Obituaries

Aug, 2021
MD 87

Mark A. Hosley ’87 MD, of Westport, Mass.; Mar. 24. He received his bachelor’s degree and PhD in biological sciences from the University of Michigan. After receiving his medical degree from Brown, he completed his neurology residency at UMass. He had a fellowship in spinal cord injury and was board certified in neurology, electrophysiology, and sleep medicine. He retired from the practice of neurology at SouthCoast Hospitals Group in 2018. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; a daughter; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
GS 97

Francine Filipek Collignon ’97 AM, of Warwick, R.I.; Feb. 13. She dedicated her life to education and serving those in need. For many years she was a faithful member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy, and during that time she worked with the Hmong culture. She spent an extended period in Thailand in their refugee camps documenting how they became literate in their own language. She is survived by her husband, Louis; a sister; a brother; and three nephews.

Aug, 2021
GS 92

Annette Marie Colella Crowley ’92 ScM, of Foxboro, Mass.; Jan. 31. She was a senior research technologist in Dr. James Gusella’s lab, which isolated the Huntington’s disease gene and its trinucleotide repeat mutation. Additionally, she was published in numerous research publications and abstracts. She was also a senior lecturer of biology at Suffolk University, Bunker Hill Community College, and Dean College. She was actively involved in her children’s sports activities and enjoyed gardening and the Boston Red Sox. She is survived by her husband, David; a daughter; two sons; two brothers; three sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
GS 90

Alta Mae Stevens ’90 AM, ’98 PhD, of Falmouth, Mass.; Feb. 20. She retired from a career as a high school English teacher. She was a member of the Falmouth Bikeways Committee and the Woods Hole Theater Company and was a photographer and reporter for the Woods Hole Weekly. For many years she was a volunteer at Falmouth Service Center. She is survived by four children and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
GS 79

Beverly Lyon Clark ’79 PhD, of Providence; Mar. 18. After graduating from Swarthmore College, she served as a Peace Corps volunteer from 1971 to 1974 and then attended Brown. She was a professor of English Literature at Wheaton College for 44 years and the author of 13 scholarly books and hundreds of articles. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by her husband, Roger ’76 AM, ’79 PhD; a daughter; a son; a grandson; and her sister Nancy Lyon ’82.

Aug, 2021
GS 77

Robert J. Brinkmann ’77 AM, of Easton, Md.; Feb. 12. He graduated from Loyola Law School, Loyola Marymount University in 1980, and practiced law. He is survived by his wife, Lisa; three children; and three sisters.

Aug, 2021
GS 75

Elizabeth Muir Ring ’75 PhD, of Clinton, N.Y.; Jan. 29. In the late 1960s she became one of the first female faculty members at the then all-male Hamilton College. She continued to teach philosophy at Hamilton through the 1980s and was known as a fierce advocate for women’s rights. After Hamilton became coed, she was a founding member of the Faculty for Women’s Concerns (FWC), which championed women’s equality on campus and supported feminist scholarship. She enjoyed cooking and traveling and is survived by a son and daughter-in-law, a grandson, and two brothers.

Aug, 2021
GS 71

Betty Joy Rossyn Jaffe ’71 AM, of Providence; Dec. 18. After raising a family and returning to school to obtain her master’s degree, she worked as an architectural historian for the mayor’s Office of Community Development. She served on the board of directors of the Bureau of Jewish Education and the Sandra Bornstein Holocaust Education Center, and was a member of the Temple Emanuel school board. In retirement, she volunteered as a counselor at Planned Parenthood. She enjoyed gardening, playing tennis and bridge, and her book club. She is survived by three children and their spouses, and
five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
GS 69

Stephen A. Scott ’69 AM, of Colorado Springs, Colo.; Mar. 10, from complications of dementia. After serving in the U.S. Army and graduating from the University of Oregon, he earned a master’s degree in music composition from Brown. He then joined the faculty at Colorado College, where he taught courses in jazz, composition, and electronic and experimental music. While there, he founded the Bowed Piano Ensemble, which was composed of 10 musicians, most of them Colorado College students that he directed, and used nylon filament, rosined horsehair and other implements to create an orchestral sound from the inside of a grand piano. The ensemble gained international fame and toured widely over the next several decades, including performances at Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Center, and the Sydney Opera House. In 2004, he was a resident scholar at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study and Conference Center on Lake Como, Italy, and in 2008 he was named USA Simon Fellow by United States Artists. He retired in 2014 as professor emeritus of music at Colorado College. He was listed in New Grove’s Dictionary of American Music and Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of Musicians. His music can be heard on the New Albion, Navona, and Albany labels and at www.bowedpianoensemble.com. He is survived by his wife, Victoria Hansen, who toured with the Bowed Piano Ensemble as a soprano soloist; a daughter; a son; two stepchildren; four grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2021
GS 68

Sarita Gattis Schotta ’68 PhD, of Fort Worth, Tex., formerly of Alexandria, Va.; Aug. 5. She is survived by a sister-in-law and 12 nieces and nephews. 

Aug, 2021
GS 66

Frances Shabica ’66 ScM, ’69 PhD, of Bronx, N.Y.; Apr. 5. A lifelong educator, she taught biology at several institutions, including Wheaton College, Connecticut College, the Lincoln School, and Dartmouth High School, before retiring in 2013. She was a Boston Red Sox fan and enjoyed solving crossword puzzles and reading mystery novels. She is survived by two daughters and their spouses, four grandsons, and two brothers, including Charles ’65.

Aug, 2021
GS 66

Hazel Conaty Donnelly ’66 MAT, of Fall River, Mass.; Mar. 19. She worked for the Fall River School Department at Durfee High School as history teacher and was the head of the history department for a combined 46 years. She retired in 2001. She is survived by three sons and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
GS 65

Henry Helenek ’65 ScM, ’71 PhD, of Milwaukee; Mar. 7. He was a geology and chemistry professor at Bradley University. He enjoyed the symphony and theater, reading and traveling. He is survived by a daughter, a niece, and a nephew.

Aug, 2021
GS 65

Lyle D. Baker ’65 MAT, of Topeka, Kans.; Mar. 24. He served in the U.S. Air Force, where he trained as a pilot. After military service, he taught high school in Clear Lake, Iowa, and junior college in Mason City, Iowa. He was a science and math coordinator for the Fort Dodge Public School system. In 1987, he began teaching at Washburn University in Topeka and with the Department of Education and the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, where he stayed until his retirement. He enjoyed photography, genealogy, hiking, traveling, and bluegrass music and its history. He is survived by three children and their spouses, four grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, and a sister-in-law.

Aug, 2021
GS 64

Nathaniel B. Atwater ’64 AM (see ’58).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1964, Class of 1958
Aug, 2021
90

Elizabeth Bird ’90, of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.; Mar. 28. For more than 20 years she taught courses on film, media, and art history at UC Berkeley, UC San Diego, California College of the Arts, and San Francisco Art Institute. She was passionate about the intersection of media and social issues, especially immigration rights. Having spent a summer in Mexico during high school and a year in Colombia and Peru in college, she developed a special connection to the struggles of disenfranchised peoples throughout Latin America. As a filmmaker, she is best known for her feature-length 2004 documentary Everyone Their Grain of Sand, which examines the impact of globalization on land ownership in northern Mexico with a focus on Tijuana’s Maclovio Rojas community. The film won several awards, including the Target Jury Award for Best Documentary at the Los Angeles Film Festival. An early proponent of marriage equality, she toured the country during the mid-1990s with her advocacy video Love Knows No Borders, which features transnational LGBTQ+ couples discussing the discrimination of U.S. marriage laws. She also worked as a producer for documentary film and television and served on the board of directors of the International Documentary Association (2007-2015). She was an avid hiker, birder, and cross-country skier and enjoyed watching her son’s soccer games and violin concerts. She is survived by her wife, Betti-Sue Hertz; a son; a brother and sister-in-law Rebecca MacDonald ’87; and two nieces.

Aug, 2021
GS 63

Kenneth V. Anderson Jr. ’63 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Brandon, Fla.; Feb. 24. He was an educator and researcher. He worked at Emory University in Atlanta as an associate professor and then full professor from 1966 to 1979. He was chairman of anatomy and professor of neurosurgery research at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss. from 1979 to 1984. He was the recipient of the Research Scientist Development Award from the National Institute of Mental Health and a member of many professional associations. He published more than 60 research papers. Later he worked as a teacher, head track coach, and then headmaster of Brandon Academy. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter; and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
GS 62

Harry C. Keenan ’62 MAT, of North Kingstown, R.I.; Mar. 11. He began his career in education as a math and science teacher and guidance counselor in the Warwick public school system. In 1965, he joined the faculty of Rhode Island Junior College (now Community College of Rhode Island) and, during more than three decades there, he was a professor of biology, psychology, and counseling, as well as an administrator in the office of academic affairs. For 10 years, he coached the CCRI men’s golf team, which won seven New England championships. He was inducted into the CCRI Hall of Fame and CCRI Athletic Hall of Fame, both in 2002. He was also a pharmacist at Oxnard Pharmacy in Warwick and Cornell’s Pharmacy in Providence. He was a U.S. Army veteran and a distance runner well into his 70s. He participated in several marathons and road races. He is survived by his wife, Norine; five children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2021
GS 61

Leonard P. Fletcher ’61 AM, ’65 PhD, of Guelph, Ontario, Canada; Mar. 22. He was recruited by the University of Waterloo in 1965, becoming the fourth faculty member of the economics department. He taught at Waterloo for nearly three decades, retiring in 1994. He founded the Caribbean Canadian Investment Club in 1974. Additionally, he was a founding member of the K-W Caribbean Canadian Cultural Association. He is survived by his wife, Hilda; three children and their spouses; four grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
GS 60

Robert F. Galante ’60 AM, of Newtown, Pa.; Mar. 27. After obtaining his MBA from NYU, he worked as an economic forecaster for AT&T. He enjoyed coaching baseball. He is survived by his wife, Juliet; three sons and their spouses; three grandchildren; and three nieces.

Aug, 2021
GS 52

Hans J. Zweig ’52 AM, of Santa Cruz, Calif.; Feb. 19. He had a career in physics research at Kodak. He published extensively in the area of optical physics with emphasis on the statistics and theory of photographic detection models. He spent many years involved with real estate and travel. He enjoyed yoga, poetry, philosophy, and cycling. He is survived by three children.

Aug, 2021
19

Alexander M.F. Barry ’19, of Calabasas, Calif.; Jan. 12, of Ewing sarcoma. He was a writer. At age 20, his short story, Fence, was published in the Catamaran Literary Reader. He was chosen for the “Top 25 to Watch” by Glimmer Train for his story Saguaro and at Brown he won the Mark Baumer Prize for Language Art. He traveled the world, visited five continents and studied abroad in London. He enjoyed books, stories, words, puns, jokes, superheroes, poems, and comics. He is survived by his parents, two sisters, grandparents, and aunts, uncles, and cousins.

Aug, 2021
94

Milica G. Kastner ’94, of London, U.K.; Mar. 14, of colon cancer and uterine sarcoma. The daughter of the late Hollywood producer Elliott Kastner and interior designer Tessa Kennedy, she was an actress and producer best known for The Dark Backward, Yesterday’s Hero, and Papadopoulos & Sons. She wrote about her terminal cancer battle in a Tatler magazine article, where she wrote she was “choosing not to be a victim.” Her brothers posted tributes online about her capacity to care for others over herself, how she always looked for the good in people and made them her friends, and of her infectious laugh. She is survived by Alex Corcoran; a daughter, a son; and four brothers, including Dillon Kastner ’92.  

Aug, 2021
92

James J. Cotter Jr. ’92, of Los Angeles; Mar. 10, of kidney cancer. He attended NYU and obtained his JD and a Master of Laws in Taxation. After a legal career in Manhattan specializing in corporate law and practicing at the international law firm Winston & Strawn, he dedicated his career to his family’s business. He spent many years as CEO of both Cotter Orchards and Cecelia Packing Corporation, a Cotter family-owned citrus grower, packer and marketer in the San Joaquin Valley. He joined the board of directors of Reading International in 2002, working with his father, who was CEO. In 2007, he became vice chairman and was later appointed president and then CEO. During his tenure at Reading, he was instrumental in establishing the company as a leading theatrical exhibition company and a major real estate company. He especially enjoyed spending time with his children and family, cooking, competitive sports, and traveling to Italy. He is survived by his wife, Gina; three children; his mother; and two sisters.

