsor in the fellowship of Alcoholics Anonymous for more than 20 years and a founder of Club Drydock in Harwich, Mass. He was a member of the Nau-Sets Square Dance Club in Dennis and traveled the world attending square dance conventions. He was an active supporter of human rights and social justice activities. He is survived by his partner Elizabeth Kelley; nine children; six grandchildren; a sister; nieces; a nephew; and his former wife, Mary Guinn Zantow.

Jun, 2021
54

Robert Wals ’54, of Rye Brook, N.Y.; Jan. 15, from complications of Alzheimer’s. He was a product manager at General Foods prior to founding his own company, Scarsdale Marketing. He was also an adjunct instructor at Manhattanville College in Purchase, N.Y., where he taught Introduction to Marketing for 28 years. He retired in 2011. For many years he interviewed prospective students for Brown. He was a U.S. Army veteran and enjoyed attending the Brown v. Columbia and Brown v. Penn football games, swimming, and participating in sculpture classes. He is survived by his wife, Avis; a daughter; a son; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
54

Ludwig “Lou” W. Murgo ’54, of San Bruno, Calif.; Jan. 4. After graduation, he enlisted in the Army. He played baseball for the Baltimore Orioles in their farm system and later became a high school baseball, basketball, and football coach both in Rhode Island and in California, where he was honored by Aragon High School for coaching 50 consecutive years. He enjoyed volunteering for local community theatres and orchestras and was active in his church. He also enjoyed reading and writing poetry. He is survived by his wife, Jeanie; two daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021
54

Glenn C. Morrison ’54, of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Feb. 8. He spent most of his professional life in pharmaceutical research with Warner-
Lambert Co. in Morris Plains, N.J., transferring to Ann Arbor when the company merged with Parke-Davis. In retirement, he enjoy-
ed following the stock market, playing bridge, golf, and bowling. He is survived by his wife, Anne; three children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
54

Alfred J. Petteruti ’54, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Jan. 19, from complications of Alzheimer’s disease. After graduating with a degree in electrical engineering, he attended graduate school at Yale and obtained a master’s degree from Northeastern University. In 1956, Al enlisted in the U.S. Army and was stationed as a security officer in Japan. Upon discharge, he worked at Raytheon for 11 years before founding Ocean Data Equipment Corp. Subsequently, he acquired Digitronics, which became Comtec Information Systems, where he served as CEO until he retired in 2000. Along with the company, he was granted numerous patents for a wide range of innovative products. Above all, he enjoyed nothing more than sharing a meal while surrounded by his children and grandchildren. He maintained a lifelong commitment to Brown through philanthropy and other roles, but hosting entertainers who performed at the annual Brown Pops Concert was one of his favorite things to do. Among his contributions, he funded the Petteruti Lounge in Brown’s Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center and the Petteruti Laboratory for Design and Entrepreneurship (part of the Brown Design Workshop in Prince Lab). He was a BASC interviewer and served as a class marshal. He was a member of Tau Beta Pi and Our Lady of Mercy Church. He is survived by his wife, Mary; daughters Anne Marie Petteruti Barone ’84 and Lenore Petteruti Kopko ’86; sons Robert ’81 and Steven ’83; nine grandchildren, including Alina Petteruti ’13, Marissa Petteruti ’14, Robert Jr. ’17, Anessa Petteruti ’21, Patrick Petteruti ’21, and Michael Barone ’24. 

Jun, 2021
54

Alphonse U. Marcotte ’54, of Hyde Park, N.Y.; Feb. 4, after a short illness. He was an electrical engineer at IBM for 32 years. He volunteered with Dutchess County Tourism, was involved with the Regina Coeli Church and School, and was a charter member of the Swim and Tennis Club in Hyde Park and a member of the Center for Lifetime Study at Marist College. He enjoyed traveling. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ellin; five children and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
54

Girard E. Haverty ’54, of Farmington, Conn.; Feb. 19, of complications of Parkinson’s. He and his brother ran E.J. Haverty, Inc., a construction company founded by their father that specialized in paving and site work in the greater Hartford area. When he was not working, he and his family enjoyed spending time in Florida and Vermont. He enjoyed skiing, fishing, scuba diving, and spending time with his buddies at the West Hartford Exchange Club. He was a former Brown football captain and class marshal. He is survived by his wife, Beverly; two children and their spouses; a granddaughter; a sister; a sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2021
53

Harriett Rubin Sherman ’53, of Stamford, Conn.; Jan. 13. She taught high school American history in the Stamford public school system until retiring in 1978. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by three children, including Pamela Sherman Lesser ’82, and six grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
52

David F. Pagenkopf ’52, of Hainesport, N.J.; Jan. 4. After Brown, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and served as a radar observer and squadron adjutant in the Eastern Air Defense Command during the Korean War. Upon his discharge from the Air Force, he spent his entire career in human resources, the last 22 years with Stauffer Chemical Company. He was active in St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Hainesport, N.J., where he served for several years on the church council, evangelism ministry and senior choir, and wrote an evangelism column for the church’s monthly newsletter. He is survived by his wife, Laura; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
52

Wheaton G. Hudson Jr. ’52, of Cumberland Center, Me.; Jan. 9. He taught science at Newport High School for two years, then moved to Cousin’s Island in Yarmouth and became the eighth grade science teacher in Yarmouth High School. He was known for his unique style of teaching, including his “Bulletin Board Questions.” Following his retirement from teaching, he mastered the difficult craft of hand sewing at L.L. Bean, where he worked for 12 years. A U.S. Navy veteran and an athlete, at Brown he was a member of the varsity hockey team and continued to skate regularly until he was 80. A competitive golfer, he played in Maine State Golf Association events for 40 years and won multiple club championships at Freeport Country Club. He also enjoyed skiing. He is survived by his wife, Elinor; four children and their spouses; seven granddaughters; and two great-grandsons.

Jun, 2021
52

George E. Gill ’52, of New Milford, Conn.; Jan. 24, after a brief illness. After earning a law degree from Boston University and serving in the military, he was a lawyer for New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, which merged with Penn Central. He later worked in the law department of Universal Oil Products’ Air Correction Division in Illinois. The company moved to Connecticut in 1979. He then worked in the General Dynamics Electric Boat Division. He was a member of the Connecticut Bar Association and the American Bar Association. In retirement, he volunteered with AARP. He was a member and historian of the American Legion Post 78 and an active member of the OWLS (Older, Wiser, Lively Seniors). He is survived by his wife, Mary; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson. 

