Obituaries

Apr, 2022
FAC
“That Changed Everything”
Professor Jim Barnhill founded the Theatre Arts department and helped launch Trinity Rep, Rites and Reason, and several acting careers
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Apr, 2022
86
Healthcare Hero
Leon L. Haley Jr. ’86, a doctor and CEO who inspired a COVID vaccination rally
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Apr, 2022
42
Unseating Freud
Aaron Beck ’42 created cognitive behavioral therapy and transformed the field of mental health
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Apr, 2022
GS 68

Gregory L. Fowler ’68 PhD, of Lake Oswego, Ore.; Sept. 19, from complications of Parkinson’s. After Brown, he moved to Oregon for postdoctoral studies at the University of Oregon, where he researched the genetics and biology of drosophila. After a Humboldt Fellowship took him to the University of Düsseldorf in Germany, he returned to Oregon in 1976 to teach at Southern Oregon University as a professor of biology, and later he was also the founder and director of the Churchill Scholars honors program there. He received grants from the National Institutes of Health, Fulbright, Department of Energy, Collins Medical Trust, and other funders to support his work and collaborations with researchers at the City of Hope, UC San Francisco, the University of Turku (Finland), and at Dartmouth. He retired in 1998 and created Geneforum, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting dialogue on genetics, ethics, and values. Geneforum took part in the state’s debate on genetic privacy, culminating in the passage of the country’s first law to protect an individual’s rights in genetic information. He was an affiliate associate professor in the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University and a senior research associate in the School of Community Health at Portland State University. He was also a Chautauqua Scholar of the Oregon Council for the Humanities, where he worked annually with high school students and traveled to communities throughout the state to lead public discussions on the societal implications of genetics. He was most proud of his work developing a curriculum for science teachers called Genomics for Everyone. Years of classical piano training in his youth laid the foundation for his lifelong passion for music. He was a bass baritone singer and soloed with the Catholic University Choral Society and Orchestra while in Washington, D.C.; with the Chamber Music Society of Schloss Benrath in Düsseldorf; and at the Sibelius Museum in Finland. He was a guest soloist with the Rogue Valley Chorale and made numerous solo and ensemble recital appearances at the Britt Music & Arts Festival. He sang in the Rogue Valley Opera productions of La Traviata and Pagliacci. He founded Chamber Music Concerts in Ashland, overseeing 15 seasons as the organization’s artistic director. He enjoyed the outdoors and worked as a ranger in Glacier National Park in his earlier years. Among his favorite activities were cross country skiing and backpacking in Oregon. He is survived by his wife, Janet; two sons, including Alexander ’91; four grandchildren; a sister; and two nephews. 

Apr, 2022
FAC

Edelgard B. Morse, of Providence; Sept. 13. She attended the University of Cologne, where she received her PhD and met her future husband. Soon after moving to the U.S. she accepted a post-doctoral position at Wesleyan University. Later she led the chemistry department at the University of Connecticut, then became an assistant professor at Northwestern University. She spent many years volunteering in the Providence public schools and was a docent at RISD before becoming a senior lecturer in chemistry at Brown from 1977 to 2005. She enjoyed backpacking through many national parks with her husband and children, attending opera performances at the Met, reading, cooking, and traveling throughout Europe visiting family and friends. She is survived by her husband, Ted; two children, including daughter Karin Morse ’84 and her spouse; a son and daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
FAC

Christine A. Biron, of Providence, R.I.; Oct. 16. She earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from UMass Amherst and a PhD in microbiology and immunology from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. After postdoctoral fellowships at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, the Karolinska Institute, and the University of Massachusetts, she began her faculty appointment at Brown as an assistant professor of medical science in 1987. In 1996, she was appointed the Esther Elizabeth Brintzenhoff Professor of Medical Science. She served as director of the pathobiology graduate program from 1995 to 1999, and then as chair of molecular microbiology and immunology from 1999 to 2009. Her work has been foundational to the development of many novel therapies in treating disease. She was honored to be elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2002, the American Academy of Microbiology in 2009, and a distinguished fellow of the American Association of Immunology in 2021. She was invited to lecture all over the world and served on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease. She has been honored with a permanent lectureship at Brown. During the course of her career, she published 175 articles. She was an amateur photographer and enjoyed singing soprano in choirs. She is survived by three sisters and brothers-in-law, a brother, and 11 nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
GS 96

Maria Guadalupe Mendoza-Diaz ’96 ScM, of Huntersville, N.C.; Oct. 18, from complications of COVID-19. She graduated from Mexico City University, where she was also an assistant professor. After Brown, she worked for Wells Fargo Bank for almost 20 years. She was an avid runner and participated in both the Boston and New York City marathons. She was also a breast cancer survivor. She is survived by her husband, Steven; a daughter; a stepson; her mother; and six siblings. 

Apr, 2022
GS 75

John F. Blazyk ’75 PhD, of Boise; Sept. 13, of complications of ALS. He taught biochemistry at Ohio University and later in his career served as the associate dean for research and grants of Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. He enjoyed “dad jokes” and solving puzzles. He is survived by his wife, Bonita; four daughters; and two grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
GS 65

Arthur C. Watterson Jr. ’65 PhD, of Nashua, N.H.; Sept. 2. He was professor of chemistry at UMass Lowell, where he also served as department chair and acting dean of the college of arts and sciences. He held multiple patents and published numerous papers detailing his study of polymers. He enjoyed the arts and was a fan of classical music, the ballet, and the Museum of Fine Arts. He sang in the choir at Nashua’s First Congregational Church for many years. He also enjoyed photography, mystery novels, crossword puzzles, and the Boston Celtics. He is survived by three sons and their spouses, eight grandchildren, a brother, two sisters-in-law, and nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
GS 65

Anne MacPherson Lindgren ’65 AM, of New York City; Oct. 31. She was passionate about housing and worked on both the public and private side, including with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. She was active with several nonprofits and served on the boards of Settlement Housing Fund and Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center. She enjoyed attending the opera and walking her dog through Central Park. She is survived by three children and seven grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
GS 65

Brian Hunt ’65 ScM, ’67 PhD, of Costa Mesa, Calif.; Mar. 31. After two years of service in the Royal Air Force and completing a degree in engineering at Cambridge University, he moved his family to Rhode Island on a Fulbright Scholarship. Upon the completion of two degrees at Brown, he traveled the U.S. for seven weeks and then returned to England and took a post as a lecturer at the University of Bristol. In 1979 he changed career paths and returned to the U.S. to join Northrop Corp. He left Northrop briefly for a position as chairman of the aerospace engineering department at the University of Maryland (1990-1992) only to return to Northrop, retiring from there in 2000 as vice president of engineering and technology. He did work as a consultant for an additional 10 years. Brown presented him with an engineering alumni medal in 1997. He is survived by his wife, Julia; a daughter; a son; and four grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2022
GS 65

Joseph F. Ballou ’65 ScM, of Williamstown, Mass., formerly of Eden, Md.; Sept. 27. During his career in the Navy he earned the rank of commander. He served in the Vietnam War aboard the USS Torsk—which is now a museum in Baltimore—the USS Bacuna, and the USS Mount Katmai. On land his duties included time at the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Military Sealift Command. After retiring from the Navy in 1979, he continued to work for the U.S. Government as a civilian and then for Computer Sciences Corp. He fully retired in 2000 and settled in Eden. He was involved in his community in a variety of capacities and continued to take education classes. He enjoyed gardening and genealogy. He is survived by three children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a brother.

 

Apr, 2022
GS 64

Norman D. Smith ’64 ScM, ’67 PhD, of Denton, Neb.; Sept. 9, of cancer. He was a University of Nebraska earth sciences professor committed to the study of rivers and advancing science literacy. He was internationally known for his research and teaching and gave of his time to professional and public service. He headed the department of geological sciences at the University of Illinois–Chicago and the department of earth and atmospheric sciences at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He was a Fulbright scholar, fellow of the Geological Society of America, and a Francis J. Pettijohn medalist for his scientific contributions to sedimentary geology. He also served as editor of the Journal of Sedimentary Petrology. For more than two decades he led Nebraska Citizens for Science, a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to advancing science literacy in the state. He enjoyed performing arts, sports, traveling with his wife, and tending to the woodlot in the Adirondacks where he built a log cabin by hand with his brother. He was a gifted musician and volunteered playing weekly piano sessions for the Bryan Medical Center East and West campuses. He is survived by his wife, Judith; two sons and daughters-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; three sisters-in-law; and several nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2022
GS 63

Loretta Marsella ’63 MAT, of Philadelphia; Sept. 29, of cancer. She spent her career in administration, teaching, and as the former director of House of Industry Community Service. She was also past president of the Italian Folk Art Federation of America. 

Apr, 2022
GS 62

John F. Hilliker ’62 AM, of Ottawa, Canada; Sept. 14, from complications of Parkinson’s disease. He joined the Canadian foreign service in 1958 and served as consul in Jakarta, Indonesia. He left to pursue his doctoral studies and taught at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay before returning to the department of external affairs as historian in 1975. As head of the historical section from 1986 until his retirement in 2003, he became a leading authority on the history of Canada’s foreign relations. He was general editor of the series Documents on Canadian External Relations, architect of the department’s official history project, and senior author of its three
published volumes. He contributed to numerous scholarly collections. 