Aug, 2021
83

Jay Sorgman ’83, of Norton, Mass.; Sept. 5, 2020, of glioblastoma. After graduating from Brown, he attended the University of Massachusetts Medical School and became a gastroenterologist in Providence. He was on staff at Rhode Island and Miriam hospitals. He was active with the alumni council at University of Massachusetts Medical School and enjoyed teaching students, residents, and fellows. He served as a clinical assistant professor of medicine at Brown and was a Tufts University teaching fellow. He liked to travel and learn about other cultures and immerse himself in their history. He was proud to say he had visited all 50 states and 44 countries. He is survived by his husband, Anthony Wilson; his father; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
83

Edward N. Belt Jr. ’83, of Riverside, R.I.; Mar. 18. He worked at Blue Cross Blue Shield and later became the vice president of Delta Dental of Massachusetts and then the director of marketing at Blue Cross in 1984. He began his own company, Primarily Care, providing compensation, benefits planning and consultation services in Rhode Island for more than 20 years before merging with CBIZ in 2012. He continued to work at CBIZ Primarily Care until 2018. He volunteered with numerous organizations serving on community boards and committees but was most proud to have served on the Bishop’s Council for the Diocese. He enjoyed music and singing and was instrumental in starting a gospel choir at Holy Name of Jesus Catholic Church. He also was active in prison ministry. He is survived by his wife, Gail; his mother; six children; and 11 grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
83

Mark J. Plesent ’83, of New York City; Feb. 19, of cancer. He joined Working Theatre as an intern in 1989 and quickly became managing director. He served as development director of Lar Lubovitch Dance Company from 1992 to 1996 before returning to Working Theatre as producing director. He became the sole producing artistic director in 2010 and brought on Tamilla Woodard in 2020 to serve as co-artistic director. Under his leadership, Working Theater was honored with six Drama Desk Award nominations, a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Ensemble for Tabletop, and three Audelco Awards. He also founded the company’s community arts education program TheaterWorks, which provides classes in writing and performance for working people. He instituted a ticket subsidy program to provide low-cost tickets to groups of working people and in 2015 he founded Five Boroughs One City, which is a community-based theater producing project aimed at fostering dialogue about pressing social justice issues within and between the diverse working-class communities of New York City. He is survived by his husband, Roger Belknap; his parents; two sisters; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
83

Anne J. Arvidson ’83, of East Greenwich, R.I.; Mar. 15. She started her teaching career at Rocky Hill County Day School and then spent the next 30 years as an English teacher at Exeter West Greenwich Regional High School before retiring. She worked with Reading Across Rhode Island to promote literacy and the value of reading within the state. In addition, she had her own free little library outside her home that she filled for her neighborhood. She is survived by a sister, two nieces, and a nephew.

Aug, 2021
79

Davina Parmet ’79, of Williamsburg, Va.; Mar. 25, of lung cancer. She worked in public television and later was a freelance writer. In 1992, she published The World of Ballet. Later in her career she earned a master’s degree in social work from the College of William & Mary and served as a court appointed special advocate (CASA), advocating for children victimized by abuse and neglect. In recognition of her tireless work, she was named CASA Volunteer of the Year in 2005. She is survived by her husband, Paul; two daughters; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter.

Aug, 2021
77

Mark A. Josephson ’77, of New York City; Mar. 2. He was a freelance music reviewer for Soho News and Village Voice before founding Rockpool Promotions in 1979. He later cofounded the pioneering New Music Seminar. Recently, he was executive director at the Wellmont Theatre in Montclair, N.J. He enjoyed sharing his music, curating from his vast collection, making CDs, and reading, and was fascinated by history of any kind. He is survived by his father, stepmother, a sister, and a brother.

Aug, 2021
77

Holly Allethaire Cullen ’77, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 19. She studied nursing at the Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University. Throughout her career as a registered nurse and family nurse practitioner she served in various capacities, including director of education at Kent Hospital and as a professor at CCRI, where she was head of the nursing department. She affectionately referred to her students as her “green beans.” She is survived by cousins.

Aug, 2021
76

Beth Hyams ’76, of Portland, Ore.; Mar. 13, of cancer. For more than two decades she was the voice of public radio on Oregon Public Broadcasting. She began her career as a reporter and anchor at Pacifica radio KPFA in Berkeley. In 1989, after moving to Portland, she was a volunteer coordinator at community radio station KBOO and was hired at OPB in 1993. She joined OPB as morning anchor before settling in at All Things Considered. She retired from the air, remaining as editor and focusing on training and development. A lifelong dancer, she danced with the African dance communities in San Francisco and in Portland. She also liked hiking and gardening. She is survived by her wife, L.C. Hansen; a stepson; a sister; a sister-in-law; and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
76

Claude Cazzulino ’76, of Pasadena, Calif.; Feb. 26. After Brown, he was a cub reporter for the Daily Record in New Jersey. In 1984, he graduated from Northeastern University School of Law in Boston, where he studied labor law. He moved to Los Angeles and for more than 32 years was an attorney and partner at Schwartz, Steinsapir, Dohrmann and Sommers LLP, where he advised labor organizations and their healthcare and pension trust funds. He authored an article on domestic relations and employee benefit plans and was a contributing editor to the American Bar Association’s treatise on Employee Benefits Law. He swam with the Masters Swimming Team for more than 10 years, was a potter, and enjoyed skiing, hiking, camping, and traveling with family. In 2017 he was diagnosed and treated for a brain tumor. He is survived by his wife, Theresa; two children; a grandson; his mother; and a brother.

Aug, 2021
73

David W. R. Wawro ’73, of Delhi, N.Y.; Feb. 21. He was the head of litigation at Torys, LLP, in New York. He spent the year following graduation working at Rhode Island Legal Services. In 1977, he received his JD from the University of Virginia School of Law and was admitted to the New York bar in 1978. He was an expert in a broad range of legal disciplines ranging from antitrust and commercial law to human rights and constitutional law. He had a passion for social justice and pro bono causes. He was an avid horseback rider, skier, and cyclist, and enjoyed the outdoors. He traveled extensively with his family. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Walker; his mother; a daughter; sister Gillian A.N. Weatherhead ’78; and four brothers, including Peter ’70, Mark ’75, and Geoffrey ’83.

Aug, 2021
72

William C. Moskosky Jr. ’72, of West Greenwich, R.I.; Feb. 27. He was a supervisor at the Rhode Island Department of Health WIC program from 1978 to 2005. He was a Fourth Degree Knight at the Msgr. Blessing Council, an Eagle Scout, a Eucharistic minister at Rhode Island Hospital, a lecturer at Saints John and Paul Church in Coventry, and a member of the Rhode Island Ski Patrol. He was also a member of the West Greenwich School Committee and the Rhode Island Emergency Management Agency. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; a daughter and son-in-law; and a son.

Aug, 2021
71

Stephen L. Lehrer ’71, of Cranston, R.I.; Feb. 13. He received a master’s degree in education from Rhode Island College and taught for more than 30 years in the Bristol/Warren school system as a high school math teacher and technology coordinator. He was also a trainer for Teachers in Technology. For many years he worked at Camp JORI as an assistant director and then, in 1991, he worked in the summers as program director at Camp Taconic in the Berkshires of Massachusetts. He was the volunteer usher coordinator at Trinity Repertory Company for many years and an avid Boston sports fan. He is survived by his wife, Freda; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; a granddaughter; a sister and brother-in-law; and five nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
68

Ross A. Yeoman ’68, of Boulder, Colo; Oct. 27, of cancer. As a geologist he did potassium-argon dating of rocks for the U.S. Geological Survey for many years. He served in the U.S. Army, supported the Boulder Philharmonic, was passionate about the environment and combating climate change, and enjoyed hiking, skiing, and mountain climbing. He is survived by his wife Agnes and a sister. 

Aug, 2021
68

Stephen W. Biello ’68, of Newport, R.I.; Nov. 7, 2019. Upon graduating from Brown, he was drafted into the U.S. Army and served in the U.S. and Korea as a preventative medicine specialist responsible for water analysis and purification and the prevention of water-, food-, air-, insect-, and rodent-borne diseases. He was a coach and referee at the local YMCA, as well as working as a youth counselor at the Boys & Girls Club Summer Camp. While in the Army, he assisted at a Korean orphanage conducting clothing drives and helping families raise domestic animals. Upon returning home from Korea, he worked for the Veterans Administration of R.I. He received many awards for his service but was most proud of being named R.I. Federal Employee of the Year in the early 1990s. He retired from the VA after more than 30 years of service. He is survived by a sister, a brother, two nieces, and a nephew. 

Aug, 2021
65

Richard Baglow ’65, of Metairie, La., formerly of New York City; May 21, 2020. He is survived by his wife, Melanie; three children and their spouses; and 10 grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
64

John Dutton ’64, of Sacramento, Calif.; Feb. 25, of multiple organ failure. He was an investment banker in Boston before moving to Los Angeles to head international development for American Medical International, a job that allowed him to travel the world. Later he started his own company, JM Dutton & Assoc., which produced investment research on small cap companies. He retired in 2015. While in school, he was an active athlete and competed in football and crew. He rowed consistently, rowing in his final years on the American River in Sacramento. He also enjoyed flying and reading about history. He is survived by two daughters; son John ’86; and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
63

Albert Yodakis Jr. ’63, of Colts Neck, N.J.; Mar. 24, of cancer. He served three terms as mayor, and was chairman of the town’s planning and zoning boards. He also held a leadership role in the Boy Scouts of America with Troop 290. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; a son; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
63

Wallace S. Tomy ’63, of Mercer Island, Wash.; Mar. 1, from myelodysplastic syndrome. He was a successful salesperson in the home heating, ventilating, and air conditioning industry, which afforded him opportunities to travel across America. He was a U.S. Navy Vietnam veteran and is survived by his wife, Lois; four children and their spouses; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
63

Robert N. Nelson ’63, of Bowie, Md.; Apr. 10. After obtaining a doctoral degree from MIT, he began teaching at Georgia Southern University. He spent many sabbaticals and summers conducting research and designing equipment for experiments at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. He retired and moved to Bowie, where he continued to be involved in research regarding cosmic dust. He was a member of many chemical professional societies and attended both Oseh Shalom Synagogue and Bet Aviv. He enjoyed genealogy, traveling, and editing chemistry textbooks. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two sons; three grandchildren; a sister; and his former wife, Anne Milbouer.

Aug, 2021
63

Gregory D. McLaughlin ’63, of West Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 13. He had a career as a district marketing manager at Hallmark Cards, Inc., during which time he also served as a sales trainer with Dale Carnegie and Associates. After retiring from Hallmark, he became the director at Dale Carnegie and later formed Northeast Sales and Services Inc., an automotive sales training consultancy. In retirement, he enjoyed ballroom dancing and traveling. At Brown he was a member of the men’s varsity hockey team and Delta Phi. He is survived by his wife, Irene; three children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
62

Charles Caperonis ’63, of North Andover, Mass.; Feb. 28, of Parkinson’s disease. After graduation, he joined the U.S. Navy serving as a communications officer. He earned his MBA at Columbia University and held positions with Procter & Gamble, Lever Brothers, and Berol Corporation. In 1980, he bought K.P. Thompson Co., a stationery and office products company in Andover and Lawrence, Mass. After selling his stationery company, he volunteered with the State Department and spent time getting an office products company started in Russia. He retired as an investment advisor with Fidelity Investments. He was a member and past president of the Lawrence Rotary Club, where he was elected a Paul Harris Fellow. He served as treasurer of the Congregational Church of Topsfield and served on the Boxford Personnel Board. He was an avid sailor and enjoyed travel and is survived by his wife, Serena; daughter Daphna Cox ’94; a son; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
62

James J. Leonard Jr. ’62, of Phoenix; Feb. 20. After Brown, where he was a member of the football team and captain of the baseball team, he was admitted to the University of Notre Dame Law School. He was admitted to the Arizona Bar in 1966 and practiced for nearly five decades representing injured victims of medical negligence, particularly birth-injured children. He was a professional mentor to other attorneys, a lecturer at professional conventions, a coach in youth sports, and a volunteer delivery driver for St. Vincent DePaul. He is survived by his wife, Sue Ann; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a sister; and four nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
61

Stephen L. Gallagher Jr. ’61 of Portland, Ore.; Mar. 12. After Brown, he joined the U.S. Air Force and later the Air National Guard. He studied law at the University of Oregon, working in private practice before being appointed to the Circuit Court of Multnomah County in 1981. He presided over numerous high-profile cases during his more than two decades on the bench. In 1996, he was one of the first judges in the United States to require a public agency to provide homosexual couples with the same medical, dental, and life insurance benefits it offered to married couples, a ruling that was initiated after Oregon Health Sciences University was found to be discriminating by denying benefits to the domestic partners of three gay employees. He served on the board of the Portland Opera and sang with the Balladeers at the Multnomah Athletic Club. He is survived by two daughters and a grandson.