Jun, 2021
52

William W. Corcoran ’52, of Newport, R.I.; Jan. 19, of a heart attack. He served as a deep sea diver in the U.S. Navy, specializing in submarine rescue, before embarking on a long career as an attorney with Corcoran, Peckham, Hayes, Leys & Olaynack, P.C. He was a member of the Newport City Council from 1967 to 1971 and a member of the Redevelopment Agency of Newport, which was responsible for the transition of Goat Island. He was a lawyer for the Newport Preservation Society and a strong advocate for historical preservation. He was an active member of the Preservation Society for decades as well as a member of the board of directors of Bank Newport from 1963 to 2005. He was also counsel for the Visiting Nurse Service for multiple decades and served as a trustee for the John Clarke Trust for more than 40 years. He is survived by six children and their spouses, including daughters Margaret Corcoran-Leys ’86 and Jane Corcoran ’91; 13 grandchildren; two brothers, including Edward ’50; and nephew Edward II ’79.

Jun, 2021
51

Mansfield S. Templeton ’51, of Stuart, Fla.; May 15, 2020.

Jun, 2021
52

Bennett S. Aisenberg ’52, of Denver, Colo.; Jan. 10. After graduating Harvard Law School and being stationed in Colorado Springs in the Army, he joined the Denver law firm Gorsuch Kirgis in 1958 as the first Jewish lawyer hired by a major Denver law firm, and practiced there as a partner until 1980, when he formed his own law firm and practiced until 2020. He served as the president of the Colorado Trial Lawyers Association, the Denver Bar Association, and the Colorado Bar Association. He was on the Denver Judicial Nominating Committee for six years, served as an expert witness, authored articles, and taught courses at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. In addition, he served on the Colorado Bar’s Ethics Committee for 35 years. He was a founding member of the Denver Bar Association Conciliation Panel and the recipient of many awards and honors, including the Warrior For Justice award from the Sam Cary Bar Association for promoting human rights, civil liberties, and equality. Both an Aisenberg Society and an Aisenberg Award were created in his honor.  He enjoyed playing bridge and became a Life Master at age 30. He also was an avid sports fan. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by two nieces and a nephew.

Jun, 2021
51

Victor M. Pierce ’51, of Felton, Del., and Mattapoisett, Mass.; Dec. 17. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and then worked at the General Foods plant in Dover, Del. He worked for many years at Dover Air Force Base as an industrial engineer with the management engineering team until his retirement. In his earlier years, he was a deacon in the United Church of Christ. He was an active member of Toastmasters International and the Rotary Club. He is survived by his wife, Roz; three children and their spouses; and seven grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
51

Frederick H. Hall ’51, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Dec. 30. He was a sales manager and later the head of engineering quality control with Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co. before retiring. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was an active member of Faith Christian Center and an avid fisherman, boater, and outdoorsman. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
50

Philip B. Woodward ’50, of Wall Township, Pa.; Jan. 5. He had a long successful career in the insurance business and retired as the owner of the Wolf Agency in Asbury Park. He was a World War II Navy veteran and a member of the American Legion Post #346. He is survived by his wife, Marian; a brother-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
50

Walter E. Schortmann ’50, of Westerly, R.I.; Jan. 21. After obtaining degrees in chemistry and physics from Brown and Harvard he was recruited as a nuclear engineer at the Oak Ridge School of Technology, where he worked on peaceful uses for atomic energy. He later worked for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Union Carbide, and Combustion Engineering Corp. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Force. He is survived by a daughter and a grandson.

Jun, 2021
50

Martin A. Levine ’50, of Maplewood, N.J.; Apr. 19, 2020, of COVID. He was a retired computer systems analyst and U.S. Navy World War II veteran. He is survived by his wife, Rosemarye, and a son. 

Jun, 2021
50

John F. Kimball ’50, of Portland, Me., formerly of Falmouth and East Boothbay, Me.; Feb. 5. After graduation he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in communication intelligence. Upon completion of his military service, he relocated to Maine, where he began at George C. Frye Co., a medical and dental supply distributor in Portland, which he helped to manage and own with his father, Milton S. Kimball. After the company was sold, he began his own advertising agency, Partridge Island Co., located in the Old Port District of Portland. He was involved in the Portland art community for more than 20 years and served as vice chairman and member of the Maine Arts Commission and board member of the Maine College of Art (now MECA). He was a trustee of the Portland Symphony Orchestra and the Portland Museum of Art. He produced his own paintings, photographs, and mixed media and exhibited his work in the Portland Community, the University of Maine in Gorham, the University of New England Gallery, and the Elizabeth Moss Gallery in Falmouth. He is survived by his wife, Ellen; three daughters; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
50

Shirley Kenyon Glenney ’50, of Manchester, Conn.; Jan. 31. She worked as an underwriter for Travelers Insurance. She was a member of the Auxiliary of Children and Family Services, a trustee of Cushing Academy, and a volunteer at Manchester Memorial Hospital. She enjoyed solving crossword puzzles, playing Scrabble, and playing in a ping-pong group that lasted for more than 30 years. She is survived by four daughters, three sons-in-law, and three grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
50

Wallace J. Cropper ’50, of Anna Maria, Fla.; Feb. 8. As a mining and exploration geologist he worked and lived in numerous locations for St. Joe Lead Company, later called St. Joe Resources. He retired as chief geologist. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran and a member of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers and the Society of Economic Geologists. He is survived by his wife, Gloria Hull; a daughter and son-in-law; son Robert ’79 AM and daughter-in-law; and a grandson. 