Apr, 2022
GS 60

Barbara Sanford Hugus ’60 ScM, ’63 PhD, of Aptos, Calif., formerly of Bar Harbor, Me.; Sept. 18, of cancer. She was the director of the Jackson Laboratory from 1981 to 1987 and remained on the faculty as a senior staff scientist until 2007, when she was named an honorary trustee and staff emerita. Before that she served as research director at Dana Farber Cancer Center and was associate professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School. From 1973 to 1978 she was a branch chief at the National Cancer Institute and at Massachusetts General Hospital. She published numerous papers on cancer research and enjoyed mentoring younger scientists. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; two sons, including Arthur ’73; three daughters-in-law; 11 grandchildren, including Kelly Sanford ’10 and Eric Sanford ’12; three great-grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
GS 57

Robert W. Thrasher ’57 ScM, of Springfield, Mass.; Sept. 1. He attended St. John’s Seminary in Brighton from 1957 to 1962, was ordained to the priesthood on Jan. 27, 1962, and served his first mass at Holy Trinity Church in Greenfield, Mass. Before retiring on June 1, 2005, Father Thrasher served as an assistant at St. Mary Parish in Orange from February to May of 1962, after which he served on the faculty at Cathedral High School teaching physics for three years from 1962 to 1965. He served as curate at the former St. Patrick Church in Chicopee from 1965 to 1970; at the former St. Mary Church in Springfield from 1970 to 1974; at Our Lady of the Valley Parish in Sheffield from June to September of 1974 and again from June to August of 1975. He was appointed a notary in the Tribunal of the Springfield Diocese in 1973. He studied at the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., from 1974 to 1978, earning a canon law degree. He served as an assistant pastor at St. Michael’s Cathedral for a year and was pastor of St. Joseph Parish in Shelburne Falls from 1979 to 1982. He was appointed vice chancellor of the diocese in 1981, diocesan consultor from 1982 to 1983 and again from 1984 to 1989, and pro-synodal judge from 1983 to 1993. He was a member of the first presbyteral council and served three three-year terms from 1985 to 1994. He also was on the St. Michael’s Residence board of directors. He served as administrator of the former St. Bartholomew Parish in Bondsville and as pastor of the former Holy Name Parish in Holyoke from 1995 to 2005. He is survived by two sisters; a cousin; and nieces and nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
GS 57

Francis Jackson Jr. ’57 ScM, ’60 PhD, of Winchester, Mass.; Sept. 21. In 1960 he joined the Cambridge research and development company Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., participating in projects involved with acoustic and anti-submarine warfare programs for the U.S. Navy. He also founded the company’s Washington office in 1967 before returning to Cambridge in 1981 to assume responsibility for the company’s physical science programs. He retired in 1998 as senior vice president. He authored numerous papers and participated in at-sea sonar trials aboard both nuclear and conventional submarines. He was a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and chairman of the Winchester Town Finance Committee. He is survived by his wife, Nancy; a daughter and son-in-law; and four grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
GS 49

Betty House Zeaman ’49 ScM, of Yukon, Okla.; Oct. 17. She was an experimental psychologist who studied learning in people with intellectual disabilities alongside her husband, Prof. David Zeaman. Together they established a laboratory at the Mansfield Training School and for more than 27 years worked on the development of theories of intelligence and the failure to learn. She was an associate editor of the Psychological Bulletin until the passing of her husband and then was editor from 1984 to 1986. During World War II she served in the women’s branch of the U.S. Naval Reserve. She retired to Yukon in 1995. She is survived by a stepson, and four nieces and nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
GS 48

Janice K. Mullaney ’48 ScM, of Irondale, Ala.; Oct. 4. She worked as a research assistant at the Harvard School of Public Health before marrying and having a family. She is survived by five children and their spouses; six grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

 

 

Apr, 2022
06

Natalie M. Schmid ’06, of Pittsburgh; June 2. She is survived by her fiance, her parents, and four siblings. 

Apr, 2022
92

Nancy E. Thomas ’92, of San Francisco; July 30, from ovarian cancer. Shortly after graduating from Brown, she and her partner Todd Weaver ’92 moved to San Francisco, where she was the cofounder of Millennium Farm, a horse training business. She joined the Impala Racing Team in 2008 and achieved several individual podium finishes in her age group. She was a champion of animal rights and supported many charities. She is survived by her partner, Todd Weaver; her parents; a sister; and Millennium Farm co-owner Jill Hamilton. 

 

Apr, 2022
82

William R. Champagne ’82, of Orlando, Fla.; Oct. 10, 2020. He worked on Wall Street and enjoyed playing golf and going to Walt Disney World. While at Brown, he was a member of the men’s soccer team and was selected to the All-Ivy League team his senior year. He is survived by his mother, a sister, and two brothers. 

 

Apr, 2022
80

Howard S. Klein ’80, of Phoenix, Md.; Sept. 11, from glioblastoma. While attending Brown, he joined the crew team and Kappa Delta Upsilon. After graduating, he returned to Baltimore to earn a law degree from the University of Baltimore School of Law and worked at the Frank, Bernstein, Conaway & Goldman law firm in Baltimore before returning to Forest Hill to join his family’s growing supermarket business. He became an executive of his family’s chain, Klein’s ShopRite supermarkets, transforming a small general store into a chain of nine full-service supermarkets and an associated real estate development company. Over the years, he assisted in capital campaigns and fundraising efforts for McDonogh School and was the recipient of their 2009 Alumni Distinguished Service Award; he was inducted into the Circle of Philanthropy in February 2021. In the spring of 2021, the Class of 1976 established an endowed scholarship in his name. He enjoyed skiing and playing golf and is survived by his wife, Susan; a daughter; two sons; two grandsons; and a brother. 

 

Apr, 2022
80

David S. Bigelow IV ’80, of Harrison, N.Y.; Oct. 17, of pancreatic cancer. He spent his career in the financial services industry, most recently as managing director at Fiduciary Trust International. He was instrumental in fundraising and was involved as a mentor with first generation college students through Project Basta. He enjoyed spending time skiing with his
children in Vermont. He is survived by his mother, four children, three siblings, many nieces and nephews, and his former wife. 

 

Apr, 2022
74

Debi Coleman ’74, of Portland, Ore.; Oct. 15. After receiving her MBA from Stanford, she became part of the original Macintosh team and rose to serve as the company’s chief financial officer and, later, vice president of information systems and technology. She moved to Oregon in 1992 to be vice president of operations and materials at Tektronix but left two years later when Tek spun out printed circuit board manufacturer Merix, where she served as CEO. In 2001 she left Merix to start SmartForest Ventures in an effort to boost local funding available to Oregon startups. SmartForest’s portfolio included an array of regional tech companies, among them SignaCert, Kryptiq Corp., NexPlanar, iMove, Attensa, and Phoseon. In 2008, she formed Rainy Day Productions to fund local theater groups. A longtime patron of the arts, she served on the boards of the Oregon Ballet Theatre and the Oregon Symphony, eventually expanding her activities to include producing Broadway plays, most notably Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. She served on several public companies’ boards of directors and this past September she was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award from Technology Association of Oregon. She also received the C200 Luminary Award Honoring Women in Business in 2002 for Technology Innovator and was an emerita member of the Brown Board of Trustees. She is survived by her mother, four siblings, 13 nieces and nephews, and eight grand-nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2022
74

Diane F. Green-El ’74, of Queens, N.Y.; Oct. 2. She had a career as a pediatrician and a healthcare administrator beginning with a position at the Syracuse Community Health Center, which launched a 40-year commitment to promoting quality healthcare for all. During her tenure at Syracuse, she was medical director of the health center and later became the first medical director for Total Care, a licensed health maintenance organization designed to insure underserved populations. She was instrumental in the development of a seven-day-a-week urgent care program called Extended Hours Services. She later helped to expand the center’s ob-gyn department to include midwives. Under her clinical leadership, the center became one of the first to be certified by the Joint Commission on Health Care Organizations. She maintained her pediatric practice while performing her administrative responsibilities. She was a member of the National Medical Association and an active member of Central Baptist Church. She enjoyed arts and crafts and making jewelry. She is survived by two sons, four grandchildren, her mother, a brother, and a niece. 

 

Apr, 2022
73

Richard E. Blacher ’73, of Providence, R.I.; Oct. 10. After Brown he earned an MBA from Cornell and held managerial marketing positions at two steel firms in Connecticut until he fell victim to a serious case of Lyme disease. A lover of popular music, he acquired a large collection of his favorite musicians and performers. He also enjoyed reading and later in life was an avid fly fisherman. He is survived by his mother, Marcia Cohan Blacher ’49, and a brother. 

 

Apr, 2022
72

Henry Swirsky ’72, of Lincroft, N.J.; July 24, of cancer. He worked as a printing industry consultant with JS Eliezer & Associates until his retirement in 2020. He enjoyed cycling, jogging, and spending time with family. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter; and brother Barry ’78.

Apr, 2022
72

William Graham ’72, ’75 MD, of Phoenix; Oct. 24. He was a graduate of Brown Medical School’s first class and became an infectious disease specialist, practicing in both West Virginia and Phoenix. In retirement he was labeled with the title Pickle Man at Madison Heights Elementary School and Litter Guy on Central Avenue’s Bridle Path, a hobby that resulted in a local artist painting him on his route. He also volunteered to read in the middle school English classes. He is survived by a daughter, a son, a grandson, and a brother. 

Related classes:
Class of 1972, MD Class of 1975
Apr, 2022
70

Howard T. Barstow ’70, of Charlestown, R.I., formerly of Trescott, Me.; Oct. 10, after a long illness. He is survived by two sisters, a brother, and six nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
69

William J. Russo ’69, of Asheville, N.C.; Sept. 29, of cardiac arrest. He was a member of Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame as an all-conference linebacker and continued to have a career in football as an assistant coach at Brown from 1970 to 1977, which included being part of Brown’s 1976 Ivy League Championship team. He was a head coach for Wagner College from 1978 to 1980 and then Lafayette College from 1981 to 1999. Among his many accolades, he was honored with the Stan Lomax–Irving T. Marsh Coach of the Year Award and the Eddie Robinson I-AA Coach of the Year Award, and was inducted into the Lafayette College Maroon Club Hall of Fame with 103 wins. He completed his coaching career at Wyoming Seminary from 2000 to 2002 in Kingston, Pa. He is survived by a daughter, two sisters, and a brother. 