Aug, 2021
60

Ann Jolly Howard ’60, of Greenfield, Mass.; Apr. 10. She taught English at Greenfield High School for 30 years. After retiring, she volunteered as a tutor for English as a Second Language students. She thoroughly enjoyed American literature and film. She is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and a brother and sister-in-law.

Aug, 2021
60

Rockwell Gray Jr. ’60, of St. Louis, Mo.; Apr. 12. He was a professor of philosophy and taught at Washington University and Webster University in St. Louis, as well as secondary schools in the U.S. and abroad. He lived and traveled extensively in Spain and Chile. He wrote the biography of Ortega y Gasset, The Imperative of Modernity, as well as A Century of Enterprise: St. Louis, 1894–1994, and translated a collection of Chilean folk tales by Yolando Pino Saavedra. He had a great sense of humor and could break into song, remembering obscure lyrics and melodies. A reader of Walt Whitman and Robert Frost, he enjoyed being read to by his wife during the last months of his life. He is survived by his wife, Madelyn; three children, including Elizabeth Gray ’99, ’04 MAT; and four grandchildren. 

Aug, 2021
60

Olive Jeanfreau Alexander ’60, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Feb. 28. She was a musician, author, educator, and missionary. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, 10 grandchildren, 18 great-grandchildren, and two sisters.

Aug, 2021
59

Donald A. Stoufer ’59, of Alexandria, Va.; Mar. 29. He received post-graduate degrees from the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College and served 30 years in the Navy, where he earned many decorations. His last assignment was executive assistant to the Under Secretary of the Navy. In 1987, he retired from the Navy and held various positions at PricewaterhouseCoopers and IBM. After retiring a second time from IBM, he worked for the National Academy for Public Administration. He founded the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Starlight Foundation for Children and he enjoyed the opportunity to play Santa Claus at the Children’s Hospital during his many years supporting the Foundation. He was a docent and later an information desk volunteer at the Library of Congress and active in the Volunteer Council for the National Symphony Orchestra. He enjoyed music and traveling and visited every continent. He is survived by his wife, Mary; two sons and daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; a sister; and a brother.

Aug, 2021
59

John F. Quinn Jr. ’59, of Warwick, R.I.; Mar. 8. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and worked for 20 years in executive capacities in Boston and Providence ad agencies before founding his own direct marketing firm in 1980. He published four eBooks on Amazon and enjoyed sailing, including up and down the East Coast. He is survived by two sisters and several nieces and nephews, including Richard Quinn ’84 and Heather Quinn ’86.

Aug, 2021
59

Laurence J. Keohane ’59, of Brighton, Mass.; Mar. 13. He retired from Conrail consolidated Rail Corp. in 1999. He served in the National Guard and enjoyed horse racing, playing golf, and reading. He is survived by a sister-in-law and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
59

Jane Moseley Bronk ’59, of Hartford, Conn.; Mar. 21. Her working life was spent in education. She taught at Windham High, Sedgwick Jr. High, and finally at Loomis Chaffee in Windsor from 1970 to 2006, continuing as a tutor there until 2011. In 50 years of teaching English, she had an impact on thousands of students, many of whom she kept up with well into their adult lives. She enjoyed many things, including knitting, gardening, baking, traveling, and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. She is survived by a daughter, a granddaughter, a brother-in-law and his wife, a niece, and a nephew.

Aug, 2021
58

Andree J. Guay Wells ’58, of Nashville; Dec. 16. After earning a master’s in public health from Johns Hopkins University, she worked for many years as a public health nurse, a nursing supervisor and a professor of nursing. She is survived by three children and their spouses and 10 grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
58

Kenneth A. Kurze ’58, of Middletown, R.I.; Feb. 24. In 1959, he became a U.S. Department of State Foreign Service Officer and throughout his 30-year service traveled to India, Nepal, Morocco, France, Barbados, and Austria. He and his wife raised their four children on four continents. He was fluent in German, French, and Hindi. In 1982, he completed the U.S. Naval War College Senior Course in Newport, R.I. He received the U.S. Department of State’s Individual Meritorious Honor Award for his handling of political affairs at the U.S. Consulate in Bombay during the 1971-72 Bangladesh War crisis, and the Individual Superior Honor Award for his actions on Grenada to assess the political situation and to ensure the safety of Americans on the eve of the 1983 U.S. invasion/intervention. He retired to Middletown in 1989 and was active in the community. He was an accomplished pianist, an occasional painter, and an avid philatelist. He is survived by daughter Barbara Kurze ’82; three sons; a daughter-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
58

Edward S. Flattau ’58, of Washington, D.C.; Apr. 8, of prostate cancer. He attended Columbia Law School but left after two years to begin his journalism career as a general assignment reporter with United Press International Albany (N.Y.) Bureau. In 1964, he became a political correspondent for UPI in New York State and in 1967, he transferred to UPI’s Washington bureau, where his beat included Congress, various federal agencies and on occasion, the White House. His prize-winning column first appeared when he took over the assignment from the late former Interior Secretary Stewart Udall. His Washington-based column has appeared in as many as 120 daily newspapers at various times during the past five decades. He won 10 national journalism awards, reported from five different continents, and covered the key issues and figures associated with modern day environmentalism. In 2011, the Washingtonian Magazine named him the “Best Columnist” in the nation’s capital. He is the author of numerous books. He was a member of the U.S. Army Reserves and the Society of Environmental Journalists. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; and son Jeremy ’01.

Aug, 2021
58

Domenic E. D’Eramo ’58, of Millis, Mass.; Mar. 18, after a long illness. After working for Consolidated Edison on Staten Island, he enlisted in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He married in 1961 and settled in Millis in 1967. From 1962 to 1999 he worked for Sverdrup Corporation, beginning as a project manager, and ascended to regional executive working out of the company’s Boston office. He worked on or managed major construction projects, such as the Red Line Extension from Harvard Square to Alewife Station, the Ted Williams Tunnel, and the Old Colony Railroad Restoration project. After retiring from Sverdrup he worked for Rizzo & Associates, where he was part of the team designing the infrastructure for Gillette Stadium. A longtime member of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers (BSCE), he was one of the founders of the Engineering Center, a nonprofit dedicated to the development of young engineers. He also served as BSCE president in the late 1980s and was named a fellow by BSCE. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus and served two terms on the Millis Board of Public Works. He enjoyed traveling with family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Janet; three children and their spouses; five grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
58

Nathaniel B. Atwater ’58, ’64 AM, of Little Compton, R.I.; Feb. 11. He earned a PhD in medieval literature from Exeter University in England and taught English at UMass Dartmouth. He retired in 1991. In retirement he served two terms as president of the Little Compton Historical Society. He enjoyed working in his vegetable garden, Indian artifact hunting, and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandsons; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Related classes:
Class of 1958, GS Class of 1964
Aug, 2021
57

Kent H. Sabin ’57, of Jacksonville, Fla., formerly of Fair Haven, N.J.; Feb. 28. After earning a master’s degree in electrical engineering from NYU in 1959, he began a career at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Whippany, N.J., where he was awarded the Distinguished Technical Staff Award designed to recognize sustained achievement. He retired in 1989. He enjoyed running and participated in numerous marathons. He was a member of the Jersey Shore Running Club and a founding member of the Rumson Chapter of the Hash House Harriers international running group. In retirement, he embarked on a 9,000-mile solo bike trip across North America and after more than five months biking, he arrived back home in New Jersey on his 28th wedding anniversary. He moved to Jacksonville in 2008 and is survived by his wife, Susie; a daughter; two grandsons; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
57

Louis R. Maiello ’57, of Cranston, R.I.; Apr. 2. After Brown, he went on to study medicine at the University of Bologna in Italy. He returned to Rhode Island and cofounded and worked as a radiologist for Rhode Island Medical Imaging for 35 years. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and summering at their home on Great Island, boating, clamming, and spending time with his family and friends. He is survived by his wife, Carol; two daughters; a son-in-law; three grandchildren; and a sister.

Aug, 2021
57

Jay Leavitt ’57, of Hendersonville, N.C.; Feb. 25. Just prior to his junior year at Brown, while a member of the cheerleading squad, he had a tumbling accident that caused him to break his neck and become a hemiplegic. Despite his disability and as a Fulbright scholar, he went on to attend the University of Italy at Pisa where he taught a numerical analysis course. He later taught in the mathematics department at the University of Minnesota and became an associate professor in their computer science department. In 1973, with the passage of Section 504 of the Americans with Disabilities Act, he became active as an advocate for the disabled. He served on several commissions for the disabled under then New York Gov. Mario Cuomo and was a member of the board of directors of Western New York Independent Living Center. He retired to North Carolina and underwent spinal surgery that left him a paraplegic. In his mid-70s, he passed the FINRA Series 65 Exam and created and published forecasting tools for stock market analysts while continuing to advocate for the elderly and serve on a state board addressing the needs of residents in long-term care facilities. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; a son; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law and several cousins.

Aug, 2021
57

Lewis A. Kay ’57, of Moorestown, N.J.; Mar. 26. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and for more than 50 years worked as a pediatric dentist. He was affiliated with several hospitals and organizations, including Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia as a senior dentist, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine as an associate pediatric dentist, Cooper Hospital Medical Center on the cleft palate team, Episcopal Hospital/Temple University as clinical director, Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped as president and board member, New Jersey Dental Association, New Jersey Foundation of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. He was recognized for his outstanding service and extraordinary effort as a member of the Dental Identification Unit during 9/11 and in 2011 was the inaugural recipient of the Dr. Lewis A. Kay Excellence in Education Award. He also served in the United States Army. He is survived by his wife, Jo Ann; daughter Dana Kay Smith ’82 and her spouse; son Stephen ’85 and his spouse; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
57

Robert K. Hitt ’57, of Port St. Lucie, Fla., formerly of Cheshire, Conn.; Nov. 21. He played football at Brown his freshman year, then interrupted his college years to serve in the U.S. Marines before graduating from Brown upon his return. He worked in the family business, Hoffman Paint and Wallpaper, his entire career and was president of the company for most of those years. He was a referee and umpire for several sports and earned the position of referee for Division One football games. He was an active member of the Connecticut Governor’s Footguard and a lifetime member of the Lanphier Cove Association of Branford (Conn.), where he served as president and treasurer. After moving to Port St. Lucie, he continued to be involved in many social groups until his health prevented it. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two daughters and sons-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
56

David S. Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn. and Charlestown, R.I.; Jan. 31, of Parkinson’s disease. He married a few months after graduating and settled in the Hartford, Conn. area. Engineer by day and law student by night, upon graduation (first in his class), he established what would be the first of several patent law firms. Not only a patent attorney, he was also a named inventor on at least five patents, a fact of which he was quietly proud. David and Linda were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera, and he was honored to share the Met stage with Luciano Pavarotti one evening. His bouillabaisse was celebrated around the world, as was his warmth and generosity. He enjoyed his family and the R.I. shore, where he had a beach home for 35 years, and where he looked forward to spending most of the summer with visits from his children, and grandchildren. He was a father figure to his younger siblings, mentor to younger attorneys, including his son, and dear friend and trusted advisor to many. He gave great toasts, was unabashed in his enjoyment of life, and set a spectacular example for those following him.He is survived by his wife, Linda Kessler ’56; son  Douglas ’81; daughter Sarah ’89; and their spouses; four grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
55

Sydney W. Noyes ’55, of Haddon Township, N.J.; Mar. 9. He served two years in the U.S. Army and worked in the field of finance for several years before joining a Philadelphia bank, where he became a senior vice president. He later owned and operated the Potted Plant in Cherry Hill, N.J., for 17 years. He was an avid boater and fisherman. He is survived by his wife, Lois; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three granddaughters; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
54

David Sloan ’54, of East Haddam, Conn.; Mar. 30. After discharge from the Army, he began a career in business development working for several multinational corporations assisting them in building their sales efforts, including international trade. He later became a real estate agent and appraiser serving Connecticut markets until his retirement. He had a mischievous sense of humor and enjoyed the opera, reading, and the N.Y. Giants. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; son David ’88 and his wife; and two granddaughters.