Jun, 2021
50

Robert H. Breslin Jr. ’50, of Saunderstown, R.I.; Jan. 11. He studied law at Boston College and worked for the City of Warwick until the age of 90, beginning as Warwick’s assistant city solicitor in 1957. He was a founding partner at Saxon, Butler and Breslin, and then at Breslin, Sweeney and Earle. He was of counsel at Sullivan & Sullivan and served in the Rhode Island State Legislature from 1961 to 1970. He was 1963 Young Republican of the Year and was elected a member of the Rhode Island Constitutional Convention in 1973. He was often written up in the Providence Journal and Warwick Beacon. He was president of the Warwick Rotary Club and a trustee of Rocky Hill School, Gilbert Stuart Birthplace, and the Willett Free Library in Saunderstown, as well as a commissioner on Judicial Tenure and Discipline and board member of the Quonset Development Corporation. He is survived by his wife, Carol; three children and their spouses, including daughter Pamela Murphy ’80; and 10 grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
50

Edmond E. Berube Jr. ’50, of Fall River, Mass.; Dec. 30. He worked for 40 years with the Fall River Welfare Dept. and the Mass. Dept. of Public Welfare, first as a social worker and later retiring as deputy director of the Southeastern Massachusetts regional office. He was an avid New England Patriots fan and a ham radio operator, enjoyed Big Band music, and was always tracking current news and events. He is survived by his wife, Harriet; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a great-grandchild; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece.

Jun, 2021
49

Bradford W. Wild ’49, of Tigard, Ore.; May 6, 2020.

Jun, 2021
49

Morris P. Schwartz ’49, of Greenville, R.I.; Dec. 23. He was a World War II Army veteran and member of Temple Emanu-El and the Rhode Island Jewish Historical Society. He was known for his banana bread, enjoyed his weekly nickel-and-dime poker game, and was an avid Boston Red Sox fan. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; three children; and six grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
49

Barbara McAdams Hoyt ’49, of Northfield, Ill.; Jan. 18. She was a homemaker and volunteer with Benton House in Chicago and the Indian Hill Club. She is survived by five children and their spouses, 12 grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
49

Christina Gartaganis Gargas ’49, of New Bedford, Mass.; Jan. 20. She was a retired teacher in the Framingham (Mass.) school system. She was a member of the New Bedford Garden Club and St. George Greek Orthodox Church, where she was a member of the Ladies Philoptochos Society. She is survived by cousins.

Jun, 2021
49

Werner R. Britsch ’49, ’50 ScM, of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Dec. 24. He was a NASA aeronautical engineer from 1962 to 1988. He served in the U.S. Army and was a member of Holden Arboretum. He was the recipient of a 1978 NASA award for stage fan casing treatment and a 1983 NASA energy efficient engine project team (Colombia Space Shuttle) contribution to mission success. He enjoyed skiing, hiking, dancing, music, photography, and playing golf. He is survived by a daughter, a son, and nieces and nephews. 

Related classes:
Class of 1949, GS Class of 1950
Jun, 2021
48

Thomas E. Pitts ’48, of Cranston, R.I.; Dec. 14. He was a mechanical engineer with Linde Air Products in Buffalo, N.Y., and then at IBM in Hyde Park, N.Y. In 1954 he returned to Rhode Island and began working at the Universal Winding Company. During his long career there (and with its successor Leesona Corporation) he designed a shoulder-mounted recoilless anti-tank gun, coilers used by the Ford Motor Company to make automobile horns, and advanced yarn winding machines. In mid-career he became chief engineer at Mount Hope Manufacturing. His work took him to India, Thailand, Egypt, and Western Europe. In retirement, he enjoyed sailing and playing tennis well into his 80s. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran. He is survived by two sons and their spouses, two grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
48

Richard C. Kiss ’48, of Pompton Plains, N.J., formerly of Verona, N.J.; Feb. 5. After Brown he earned a master’s degree in industrial engineering from Newark College of Engineering, where he later became an adjunct professor. His career began as an engineer for Wright Aeronautical before joining Westinghouse Electric Lighting (later Philips), where he worked for more than 30 years. He held various positions in manufacturing and quality control and traveled internationally assisting in foreign operations. He enjoyed camping and boating and is survived by his wife, Helen; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; and grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
48

Virginia Silva Baxter ’48, of Riverside, R.I.; Feb. 2. She worked as a secretary at Brown for 25 years before retiring in 1999. She was a member of the Riverside Order of the Eastern Star and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by a daughter, seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and a brother. 

Jun, 2021
48

Ernest M. Greenberg ’48, of Dedham, Mass.; Jan. 16. He earned his medical degree from SUNY, completed his internship and residency training in anesthesiology at Grasslands Hospital (N.Y.), then worked in the anesthesia department at Framingham Union Hospital for 36 years. He was chief of anesthesiology (1974-76), medical director of respiratory therapy (1968-78), and president of Anesthesia Associates of Framingham, Inc. (1981-92). He was also an assistant clinical professor of anesthesiology at Boston University. He was board-certified and a Fellow of the American College of Anesthesiology. After retiring in 1992, he became a volunteer at the former New England Wildflower Society and the Arnold Arboretum. He was a longtime member of Temple Beth Am and a U.S. Army World War II decorated veteran. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Libby; three children and their spouses, including son Mark ’76, ’79 MD; and six grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
47

Frederick J. Schachinger ’47, of Wayne, Pa.; Jan. 8. Upon honorable discharge from the Navy, he worked for Sears, Roebuck and Co. in New York City. He retired to Wayne after 35 years and enjoyed the outdoors, sailing, and building and repairing. He is survived by his wife, Mary; five children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
47

Irving B. Lees ’47, of North Palm Beach, Fla.; Nov. 26. He was an ob-gyn in Palm Beach for more than 40 years, serving at Good Samaritan, St. Mary’s, and Palm Beach Gardens Hospitals. He served in the U.S. Navy and spent weekends and summers with the family sailing out of the Sailfish Club, receiving awards as skipper and navigator for the Southern Ocean Racing Conference and Block Island races. He taught judo and played the drums. He is survived by four children and their spouses, including son Madison ’79 and daughter-in-law Susan Lesueur Lees ’79; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
46

Mary Donatelli Nation ’46, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Providence; Dec. 29, after a brief illness. She was a social worker in Providence, and after earning her master’s degree from Boston University she worked as a medical social worker in the Boston area. She volunteered with several organizations throughout her life, especially those dedicated to the political and personal empowerment of women, such as the League of Women Voters, the Democratic Women’s Club, and Planned Parenthood. In April 2004, at the age of 80, she proudly participated in the March for Women’s Lives in Washington, D.C., to defend a woman’s right to reproductive choice. She was also instrumental in the successful bid to place a historical marker in Fellsmere, Fla., to commemorate the first-ever vote cast by a woman in Fellsmere. After retiring to Florida in 1990, she and her husband enjoyed collecting antiques and opened Nation’s Bounty, an antique business. She was an avid gardener and is survived by three children and three grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
43

Robert Leadbetter ’43, of Sarasota, Fla.; Sept. 14. He retired from a management position in the harmonic drive division of USM Corporation. He was a sports enthusiast and a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II. He is survived by his wife Anna.