Apr, 2022
66

Stephen M. Tooker ’66, of Scituate, Mass.; Oct. 8. He worked as an English professor at Massasoit Community College until his retirement. A master gardener, he took pride in his award-winning daylilies, which were featured in the Boston Globe. He also was a longtime member of the Unicorn Singers and a tenor soloist in the choir at Old Ship Church in Hingham, Mass. He is survived by daughter Jessica Tooker ’05; two sisters; and many nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
66

J. Gibson Henderson Jr. ’66, of St. Louis, Mo.; Sept. 30. He taught and served in several educational positions before returning to school and becoming a psychologist. In 1996 he was diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia, which left him paralyzed. He was accepted into a clinical trial that extended his life 25 years. Strong in his faith, he was courageous in dealing with his terminal condition. He was a former president of his fraternity and member of the Jabberwocks. He learned to play the banjo and enjoyed time with his family. He is survived by his wife, Faye; three children; and six grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
66

Ernest T. Cimorelli ’66, of Cranston, R.I.; Sept. 21. Fluent in many languages, he was a teacher of foreign languages at Cranston West High School for 17 years. He enjoyed visiting libraries, reading, ’50s music, radio talk shows, and the New York Yankees. He is survived by cousins.

Apr, 2022
65

Thomas H. Pitts ’65, of Lafayette, Calif.; Sept. 20, after a short illness. He went on to earn an MBA from Wharton School of Business and serve in the U.S. Navy. After his time in the military, he began working at Crown Zellerbach Corp., a pulp and paper company based in San Francisco. He remained with the company as it changed ownership several times and ultimately retired as president of Fletcher Challenge Paper in 1997. He was an active member of the Bohemian Club, the Pacific-Union Club and the Montgomery Street Motorcycle Club. He is survived by his wife, Pamela; two children; a sister; and his former wife, Sally Pitts. 

 

Apr, 2022
64

Barbara Froling Immroth ’64, of Portland, Ore., formerly of Denver and Austin, Tex.; Sept. 6. She earned her master’s in librarianship from the University of Denver in 1965. During her time there, she married and started a family. The family moved to Pittsburgh, where she worked as a children’s librarian at Carnegie Library. In 1973, she began working as the school librarian at Central Catholic High School. After her husband’s passing in 1976, she was inspired to continue her education in order to support her family, and over the next four years she worked full-time at Central Catholic while completing her doctorate in library and information science at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1980, she accepted a position as assistant professor at the University of Texas Graduate School of Library and Information Science (now the iSchool) and moved to Austin. She was a faculty member at the iSchool for 36 years, where she was the first woman to advance from assistant professor to full professor or to direct a dissertation. She shaped the careers of countless librarians throughout Texas and the country and won numerous state and national awards for her service to the library field, including the American Library Association Beta Phi Mu Award in 2007 and the Texas Library Association Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009. She served on numerous committees and in leadership positions, notably as president of the Association for Library Service to Children, and was a trustee of the Freedom to Read Foundation, president of the Texas Library Association, and national president of the Beta Phi Mu International Library Science Honorary Society. She served on national book award committees including the Randolph Caldecott Medal and the John Newbery Medal, both for children’s literature. She authored or coauthored seven books on the topics of library service and health information, including Texas in Children’s Books, Library Service to Youth of Hispanic Heritage, and Health Information Across the Curriculum. She enjoyed traveling with fellow librarians, attending librarian conferences all over the world, and being a volunteer greeter at the Texas History Museum. She is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, three grandchildren, and three siblings. 

Apr, 2022
58

Susan Adler Kaplan ’58, ’65 MAT, of Providence, R.I.; Oct. 30. After graduating in 1958, she moved to New York. One year later, she returned to Providence to marry, continue her education, and work as a manager/secretary in the theater arts department. After a year and a half of managing work, she began to teach English at Classical High School, which she did for 28 years before moving into administration. She held various positions with Rhode Island Writing Assessment, Rhode Island Writing Project, and Blackstone Academy. Her love for teaching extended to roles as an adjunct professor at Providence College and Roger Williams University; she also did consulting in New York and California, and in Egypt with the Ministry of Education. She remained affiliated with Brown as a trustee, a trustee emerita, and chair of the Corporation emeritus executive committee. She chaired 100 Years of Women at Brown and served as the associate chair of Brown’s Advisory Council on Relations with Tougaloo College. She also chaired the Ogden Lectures on International Affairs. Her honors included an Outstanding Teacher Educator Award, a Brown Bear, an Ittleson Award, and being voted Teacher of the Year by Good Morning America. She was a proud supporter of Trinity Repertory Company in honor of her late husband, who was a founding member. She also served on the boards of Temple Beth-El and Miriam Hospital. She is survived by a granddaughter, a sister, and many nieces and nephews. 

Related classes:
Class of 1958, GS Class of 1965
Apr, 2022
65

Robert “Jock” Jerrett III ’65, of Kensington, Md.; Oct. 18. He worked as a consultant in Massachusetts for many years, then continued in the Washington, D.C., area. Forced to retire because of multiple sclerosis, he became an avid collector of older American and British literary first editions. He also had a large collection of Winslow Homer prints from Harper’s Weekly magazine of the 1860s. While at Brown he sang with the Jabberwocks and graduated Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Peggy; two daughters; two granddaughters; a brother; two sisters-in-law; and seven nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
64

Roy M. Maletz ’64, of Andover, Mass.; Sept. 23. He earned his medical degree from Johns Hopkins, served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War, and completed a fellowship at the University of Michigan before settling in Andover. He founded Nephrology Associates of the Merrimack Valley and enjoyed a long and distinguished career. He was a military history buff and enjoyed good wine, classical music, the opera, photography, and carpentry. He is survived by a daughter-in-law, two grandchildren, and two sisters and brothers-in-law.

Apr, 2022
64

Stephen C. Biklen ’64, of Pittsford, N.Y.; Sept. 15, of lung cancer. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Navy on a destroyer in Yokosuka, Japan. Following his service, he worked at Coopers & Lybrand in New York City and joined Citibank in 1973. In 1978, Citibank transferred him to Rochester, N.Y., as vice president of finance and in 1980 made him manager of the Citibank Student Loan Business. He retired in 1998 as CEO of the Student Loan Corp. In retirement, he served on the board of the Massachusetts-based American Student Assistance and volunteered with Meals on Wheels and Lifespan. He enjoyed traveling with his wife and family. He is survived by his wife, Britta; two stepsons and their spouses; two step-grandchildren; and a brother. 

Apr, 2022
63

Richard A. Wenzel ’63, of Aiken, S.C.; Sept. 22. After Brown, he earned an MBA from the Dartmouth College Tuck School of Business and pursued a career in marketing that spanned more than 30 years, including work in Canada. He retired from the plastics division of Mobil Chemical in New York in 1996. Following retirement, he enjoyed traveling with his wife and many woodworking projects. He was especially proud of the large solid cherrywood dining table he built. He also enjoyed oil painting. He was a former member of Brown’s hockey team. He is survived by his wife, June; a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and a brother. 

Apr, 2022
63

Katherine Gauthier Titchen ’63, of Honolulu; Oct. 23, 2020. She was a flight attendant for several years after graduating from Brown, but she always wanted to write and landed her first writing job at a small newspaper in 1967. In 1969 she was hired at the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and selected for a prestigious East-West Center Fellowship in 1982. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Hawaii and later worked as a Honolulu-based correspondent for Money Magazine and for PBS Hawaii. She volunteered at Unity Church and enjoyed taking hula dance lessons. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son, a granddaughter, a sister, and a brother. 

Apr, 2022
62

Arthur B. Shattuck ’62, of Newport, R.I.; Sept. 16. He had a career in the field of computers working for such companies as Sperry, IBM, Lucent, the Hartford Courant, Coopers & Lybrand, and Stratus. In retirement, he enjoyed working with the Newport Preservation Society and Fort Adams. He also
enjoyed visiting battlefields, researching his genealogy, and traveling. He is survived by his wife, Marianne; four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother-in-law; and two nieces. 

Apr, 2022
62

Sara Glock Peiter ’62, of Chelsea, Mich.; Oct. 25. She taught many years as both a private and public school elementary teacher. She authored the first iteration of A History of Chelsea, a storybook for elementary students. She enjoyed reading, especially mysteries, as well as gardening and and walking her dogs in the country. She is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and four grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
61

C. Barry Titus ’61, of Decatur, Ga.; Oct. 23, after battling the effects of Lewy Body Dementia. He was retired from both IBM and Cox Enterprises. He enjoyed listening to classical music, playing guitar, and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Frances; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and three sisters. 

 

Apr, 2022
61

John “Jay” K. Soest ’61, of Creve Coeur, Mo.; Oct. 18, of Alzheimer’s disease. He worked at Chemical Bank in New York City prior to becoming a broker for Merrill Lynch in St. Louis, where he worked for more than 30 years. He was also a deacon at Ladue Chapel in St. Louis. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the Missouri Athletic Club and Phi Gamma Delta. He enjoyed traveling, attending the theater, and various sports. He is survived by daughter Susan Valoff ’92; a son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister-in-law; three nieces; and a nephew.

Apr, 2022
60

Allan W. Osborne ’60, of Bellefonte, Pa., formerly of Elgin, Ill., and Williamston, N.C.; Oct. 22, after a long illness. He taught at Middlesex Academy in Concord, Mass. before moving to Elgin, where he spent seven years building the theater program and teaching English and drama at the Elgin Academy. While there, he completed his master’s in theater at Northern Illinois University. In 1972, he moved his family to Williamston and developed a successful theater program for the high school. He founded the local Martin Community Players and spent 25 years as its artistic director. He and his wife retired to Bellefonte in 2006 to be near their children and grandchildren. In retirement he continued to be active in local theater. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; two daughters and sons-in-law; three grandchildren; a sister; a niece; and three nephews. 