Aug, 2021
54

Charles M. Moran Jr. ’54, of Tiverton, R.I.; Feb. 18. He served in the ROTC at Brown and was drafted into the Army during the Korean War. After military service, he worked at Honeywell before transitioning to print journalism. He was a stringer for the Providence Journal and Fall River Herald News, and eventually the editor and publisher of the Tiverton Bulletin in the 1960s. Later he worked in the office at the family business, National Roofing Company, until its closing in 1984. During the time working in the family business, he returned to school and earned a law degree from the New England School of Law. He was passionate about local government and politics and served on the Tiverton Planning Board from 1963 until 1975 and again from 1978 to 1988. He also served on the Town’s Personnel Board in 1977 and 1978. He went on to serve as chairman of Tiverton’s Democratic Town Committee from 1995 until 2011. He was an alternate on the Board of Canvassers from 2011 until 2014 and was part of Congressman David Cicilline’s Senior Advisory Council during Cicilline’s first term. He strongly believed in citizens exercising their right to vote, offering rides to the polls for voters without transportation, and often organized meal delivery to poll workers of both parties on Election Day in Tiverton. He was a communicant of St. Christopher’s Church for more than 80 years. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; two sons; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
54

Patricia J. Collins ’54, of Branford, Conn.; Mar. 21, of pancreatic cancer. She was a Tony Award–winning lighting designer. After graduating from Brown, she spent a year at Yale Drama School. She worked as a stage manager at the Joffrey Ballet, then as an assistant to Jean Rosenthal, who was a top Broadway lighting designer at the American Shakespeare Festival Theater in Stratford, Conn. She worked as a stage manager, among other jobs, in the 1960s when Joseph Papp, the founder and director of the New York Shakespeare Festival, hired her to design the lighting for productions of The Threepenny Opera (Lincoln Center Revival) in 1976. She won her Tony for Herb Gardner’s I’m Not Rappaport in 1986, and was the lighting designer for more than 30 other Broadway productions, among them Ain’t Misbehavin’ and Doubt, which earned her a Tony nomination. In a 2002 revival of Lanford Wilson’s Burn This at the Union Square Theater, she transformed figures onstage into what Ben Brantley of The New York Times called “ambiguous silhouettes.” She also worked at regional theaters throughout the United States and with opera companies in New York, San Francisco, Santa Fe, London, Paris, and Munich. She is survived by her partner, Dr. Virginia Stuermer.

Aug, 2021
54

Ruth Finkelstein Drill Ignatoff ’54, of Roseland, N.J.; Nov. 20. She was a homemaker who wanted more and returned to school, graduating from Rutgers University School of Social Work in 1968. She accepted a position with the Jewish Family Service, where she worked as a social worker, and was an active member of the Community and Social Agency Employees union. She was a role model for community involvement and an advocate for social justice. In 1970, she led a sit-down strike which ended with her spending an afternoon in jail. She was a lifelong member of the Democratic party and had strong opinions about politics. She is survived by five children and their spouses, including son Jonathan Drill ’80; daughters Rebecca Drill ’82 and Esther Drill ’90; four stepchildren and their spouses; 17 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
54

Olinda Andrade Calista ’54, of Worcester, Mass., formerly of Rumford, R.I.; Feb. 10, of Parkinson’s disease. She continued working towards a master’s degree at Rhode Island College while working as an elementary school teacher in East Providence. She believed in educational equity and was a volunteer for many years with Literacy Volunteers of America, assisting English Language Learners to read and write. Throughout her life she experienced medical challenges, yet did so with dignity and a quiet elegance, always wanting to be productive and contribute to the well-being of her family and others. She was active in the R.I. Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association. It was her wish to make an anatomical donation (her brain) for the advancement of Parkinson’s Disease research. In 2016, she moved to Worcester to be closer to her daughter and was welcomed by the Briarwood Community, where she actively participated in life and ongoing learning. She is survived by a daughter, two sisters, two sisters-in-law, an aunt, and a cousin.

Aug, 2021
54

William Brigden ’54, of Fairfield, Conn.; June 13, 2020, from COVID-19. He was a marketing director for various agencies, including Benton & Bowles of New York City. He retired in 2001. He was an avid golfer, swimmer, and hiker and enjoyed traveling and photography. He is survived by three children, including Adriane Brigden McDermott ’91, and six grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
53

Robert E. Kay ’53, of Philadelphia; Mar. 3, from COVID-19. He had a psychiatry practice that was focused on helping the most severely mentally ill, juvenile delinquents, and drug addicts. He had many interests, including reading and music, especially classical and jazz, and enjoyed listening to music at the Curtis Center for many years. He encouraged home schooling and was always available to help those in need. He was involved in the Main Line Unitarian Church and the Philadelphia Ethical Society. He is survived by a daughter, two sons and daughters-in-law, two granddaughters, and a great-granddaughter.

Aug, 2021
53

Louis W. Bauman ’53, of Scarsdale, N.Y.; Mar. 22, after a long illness. He was an accomplished real estate attorney who used his legal acumen for the Jewish community in decades of community service, including on the School Board of Hawthorne Cedar Knolls Union Free District, for which he served as president from 1986 to 2001. He was also chair of the Town of Eastchester Zoning Board of Appeals from 1985 to 2001. He served as a trustee of the Jewish Board of Family and Children’s Services, Inc., and was an honorary member of the Advisory Board of the Maxwell Institute, a division of St. Vincent’s Hospital-Westchester. He is survived by his wife, Susan; five children and their spouses; and nine grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
52

Robert J. Wheeler ’52, of Hamilton, Mass.; Apr. 13. He was an integral part of Brown hockey, culminating in a Final Four appearance in 1951. Seven decades later, he still holds the Brown record for goals in a game (8), goals in a season (36), and career goals (86). In addition, he had 12 career game-winning goals and 10 career hat tricks. An All-American in 1952, he was also awarded numerous league honors. Additionally in 1952, he was named Most Valuable Player and received First Team All-Pentagonal League. He was also named to the First Team in 1951 and received Second Team accolades in 1950. In 1971, he was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame. He also competed for the Brown baseball team as a third baseman. He served in the U.S. Army in Korea from 1952 to 1955 and joined IBM as a sales manager upon discharge. He moved across the East coast with IBM and after settling in Hamilton started a new career in the investment business, initially for White Weld and then later at Merrill Lynch. He enjoyed raising labs, collies, and spaniels. He is survived by five children and their spouses, 14 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
52

Douglass E. Randlett ’52, of Oklahoma City, Okla., formerly of Milton, Mass. and Albany, N.Y.; Mar. 25, of pneumonia. From 1968 to 1988 he had a career in the warehousing industry. Upon retirement, he moved to Milton to care for his parents. He was a veteran of the U.S. Navy and a lifelong Red Sox and New England Patriots fan. He is survived by daughter Karen Randlett Delaney ’78 and two grandchildren. 

Aug, 2021
52

Carlton J. McLeod ’52, of Hernando, Fla.; May 1.  After Brown, he went on to earn his DDS from the University of Maryland in 1956 and began his naval career as a senior dental student on active duty. Upon graduation, he was selected for the Navy Dental Internship Program and served at St. Albans Naval Hospital, Long Island, N.Y. After subsequent tours he began a three-year program in the specialty of periodontics at the National Naval Dental Center in Bethesda, completing his residency and earning a master’s degree from Georgetown University in 1967. Thereafter, he served as senior dental officer aboard the USS Enterprise, completing two tours to Vietnam from 1967 to 1969.  He was promoted to captain while serving as head of periodontics at Naval Hospital, Oakland, Ca., also known as Oak Knoll Naval Hospital, and was transferred to Naval Dental Center, Great Lakes, Ill. in 1974 as executive officer. He assumed command in 1976. In 1979, he reported to the Navy Bureau of Medicine, and Surgery in Washington, D.C. as head of the professional branch of the dental division. In 1981, now Admiral McLeod, he became Inspector General of the Navy Medical Department. In 1983 he was appointed Chief of the Navy Dental Corps, Assistant Chief of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for Dentistry and, additionally, was the first Director of Health Care Operations, serving on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations in the office of the Surgeon General. He retired in November 1984. He received numerous honors, including the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Unit Citation, Meritorious Unit Citation, National Defense Service Medal, Naval Expeditionary Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal with Two Stars, Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm Cluster and the Vietnam Service Medal. Professionally, he has been honored as a Fellow of the American College of Dentists and a Fellow of the International College of Dentists. He was honored by the University of Maryland Dental School as the Distinguished Alumnus in 2001. He remained active in community and veteran’s affairs, serving as past president of the Citrus County Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America. He has served as chairman of the financial advisory board for the Citrus County Art League’s new theater and has been a member of the Veterans Appreciation Week Committee and chairman of the Veterans Day Memorial Service and a member of the Veterans in the Classroom Program since 1995. In December 2018, he was inducted into the Florida Veterans Hall of Fame. He is survived by his longtime companion, Marge M. Blunk; three children; and four grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
52

Daniel M. Garr ’52, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Rochester, N.Y.; Apr. 3. He was the owner of the former Greene Douglas Maintenance Supply Co. He is survived by his wife, Jane; four children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and a sister.

Aug, 2021
51

Martha Davis Schroeder ’51, of Slingerlands, N.Y.; Feb. 25. After moving to Albany, where she became a mother and homemaker, she returned to school at Albany Business College to gain secretarial skills, which led her to working as a secretary for 15 years at the Unitarian Church in Albany. Among her many volunteer pursuits, she was active in education and advocacy for the Right-to-Die movement on local and state levels for most of her adult life. She is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, three grandchildren, and two brothers.

Aug, 2021
51

William L. Oliver ’51, of Middleton, Mass., formerly of Beverly, Mass.; Mar. 25. He retired from Johnny Appleseed’s in Beverly. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was the recipient of the Bronze Star for meritorious service in the Battle of the Bulge. He is survived by his companion, Mary Maggiacomo; two daughters and their spouses; eight grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister; and several nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
51

Edward W. Girard ’51, of Lilburn, Ga.; Mar. 11. He retired from Boeing and served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He is survived by three sons, a daughter-in-law, and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
50

Stanley B. Thomas ’50, of Cranston, R.I.; May 8, of COVID-19. He is survived by his companion, Claire Connors; two daughters; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
50

William S. Houston ’50, of Bridgeville, Pa.; Feb. 26. He served in the U.S. Coast Guard during WWII. Prior to his retirement in 2005, he worked for American Universal Insurance. He is survived by companion Zoraida Laniefasky and a son.