Jun, 2021
42

Eleanor Mishel Leventhal ’42, of Dedham, Mass.; Jan. 2. She was a former trustee of Temple Shalom and Beth Israel Hospital (now Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center). She was an active member of the Beth Israel Hospital Women’s Auxiliary for 50 years and a volunteer cochair of the hospital’s gift shop, using retailing skills developed from an early job at Filene’s to make the shop a success. For 15 years she served on the board of what was then the Hospice of the Good Shepherd (now Good Shepherd Community Care). She enjoyed her book group, gardening, and playing bridge. She is survived by three sons, including John ’69 and his wife, Beverly Hodgson ’70; three grandsons, including Adam Leventhal ’01 and Daniel Leventhal ’07; three great-grandsons; sister Audrey Cooper ’45; and 10 nieces and nephews, including Emily Leventhal ’00.

Jun, 2021
40

Sydney William Skoler ’40, of Milton, Mass.; Jan. 1 at 101 years of age. After graduating from Boston University School of Law, he served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Later, with his brother, he joined the family business, B. Skoler Company, a retail store and wholesale supplier of uniforms and equipment to hospitals and other institutions. He had a distinctive style, which was highlighted by his bow tie collection and many convertibles. He is survived by a sister-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
FAC

Michael Silverman, of Concord, Mass.; Aug. 29. He joined the Brown faculty in 1973 as an assistant professor in the department of English. He retired from the department of modern culture and media in 2010 and is survived by his partner of 30 years, E.J. Anderson ’81.

Apr, 2021
FAC

Dr. Rocco Marzilli, of East Providence and Jamestown, R.I.; Aug. 18. He graduated from Providence College as a member of Alpha Epsilon Delta and served in the U.S. Army for two years during the Korean conflict. In 1957, he enrolled at the University of Bologna School of Medicine in Bologna, Italy. Upon returning to the U.S. he and his wife settled in East Providence, where they would remain for more than 50 years. He completed his residency at the VA Hospital in Providence and remained on staff until 1968, when he decided to enter private practice specializing in gastroenterology. He was on staff at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital until 2008. He was the first medical director for Waterview Villa Rehabilitation and Health Care Center and continued in that role until 2010. He was also on the clinical staff at the Warren Alpert Medical School. He served as medical advisor for the Rhode Island Chapter of the National Foundation of Ileitis and Colitis (NFIC) while also serving on the board of directors of the Colitis and Ileitis Association, and he was the president of the Rhode Island Gastroenterological Society. He was named Physician of the Year in 1983 by NFIC. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, a grandson, and a sister.

Apr, 2021
FAC

L. Perry Curtis, of North Pomfret, Vt.; Apr. 9, 2019. Emeritus professor of history at Brown. During the course of his 40-year teaching career, he held appointments at Princeton and at UC Berkeley and retired from Brown in 2001. He was an American scholar who made a significant contribution to the study of Irish history. He published numerous works relative to Irish history, including Apes and Angels, Coercion and Conciliation in Ireland, and The Depiction of Eviction in Ireland, 1845-1910. He frequently visited Ireland, both for research purposes and for pleasure. He was a member of the Kildare Street and University Club for many years. In 2011 he lectured at the National Library of Ireland to a capacity audience and in 2015 he addressed the Parnell Summer School on “Rethinking the Origins of the Land War in Ireland.” His last visit to Ireland was in March 2018 for the opening of the Coming Home exhibition of art from the collection of Ireland’s Great Hunger Museum at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut. He is survived by his wife Alison; a daughter; and a son.

Apr, 2021
FAC

Dan W. Brock, of Newton, Mass.; Sept. 26. Charles C. Tillinghast, Jr. University Professor and professor emeritus in philosophy. Professor Brock joined the philosophy department at Brown in 1969, where he became professor of philosophy and biomedical ethics and director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics. He was chair of the department from 1980 to 1986 and eventually received a joint appointment in the medical school. During his 33 years at Brown, he established himself as a leading authority in bioethics and medical ethics. He served as staff philosopher on the President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine in 1981 and in 1993 was a member of the Ethics Working Group of the Clinton Task Force on National Health Reform. He left Brown in 2002 to join the department of clinical bioethics at the National Institutes of Health as senior scientist and head of the section on public health. In 2004, he became the Frances Glessner Lee Professor of Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. He served as an advisor to the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress, the Institute of Medicine, the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, and the World Health Organization. Over the course of his career, he authored six books and more than 150 articles establishing a high standard of analytical rigor in bioethics. He was president of the American Association of Bioethics and a founding board member of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He was an avid reader and is survived by his wife, Chon, formerly known as Charlene Stephens ’62; a daughter; and two sons, including David ’02.

Apr, 2021
MD 79

Desmond Jordan ’79 MD, of Hoboken, N.J.; Nov. 2. He was professor of anesthesiology at Columbia University Irving Medical Center and a cardiothoracic anesthesiologist at New York-Presbyterian/ Columbia University Irving Medical Center. He joined CUIMC in 1987 and developed protocols for the care of heart and lung transplants. He was a pioneer in bioinformatics and healthcare technology in critical care medicine and an educator to physicians in training. He is survived by two daughters, including Kristin Jordan ’09.