Apr, 2022
60

Richard A. Laudati ’60, of Fort Myers, Fla.; Sept. 18. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, he graduated from Brown. His first job was with IBM and lasted 10 years before he established Applied Systems Development Corp., from which he retired in 1985 and settled in Florida. He enjoyed playing golf and gardening. He is survived by his wife, Elsbeth; a stepdaughter; a stepson; sister Ruth Laudati Robinson ’66; brother Robert ’63; niece Heather Robinson ’89; and nephew Robert Laudati ’85.

Apr, 2022
60

Robert P. Burchard ’60, ’62 ScM, of Springfield, Va., formerly of Catonsville, Md.; Sept. 21, of complications of Parkinson’s disease. He served in the Peace Corps in Nigeria teaching microbiology at Obafemi Awolowo University. After returning to the U.S., he joined the faculty of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, as a professor of biological science, remaining there for 33 years. He was a campus leader for decades, serving as president of the faculty senate, interim chair of his department, and interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. In retirement, he volunteered for another 14 years teaching, researching, and working on committees. He also cofounded and chaired the Baltimore Inner City Outings program of the Sierra Club. He was a supporter of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Center Stage, and Walters Art Museum. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and a sister. 

Related classes:
Class of 1960, GS Class of 1962
Apr, 2022
60

Allan I. Bezan ’60, of Denver; Sept. 7. He was a pediatrician from 1964 to 1971 and then became a psychiatrist. He was a founding director of inpatient and day hospital services at Newton-Wellesley Hospital, where he remained for 21 years. He was a member of the corporation of Winsor School, an avid art collector, and enjoyed traveling. He is survived by a son and two grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
59

Janet Saunders Wright ’59, of Miami; Oct. 18. After Brown she attended the Parsons School of Design. She had a career as an interior designer for two years in New York City followed by many years in Miami. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law; two granddaughters; two sisters; and two nephews. 

Apr, 2022
59

George J. Posejpal ’59, of Fostoria, Ohio, formerly of Culver, Ind.; Oct. 6. He is survived by his wife, Alma; a daughter; a son; four stepchildren; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; and a sister. 

Apr, 2022
59

Karin Scott Gunn Gale ’59, of Gloucester, Mass.; June 5, of ovarian cancer. During the course of her career she worked at the American Medical Association, IBM, Gorton’s of Gloucester, and BankBoston. She was active with many local organizations and enjoyed traveling. She is survived by two daughters, including Catherine Gunn ’88; a son-in-law; and a granddaughter. 

Apr, 2022
58

Joseph J. Tebo ’58, of La Jolla, Calif.; Sept. 10, of bladder cancer. After graduating he worked at the Atlantic Richfield Company for 30 years. During his tenure, he was promoted to president of AM/PM International and opened stations in Brazil, Japan, and Indonesia. After his time at ARCO, he continued his career as president of Price Ventures at Price Club (now Costco), then later became CEO of Trusonic, a music and technology company. During his time at Brown, he was a member of the men’s basketball team and cocaptain of the 1957-58 season, was named first team all–Ivy League in 1956, and received honorable mention honors in both 1957 and 1958. In 1978 he was inducted into the Brown Athletic Hall of Fame, and in 2006 he was named to Brown’s 100th anniversary team by being selected as one of the 15 greatest players in Brown basketball history. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter; and a son. 

Apr, 2022
58

Radley Sheldrick ’58, of Westborough, Mass.; Oct. 29, after a long period of declining health. Upon receiving his chartered property casualty designation, he handled both reinsurance and excess and surplus lines claims at Cameron and Colby, where he progressed to secretary of the company. His final years of employment were spent at F.M. Global in Waltham, Mass., as vice president, where he oversaw reinsurance audits in the London market. In retirement, he continued working in arbitration in the U.S. He was his happiest while racing his sailboat on Pleasant Bay. He was both race committee chair and vice commodore of Chatham Yacht Club. He also enjoyed skiing, fishing, birding, and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Karen; a daughter and son-in-law; son Radley ’93 and his wife; and six grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
58

James F. Ott ’58, of Melbourne, Fla., formerly of Chicago; Oct. 10, of congestive heart failure. After Brown he earned an MBA from Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and his CPA in 1978. He worked in Chicago in various senior financial executive positions, including at AmPro Corp., The Middleby Corp., Chicago Title and Trust Co., the L.E. Meyers Co., Blunt Ellis & Simmons, Eastman Dillon Union Securities & Co., and White Weld & Co., eventually relocating to Melbourne. He retired in 1999. He served in the Illinois Air National Guard and was a member of the Illinois Society of Certified Public Accountants, the Investment Analyst Society of Chicago, the Financial Executives Institute, and the Economic Club of Chicago. He enjoyed reading and collecting classic movies from the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s. He is survived by his wife, Edna; four children and their spouses; and eight grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
58

Maxwell R. McCreery ’58, of Chilmark, Mass., formerly of Darien, Conn.; Oct. 22. Completing ROTC at Brown, he graduated as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force and served in Bermuda, Puerto Rico, and Maine. After military service, he began a 25-year career at Exxon as a regional sales rep in Northampton, Mass., then as a regional sales manager in Buffalo, N.Y., and finally at the New York City headquarters, where he headed an executive recruiting team. He retired early and had a second career working in outplacement, where he enjoyed helping people find jobs. Actively involved in his community, he started a girls basketball league at the Darien YMCA and was a founder of the Darien Nature Center and Friends of Woodland Park. He served on the board of the Friends of Sengekontacket and United Way, and was on the Board of Selectmen for the town of Darien and the Board of the Democratic Town Committee. He was also president of the Brown Club of Fairfield County. In his 70s he trained and volunteered as an EMT for Tri-Town Ambulance Service and he delivered meals for Meals on Wheels each Tuesday. He is survived by his wife, Connie; daughters Margaret ’87 and Georgia ’89; two sons-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister and brother-in-law; and 18 nieces and nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
58

Donald MacKenzie III ’58, of Concord, Mass., formerly of Acton, Mass.; Sept. 24. After Brown he briefly worked for Mobil Oil Co. and then joined New England Telephone, the beginning of his career in the telephone industry. He held managerial positions there as well as at AT&T and Bell, and was chairman and CEO of NYNEX Information Resources. In the two years prior to his retirement, he was president of the Telephone Pioneers of America. In retirement, he began a charitable foundation fund and was involved with many boards, including Boston Urban Ministries, Acton Library Foundation, and the Discovery Museum. For 40 years he was the moderator for the town of Acton, the longest serving moderator in the town’s history and one of the longest in the state. He also served nine and a half years as chairman of the personnel board. He was a strong believer in volunteerism and giving to the community; he served as president of the Mass Moderators Association. He enjoyed playing golf and tennis and is survived by his wife, Patricia Pennal Mac-
Kenzie
’59; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and two nieces.

Apr, 2022
58

George A. Benway Jr. ’58, of Mashpee, Mass.; Oct. 6. After Brown he enlisted in the U.S. Navy Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I., and served on the USS Hartley during the Cuban Missile Crisis naval blockade. Later he taught at the Officer Candidate School. Upon discharge from the military, he married and moved to Mashpee, where he raised a family and started his firm, Benway Real Estate. He was a Mashpee selectman for many years and was proud to be the first Cape Cod Commissioner for the Town of Mashpee. In later years he also served as the Mashpee town moderator. When not busy with his real estate business or Mashpee town business, he was an avid boater. He enjoyed winter skiing, gardening, cooking, and spending time with family. He is survived by three sons and their spouses, six grandchildren, and his former wife, Carolyn McDonald Benway. 

Apr, 2022
57

Robert E. Tatem ’57, of Sun City Center, Fla.; Feb. 5, 2021. He was a teacher before joining UPS, where he worked for 25 years prior to retiring. He enjoyed tinkering in his workshop and teaching his children and grandchildren to fish. He was active in his local community, serving on the neighborhood security patrol. He was a naval officer, member of the Military Officers Association of America, and a member of the Knights of Columbus. He is survived by his wife, Elaine; four children and their spouses; six grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
57

Michael Scardera ’57, of Hamden, Conn.; Sept. 18. He had a long and successful career as a research scientist at Olin Corp. An avid stamp collector, he was a lifetime member of the American Philatelic Society. He is survived by his wife, Georgette; four children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
57

Gustave W. Kilkenny ’57, of Mainesburg, Pa.; Sept. 6. He served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War and at the Pentagon before retiring after 20 years of service with the rank of major. He received the Bronze Star and Meritorious Service Medal. Following military service, he worked for the U.S. Postal Service, studied history at Mansfield University, and was a substitute teacher in the Mansfield (Pa.) school system for many years. He enjoyed hunting and fishing and is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, and four stepchildren. 

Apr, 2022
57

Richard D. Godfrey ’57, of Santa Barbara, Calif.; Oct. 12. After graduating, he married Katherine Bernhard Godfrey ’60, joined the Army, and was stationed in France. Upon completion of his military service, he and Katherine moved back to Rhode Island and Richard entered the banking profession with a focus on trust services. He rose to head the asset management subsidiary of the Industrial National Bank of Providence. In 1975, he accepted a position at American Express in San Francisco and relocated to the West Coast. He retired after a successful career with Trust Company of the West and settled in Santa Barbara, where he volunteered in the community and served on several boards and committees, including Direct Relief and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. He is survived by his wife, Katherine; three children; and six grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
56

Stuart Terrill ’56, of Brookfield, Conn.; Sept. 9. He was an accountant and retired from Nuclear Services of Danbury (Conn.) in 1996. He was past president and a 62-year member of the Brookfield Volunteer Fire Department and was honored for his service to the community in 2021. He was an active member of the Brookfield Historical Society and a veteran of the U.S. Army and enjoyed gardening, golfing, and watching football. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
56

Jayne Partridge Oliver ’56, of Baton Rouge, formerly of Amarillo, Tex.; Oct. 12, after 15 years battling cancer. She worked for United Airlines in New York and later in San Francisco. She and her family moved to Baton Rouge in 1976 and she worked as a substitute teacher in both public and private schools, then spent many years working in the travel industry at Pearson’s Travel World. She enjoyed volunteering in the women’s ministries at Broadmoor Methodist Church. She is survived by her husband, Tom; a daughter and son-in-law; two grandsons; and nieces and nephews.