Aug, 2021
50

June Johnson Gibbs ’50, of Naples, Fla., formerly of Warren, R.I.; Feb. 11, after a long illness. For many years, she was an elementary school teacher in Warren. She was active in alumnae affairs and served as class marshal at her 50th reunion. In later years, she wintered in Naples and was a member of the Naples Garden Club, where she won many prizes for her floral arrangements. She is survived by son Kendall ’82 MD and two grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
50

Dorothy Baker Feld ’50, of Bloomington, Ind., formerly of East Haven, Conn.; Feb. 18. After receiving a master’s in education from Southern Connecticut University, she spent the next 25 years as an elementary school teacher. She was an active member of Old Stone Church in New Haven, where she participated in numerous volunteer activities and was honored as a 50-year member in 2013. She supported a wide range of causes, including Amnesty International, Planned Parenthood, and the United Negro College Fund. She was also an avid women’s college basketball fan and enjoyed reading, playing card games, and solving puzzles. Phi Beta Kappa. She is survived by a daughter, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and a niece.

Aug, 2021
49

Milton H. Zara ’49, of Park Forest, Ill.; Apr. 2. He attended MIT and was drafted into the Army during World War II. Following his discharge from the military he attended Brown, where he played on the rugby team. In 1965 he and his family moved to Illinois, where he was hired by De Soto. Eventually he began his own building product consulting firm, Zara and Associates, which allowed him to travel all over the U.S. During that time, he established two U.S. patents. He had an interest in coin collecting, stamp collecting, and playing the piano and the mandolin. He was a member of the Mensa Society and active with the family ancestry. He is survived by his wife, Louise; and three children and their spouses.

Aug, 2021
49

Leonard J. Triedman ’49, of Narragansett, R.I.; Mar. 19. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and upon graduation joined the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War and was stationed at Otis Air Force Base in Hyannis. After his military service, he moved to Boston, married, completed his residency in surgery at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston and did a fellowship in head and neck surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He later returned to Providence and for more than four decades served on the surgical staff of many Rhode Island hospitals, including Miriam and Women & Infants, and was a clinical associate professor of surgery at Brown’s Warren Alpert Medical School. He was an avid New England sports fan and became a team physician for both the Rhode Island Reds and the Pawtucket Red Sox. He enjoyed playing golf and was also a ski patrolman and an avid runner who finished the Boston Marathon numerous times. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia; five children, including daughters Kim Triedman ’81 and Julie Triedman ’86; son Scott ’82, ’85 MD; daughter-in-law Mary Jo J. Kaplan ’82; son-in-law Eric Oldsman ’80; 15 grandchildren, including Charlotte Oldsman ’11 and Cole Triedman ’21; and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
49

Mary Dure Johnson ’49, of Akron, Ohio; Apr. 14. She was a homemaker and for a short period of time she worked in real estate during the 1970s. A sports and animal enthusiast, she enjoyed playing tennis, skiing, and taking her dogs to the dog park or riding one of her horses. She became an accomplished equestrian, winning many ribbons for dressage in her later years. She also enjoyed the Cleveland Orchestra and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle. She was well read and received three papers daily to stay updated on current world affairs. She is survived by three children, four stepchildren, seven grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
49

Lois Jagolinzer Fain ’49, of East Providence; Apr. 17. She was a teacher at the Rhode Island School for the Deaf from 1970 to 1988. Active in the Brown Association of Class Officers, she served as president and vice president of her class, chaired several reunions, and was the 1994 recipient of the Alumni Service Award. Along with her late sister, she was a cofounder of the annual Dorothy and Carl Jagolinzer Commencement Recital and Concert of Brown’s Music department and Camp Dotty, part of the Tomorrow Fund at Hasbro Children’s Hospital. She was involved in many civic and service activities and was a Save the Children sponsor of a child in Bangladesh. She was a volunteer at RISD and a member of the National Council of Jewish Women, Temple Emanuel, the Narragansett Bay Quilters, and the Chaminade Club in Providence. She enjoyed baking, playing card games, and traveling, especially to China with her late husband. She is survived by a son, two grand

Aug, 2021
48

Henry B. Williamson III ’48, of Centerville, Ohio; Mar. 23. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and achieved the rank of master sergeant and received the Bronze Star for his contribution during the Battle of the Bulge. After the war, he attended Brown and later served in the Army Reserves, where he worked for U.S. Army intelligence in Europe during the early 1950s. Following his second term of military service, he began working in the television industry in Texas and later in Los Angeles, working as an announcer and producer. In the early 1960s he began a career in the advertising business in New York City. He married and settled in Ohio. As a World War II veteran, he visited the bedsides of terminally ill Dayton area veterans presenting flag pins in honor of their military service. He gave presentations to local high school and college students, as well as to various civic organizations, recounting his experiences during World War II. He was an active member in the VFW Post 9550 in Centerville, a volunteer at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton, and an active member of the Vineyard Church. He is survived by his wife, Christine; two daughters; a son; two sons-in-law; five grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
48

James Lovell ’48, of Sandwich, Mass.; Apr. 26, from complications of a stroke. Prior to working at Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in Niskayuna, N.Y., he worked at General Electric for 40 years in Schenectady, N.Y., Lynn, Mass., and Cincinnati. He retired in 1987. He was an accomplished pianist, sharing his talents as rehearsal pianist for Schenectady Light Opera, as well as playing for church services. He sang in the Brown Glee Club and with the Cuttyhunk Cruisers, and was a chorus member and soloist for the Burnt Hill Oratorio Society, the Burnt Hill United Methodist Church choir, and the KAPL Chorale. He was a member of the Scotia-Glenville Rotary Club and he was proud of attending a Rotary meeting in Kirkwall, Orkney, Scotland, where he celebrated his 90th birthday on a youth hosteling adventure with his eldest daughter. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and in addition to music had wide and varied interests, including geology, Greek mythology, astronomy, physics, golf, gardening, skiing, and swimming. He was a World War II veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He is survived by five children and their spouses, including daughter Rebecca Lovell Scott ’69 and son Bruce ’71; six grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
48

Francis D. Johnson ’48, of Bristol, R.I., formerly of Belmont and Weston, Mass.; Mar. 1. After receiving his MBA from Harvard, he began working as a consultant. Additionally, he worked at a service station at night pumping gas and working on cars. During his lifetime his many jobs included business consultant, construction worker, professor, and post office clerk, while never calling in sick. He retired from the USPS at 78. He spent many years involved at St. Peter’s Church in Weston. He is survived by six children and their spouses, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a brother.

Aug, 2021
48

James W. Freeman ’48, of Cambridge, Mass.; Mar. 21. After obtaining a master’s degree in architecture from Harvard Graduate School of Design, he was one of the principals in a small, client-centered architecture practice, culminating in his work with Freeman, Brigham, and Hussey. He designed buildings for Cushing Academy, Shady Hill School, Concord Academy, Wheelock College, and Emerson College, as well as the Riverview apartment complex, and private residences in the greater Boston area. He was an advocate for preservation and fought to preserve farmlands and forests. In retirement, he was engaged in efforts to protect the architectural heritage of Cambridge. He enjoyed attending the Boston Symphony and traveling with his wife. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He is survived by his wife, Ann; four sons and their spouses; five grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
48

Barbara Oberhard Epstein ’48, of Scottsdale, Ariz.; Mar. 12. She worked for two years as a social worker in Providence after graduating and then married in 1950 and moved to New York City. In 1953, following the birth of her first child, she moved back to Rhode Island and she and her husband joined her father’s business, Max Oberhard, Naval and Civilian Outfitters. Throughout the years they enjoyed traveling the world, including a trip on the Orient Express. She sold the business in 1986 after her husband’s passing and reconnected with her high school classmate, Zalman Newman. She was a trustee emeritus and life member of the Naval War College Foundation and was a member of the board of the Newport Council Navy League, trustee of Bank Newport, and trustee of Newport Hospital, served as chair of the Newport Public Housing Authority, and was an advisory committee member of R.I. Blue Cross and Blue Shield, a board member of Child and Family Services, and a member of the Newport Rotary Club. In addition she was an active member of the Jewish community, serving as a board member of both Touro Synagogue and the Touro Synagogue Foundation. She was a past board member of Jewish Alliance of RI and a life member of Hadassah. She was a president of the Newport County Chapter of the American Association of University Women and the 1986 Honoree of the AAUW Educational Foundation. She also served as a president of her class and was a past president of the Newport County Brown Club. She is survived by her companion, Zalman Newman; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons and daughters-in-law, including son David ’74; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
47

Ayres Holmes Stockly ’47, of Falmouth, Me.; Jan. 9, of congestive heart failure. During his time at Brown, he spent the first two years in the NROTC. He was a graduate of Cornell University’s School of Architecture, Art and Planning in 1953 and was then drafted back into the Navy for two years, serving in the Pentagon in Naval Intelligence. Following his military service, he moved to New York City and worked in the office of Mies van der Rohe and Philip Johnson when the Seagram Building was their principal project. In 1958, he and his wife traveled abroad to study architecture in Japan, Cambodia, India, and Italy, subsequently moving to Falmouth in 1966, where he established his architectural practice, Stockly Associates Architects, in Portland, which continued until his retirement in 1990. He was a supporter of Greater Portland landmarks and contributed to the rehabilitation of City Hall Auditorium, now Merrill Auditorium. He enjoyed spending time with his family on Vinalhaven Island (Me.). He is survived by his wife, Didi; three children, including daughter Mariana Stockly Tupper ’83; and five grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
47

Burton Bellow ’47, of Rockville Centre, N.Y.; Jan. 25. After graduating, he worked as an applied physicist for the U.S. Navy’s Underwater Sound Laboratory in New London, Conn., and then for several companies, including Pratt & Whitney, Kaman Aircraft, and General Applied Science Laboratory. In the mid 1960s he turned his attention to teaching, serving as an instructor at Adelphi University and Nassau Community College, and finally as a professor of physics at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, N.Y., from which he retired in 1999. He enjoyed traveling, book clubs, playing piano, bridge and chess, and spending time with his family. He was a lifelong fan of Boston sports teams, especially the Red Sox. He is survived by his two sons, a sister, and nieces and nephews.

Aug, 2021
46

Lawrence Mueller Jr. ’46, of Oak Ridge, Tenn., formerly of Asheville, N.C.; Feb. 17. He had a 43-year career in the carpet industry with extensive experience in both domestic and international carpet operations, manufacturing, and product development. He was employed for more than 32 years with Mohawk Carpet Corp. as vice president of commercial product development, including four years in Brussels, Belgium, as technical director of Balamo, S.A. Tournai, building a joint venture carpet company from the ground up. He continued his career in 1984 with Stratton Industries, Inc., as vice president of research and development, and then as vice president of manufacturing and development. In 1987, he concluded his career as vice president of manufacturing for Harding Carpets in Canada. He was a longtime volunteer at the North Carolina Arboretum in Asheville and the Radio Reading Service for the Blind and enjoyed singing in choirs, including the Asheville Choral Society. He was a World War II U.S. Navy veteran. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; four children and their spouses; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
45

Robert G. Walker ’45, of South Dartmouth, Mass.; Feb. 19. He entered Brown in 1941 and joined the Navy ROTC. In 1944, he was commissioned as an Ensign USNR and deployed. Following World War II, he returned to Brown to complete his engineering degree. Throughout his career he served at sea commanding three ships and onshore working on the staffs of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the Pentagon. He retired in October 1968 with the rank of Captain and returned to South Dartmouth to begin a business career. From 1975 to 2001 he was the owner of Walker Reel Company. He is survived by his wife, Jane; four daughters; two sons-in-law; nine grandsons; and four great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
45

Abraham Ehrenhaus ’45, of Providence; Jan. 22. After serving in the U.S. Army during World War II and completing his degree at Brown, he joined his father’s business, American Wallpaper Co., which he helped to grow. After retiring, he took on leadership positions with Union Savings Bank, including serving as chair of the board for many years. He volunteered in the community, was chair of the Fall River Red Cross, helped found the Fall River Soup Kitchen, and was involved with the Fall River Historical Society and the Marine Museum. He enjoyed reading and solving the New York Times crossword puzzle, collecting stamps, and playing the flute, which for years he played with the New Bedford Symphony and the Swansea Community Band. He is survived by three daughters, two sons-in-law, six grandchildren, and 14 great-grandchildren.