Apr, 2021
GS 89

Jeffrey P. Whitman ’89 AM, ’91 PhD, of Selinsgrove, Pa.; Sept. 25. Following his graduation from the United States Military Academy at West Point, Jeff served in the U.S. Army. He was an artillery officer and spent a significant part of his career in Germany. He returned to West Point in 1987 and taught philosophy and English there until his retirement in 1995 with the rank of major. Jeff then began a second career as professor of philosophy at Susquehanna University. He served as philosophy department head from 2000-2010, was speaker of the faculty from 2005-2008, chaired the Edward S. and A. Rita Schmidt Lecture in Ethics for many years, was codirector of the Arlin Adams Center for Law and Society, and served on such committees as the Advisory Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, University Council, and the Faculty Affairs Committee. In recognition of his outstanding teaching and service, he received the John C. Horn Award for Distinguished Scholarship and Creative Activity in 1998. Jeff was a published expert of war theory and medical ethics. He was the faculty advisor for Susquehanna University’s ROTC cadets for many years and served on the Geisinger Medical Center Bioethics Review Committee. Active in the Selinsgrove community, Jeff served two terms on the board of directors of the Selinsgrove Area School District. He was a member of Sharon Lutheran Church, Selinsgrove, where he served as the Church Council president and sang in the choir. He is survived by his wife, Linda; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; a stepson and his spouse; four grandchildren; a sister; and a brother

Apr, 2021
GS 89

Linda L. LaGasse ’89 ScM, ’91 PhD, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Sept. 19. She had been director of research at Brown’s Center for the Study of Children at Risk and at Women & Infants Hospital. She dedicated her life to infant and maternal health. She is survived by her husband, Barry Lester; five children; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 87

Ellen B. Furlough ’87 PhD, of Lexington, Ky.; Sept. 26, after a long illness. She taught middle school in South Carolina before obtaining her master’s degree. She later was a history professor at Kenyon College, where she earned tenure and served as department chair. She joined the University of Kentucky history department in 1999 and in 2005 received a UK Great Teacher award. Her research, focused on consumer cooperatives and the history of tourism, received international recognition and invitations to speak at conferences in several countries. Her publications have been cited by other scholars. She is survived by her husband, Frank; a son; a daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a sister; a brother; a niece; and two nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 79

Elizabeth Barclay Engen ’79 AM (see ’73).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1979, Class of 1973
Apr, 2021
GS 77

Aida M. Botelho ’77 AM, of Fall River, Mass.; Nov. 6. She taught in the Providence school system for 36 years and dedicated her life to caring for her parents and siblings. She is survived by a sister and many cousins. 

Apr, 2021
GS 73

Shirley Williams-Scott ’73 ScM, of Marrero, Ala.; July 29. She began her teaching career at Miles College as a graduate laboratory assistant and went on to teach life sciences as an instructor at Miles College and Lawson State Junior College. She then became an assistant professor of biology at Jackson State University and later a full professor of biology at Stillman College. While at Stillman, she served as acting chairperson of the natural science division as well as the faculty representative to the 1987 White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. She became an associate professor of research in the College of Pharmacy and graduate faculty at Xavier University in New Orleans and retired from her teaching career after her tenure at Southern University in New Orleans (SUNO), where she was a professor of biology and served as chair of the biology department. While at SUNO she was instrumental in developing several partnerships, including the Howard Hughes Internship Program in collaboration with the University of New Orleans, and was codirector of the SUNO/LSUMC Collaborative Research Initiative in Stress Biology Program. She also developed SUNO’s first marine biology program and lab. Shirley had an extensive research career that included studies on hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, B-6 deficiency, and glucose metabolism, and collaborations with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, National Science Foundation, Tulane University, and the Louisiana State University Medical Center. She was the author or coauthor of more than 50 scientific publications. In addition to her teaching and research, she served as a science evaluator for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) for Life Sciences, a grant reviewer for the Minority Research Center of Excellence Program (MRCE), and chair of the panel of the Research Improvement in Minority Institutions (RIMI) Program. Throughout her career she received numerous awards and honors. She was also instrumental in starting the Robert Charles Blakes Senior Bible College and Theological Seminary and served as the school’s first dean. She is survived by five children, 12 grandchildren, two brothers, a sister-in-law, and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 72

Stephen M. Roberts ’72 MAT, of Grand Island, N.Y.; Sept. 21, of prostate cancer. He taught high school English until 1977, when he became assistant to the director of University Libraries at the University of Buffalo. He became associate director of University Libraries in 1986, and spearheaded initiatives automating the libraries, promoting resource-sharing among SUNY libraries, and envisioning the role of the libraries in the 21st century. He secured grants to develop resource sharing among SUNY university centers and built an off-campus storage library facility. He developed a road map for moving the libraries into the emerging digital environment and established UBdigit, the platform for digital collections. His efforts were recognized with the Joseph F. Schubert Moving Towards Excellence Award and the NYLINK Achievement Award. He retired in 2010 after serving as associate vice president for university libraries for five years. He is survived by his wife, Cindy; two daughters and their spouses; two stepsons; a sister and brother-in-law; and two brothers and sisters-in-law.

Apr, 2021
GS 72

Thomas E. Rosenbaum ’72 AM (see ’71).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1972, Class of 1971
Apr, 2021
GS 71

Ben R. Golden ’71 PhD, of Marietta, Ga.; Nov. 27. He taught for 55 years, including 40 years at Kennesaw State University, finishing his work there as professor emeritus of biology. He is survived by his wife, Noel; four children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Apr, 2021
71

Constance H. Buchanan ’71 AM, of New York City; Sept. 16, of complications from Parkinson’s disease. She led the Women’s Studies in Religion Program at Harvard Divinity School for two decades. Hired at age 30 in 1977, she stayed at Harvard until 1997. Along with directing the Women’s Studies in Religion Program, she was a faculty member and associate dean at the school and spent six years as special assistant to the president. Her greatest legacy was directing what is known as WSRP, which annually hosts five full-time research associates who serve as visiting faculty for a year and work on book-length projects. She published Choosing to Lead: Women and the Crisis of American Values in 1996, became a senior program officer at the Ford Foundation in 1997 and retired a decade later, well into her Parkinson’s diagnosis.

Apr, 2021
GS 70

Lawrence R. Ernst ’70 PhD, of Silver Spring, Md.; Nov. 4. He spent the majority of his career as a mathematical statistician for the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He is survived by his wife, Gail; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; and two granddaughters. 