Apr, 2022
56

David W. Merson ’56, of Boynton Beach, Fla., formerly of Lewiston, Me.; Sept. 28. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Army in Italy. Upon discharge, he earned a master’s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and worked for a short time in New York as a buyer for Bloomingdale’s. He then worked at the family business, Ward Brothers, an upscale women’s retail store. Under his tenure, the business grew to three locations in Maine. Business and travel were a constant in his life to buy merchandise for the next season or to meet with his buying group. He retired to Florida in 1987. He enjoyed reading multiple newspapers daily, traveling, and playing bridge, achieving the title of life master. He is survived by three children and their spouses. 

Apr, 2022
56

Christa Y. Buhler Fagerberg ’56, of Binghamton, N.Y.; Sept. 21. She was a lifelong learner, a teacher, and an artist. She was involved in village theater productions and enjoyed raising her family. She is survived by four children and their spouses; three grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and a niece. 

 

Apr, 2022
55

Walter B. Goldfarb ’55, of Portland, Me.; Oct. 13. He met and married Marcia Finberg ’55, who predeceased him. After receiving his medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine and completing his surgical residency at Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., where he was an instructor in surgery from 1963 to 1965, he moved his family to Portland and began a surgery practice at Maine Medical Center and Mercy Hospital. He was drafted into the U.S. Army and served at Fort Sam Houston (Tex.) and then became chief of surgery at Ireland Army Hospital at Fort Knox (Ky.). He was awarded the Army Commendation Medal and was commissioned as a Kentucky Colonel during his tenure there. He and his family returned to Portland to resume his surgical practice, from which he retired in 2003 as chief of general surgery at Maine Medical Center (MMC). During his tenure, he served in a variety of leadership positions, including president of the medical staff, trustee, and founding trustee of MaineHealth. He took pride in his involvement in the growth and development of MMC’s surgery department and was twice recognized as Teacher of the Year by surgical students. In retirement, he remained active for 10 years teaching third-year medical students in weekly surgical seminars. He was clinical professor of surgery at the University of Vermont and then at Tufts University School of Medicine when MMC changed its medical school affiliation. He was a member of several medical and surgical societies, including serving in leadership roles. He was also active in the Boston Surgical Society, serving on the executive committee for six years and as vice president in 2005. He wrote 40 articles and two book chapters in surgical literature. He served as a trustee over the years for the Portland Concert Association, Portland Chamber Music Festival, and Maine chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. He was a trustee of the Portland Museum of Art, serving as vice president in 2011, and donated major American paintings to the museum. He enjoyed fly fishing and playing squash. He is survived by three children, including daughter Miriam Goldfarb ’85 and son Adam ’82; and six grandchildren, including grandson Jonathan Aronson ’13. 

Apr, 2022
55

Harry L. Devoe Jr. ’55, of New Zion, S.C.; Aug. 17. After Brown he attended the University of Virginia School of Law and served as public defender for the 3rd District Judicial Circuit for more than 20 years. He was past president of the Clarendon County Republican Party and a member of the American Bar Association, the American Legion Post 149, and the Turbeville Ruritan Club. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of the Vietnam War. He is survived by two sons, five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and two nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
53

Donal R. Sisk ’53, of Norwood, Mass.; Sept. 10. He had a long career in property management with the Niles Company and spent many years overseeing Westbrook (now Hancock) Village in Brookline, Mass. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and he enjoyed fishing. He is survived by five children and their spouses; six grandchildren; a sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews.

 

Apr, 2022
53

Angus L. MacLean Jr. ’53, of Burlingame, Calif.; Sept. 20. After graduating from Brown, where he was captain of the wrestling team, he was commissioned in the U.S. Marine Corps. Upon discharge, he taught English and history and coached wrestling, football, and baseball at St. Albans School in Washington, D.C. He then switched careers and began a sales position at Coldwell Banker Commercial Brokerage Co. He rose through the ranks during his 27-year career and was a senior vice president in charge of 11 offices in the Northwest, and later served as a resident manager of the San Francisco and San Jose offices. He left Coldwell Banker in 1987 as a founder and president of the real estate investment banking division to accept a position as managing director and senior vice president at Kidder Peabody. In 1975, he was inducted into Brown’s Athletic Hall of Fame. His many social and athletic activities included serving as director of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, trustee of Mills Hospital Foundation, vice chairman of the Bay Area Council, director of the San Francisco Board of Realtors, and president of the board of directors of That Many May See, a University of California San Francisco foundation that raises money for ophthalmic research. He is survived by his wife, Virginia; three children; six grandchildren; a great-grandson; a sister; and a brother. 

Apr, 2022
53

Betty Leaver Goff ’53, of East Providence, R.I.; Sept. 28. In 1957 she married Luther Goff and together they were co-owners of Goff Marine Company, designing electrical systems for yachts in the Northeast and Bermuda. The two were inseparable and enjoyed dressing alike and traveling to Florida and Bermuda on their boat the Anna Brown. In 2001, after surviving lung cancer, she was instrumental in forming a women’s survivor support group called Out of the Shadows at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. The group continues today and Betty remained active with the group’s quarterly educational meetings until her illness in May. She collected teddy bears and organized several fundraising events for local charities. For many years she was a class secretary and a fundraising volunteer in support of women's scholarships at Brown. She is survived by nieces, nephews, and friends. 

Apr, 2022
53

Craig Gambee ’53, of Nantucket, Mass., formerly of Weston, Conn., and Englewood, N.J.; Sept. 15. He is survived by his wife, Mary; a daughter; a son and daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; a step-grandchild; a sister; and a brother. 

 

Apr, 2022
52

James L. Muller ’52, of Voorhees, N.J.; Sept. 28, of pancreatic cancer. After earning a law degree from the University of Pennsylvania, he practiced law in Camden, Haddonfield, and Cherry Hill (all N.J.) for 60 years, first with firms, two of which he founded, and then as a solo practitioner from the 1980s until his retirement at age 85. His expertise was in commercial law, bankruptcy, and real estate. He enjoyed helping his clients’ businesses solve their legal problems, as well as helping their businesses to grow. Prior to his wife’s passing, they enjoyed traveling the world together. He is survived by two sons, David ’81 and Eric ’84; two daughters-in-law, including Diana Marcus Muller ’82; five grandchildren, including Abby Muller ’16 and Daniel Muller ’17; and two nieces. 

Apr, 2022
52

Walter A. Horton III ’52, of Bridgton, Me.; Oct. 13. After graduating, he joined the Order of Cistercian Monks of the Roman Catholic Church. During the next 14 years he became an ordained priest, helped to build St. Joseph’s Abbey in Spencer, Mass., and received a license certificate in theology after a year of study at St. Thomas University in Rome. He eventually left the priesthood, married, and became a civil engineer for the State of Maine Department of Transportation. He was chief engineer of many Maine road construction jobs before retiring in 1987. He also became a licensed site evaluator and for almost 50 years designed septic systems throughout southern Maine; he officially retired from that work on Oct. 3, 2021. He enjoyed gardening and spending time with his family. Unfortunately, his wife passed on Oct. 2, 2021. He is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, a son, six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a sister and brother-in-law, and nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
52

Louise Simon Felder ’52, of Fall River, Mass.; Aug. 6. She earned a master’s degree in library science from URI. She was a member of the Pembroke Club, Brandeis Women’s Club, Temple Emanu-El in Providence, and Tifereth Israel Congregation in New Bedford, and served as past president of Hadassah in Fall River. She is survived by two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren, including Daniel Felder ’11; a sister; and a brother. 

 

Apr, 2022
52

Peter T. Case ’52, of Plymouth, Mass., formerly of Duxbury and Westwood, Mass.; Sept. 9. He obtained his master’s degree in education attending night classes at Boston University while working selling insurance during the day. He then became a high school teacher and coach at Westwood High School for more than 28 years. While living in Duxbury, he was involved in community affairs, served on the Conservation Commission and was a member of Rotary. In the late 1980s he retired and enjoyed painting and wood carving. He also liked to sail and play tennis and golf. He was a member of the varsity hockey and lacrosse teams at Brown and served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War. He is survived by four children and their spouses, four grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2022
51

Cleopatra Palelis Hazard ’51, of Mystic, Conn., formerly of North Kingstown, R.I.; Oct. 16. She was the office manager of her husband’s industrial design consulting business, Robert E. Hazard Associates, Inc., for many years, former president of the Brown Alumni Club of Kent County, and a member of the Wickford Yacht Club. She is survived by a son and daughter-in-law. 

Apr, 2022
51

Sanford Golin ’51, of Chapel Hill, N.C., formerly of Pittsburgh, and West Palm Beach, Fla.; Sept. 22. After earning a doctorate in psychology from the University of Iowa, he became a psychology professor at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and later joined the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh. He published numerous articles on depression and trained generations of young psychologists over a 30-year career. He retired from the University of Pittsburgh in 1995 and moved to Florida, where at the age of 80, he studied and passed the Florida psychologist licensing exam. In retirement, he continued to work as a clinical psychologist both in Pennsylvania and Florida. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army. He enjoyed traveling and sailing in the Chesapeake Bay and the Caribbean. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two daughters, including Sarah Golin ’84; son Eric ’81, ’85 ScM, ’91 PhD and his wife, Marion Abrams Golin ’81; a son-in-law; seven grandchildren, including James Golin ’13; two stepchildren and their spouses; four step-grandchildren; a sister; and three nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
51

Grace Burnham Evans ’51, of Oriental, N.C.; June 12. She worked within the North Carolina Highway Commission for 40 years in various capacities. She also owned a sailing school and delivered sailboats to marinas and owners. She was instrumental in the opening of the Oriental History Museum and involved in the startup of the town’s annual New Year’s Eve “Dragon Run.” She worked to raise funds for Heartworks and Hope Clinic and volunteered with the Red Cross. She is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a stepson; two grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; a sister-in-law; and four nieces and nephews. 