Aug, 2021
45

George L. Cady ’45, of Tempe, Ariz.; Feb. 11. After Brown, he pursued a career in electrical contracting construction. He was president of MacNutt Electrical Co. in New York City and retired in 1985 as general manager of the Rocky Mountain Division of Dynalectric in Denver. He was the longtime chair of the Architectural Review Committee at Moss Creek. An avid golfer, he achieved four holes-in-one. He is survived by four children and their spouses, 12 grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

Aug, 2021
44

Abby Burgess Rockett ’44, of Peterborough, N.H.; Jan. 26. Before retiring in 1973, she had worked as a bookseller in Providence (Dana’s Bookstore), and after moving to Washington, D.C., in the mid-1960s, she worked in her children’s school library and continued her education in library science at Catholic University of America. Her husband’s job afforded them travel to Japan, Australia, and Denmark. She was a supporter of many environmental and civil rights organizations. She enjoyed gardening, knitting, and needlework. She is survived by daughter Kate Rockett ’80; son Angus ’80; four grandchildren; and nieces and nephews, including Martha Burgess Kroch ’66 and Edward T. Burgess ’66.

 

Aug, 2021
40

Maxwell A. Sturtz ’40, of Somers, N.Y.; Nov. 11, at 101 years of age. While at Brown he participated in baseball, football, and crew, in addition to working at WBRU. After graduation, he attended Columbia Law School, was drafted, and completed his degree at NYU Law School after serving five years with the 8th Air Force as a Judge Advocate and as a captain in the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps running motor transportation for all of Europe. An attorney in private practice, he retired at the age of 97. He was an active alum, conducting student interviews through the Brown Club for many years, and was a fixture with his older classmates on the upper deck of the stands at Brown football games for more than 50 years. He lived in Roslyn Heights, N.Y., for 45 years and served as a Little League commissioner and coach, cochaired the Race and Education Committee in the Roslyn School District, sang with his synagogue’s choir and performed in local theater. In 2001, after moving to Somers, he was involved with various education committees and was a perennial player in the Heritage Hills Community Theater for more than 18 years, performing, writing and directing, and building complex stage sets. He was an avid fisherman and enjoyed gardening and traveling with his wife. He is survived by his wife, Carol; daughter Laura Sturtz Kleinman ’77; son Ted ’80; and three grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Stuart E. Rosenbaum ’72 PhD, of Hewitt, Tex.; Dec. 14. He taught American philosophy for 40 years at Baylor University and  for many years  was director of Baylor’s graduate program in philosophy, where  he was the key figure in designing its PhD program. He served multiple terms on the Faculty Senate and twice earned Baylor’s Outstanding Faculty Member Award. He led Baylor’s summer program at Oxford for a few years. He retired from the department of philosophy in 2019. He wrote Pragmatism and the Reflective Life (2009); Recovering Integrity: Moral Thought in AmericanPragmatism (2015); and  Race, Justine, and American Intellectual  Traditions (2018). He is survived by two daughters, two sons, a daughter-in-law, four grandchildren, and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Frank L. Mott ’72 PhD, of Bexley, Ohio; Dec. 31. His work in demography led him to Lagos, Nigeria, where he helped develop the Population Center at the University of Lagos. In 1975 he joined the Ohio State University faculty and its Center for Human Resource Research. There he helped manage national longitudinal surveys. He was an internationally respected researcher in demography and recipient of many honors. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
GS 72

Lester J. Libby ’72 PhD, of Quincy, Mass., formerly of Virginia; Dec. 30. He taught at UNC then worked for the Massachusetts Commission for the Blind and the Department of Social Services. He later worked as a research analyst for the federal government in Washington, D.C. He enjoyed reading and drawing and is survived by his wife, Joyce.

Jun, 2021
GS 72

John L. Keedy ’72 MAT (see ’66).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1972, Class of 1966
Jun, 2021
GS 72

James C. Hogan ’72 PhD, of North Haven, Conn.; Jan. 22. He taught elementary and high school science in Sparta, Georgia, until 1966. After obtaining his advanced degrees, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the biology department at Yale and a research associate in pathology at Yale School of Medicine, then took a position at Howard University School of Medicine in 1976. In 1978 he joined the UConn faculty and developed and implemented the Health Science Cluster Program, a summer enrichment program for state high school students. He was also an assistant professor at the UConn School of Allied Health, and became director of minority student affairs. More recently, he was responsible for running the lab for Connecticut’s Department of Public Health. He retired in 2009. He presented at conferences internationally and published in major scientific journals. Notably, he authored an award-winning article entitled  “Lead Poison Prevention in Young Children: A National Tragedy.”  He was the recipient of multiple awards and is included in the second edition of 2000 Outstanding Scientists of the 20th Century. He was a founder and past president of the Black Healthcare Professionals Network (Hartford), the Connecticut Chapter of the National Technical Association, and the North Haven Association of Black Citizens. He founded the Immanuel Baptist Church Academy of Math and Science and was the first African American to be elected to the Board of Education in North Haven, Connecticut. He was a member of the band The Carvettes, playing saxophone and clarinet, and Omega Psi Phi. He is survived by his wife, Izola; a daughter; two sons; six granddaughters; a sister; three brothers; and many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 70

P. Dwight Sherman Jr. ’70 PhD, of Johnson City, Tenn.; Dec. 20. In 1968, he began working at Union Carbide Chemical Company in South Charleston, W.Va. He served in various roles, advancing to lead the Union Carbide South Charleston Technical Center site. When he retired, he was serving as Union Carbide’s link to the West Virginia legislature, public, and media as director of public affairs. He retired in 2001. He also held board positions at the United Way of Central West Virginia from 1993 to 2011 and served as vice chairman of the board of directors for MATRIC, a West Virginia-based technology development organization that he helped found. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn; two daughters and sons-in-law; two grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Andrew C. Twaddle ’68 PhD, of Columbia, Mo.; Dec. 2, of COVID. In 1971, he joined the University of Missouri with a joint appointment in sociology and behavioral science. He previously served on the faculties of College of the Holy Cross (sociology), Harvard Medical School (preventive medicine), Massachusetts General Hospital (medicine), and the University of Pennsylvania (sociology and community medicine). He also held visiting faculty appointments at Northeastern Univ., University of Western Ontario, various universities in Sweden, and Colby College in Maine. He retired in 2001. He was an avid sailor and amateur photographer, sang in the University of Missouri’s choral union, and enjoyed researching ancestry. He is survived by his wife, Sarah; two daughters and their spouses; five grandchildren; a sister; and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Sarita Gattis Schotta ’68 PhD, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Aug. 5. She is survived by a sister-in-law and 12 nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 68

Richard C. Drey ’68 MAT, of Bethlehem, Pa.; Jan. 11. He taught for two years at Reading High School and then attended Brown on a National Science Foundation Grant, receiving his master’s in mathematics. Richard then joined the faculty at Northampton Community College and served for 32 years as a professor of mathematics. He was treasurer for the East Allen Twp. Volunteer Fire Dept., coached East Allen soccer, and was a fan of the Cincinnati Reds. He is survived by his wife, Mary Ann; two daughters; a son-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; a niece; and two nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 66

Dorothy F. Donnelly ’66 AM, of Providence; Dec. 23. She was an English professor at URI for four decades and chair of the department for 12 years. She was involved with two unions, the URI AAUP full-time faculty union and the URI Part-Time Faculty United. She was cofounder of Changing Lives Through Literature, Rhode Island chapter. In the 1960s, she traveled to Alabama in support of the Civil Rights Movement. She was the recipient of the Woman of the Year award from the URI Association of Professional and Academic Women, the Excellence in Teaching award, and the Rhode Island Labor History Society award for lifelong achievement. She is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
66

Beth Randall Arnold ’66 MAT, of West Chester, Pa.; Dec. 9, of organ failure due to COPD, congenital heart disease, and osteomyelitis. During her career she held several positions, including high school teacher, college career counselor, social worker, and transportation coordinator for the disabled. She was active in her community and volunteered with Friends of Valley Forge explaining colonial history in dresses she’d sewn herself. In later years she joined the P.E.O. Sisterhood, raising money for women in higher education. She enjoyed cooking, traveling, and genealogy. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, two grandsons, and a brother-in-law and sister-in-law.

Jun, 2021
GS 64

Elizabeth Ballantine Gardner ’64 ScM, ’65 PhD, of Wellesley, Mass.; Dec. 1. She taught at Queens College in Flushing, N.Y., and Wellesley College before settling into a 50-year career teaching at Pine Manor College, where she also chaired the science department. She endowed a wildlife viewing site at J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Florida and established a scholarship for nurse practitioners at Newton Wellesley Hospital. Her interest in her mother’s family’s well-documented history led her to oversee the distribution of family papers, objects, and photographs to institutions where they could be used for research by the public. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Catherine Rodgers Myers ’63 PhD, of Wellfleet, Mass.; Jan. 27, of complications from a stroke. After teaching at Bryn Mawr College, she joined the English department of Manhattanville College in 1968, retiring in 2005. Over the years she served as dean of students, dean of faculty, and twice as provost. She volunteered with the Wellfleet Harbor Actors’ Theater, giving lectures introducing productions of the Metropolitan Opera. She volunteered at the Massachusetts Audubon’s Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary. She is survived by two daughters, a son-in-law, two grandchildren, and a nephew. 

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Darnell C. McCauley ’63 MAT, of New Haven, Conn., formerly of Providence; Jan. 16. During his senior year at Livingstone College he became the pastor of Stewards Chapel in Rural Hall, N.C. Upon his return to Providence, he served as pastor of A.M.E. Zion Church and was ordained into the Christian Church on Sept. 3, 1953. He obtained further degrees, such as as a bachelor of sacred theology from Boston University and doctor of education from Nova University. His many educational positions culminated in retiring as vice principal at Roger Williams Middle School in 1989. In 1971, the local chapter of the Omega Psi Phi fraternity named him Rhode Island Educator of the Year. He is survived by seven siblings and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 63

Joan C. Kauttu ’63 ScM, of North Canaan, Conn.; June 17, 2020. She taught anatomy to medical school students and then helped her husband run a resort in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. After divorcing, she returned to North Canaan to care for her parents.

Jun, 2021
GS 62

Anthony L. Scotto ’62 ScM, of Narragansett, R.I.; Jan. 2. He taught science and biology at La Salle Academy in Providence. He entered the Brothers of the Christian Schools in 1959. He had teaching and administrative roles at De La Salle Academy in Newport, R.I.; La Salle Military Academy in Oakdale, N.Y.; Bishop Bradley High School in Manchester, N.H.; Christian Brothers Academy in Lincroft, N.J.; and La Salle Center in Oakdale, N.Y.

Jun, 2021
GS 61

Donald E. Miller ’61 AM, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Jan. 6., after a long illness. He was a successful university development officer, raising millions of dollars in funds for both the University of Michigan and Boston University. He was a world traveler and writer, visiting many countries on multiple continents, and had a special connection to the former Czechoslovakia. In 1967, he was a first-hand witness to the Prague Spring and, years later, had the opportunity to interview Vaclav Havel. Throughout the 1990s he lived part-time in Slovakia. He rescued cats and compiled many short stories about his animal companions in a book entitled Callie and Me. He was an avid swimmer and is survived by a sister, a brother, four nieces, and a nephew.

Jun, 2021
60

Barry M. Mitchell ’60 PhD, of Kingston, N.J.; Jan. 26. He was a mathematician whose career included teaching at Columbia University, Bowdoin College, and Rutgers University. He authored two textbooks, Calculus Without Analytic Geometry and The Theory of Categories. He is survived by friends and family in Canada.