Apr, 2021
GS 67

David M. Nicholas ’67 PhD, of Clemson, S.C.; Nov. 10. He taught at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln from 1967 to 1989 and retired from Clemson University in 2006 as the Kathryn and Calhoun Lemon Professor Emeritus of History. In retirement he continued to teach at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Clemson, including classes in classical music. He was an accomplished classical pianist and playing the piano was one of his favorite hobbies. He is survived by his wife, Marlene; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three stepchildren; and eight grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 67

Francis Crowley ’67 MAT, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Aug. 14, 2019. He was a teacher with positions at Cranston West and Moses Brown schools, and later at Roger Williams and Rhode Island College. In 1970 he entered the private sector and began a 20-year career with CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, from which he retired in 1991 as a corporate director. After retiring, he entered Portsmouth Abbey Monastery and taught in the science and Christian Doctrine departments. For 15 years, Brother Francis also served as the community’s master of ceremonies, overseeing the liturgies and celebrants and altar servers. He is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, and a sister.

Apr, 2021
GS 66

James B. Walker ’66 PhD, of Wilmington, Del.; Dec. 4. In 1967 he accepted a position as a research engineer in the plastics division of E.I. DuPont de Nemours Inc. in Wilmington. During his career at DuPont, he worked on numerous projects, including the development of Lucite and the plastic used for disposable drinking bottles. He spent several years in the United States and France working with partners in the fresh juice and wine industries, helping to extract sugar using membrane technology he invented. While at DuPont, he was honored to be named Research Fellow. He retired in 1991 to begin a second career as CFO and mechanical engineer of Designer Stencils—a design, manufacturing, and retail/wholesale company founded by his wife. His expertise enabled the family business to develop a customized cutting process and to serve retail and wholesale customers worldwide for more than 40 years. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Air Force. He is survived by his wife, Helen; two daughters; a son-in-law; and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
55
Ever True
Artemis A.W. Joukowsky ’55 was one of Brown’s biggest cheerleaders and fundraisers.
Read More
Artemis A.W. Joukowsky and Ruth Simmons
Apr, 2021
GS 66

Thomas Parr ’66 ScM, of Reading, Mass.; Oct. 2, of Alzheimer’s disease. He received a bachelor’s degree in geology from MIT and, after graduating Brown he joined the team at Draper Labs that designed the optics system for the Apollo Program. He was an early pioneer in remote sensing, working on the Landsat program, and later appeared on the TV program NOVA to discuss his work. Following his work for NASA he worked for TASC and Northrop Grumman, and he retired from BBN in 2012. He was an outdoors enthusiast who enjoyed rock climbing, hiking, camping, and skiing. He obtained his pilot’s license and owned a Cessna for many years. He was an avid traveler and also enjoyed photography. He had a mischievous spirit and enjoyed playing pranks. One of his proud accomplishments was using his rock-climbing skills to mount a red wooden heart on a tower on Brown’s campus in honor of Valentine’s Day. He is survived by his wife Mary; four children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 66

Thomas A. Johnson ’66 MAT, of Okeechobee, Fla., formerly of Ohio; Sept. 27. He taught mathematics, physics, science, and electronics in the Buckeye Local School District for 30 years. Through the Fulbright Classroom Teacher Exchange Program in 1986 he moved his family to Nottingham, England, exchanging teaching positions and homes for one academic year. Upon his retirement from public education, he was employed by LTV Steel Corporation in Cleveland to develop and teach its curriculum. He also spent three years at Geneva Area City Schools as the audiovisual director. He was an avid amateur radio operator and a member of the Ashtabula, Ohio, and Okeechobee, Florida, amateur radio clubs. He is survived by his wife, Lou; a daughter and son-in-law; a son; and three grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
GS 64

Paul Kechijian ’64 ScM (see ’61).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1964, Class of 1961
Apr, 2021
GS 64

Che C. Chow ’64 PhD, of Penfield, N.Y.; Nov. 26. He worked for the DuPont Company in Delaware for several years. In 1970, he accepted a position at Xerox Corporation in Rochester, N.Y., where he would spend the next 28 years as a research chemist. He was awarded numerous patents. During his time in Rochester, Che and his wife provided active support and assistance to international college students who came to the United States to study there. He spent many years serving as a deacon and singing in the choir of his local church. He is survived by his wife, Betty; a daughter; a grandson; a sister; a brother; and numerous cousins, nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
GS 62

Teresa Gagnon Mellone ’62 AM (see ’39).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1962, Class of 1939
Apr, 2021
GS 62

Margaret O’Brien Donohoe ’62 MAT, of Narragansett, R.I., formerly of Forest Hills, N.Y.; Nov. 7. She was a Peace Corps volunteer in Ethiopia from 1962 to 1964. She came back to the U.S. in 1965, then in 1966 returned to Africa as Peace Corps staff in Somalia until 1968, when she began her career in education teaching in the West Warwick School Department, R.I. She later moved to Forest Hills, where she taught in a state correctional facility for seven years. In 1978, she was employed with District Council 37, New York City’s municipal labor union, representing the majority of New York City’s public employees. She retired in 2006 as an administrator and director of counseling. She is survived by three children and one grandchild.

Apr, 2021
17

Jack H. Ruddell ’17, ’22 MD, of Rancho Mirage, Calif.; Nov. 1. He achieved academic success while quietly managing the learning challenges associated with Tourette’s Syndrome. Before attending Brown he sang with the Paulist Choristers, and he continued to sing with Brown’s Bear Necessities a capella group. He explored various fields of medicine, including extended summer research and projects at Warren Alpert Medical School, a program in geriatric medicine at University of Rostock, Germany, and a fellowship at the UCLA neurology research lab. He was a co-lead and/or author of more than 20 medical papers and his research spanned a variety of topics, particularly the impact of opioid dosages post-surgery. He is survived by his parents and two brothers.

Related classes:
Class of 2017, MD Class of 2022
Apr, 2021
08

Evan Werlin ’08, of Philadelphia; May 27, of cancer. After Brown, he went to medical school at the University of Pennsylvania before moving to San Francisco to begin a surgery residency at UC San Francisco Medical Center. Throughout a series of treatments for cancer, he continued to practice medicine, serving as chief surgery resident and matching for a vascular surgery fellowship at UCSF in early May 2020. He enjoyed music and running and is survived by his parents and many friends and colleagues.