 

Apr, 2022
51

Gifford R. Dean ’51, of North Palm Beach, Fla., formerly of Cohasset, Mass.; Oct. 6. He worked in the paper industry before switching careers and founding Dean and Hamilton Real Estate in Cohasset. In 1976 he moved o Florida and continued in the real estate business. He was instrumental in helping numerous recovering alcoholics. He enjoyed boating and is survived by two children, five grandchildren, two great-grandsons, a step-grandson, and two former wives. 

Apr, 2022
50

J. Richard Feibelman ’50, of Norwood, Mass.; Sept. 23. He started his own business as a manufacturer’s representative for water treatment systems throughout New England. He was a World War II U.S. Army veteran and he enjoyed sailing. He is survived by three children, three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

 

Apr, 2022
50

Charles W. Dougherty ’50, of Vero Beach, Fla.; Sept. 13. He was a retired insurance executive. He worked at Travelers Insurance Company for more than 30 years. He was a veteran of World War II and a member of Notre Dame Catholic Church in Ft. Pierce, Fla. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; three stepsons and their spouses; 11 grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
49

Zenas W. Bliss ’49, of Rumford, R.I.; Sept. 4. He spent his entire career working as an engineer with Factory Mutual Global. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling the world with his wife before her passing and in recent years with his grandchildren. He visited six of the seven continents several times. He was a decorated World War II Army veteran and served in the Rhode Island National Guard following the war. He enjoyed sailing off the Rhode Island coast. He is survived by a son and daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
48

Virginia “Ginger” Bellows Henderson Schultz ’48, of Alexandria, Va., and Nantucket Island, Mass.; Sept. 11. After divorcing John B. Henderson ’46 in 1977, she moved to Nantucket Island and became active in the League of Women Voters and the Nantucket Conservation Foundation. She remarried in 1983 and enjoyed sailing and scalloping on Nantucket Island. She is survived by three daughters, including Sophie Henderson ’87 and her husband Nicholas Kalogeropoulos ’88; grandson Stephen Young ’16 PhD; and three great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
48

Theresa Mastrangelo Mahoney ’48, of Lunenburg, Mass.; Oct. 26. For 45 years she was an educator at St. Anthony’s School, where she was afforded the opportunity to teach a variety of subjects and grade levels. She also led the drama club, judged and prepped students for the National Spelling Bee, and taught religious education. She continued to teach Latin and French to 8th grade students part-time until she fully retired at the age of 82. She was an avid reader. She is survived by four children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; 20 great-grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and several nieces and nephews. 

Apr, 2022
48

Philip D. Holmes ’48, of East Falmouth, Mass.; Oct. 18. He entered Brown only to leave shortly thereafter to serve in the Maritime service. Upon returning home from war, he completed his Brown degree and began a civil engineering position at the Otis Air Force base in Bourne, Mass. (now Cape Cod Coast Guard Air Station). After several years at Otis, he started his own civil engineering company in Falmouth; after choosing a partner, the company became Holmes & McGrath Inc. In 1983, Philip and his wife moved to Maine, where they managed their 250-acre woodlot and grew several acres of balsam fir Christmas trees—it was a place families came to cut their own tree, have a sleigh ride, and drink hot chocolate. They returned to Cape Cod in 1999 to be closer to their children and growing family. He is survived by his wife, Jean; five children; six grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
48

Frances “Billie” Ridge Babcock ’48, of Glastonbury, Conn.; Oct. 9. She met her husband Jim, who passed two months prior to her death, at Brown. After graduating, they married and started a family. While her life was dedicated to her family, she had a brief career as a stewardess for Pan Am and later as a travel agent with Holidays Unlimited, which she owned with her brother. Both of those positions offered her opportunities to travel and her destinations covered the globe. She will be remembered for her hand-knitted socks and Afghans, her paintings, and her cooking. She is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
47

Gerald F. Tucci ’47, of Port Washington, N.Y.; Oct. 2, after a short illness. His attendance at Brown was interrupted by service in the Navy; after graduating, he attended Harvard Business School and graduated with an MBA. His career included work for the American Can Company, the Artcraft Hosiery Company, and Leach and Garner before he transitioned to being an entrepreneur in 1963, starting Micro Contacts. During the course of his career he obtained several patents and bought/founded other companies. After the passing of his wife, his son joined Micro Contacts and all the other companies morphed into Microtechnologies. He was well known and remained friendly with many university, neighborhood, and club friends over his lifetime. He is survived by his longtime companion, Hilda Ostheimer; three children and their spouses, including son Francis ’91 and daughter Amy Tucci ’00; and eight grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
47

Doris “Dolly” Fisher ’47, of Worcester, Mass.; Oct. 11. She was a real estate executive with Fisher Properties and Dorel Realty in Worcester for many years. She was also a founding member of Beth Israel Synagogue and its sisterhood and a member of the Genesis Club of Worcester, and the Worcester Chapter of Hadassah. She enjoyed playing bridge, golf, tennis, swimming, and traveling. 

Apr, 2022
45

James O. Starkweather ’45, of Riverside, Conn.; Oct. 22, two weeks shy of his 98th birthday. He joined Brown’s Naval ROTC, graduating in two and half years as a Navy ensign with a mechanical engineering degree. Upon the completion of his military service, he earned a master’s degree from MIT. He went on to work in the paper industry, first at Great Northern Paper Company (Me.) as a chief engineer supervising the construction and start-up of their large new paper mill. In 1957 he and his family moved to Greenwich, Conn., and his career evolved from designing mills to focusing on energy conservation. He became active in paper industry association efforts to analyze industry energy usage and reduce dependence on foreign oil. After moving to Riverside, he was recruited as a crew member for several ocean-racing opportunities, including many Newport to Bermuda races, as well as Vineyard, Block Island, and Halifax races. He was an accomplished navigator and was featured on the August 1949 cover of Yachting magazine. He was a member of Riverside Yacht Club, where he served as Commodore in 1975 and was awarded the Club’s highest service award. He also served as treasurer of Greenwich Hospital Auxiliary and deacon of First Congregational Church of Greenwich, was an elected member of Greenwich Representative Town Meeting, and was a longtime volunteer in the AARP tax assistance program. He is survived by his wife, Mary; five daughters, including Martha Altreuter ’79, Julie Halloran ’85, and Mary Bushman ’86; 12 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
45

Robert B. Hill ’45, of Minneapolis; Sept. 4. He owned and operated a water treatment company. He is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law; a son-in-law; six grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Apr, 2022
45

Walter C. Cotter ’45, of Stuart, Fla.; Oct. 27. He attended Boston University before entering the U.S. Navy during World War II. Following his military service, he resumed his premedical education at Brown, then attended medical school at Tufts University. He returned to Rhode Island to begin a long career as a physician, working on the staff of several Rhode Island hospitals. In the final two decades of his surgical practice, he assumed a leading role in the development and leadership of the neurosurgical center at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Providence and was named chief of neurosurgery at both St. Joseph’s and Kent County hospitals. He was frequently called upon by local media to provide medical insights, notably on Vinnie “Paz” Pazienza and the death of Robert F. Kennedy. He was named president of both the Rhode Island and New England neurosurgical societies and was a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. He retired in 1995. He is survived by his wife, Mary; six children and their spouses, including daughter Betsy Wisehart ’81 and son David ’77; 15 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. 

 

Apr, 2022
44

David B. Fowler ’44, of South Windsor, Conn.; Oct. 21, after a brief illness. At the start of World War II he left Brown to enlist in the U.S. Army Air Corps and completed his degree at Boston University. He received many commendation medals for his service and spent most of his career working in the insurance business. He is survived by two sons, a daughter-in-law, and a granddaughter. 

 

Apr, 2022
42

Dorothy Johnson Danielson ’42, of Golden Valley, Minn.; Sept. 4, at 101 years of age. She was a retired secretary and is survived by a daughter and son-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
FAC

Julius W. Kling, of Providence; Aug. 8. He accepted a teaching and research position in the psychology department at Brown in 1947. He served as department chair for more than 10 years and during his tenure received numerous honors for his academic accomplishments. He retired in 1989. He was a veteran of World War II and recipient of two Purple Hearts for his service. He is survived by four children, two grandchildren, and three great-granddaughters. 

Jan, 2022
GS 55

Donald Kagan ’55 AM, of McLean, Va.; Aug. 6. He was a distinguished scholar of Greek history. He taught at Ohio State, Pennsylvania State University, and Cornell before joining the Yale faculty in 1969. From his first years at Yale he was heralded as a dynamic and influential teacher. For his distinction in the classroom he received the Phi Beta Kappa DeVane Medal for teaching and scholarship in 1975 and, 20 years later, the Byrnes/Sewall Teaching Prize, which is awarded to the teacher who “has given the most time, energy, and effective effort to educating undergraduates.” While at Cornell, he won two prestigious teaching awards as well. He was often consulted by political figures and he promoted his views on politics in national articles and columns. With his son, he wrote While America Sleeps, a book comparing American foreign policy of the 1990s to that of the United Kingdom following World War I. During his tenure at Yale, he was twice chair of the classics department and was dean of the college from 1989 to 1992. In 2005 he was invited to give the National Endowment for the Humanities Jefferson lecture, the highest honor the federal government confers for distinguished intellectual achievement. For his body of work he was awarded the National Medal for the Humanities, presented by President George W. Bush in 2002. He is survived by two sons and their spouses and two grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
GS 07

Christopher M. Lamberti ’07 AM, ’13 PhD, of Chicago; July 23, from glioblastoma multiforme. He was a historian, a published author, and a fighter for social justice as an organizer and researcher for labor unions. He enjoyed family fishing trips to Wisconsin, playing music with his band, Bamboo Grove, and cooking. He is survived by his wife, Milena; a daughter; his parents; a sister; and a brother. 