Jun, 2021
GS 59

Ann J. Nelson ’59 MAT (see ’56).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1959, Class of 1956
Jun, 2021
GS 58

Donald H. Fortnum ’58 PhD, of Gettysburg, Pa.; Feb. 2. He began teaching chemistry at Ursinus College in 1958. In 1965 he joined the chemistry faculty at Gettysburg College and was appointed a full professor in 1972, when  he was also selected to Outstanding Educators of America. He retired in 2000. At Gettysburg his final exams were filled with challenging equations but also inspiring quotations and jokes served with a table full of snacks, including homemade chocolate chip cookies—his motto being “when the chips are down, down the chips.” A member of the Gettysburg United Methodist Church, he was active in leadership roles and taught Sunday school classes for many years. He enjoyed photography and participating in the Washington Apple Pi and the Keystone MacCentral user’s groups. He is survived by four children and their spouses, four grandchildren, two brothers and their spouses, and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
GS 58

Conrad P. Caligaris ’58 AM, ’61 PhD, of Franklin, Mass.; Feb. 19. He was an economics professor at Northeastern University for 30 years. He had previously taught at Boston College and the University of Maine. He enjoyed spending time at the Franklin Senior Center, where he played cribbage. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, four sons and daughters-in-law, and 13 grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
GS 56

James R. Trew ’56 ScM, of Fayetteville, N.C.; Jan. 25. He worked for Standard Oil Company of Texas as a subsurface geologist before entering the U.S. Air Force as a technical intelligence officer. Following military service, he was associate chief librarian at Space Technology Laboratories in California. In 1962, he began a 36-year career at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., retiring in 1996 as the director of the Library of Congress Integrated Support Services, providing advice on facility planning and collection storage to librarians and archivists throughout the world. He coached football and basketball and enjoyed hiking and camping. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and seven grandchildren. 

Jun, 2021
GS 52

Robert Burger ’52 ScM, ’55 PhD, of Cary, N.C.; Nov. 29. He joined the U.S. Navy at 16 years of age during World War II. After the war he graduated from William & Mary College and Brown. As a physicist, he was a pioneer in the emerging field of solid state electronics and worked in the early years of NASA’s Apollo program. He was recruited to North Carolina by the Research Triangle Institute in 1962 and later cofounded the Semiconductor Research Corporation, which was presented the National Medal of Technology by President George W. Bush in 2005. He is survived by his wife, Marian; two children and their spouses; six grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and four siblings.

Jun, 2021
GS 50

Werner R. Britsch ’50 ScM (see ’49).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1950, Class of 1949
Jun, 2021
GS 82

Christina Crosby ’82 PhD, of Middletown, Conn.; Jan. 5, of pancreatic cancer. As an undergraduate she attended Swarthmore College, wrote a column called The Feminist Slant for the student newspaper and helped found Swarthmore Gay Liberation. At Brown, she was part of a socialist feminist caucus that focused on such issues as domestic violence. She and the caucus established a hotline for battered women and in 1976 founded Sojourner House, a domestic violence agency based in Providence. She worked in Wesleyan University’s English department and became a central part of the University’s women’s studies program, which she helped establish as a major and later helped redesign as feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. She received Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 1994 and in 2003 the University faculty elected her chair of the department. She published the novel The Ends of History: Victorians and “the Woman Question” (Routledge, 1990) and after a 2003 bicycle accident that left her paralyzed, she published A Body, Undone: Living on After Great Pain (NYU Press, 2016). Her BAM essay, “Others Stop Looking,” appeared in November/December 2016. She is survived by her partner Janet Jakobsen.

Jun, 2021
GS 49

Jeffrey J. Bowe ’49 AM, of Boston; Feb. 3. He worked at Air Force Cambridge Research Center, where he served as part of the Semiconductor Advisory Group with senior representatives selected from throughout the industry and government to review and approve all government semiconductor research contracts, while also advising the President’s office on the latest industry developments. He joined Sperry (Conn.) in 1959 as director of research, specializing in silicon integrated circuits, before accepting a position with Radio Corporation of America in 1962 to oversee the development of thin film transistors. In 1966 he was offered a position with NASA overseeing its Electronic Research Center in Cambridge, where his team used newly developed mathematical statistical analyses to test the efficiency, stability, and reliability of the integrated circuits designed for use in the Apollo space program. After NASA’s Cambridge location closed in 1970, he joined the Department of Transportation Systems. He retired from the DOT in 1978 and began teaching at Bunker Hill Community College in Charlestown and was invited to spend a semester teaching physics at Technical University of Budapest in 1987. He retired from Bunker Hill in 1998. He published more than 150 articles and held a dozen patents. He is survived by his wife, Marion; six children and their spouses; 17 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
21

Maximilian Y. Lenail ’21, of Palo Alto, Calif.; Jan. 29. He was to graduate from Brown in May 2021 with a concentration in neurobiology, and planned on applying to medical school and becoming a physician. Max had worked in several research labs at Stanford Medicine and for the neuroscience company Inscopix. He participated in many service trips to Central America with the Menlo Church and will be remembered as a peacemaker and for his extraordinary kindness and generosity. He was an exceptional athlete and outdoorsman and had a passion for rock-climbing. He was also a glassblower and chef. He is survived by his parents, grandparents, a brother, two aunts and an uncle. 

Jun, 2021
11

Andrew Migneault ’11, of Bellingham, Mass.; Jan. 25. He obtained his master’s in agronomy at the University of Florida while doing research on sugar cane with USDA in Florida. At the time of his death, he was working on his PhD at the University of Melbourne working on plant genetics. He is survived by his parents and a sister. 

Jun, 2021
94

Paul C. Bozzuto ’94, of Alpharetta, Ga.; Jan. 28. He was employed at KeyBank in Cleveland, Ohio, then joined Franklin Templeton in California before working for the Federal Reserve in Virginia. In 2006, he moved to Alpharetta to be the leader of Invesco’s Continuous Improvement Division. A former member of Brown’s baseball team, he played, coached, and umpired baseball games, as well as coaching youth basketball. He is survived by his wife, Megan; three sons; two brothers; and numerous family members. 

Jun, 2021
89

Greg S. Hallisey ’89, of McLean, Va.; Aug. 7, 2020, following a two-year battle with renal cell carcinoma. After working in Washington for the House Banking Committee, he earned his MBA at Dartmouth College’s Amos Tuck School of Business. He had a business career in strategy and finance at Citibank, Yum Brands, LG&E, Eaton Manufacturing, and Raytheon. His passion was playing and refereeing water polo. He is survived by his wife, Cece; three daughters; his mother; three siblings and their spouses; and 12 nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
86

David W. Griego ’86, of Providence; Jan. 6. He taught legal math for many years to pre-law students at The Princeton Review and was head of the math department of Squared School Academy of Mathematics in Providence, a school for students gifted in math. A chess prodigy, he won numerous state and national titles in his teens, including New England Co-Champion, ranked third in the U.S. in the 18-and-under category, and was a National Master at age 15. While at Moses Brown School, he led the team to three Rhode Island High School crowns and earned the title of FIDE Master. He was a talented flute player, a member of Mensa and Intertel, and superintendent for the Sunday School of Saints Sahag & Mesrob Armenian Church. He is survived by his parents, a sister, and two nephews.

Jun, 2021
79

Terrence M. Dunn ’79, of New York City; Jan. 18. He graduated from the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and was a founding partner of the law firm Einbinder and Dunn. He was an active member of the ABA Forum on Franchising. He wrote a self-published novel, Out Beyond the Verrazano, and maintained an active blog where he posted thoughtful and heartfelt reflections. He was an avid runner and completed several half-marathons. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; a daughter; a son; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece and nephew. 

Jun, 2021
79

Brian J. Buckley ’79, of Worcester, Mass.; Dec. 25, after a long battle with progressive supranuclear palsy. A former member of Brown’s crew and rugby teams, he graduated from Suffolk University Law School and he was an assistant district attorney in Worcester County and an associate at Seder and Chandler. In 1989, he and his father John started the Buckley Law Firm. In 1997, Brian joined Fletcher Tilton PC and practiced law for the next 25 years. He dedicated his time and leadership talents to many local organizations, including the Worcester Public Library, Massachusetts Bar Association, Worcester Regional Research Bureau, St. John’s Food for the Poor, and Worcester Jewish Community Center. He was also involved with the Brown Club of Worcester, the Judicial Nominating Council Executive Committee, and the Worcester Civic Center Commission. He is survived by his wife, Ann Marie; three children; sisters Martha Rizzoli ’80 and Eirinn J.B. Campaniello ’89; a brother-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
77

Sylvia E. Shortt ’77, of Athens, Ga.; Dec. 17, after a brief illness. After Brown, she earned a master’s degree and became a counselor at West Georgia College, now known as the University of West Georgia. She was an adviser to its International Student Program, expanding the program, and retired as associate director of International Services and Programs in December 2012, then served as a volunteer alumni coordinator for the UWG Alumni Association. She was instrumental in developing the American College Counseling Association and served as the organization’s president, treasurer, and conference chair. She was involved in many professional organizations and won numerous awards and recognitions. In retirement she became a member of Athens Rotary. She is survived by her partner Robin Mullinix; a daughter, and several cousins.

Jun, 2021
74

Gary E. Wilcox ’74, of Wilmette, Ill.; Feb. 15, of metastatic melanoma. After Brown, he attended Dickinson School of Law and became a prosecuting attorney in Delaware County. Following a move to Chicago, he worked as a litigator with Peterson, Ross, Schlerb & Seidel, and later with Hardt & Stern. He enjoyed playing squash and tennis, competing in—and winning—numerous squash tournaments through the Racquet Club of Chicago. He also enjoyed auto racing, fishing, and music, and had a deep love of art, cultivating his own artistry in both photography and pottery. He is survived by his wife, Julie; three children; a sister; a brother; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jun, 2021
73

Alan Mansfield ’73, of New York City; Jan. 11. After receiving his JD in 1978 from Duke University School of Law, where he was editor of the Duke Law Journal, he was a member of the executive committee at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, where he had also served as cochair of global litigation practice. He joined the firm in 1994 and his legal practice spanned more than 42 years. His work centered around complex civil litigation, constitutional law, and white-collar criminal litigation matters. He represented clients in diverse industries in litigation matters ranging from product liability and corporate and securities to defamation and fraud. He was involved in many professional organizations and was a life fellow of The American Bar Foundation, a fellow of The New York Bar Foundation, and a mediator in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. He was a trustee of Lexington School for the Deaf/Center for the Deaf and a member of the board of directors at Mobilization for Justice, a provider of free legal assistance to low-income New Yorkers, serving as a chair from 2006-2008. His recognitions included being listed in the Best Lawyers in American Commercial Litigation and in Super Lawyers magazine. He is survived by his wife, Susan, and two sons, including Daniel ’15 MPH. 

Jun, 2021
73

Charles G. Dyke ’73, of San Francisco; Dec. 2. He was a writer and a musician and is survived by a sister, four step-siblings, and four nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
72

Richard E. Whikehart ’72, of Philadelphia; Nov. 3. He spent many years of research in clinical psychiatry and was department head of psychiatry at Abington Hospital in Philadelphia, along with operating a private psychiatric practice.

Jun, 2021
70

Mark P. Pasek ’70, of Houston; Feb. 15, from heart disease. He completed his master’s in biochemistry at the University of Chicago in 1973 and his PhD in biochemistry in 1975. Between 1975 to 1979, he was an American Cancer Society Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard before being hired by Biogen, SA in 1979. For the next two years, he worked in Biogen SA’s recombinant DNA laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. By 1981, U.S. regulators allowed Biogen to do its research in the United States and he returned to Cambridge, Mass., where he helped open Biogen, Inc.’s new Cambridge lab and became Biogen’s senior scientist until 1991. His lab was awarded the Presidential Medal of Science and Technology in 1998 by President Clinton “for the development of hepatitis B vaccines, the first vaccines using recombinant DNA technology.” He was awarded four patents and he authored several publications. He is survived by a daughter, a son, his mother, and brother David ’76. 

Jun, 2021
70

Robert A. Clifford ’70, of Walpole, Mass.; Jan. 19, from COVID. He taught for 38 years at Norwood High School. At Brown, he was a member of the hockey team. He is survived by his wife, Marie; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; three stepchildren and their spouses; a sister; two brothers, including Thomas ’68; six grandchildren; and a niece and nephew. 

Jun, 2021
69

 Joseph P. Woodford ’69, of Fairfax, Va.; Dec. 6. After Brown, he continued his postgraduate studies at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. During his time serving in the Navy, he was honored with numerous commendations, medals, and ribbons for his meritorious service. He retired in 1996. Following his retirement, he became the senior advisor to the Northern Virginia Association of Rocketry and volunteered in schools. He is survived by his wife, Consuela; three children; two grandchildren; and five siblings.