Apr, 2021
86

Nicholas M. Edgerton ’86, of Kalamazoo, Mich.; Nov. 16. He was a professional educator who started his career as a teacher and dean of students at the Kildonan School, a boarding school for dyslexic children in Amenia, N.Y. He was a tireless advocate for children and adolescents with learning differences. In 2000, he moved to Williamstown, Mass., where he was appointed head of Pine Cobble School. He moved his family to Kalamazoo in 2010 and continued to pursue opportunities as a school administrator and leader. As an administrator he dedicated himself to knowing each student and their family and was a stickler for grammar, manners, and propriety, and he carried with him an encyclopedia of knowledge. He is survived by daughter Elizabeth “Lily” Edgerton ’21; a son; his father; a brother and sister-in-law, and his former wife, Elizabeth.

Apr, 2021
85

Adrienne Metoyer Eng ’85, of Hayward, Calif.; Sept. 9. She had a career in human resources and senior compensation management in Silicon Valley; her last position was with Survey Monkey. She was an author of fiction under the pseudonym Addison James and was a member of Romance Writers of America; she had several Amazon short-story bestsellers and a blog. She is survived by two daughters, a sister, three brothers, two sisters-in-law, and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
80

Thomas A. Epstein ’80, of Carver, Mass.; Sept. 30, of cancer. He was a supervising engineer for the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management for more than 35 years, where he was credited with being a skilled writer. He wrote some of the first rules for solid and hazardous waste management programs and created the department’s first website as its webmaster. He retired in 2018, then drove a school bus and played Santa Claus for the Edaville Railroad. He was also an actor who won the role of Carver’s King Richard’s Faire’s Chef Crumpet in 1993 before being crowned king in 2002, a reign that lasted 16 years. He is survived by his wife, Diandra, and two children.

 

Apr, 2021
79

Cynthia M. Sheldon ’79, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Oct. 27. She was a property/casualty actuary for 40 years with the Metropolitan Insurance Company. She was also an active member of East Greenwich United Methodist Church. She enjoyed biking and skiing and took part in bicycling tours in Europe and throughout North America, and for many years she took regular ski trips to Killington Mountain in Vermont. She was formerly part of a crew team that sailed out of Newport, R.I., and an avid fan of the Boston Red Sox. She is survived by parents, two sisters, a brother, a brother-in-law, and several aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Apr, 2021
78

Edward “Ted” von Gerichten ’78, of Boston; Sept. 19, after a seven-year battle with cancer. He was an attorney in Brown’s Office of the General Counsel for his entire career (1983-2013). He was a member of Brown’s men’s soccer team that reached the NCAA tournament final rounds during two of his seasons. He enjoyed sailing competitively on Narragansett Bay and giving back to the community, including coaching youth soccer. He held leadership roles in the Rhode Island Soccer Association, ultimately serving as president of Bruno United FC. He was a supporter of the YMCA, serving on the Bayside YMCA board of directors in Barrington for several years. He is survived by his wife, Carmen; two daughters, including Kristina von Gerichten ’13; and a son-in-law.

Apr, 2021
77

David E. Dudek ’77, of Hadley, Mass.; Oct. 9, of sarcoma. After graduating from Brown, he was hired by General Electric and employed in their Syracuse office until 1980, when he transferred to their offices in Seattle. He received his MBA from Seattle University and left GE to accept a position at Starbucks Coffee. After moving back East he became a professor of business management at UMass Amherst. He was an environmentalist and cultivated an organic garden. In addition, David and his wife raised Welsh Corgi dogs and participated in AKC dog shows. He enjoyed playing cards and board games as well as outdoor games, especially horseshoe pitching. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; his mother; and three brothers and their families.

Apr, 2021
76

William Pordy ’76, of New York City; Sept. 12, from sudden cardiac arrest after a long fight against frontotemporal degeneration. He graduated from NYU School of Medicine and was a nephrologist at Mount Sinai Hospital. He was also an accomplished inventor with several of his patented products on the market. He had a never-ending desire to learn and earned a membership to the Mensa Society. He enjoyed art, the opera, and traveling. He is survived by his brother Robert ’79, ’82 MD; a sister; two nieces; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
76

Frank J. Moncrief ’76, of Desert Hot Springs, Calif.; Oct. 7. He was a technical editor and publisher of magazines for electronic engineers and computer programmers. He cofounded a software company, founded a website design business, and taught community college computer courses. In 1983, he spent a year in Kyoto, Japan, practicing Aikido and Buddhist meditation. He wrote a novel, spoke four languages, and traveled the world. He dedicated the second half of his life to developing his psychological and spiritual awareness. He read the Collected Works of C.G. Jung and taught the Enneagram. He enjoyed his time at Brown, especially time with his football teammates and fraternity brothers, with whom he became lifelong friends. He is survived by his wife, Beatrice.

Apr, 2021
75

Paul Steen ’75, of Ithaca, N.Y.; Sept. 4, from a heart attack. He earned his PhD in fluid dynamics at Johns Hopkins University and was a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University. In 1982, he joined Cornell’s School of Chemical Engineering and in 2008, he became the Maxwell M. Upson Professor of Engineering, an endowed professorship that he held until his death. For 38 years, he was a teacher and advisor across departments and graduate fields in the College of Engineering at Cornell. He was internationally recognized as a scholar in fluid mechanics and engaged broadly in the international research community. He was a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (2013) and the American Physical Society (1996), in addition to being the Alexander von Humboldt Fellow (1990, 1996, 2011, 2019). He was the recipient of the 2007 Henry Marion Howe Medal. He is survived by his wife, Kyra D. Stephanoff; two daughters, including Frances Steen ’15; a sister; three brothers, including John ’67 and Rodger ’69; and nephews Douglas Steen ’90, Andrew Steen ’00, and Eric Steen ’05.

Apr, 2021
74

Richard Preisler ’74, of Reisterstown, Md.; June 2, of progressive supranuclear palsy and possibly COVID-19. He was a chemistry professor and department chair at Towson University. He retired in 2017. He enjoyed classical music, reading, and family. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; his mother; and a sister.

Apr, 2021
74

Barbara A. Erwin-McGuire ’74, of Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y.; Sept. 11, of pancreatic cancer. She obtained a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in neuroanatomy and joined the lab of Nobel Laureate Torsten Wiesel at Harvard as a postdoctoral fellow. She then moved to Rockefeller University in New York City, where she continued to explore the microscopic structure of the retina. She also lectured at Cornell Medical School. She became disenchanted with research science, returned to Columbia to obtain her master’s in social work, and practiced privately for 20 years. She enjoyed genealogy and gardening. She is survived by her husband, Don, and two daughters. 