Jan, 2022
GS 77

Ruth H. Pater ’77 PhD, of Bethesda; formerly of Yorktown, Va.,  and Windsor, Conn.; June 27. She taught undergraduate chemistry at Southeastern Massachusetts University and did postdoctoral work at Brown before entering the private sector as a chemist at United Technologies Research Center in Hartford, Conn. In 1980, she joined NASA as a senior polymer scientist, first at the Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, and then at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va., where she worked until her retirement in 2013. During her tenure with NASA she achieved global recognition and in 1981 the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering chose a paper she had coauthored on epoxy resins as its paper of the year. She was the recipient of numerous awards, including the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, the 2005 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year Award, and a Floyd L. Thompson Fellowship to conduct research at the Tokyo Institute of Technology for a year. In addition she held more than 20 U.S. and foreign patents. She enjoyed gardening, cooking, hiking in Shenandoah National Park, and listening to opera. She is survived by three daughters, seven grandchildren, a sister, and two brothers. 

Jan, 2022
GS 74

Mutlu Konuk Blasing ’74 PhD, of Providence; Aug. 16. She taught for nearly 40 years at Brown as a professor of English. She was an internationally recognized author of four books on American poetry and published ten books of the first English translations of works by Naim Hikmet. She wrote his biography, entitled The Life and Times of Turkey’s World Poet. She is survived by a son, a sister, and her former husband, John Blasing. 

 

Jan, 2022
GS 71

Archie V. Farnsworth Jr. ’71 PhD, of Los Lunas, N. Mex.; July 28. After Brown he began working at Sandia National Laboratories as a scientist and remained there for 34 years until retiring. He was a volunteer firefighter in Valencia County and served in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as bishop, teacher, and executive secretary. In his younger years, he spent two years serving full-time as an ecclesiastical missionary in Mississippi. He is survived by his wife, Jackie; seven children and their spouses; 28 grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and three sisters.

Jan, 2022
GS 70

Richard R. Brockhaus ’70 AM, ’71 PhD, of Rockville, Md.; Aug. 12. He taught philosophy at Bucknell University before moving to Maryland to teach calculus and physics at Landon School in Bethesda for 30 years. He is survived by his wife, Ann; a daughter; a son; two stepdaughters; five grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jan, 2022
GS 65

Ernest C. Ilgenfritz ’65 ScM, of Easton, Md.; Aug. 22. He taught mathematics at Baltimore Polytechnic High School and Towson University, where he also served as department chairman. He ran in 13 Maryland marathons. He also enjoyed boating, fishing, crabbing, and camping. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn. 

 

Jan, 2022
GS 62

Michael Voichick ’62 PhD, of Madison,Wisc.; July 1. In 1964, he joined the math faculty at the University of Wisconsin, where he enjoyed teaching for more than three decades. He is survived by his wife, Jane; three children, including Jenifer Voichick ’85; a daughter-in-law; and four grandsons. 

Jan, 2022
GS 57

Nicholas Pappas ’57 PhD, of Wilmington, Del.; July 6. He began his career at the DuPont Company as a research chemist at the Experimental Station Laboratory in Wilmington. After a series of management positions in research and development, industrial sales, market development, and corporate planning, he was named vice president and general manager of the DuPont fabrics and finishes department in 1978. He transferred to the polymer products department as vice president in 1983, leading a period of expansive growth for this business. He served as chairman of the Executive Board of the Council for Solid Waste Solutions and was instrumental in DuPont polymer products taking a leadership role in plastics recycling and environmental protection. In 1988, he was promoted and appointed to the DuPont executive committee, where he served until his retirement in 1990. He served as chairman of the United Way of Delaware Campaign and Board of Directors 1985-86. He served on numerous Delaware boards and was committed to advancing the cause of workplace diversity as the chairman of the DuPont Affirmative Action Committee. After his retirement from DuPont, he was appointed president and COO of Rollins Environmental Services from 1991-96. He also served on numerous boards of directors related to industrial materials, including ChemFab Corporation, Witco Corporation, Nova Chemicals, and EnviroKare LRM Industries. He was a member of the Greek Orthodox Church and served on parish council boards for church communities in Wilmington. He is survived by his wife Dorothy; four children and their spouses; nine grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

Jan, 2022
GS 55

Anne Sangree Parke ’55 AM, of Stowe and Greensboro, Vt., formerly of Va. ; July 29, of pancreatic cancer, diagnosed only 10 days previously. After earning her master’s degree in sociology from Brown, she and her husband moved to New Brunswick, N.J., where she taught sociology at New Jersey College for Women (now Douglas College). In 1959, she moved to Washington, D.C., and joined the board of directors for the D.C. League of Women Voters. She and her family moved to Virginia in 1962 and she became involved in the school system as a PTA member representative on the Fairfax County Child Care Advisory Council and served on the Commission for Children, which led to the establishment of many after school programs for elementary schools. She later went back to work part-time as a bookkeeper, followed by a position as a legal assistant, which prompted her to return to school and obtain a paralegal certificate and work at Crowell & Moring for 14 years. In retirement she enjoyed traveling. She moved to Stowe in 2018 and spent each summer in Greensboro. She also enjoyed reading and poetry groups and was a supporter of libraries. She is  survived by three children and their spouses, two grandchildren, and two siblings. 

 

Jan, 2022
04

April L. Freely ’04, of Brooklyn, N.Y.; July 9. She was a poet, essayist, and newly appointed director of the Fire Island Artist Residency at the time of her passing. During her short tenure, she launched a Social Justice Committee that was heavily involved with the Black and Brown Equity Coalition of Cherry Grove’s Juneteenth weekend. She previously worked as an associate in Columbia’s School of Social Work Writing Center from 2019 to 2020. She had been a program coordinator at the Vermont Studio Center and was the nonfiction editor at Washington Square Review. In addition to Brown, she was a graduate of the University of Iowa’s master’s program in nonfiction writing. She was a faculty member at Bard College in Annandale-on-Hudson (N.Y.), where she taught in the Language and Thinking program. She was the recipient of a 2020-21 Queer Arts Mentorship fellowship in literature and of awards from the Ohio Arts Council, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the Tulsa Artist Fellowship, and the CUE Art Foundation, among others. Her work appeared in several publications, including American Poetry Review, Gulf Coast, Kenyon Review, and Ninth Letter. She volunteered as a labor activist and campaigned against gun violence. 

Jan, 2022
97

Arik Zwirner ’97, of Melrose, Mass.; July 4, of pancreatic cancer. He was an electrical engineer at Bureau Veritas Consumer Product Services in Littleton, Mass. He was a former member of the Brown Band and continued to play saxophone with the Community Summer Concert Band in Wakefield. He enjoyed camping, skiing, hiking, playing chess, and making beer with his father, brother, and sister-in-law. He is survived by his parents, a brother and sister-in-law, and two nieces. 

Jan, 2022
95

Peter J. Wied ’95, of Los Angeles; June 28. Following Brown, he attended Harvard School of Law and was admitted to the California Bar Association in 1998. His law career spanned more than 20 years, during which time he represented patent litigation clients at Alschuler Grossman Stein & Kahn LLP; Paul Hastings, LLP; Goodwin Proctor, LLP; and LTL Attorneys before he joined Nixon Peabody as a partner in 2018. He traveled regularly to China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from his offices in Los Angeles for the fact discovery portion of patent cases and enjoyed building relationships with his international colleagues and clients. He represented clients before U.S. district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the U.S. Supreme Court, as well as in international arbitration. His most high profile case was decided in favor of his team’s client Quanta Computer on June 9, 2008, after eight years of preparation. While at Brown, he was the editor-in-chief of the Critical Review. At Harvard, he served as the managing editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology. He was elected to Sigma Xi Honor Society and was known as “the professor” to his colleagues. He is survived by his father, grandmother, sister, brother, and two nieces. 

Jan, 2022
91

Peter A. Lees ’91, of Miami; Aug. 6. After Brown, he earned an MBA from Yale. He lived abroad for many years before settling in Miami. He spoke Mandarin, Chinese, Japanese, and some French and enjoyed reading. In recent years he began a career both as an actor and as a producer. He is survived by two sisters, a brother, a sister-in-law, a brother-in-law, and two nephews.

Jan, 2022
91

 Marguerite M. Cargill ’91, of Bell Canyon, Calif., formerly of Venice, Calif.; July 10. She moved to Southern California to embark on a career as a visual effects compositor, with credits on such movies as Contact, Stuart Little, and What Lies Beneath. Her recent work was mostly in the commercial space with advertising agencies such as Saatchi & Saatchi, Apple, TBWA/Media Arts Lab, 72 and Sunny, Enso, Publicis, Deutsch LA, and Team One. She was passionate about her work and you could find her at studios in Los Angeles including Digital Domain, Company 3, Nomad, Method Studios, Mirada, Framestore, Brewster Parsons, and Parliament. As a freelancer, she excelled not only technically but also in building a sense of team and inspiring confidence. She was well-known for doing things the right way. She enjoyed time spent with her only daughter, reading, creating pottery, and all animals, especially welcoming rescue cats and dogs into her home. She is survived by her husband, Alex; her daughter; her father; an aunt; and several in-laws. 