Jun, 2021
68

Michael F. Maznicki ’68, of West Warwick, R.I.; Jan. 7. He had a long career in banking. At Brown he was a three-sport athlete. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He played with various semi-fast pitch softball teams for many years and was inducted into the West Warwick Wizards Hall of Fame. An avid golfer, he was a longtime member of West Warwick Country Club and Cranston Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Joyce; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021
67

Paul R. Peller ’67, of Menomonie, Wisc.; Feb. 15. He was a retired workplace inspector with the State of New York. He was an avid reader and liked to crochet. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law and a niece. 

Jun, 2021
67

Mollie E. Harris Farmer ’67, of Kingston, Pa.; Jan. 9. After Brown, she continued her studies at the Université de Poitiers in Tours, France. She began her teaching career at College Misericordia and later joined the faculty of King’s College as adjunct instructor in the department of foreign languages and literature. In 2001, she became director of King’s College Study Abroad Program, a position she held until her retirement in 2014. She volunteered for many years, focusing mainly on the arts and tutoring, and was named Volunteer of the Year by the Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce. She is survived by a daughter, a son, three grandchildren, her mother, three siblings, and nieces and nephews.

Jun, 2021
66

John L. Keedy ’66, ’72 MAT, of Louisville, Ky.; Dec. 25, of complications related to COVID and Parkinson’s. After graduation, he took a position at the Punahou School in Hawaii as a Latin teacher, taught Latin at private schools in the States, traveled to Europe, Mexico, and North Africa, and then started his own roofing and painting business. In his 30s he returned to graduate school and then taught history at public schools in Massachusetts. He later worked as a school administrator, then as an associate professor of education at West Georgia College. He later became an associate professor at North Carolina State University and retired as a full professor at the University of Louisville. He researched, published, taught, and directed many doctoral dissertations throughout his career. He enjoyed playing tennis and sailing. He is survived by his companion Karen Gordon; a daughter; a sister; a brother; and his former wife, Cathy Meine.

Related classes:
Class of 1966, GS Class of 1972
Jun, 2021
66

Frederick Bopp III ’66, of Downingtown, Pa.; Dec. 22. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1966 to 1970, which included time served in Vietnam. He received his master’s and then his PhD in geology from the University of Delaware in 1973 and 1980. He was the senior geologist and vice president of the geosciences department at Roy F. Weston Inc. in West Chester, Pa., from 1979 to 1996, and retired in 2015 as a geological consultant. He enjoyed singing in the United Methodist Church of West Chester Chancel Choir and the Chester County Choral Society. He also enjoyed cooking and reading. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two children; and a grandson.

Jun, 2021
66

Francis W. Bogaczyk ’66, of Austin, Tex.; Jan. 4, from complications of bladder cancer. He worked at IBM for one year before being drafted into the U.S. Army. He returned home and continued at IBM, retiring after 30 years. He is survived by his wife Sandra; a daughter; a son; and a grandson. 

Jun, 2021
65

Mark I. Tafeen ’65, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; Mar. 29, 2020. 

Jun, 2021
63

William McManus ’63, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Jan. 30, of COVID. He pursued a doctor of dental surgery degree from Columbia University and received the Ella Marie Ewell medal for proficiency in dentistry. He was a captain in the U.S. Army in the dental corps during the Vietnam War, then moved to East Hampton and practiced general dentistry from 1970 to 2006. He was president of the dental staff at Southampton Hospital and a member of the New York Academy of Dentistry. He also served as president of the East Hampton Lion’s Club. He retired to Vero Beach and enjoyed fishing, clamming, hunting, and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two daughters; and three grandsons. 

Jun, 2021
63

Martha A. Wise Chattin ’63, of Gardner, Mass.; Feb. 13, of COVID. After earning a master’s degree in social work from Boston College, she embarked on a 20-year career providing care and counsel to people experiencing homelessness, mental illness, and developmental disability, as well as to prisoners, veterans, and the elderly. She enjoyed singing and piano playing and was a music teacher, an organist, and choir director at the Phillipston Congregational Church. For several years she worked with her husband at the Fernald School for the Developmentally Disabled, later named the Templeton Developmental Center, where they led a choir and Christian service for residents. She is survived by four sons and their spouses, eight grandchildren, and a great-granddaughter. 

Jun, 2021
62

John R. Simpson Jr. ’62, of Dalton, Pa.; Jan. 20. He attended the Yale School of Drama before starting his acting career at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis, Minn. He worked at many national repertory theaters, appeared in several Broadway productions, including Find Your Way Home and Sly Fox, and played a judge on Law & Order for more than 10 years. He was a member of Psi Upsilon, Actors Equity Association, SAG-AFTRA and the Clemo Hunting and Fishing Club and served as president of the Cherry Ridge Corp. He enjoyed telling stories and cooking. He is survived by his partner Dawn M. Richards; two daughters, including Phoebe Simpson Bean ’93; a stepson; four grandchildren; and a sister and brother-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
62

G. Arthur Padmore Jr. ’62, of Cary, N.C., formerly of Wilmington, Del., and Monrovia, Liberia; Jan. 7. After graduating from Brown, he returned to Liberia and obtained his law degree from the University of Liberia. Because of his lifelong love of music, he became a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and cofounder of the WAVE, a popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time. He also hosted the popular jazz radio show, Music for Moderns. Before leaving the country in 1980, he owned and operated a law practice and was general manager of Liberia Amusements Ltd. Once in the U.S., he settled in Delaware and sold insurance. Eventually, he served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for 15 years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the public advocate for the State of Delaware. He retired in 2010 and moved to Cary. He is survived by his wife, Pairlene; three daughters and their spouses; and four granddaughters.

Jun, 2021
62

A. Michael Honer ’62, of Asheboro N.C.; Feb. 9. He was an engineer in manufacturing and quality control. He had a private pilot’s license and owned his own airplane and logged more than 2,200 hours in the air traveling throughout the U.S. He was involved in amateur radio for 65 years and also enjoyed metal working, photography, and motor camping. He is survived by his wife, Anne; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; two sisters; and a brother-in-law.

Jun, 2021
62

Archie Q. Frost ’62, of Gwynn, Va.; Feb. 14. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, he worked in sales and retired from Tredegar Industries, formerly known as Crown, Cork & Seal. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; a daughter; a son; a stepson; five grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
62

David B. Casey ’62, of Pawtucket, R.I.; Dec. 10. He received his master’s degree from Columbia University Graduate School of Business in 1964 and served as an administrator and chief financial officer for the Rhode Island Department of Health for 40 years. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; six children and their spouses, including son Christopher ’03; 10 grandchildren; and a sister.

Jun, 2021
62

Nelson P. Bowsher II ’62, of Washington, D.C.; Jan. 4, of complications from COVID. While at Brown he was co-editor-in-chief of the Brown Daily Herald and worked as a reporter for the Providence Journal. In 1966 he moved to Washington, D.C., to write for Congressional Quarterly and the National Journal. In his professional life he advocated for affordable housing and community-based economic development. He worked for NeighborWorks, served on the boards of national nonprofits, and volunteered with local housing groups. After retiring, he became a master gardener and volunteered at the Polly Hill Arboretum on Martha’s Vineyard and at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He is survived by his wife, Sally Steenland; son David Bowsher ’95; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
61

Nicholas B. Willard ’61, of Wayland, Mass.; Feb. 5, of Parkinson’s. Following graduation, he began a career in printing and packaging. He was the national account sales manager and plant manager with Container Corporation of America, president of Rand Whitney Corporation, and president of NS Converters. He was active in the Wayland community, serving on the personnel board and economic development committee. He enjoyed solving the New York Times crossword puzzle, playing golf and tennis, and following the Red Sox and Celtics and Patriots. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three daughters; a son-in-law; and three grandchildren.

Jun, 2021
61

John N. Tine ’61, of Kitty Hawk, N.C.; Dec. 28. After Brown, he began working with C&P Telephone, later finishing his career with Bell Atlantic in Rome, Italy. He retired to Kitty Hawk in 1993. He was a member of Delta Phi fraternity and enjoyed golfing, skiing, and traveling. He is survived by three children, five grandchildren, and a sister.

Jun, 2021
61

Robert W. Streett ’61, of Clayton, Mo.; Feb. 13. He was an entrepreneur, lifelong learner, and world traveler. After graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and rose to the rank of First Lieutenant. He sang in the August Opera Festival Chorus and was a member of the Missouri Choral Society. He served on the boards of Central Institute for the Deaf and the French heritage organization Les Amis and was a member of the vestry of the Church of St. Michael and St. George. He is survived by his wife, Liza; two daughters; five granddaughters; and two brothers, including Ken ’58.

Jun, 2021
61

Charles F. Rood ’61, of Tucson; Dec. 26. As an engineer, he had careers that led him to practical applications in big companies, managing a federal project, and finally financial advising with a certified financial planner designation. He served in the U.S. Navy and he enjoyed sailing with his wife. He was a former president of the YMCA and a board member of the United Way and the American Silver Museum in Connecticut. He is survived by his wife, Shane.

Jun, 2021
61

Sandra Nelson Roberts ’61, of Chelmsford, Mass.; Jan. 4. She worked for Northern Essex Community College in the 1980s and was the director of its Center for Business and Industry until her retirement in 1998. She was president of the Open Gate Garden Club for many years and enjoyed painting landscapes, reading, music, and singing. She is survived by her husband, David; a son, a son-in-law; a granddaughter; and a sister.

Jun, 2021
61

Keith C. Humphreys ’61, of Portsmouth, R.I.; Feb. 8. After graduation, he served in the U.S. Navy as a supply officer on the USS Jupiter in Japan. He then served as a Naval Reserve officer for 30 years, retiring with the rank of captain. He had a career in retail banking and commercial real estate in Newport, R.I. and Fall River, Mass., and was a community volunteer. He enjoyed woodworking and train travel through China, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. He is survived by his wife, Maris; three children; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; five grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law. 

Jun, 2021
61

Nancy Ferguson Downer ’61, of Billings, Mont.; Dec. 13, of complications of dementia. After moving to Billings in 1976 and receiving a master’s degree in counseling from Montana State University Billings, she counseled students for many years. She was passionate about helping junior high and high school students to overcome personal difficulties and strive for advanced education. She was active in her church and sang in the Billings Chorale for more than 30 years. She also enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, Larry; two sons and their spouses; four grandchildren; and a brother.

Jun, 2021
60

Wilber L. Stadele ’60, of Belle Mead, N.J.; Dec. 26, of cancer. Like his father and grandfather before him, he worked in the church organ industry. In his lifetime, he installed more than 2,500 organs for churches, homes, and events. One of his proudest career highlights was setting up the organ for Pope Benedict XVI’s 2008 Papal Mass at Yankee Stadium. When not designing and installing organs, he enjoyed restoring antique furniture, collecting art, and making improvements to his historic farm. At Brown he wrote for the Brown Daily Herald. He is survived by six children, including daughter Marjorie Stadele ’87; 12 grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and sister Marjorie Stadele Aamodt ’51 ScM.

Jun, 2021
60

Benjamin V. Lambert ’60, of New York City; Jan. 31. He worked selling fabrics in Manhattan’s garment district before landing a job at a mortgage firm. In 1967 he founded Eastdil with the idea of bringing an investment banking approach to real estate brokerage. Eastdil Secured is known for iconic and record-breaking deals including the purchase of Irvine Ranch and sales of the GM building, Embarcadero Center, and Helmsley portfolio. Beyond his involvement with Eastdil, he was an adviser to several corporate boards and organizations, including the Irvine Company and Hilton Hotels Corporation. He was also a founder and chairman of the Harlem Day Charter School and a member of Brown’s board of trustees. He is survived by his wife, Linda; daughters Alexa Lambert ’85, Lauren Lambert ’88, and Hilary Lambert ’91; two sons-in-law; stepson Oliver Lloyd ’03; a daughter-in-law; six grandchildren, including Jack Parker ’18 and Grace Parker ’21; and a brother.

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