Apr, 2021
73

Frederick Scott Reding ’73, of Venice, Fla.; Sept. 16. He was recruited to Brown to compete for the swim and water polo team that would go on to win the New England Championship. After earning his MBA from Columbia University securing a full fellowship both years, he had a long professional career in banking and finance as an assistant vice president of Union Trust Company (1974-1979), vice president of investment banking at Dean Witter Reynolds (1980-1987), director of investment banking at Nomura Securities International (1987-1996), CFO of Immuno Therapy (1995-1998), CFO of Zonagen (1998-2000), CFO of Molecular Staging (2000-2005), CFO of Biodel (2007-2007), and retired as chairman and CFO from the Leadership Group in 2012. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2021
73

Elizabeth Barclay Engen ’73, ’79 AM, of East Providence; Oct. 23, after a lengthy illness. She was a linguist and taught at the Rhode Island School for the Deaf. A lover of languages, she spoke Norwegian and Portuguese. She enjoyed sailing, riding horses, skiing, and visiting friends and family in Norway. She is survived by two sons and their spouses, and seven grandchildren. 

Related classes:
Class of 1973, GS Class of 1979
Apr, 2021
73

James T. Cahill ’73, of Petaluma, Calif.; Nov. 18, of cancer. He worked his entire almost 40-year career in the wine business, where he was very well respected. He was a life-long learner, a voracious reader, and amateur financial advisor. He is survived by his wife, Ann, and three children.

Apr, 2021
72

Stowe H. Tattersall ’72, of Edgartown, Mass., Vero Beach, Fla., and Lawrenceville, N.J.; Nov. 25, after a three-year battle with pulmonary fibrosis. He had been an assistant vice president in the private clients group of Bankers Trust Company in New York. He is survived by his wife, Peg; a daughter and son-in-law; a sister and brother-in-law; and a nephew.

Apr, 2021
72

Donald S. McCullough ’72, of Boothbay, Me.; Sept. 29. He worked at Rolex, where he was top salesperson for many years. He enjoyed spending as much time as he could aboard his boat and was a member of the New York Yacht Club, the Cruising Club of America, and Lincoln County Rifle Club. He is survived by his wife, Kathy; two stepsons and their spouses; five grandchildren; and three sisters, including Sandy McCullough ’67.

Apr, 2021
71

Thomas E. Rosenbaum ’71, ’72 AM, of Mamaroneck, N.Y.; Sept. 16, of cancer. He worked for more than 40 years at the Rockefeller Archive Center in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. He also worked on behalf of the Community Unitarian Universalist Congregation of White Plains, N.Y., the United Way of Westchester, and several other organizations. He was the recipient of many awards for his service and dedication. He is survived by a sister, brother-in-law, niece, and nephew.

Related classes:
Class of 1971, GS Class of 1972
Apr, 2021
71

Thomas Goin ’71, of Jakarta-Pusat, Indonesia; Apr. 10, 2020, of cancer. He was a foreign legal adviser from 1984 to 2018. As a child of a Foreign Service officer, he grew up in Indonesia, Turkey, and Brazil. He traveled around the country giving lectures on law. He also coached teams for moot court. Previously, he worked at Bechtel Group and Thelin, Marrin, Johnson & Bridges, both in San Francisco. He enjoyed playing chess. He is survived by his mother, a sister, a brother, two nieces, and several cousins and friends.

Apr, 2021
69

Ronald S. Hutson ’69, of Norton, Mass.; Apr. 28, of COVID-19. His career began at the Providence Journal followed by work at the Call & Post, a weekly in Cleveland. He then covered City Hall for the Cleveland Press before joining the staff of the Boston Globe in 1974 as a general assignment reporter. While working at the Boston Globe, he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1975 as part of the newspaper’s coverage of court-ordered school desegregation. He also edited a series about race issues in Boston that was awarded a Pulitzer in 1984. After leaving the Globe, he worked as an adjunct professor of journalism at Suffolk University in Boston and at a nonprofit agency. He is survived by three daughters, two granddaughters, and two sisters. 

Apr, 2021
69

Harlan Hurwitz ’69, of River Edge, N.J.; Nov. 11. He had a career in dosimetry and software for cash handling systems. He kept active with a wide range of interests, including cars, languages, travel, and sci-fi novels and films. He is survived by his wife, Susan; three children; and a grandchild.

Apr, 2021
68

Diane Della-Loggia ’68, of Washington, D.C.; Sept. 23. She worked for more than 35 years at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, primarily on the Handbook of North American Indians, an encyclopedic multi-volume hardcover reference set about the prehistory, history, and cultures of the Indigenous peoples of North America. She retired in 2007 and was active in her church, book clubs, and volunteering in service positions that included writing letters to inmates as well as serving as a reading tutor for elementary students. She enjoyed gardening. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; and a brother.

Apr, 2021
67

Edward C. Arnn ’67, of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Nov. 1. He was a television anchor for WKTV in Utica, N.Y., for 13 years and a radio newscaster in the New York area for 25 years. Additionally, he taught science and math to children with special needs for 10 years. He is survived by his wife, Pam; a son; and two stepdaughters.

Apr, 2021
66

Maureen S. Levy Krasnow ’66, of Providence; Nov. 4. She was a fundraising professional for more than 30 years and helped ensure financial support for Meeting Street in Providence and for the Providence Public Library. She retired in 2010 but remained active with Hamilton House, an adult learning exchange in Providence, and Temple Sinai in Cranston. A proud alumna, she served as a grand marshal during her 25th reunion. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses and four grandchildren.

Apr, 2021
65

John G. Poole ’65, of Stamford, Conn.; Sept. 27. After receiving an MBA degree from the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business, he began working with Merrill Lynch in investment banking. His career there took him to Chicago and New York. Later, he and two partners formed Stanwich Partners Inc., an investment firm in Greenwich and then Stamford, Conn. He was a member of Delta Upsilon, the University Club of New York, and Second Congregational Church. He is survived by three children, including son Jessie ’94; five grandchildren; and his brother Donald W. Poole Jr. ’60.

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