Jan, 2022
72

George H. Billings ’72, of Falmouth, Mass.; Aug. 20, of cancer. After Brown he earned an MBA from Harvard Business School and began working in the cellular communications and satellite television industries. He moved to Washington, D.C., and joined a management analysis firm specializing in strategic planning and finance and marketing. A position as senior advisor of corporate development for COMSAT followed. In 1980, he was named vice president for business development of COMSAT’s subsidiary, Satellite Television Corp., and later was founder and president of Billings & Co., a management consulting firm serving both Fortune 500 and development stage companies. He was a pioneering executive in the satellite TV industry in the U.S. and Latin America. He served on the boards of directors of several private and public companies and was a former director of Avid Technology, Cambridge Strategic Management Group, Cignal Global Communications, Symmetry Communications Systems, and Melior Innovations. He was a supporter of the schools he attended and served on the annual giving board of Phillips Academy at Andover. At Brown, he was a trustee, president of his class, was elected secretary and president of the Brown Alumni Association, cochairman of the Brown entrepreneurship initiative, and was a member of the Brown Annual Fund Executive Committee. In 2002 he was the recipient of the Brown Alumni Association’s Service Award, and in 2008 he received the Brown Bear Award. On the day of his death, President Paxson conferred on him the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters and presented him a doctoral hood. He was a lifelong member of the Quissett Yacht Club and active board member of Quissett Harbor House Land Trust. He participated on the board of overseers of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole and supported local environmental organizations. He is survived by a sister, two brothers, four sisters-in-law, a brother-in-law, and several nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
77

Alfred V. Saravao Jr. ’77, of Chepachet, R.I.; Aug. 5. He worked as a computer programmer for Fleet Bank and CVS until his retirement in 2017. He is survived by his wife, Susan; a sister; two brothers; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
76

George C. Scott ’76, of Malvern, Pa.; July 29. He spent 15 years as a member of the technical staff at AT&T and was an assistant professor at Rider University for 14 years, a senior manager at AstraZeneca for 11 years, an assistant professor at Temple University College of Public Health, and a lecturer in analytics at Northeastern University. He had a private pilot license and certification in scuba diving. He volunteered interviewing prospective students for Brown and enjoyed woodworking, traveling, and playing trivia games. He is survived by a sister and brother-in-law, nieces and nephews, and his former wife, Julia Scott. 

Jan, 2022
76

John W. McEvoy Jr. ’76 of Belmont, Mass.; Aug. 25. While at Brown he played football and baseball and was captain of the varsity baseball team. After Brown, he continued to play baseball in the Intercity Amateur League for the next 18 years. He graduated from Suffolk Law School in 1979 and was appointed an assistant Middlesex District Attorney. He served in that capacity for 42 years. During his tenure, he was a supervisor for each of the three regions within the Middlesex DA’s office; as chief of homicide for more than 20 years and as first assistant district attorney for three consecutive administrations. One of his greatest satisfactions was seeing the continued accomplishments of the many talented dedicated assistant district attorneys whom he helped train. He remained involved with sports and his community, coaching several youth teams. He is survived by his wife, M. Jane Walsh; three children and their spouses; three grandchildren; and two sisters. 

Jan, 2022
75

Polly Povejsil Heath ’75, of Washington, D.C.; July 3, of pancreatic cancer. She earned an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1981 and was a senior accountant with Price Waterhouse and a consultant with Boston Consulting Group before joining the Washington Post in 1982. She held financial and management positions at the newspaper. She left the Post and spent more than a decade as WETA-TV’s chief financial officer before joining the Holocaust Museum as chief financial officer. She served on the board of CareFirst/BlueCross BlueShield. She is survived by her husband Thomas; two sisters; and a brother. 

Jan, 2022
75

Diane Colborn ’75, of Berkeley, Calif.; Aug. 4, from complications of pneumonia. She worked in the public school system for more than 40 years as a school teacher in first South Dakota and then the Boston area before joining the Berkeley school district. For more than 20 years she worked in special education for Berkeley Public Schools, culminating her career as a special education program manager for Berkeley High School. She retired in 2017 and remained tutoring and evaluating Berkeley High School students. She had her own unique style and wore a red beret and had brightly colored nails. She enjoyed reading, swimming, and traveling. She is survived by two children, a grandson, three siblings, and nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
73

James McBee Jr. ’73, of Sewell, N.J.; July 24. After Brown, he earned master’s degrees at both VCU and Rowan University. He was an active mentor for Project Impact at Rowan. He enjoyed reading, playing golf, and singing in his church choir. He is survived by two children and their spouses, five grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
73

Robert A. Cloutier ’73, of Hopkinton, Mass.; Aug. 25, after an eight-month battle with a rare form of lymphoma. He graduated from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and was a pastor at Faith Community Church Hopkinton (formerly First Congregational Church of Hopkinton) for more than 37 years. He enjoyed biking the Milford and Cape Rail trails and playing golf and basketball. He is survived by his wife, Linda; his mother; two daughters and sons-in-law; a son and daughter-in-law; and six grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
71

James V. Mazzarella ’71, of Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Jan. 18, 2021, from a heart attack. He held various jobs before attending Rhode Island College to earn an MAT. He taught for several years in a Montessori school in Rhode Island. In 1991, he began a career teaching in international schools in Southeast Asia, China, and the Middle East, retiring from teaching in Cambodia. He is survived by a stepdaughter, a sister, and two nieces. 

Jan, 2022
70

John H. Stone ’70, of Chicago; Aug. 27, 2020, of a heart attack. He scored a perfect 1600 on his SAT and in the summer of 1966 was enrolled in an accelerated math program at UC Berkeley. That fall he entered Brown, joined the Freshman football team as a defensive end, and was soon affectionately known as “Stoney” by his teammates. He was a stalwart on the field and named to the All-Ivy Second Team and All-New England second team. In his last home game, he was the hero of the famous Mistweet Play. During the summers he was a sailor in the U.S. Merchant Marine. After graduating, he enrolled at Catholic University of America and earned a master’s in aeronautical engineering. He later decided to pursue a business career and applied to Harvard Business School, answering a question on the application in the form of an acrostic puzzle that the admissions staff had to solve in order to get his answer. After graduating from Harvard, he accepted a position as manager of business analysis for the Food Service Division of Kraft Foods in Chicago. In 1981 he was awarded the J.L. Kraft Jade Ring for innovation and creativity, at that time the youngest recipient of the award, and remained with Kraft until 1989. He also played on the Chicago Lions rugby team. Seeking more entrepreneurial pursuits, he and his wife signed up to become Amway distributors. They achieved the Emerald level and traveled all over the country as speakers in the Amway organization. From 1995 to 2005 he was vice president of the startup Fidelity Capital, and from 2005 to 2020 he operated Stone4U, LLC, consulting to nursing homes, cancer centers, and home health care centers. His website was Ideas4U2Use.com. He was a member of Delta Tau Delta and four Toastmasters’ Groups and was a sought-after speaker. He is survived by his wife, Suzanne; a sister; and a brother. 

Jan, 2022
69

John Rizzo ’69, of Washington, D.C.; Aug. 6, of a heart attack. After Brown, he enrolled at George Washington University Law School and interned at corporate law firms. Upon graduating in 1972, he worked for the U.S. Department of the Treasury. But in 1974, after reading an article published in the New York Times about the CIA being engaged in illicit and covert operations for years, he was prompted to apply for a position at the CIA. He was hired in 1976, and by 1986 he was the liaison between the CIA and the congressional investigators studying the Iran-Contra affair. He held the titles of deputy counsel and acting general counsel. In 2006, President George W. Bush nominated him to become the CIA’s permanent general counsel, but he did not receive Senate confirmation and continued to serve as acting counsel until he retired in 2009. When he retired he received the agency’s Distinguished Career Intelligence Medal and became a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution and senior counsel at the Washington law firm Steptoe & Johnson. During his tenure, he was responsible for the CIA’s detention and interrogation program established in response to the attack on the U.S. on 9/11 and the CIA-directed drone strikes. During the course of his career he worked for 11 CIA directors and seven U.S. Presidents. He published his memoir Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA in 2014. In an interview he once said that he always tried his “hardest to do the right thing, even when things were the hardest.” The BAM profiled him in the 2014 “Clear Conscience” story (brownalumnimagazine.com/articles/2014-09-03/clear-conscience). He is survived by a son, a stepdaughter, a granddaughter, a step-grandson, and two sisters. 

Jan, 2022
67

Stanley Cummings ’67, of Port Townsend, Wash.; July 13, of injuries sustained in an accident while riding his bicycle. After Brown, he obtained an MAT from Wesleyan University and a PhD from Stanford University. He was dean of faculty and president for the Yosemite National Institutes, where he developed curriculum content and residential field experiences for students and adults in cooperation with the U.S. National Park Service. In 1980, he was hired as executive director/president of the Orange County Marine Institute in Dana Point, Calif., which later became the Ocean Institute. He held the top leadership post for 20 years. He moved to Port Townsend in 2007 after accepting the position of executive director for Northwest Maritime Center. During his tenure, he oversaw a capital campaign that constructed the Chandler Maritime Education Building and the Heritage Building. He retired in 2010 and remained active in the Port Townsend community and with the Maritime Center. He was an active member of Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship and was elected to their endowments committee. During the pandemic, he served as a Sunday services video editor, making online services possible. He was instrumental in the development of a finance plan that enabled the fellowship to build a columbarium and memorial circle. He was the recipient of the 1995 Walter Cronkite Award for Excellence in Maritime Education from the National Maritime Historical Society and the 1996 Sea Education Program of the Year Award from the American Sail Training Association. A scholarship fund has been started for emerging marine scientists in his memory through the Ocean Institute based in Dana Point. He is survived by his wife, Sigrid; two daughters and sons-in-law; four grandchildren; sister Cathryn Cummings Nunlist ’70 and a brother-in-law; a brother and sister-in-law; and five nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
70

Christopher H. Logan ’70, ’75 AM, of South Chatham, N.H.; July 4, of a heart attack. He held several maintenance-related positions prior to earning his teaching certificate as an elementary school teacher. He was a veteran of U.S. Army Intelligence, where he spent most of his service years in East Germany. He is survived by a son, a brother, three nephews, and his former wife, Susan Wheaton Logan. 

Related classes:
Class of 1970, GS Class of 1975
Jan, 2022
69

Alan Carlson ’69, of Westborough, Mass., formerly of Londonderry, N.H.; Nov. 12, 2020, after battling Parkinson’s disease. He retired in 2000 from Ziff Davis as a data center manager. After his ROTC commission in the U.S. Air Force, he pursued an MBA at Boston University. He volunteered at the local elementary school for several years teaching math enrichment and he coached Odyssey of the Mind teams, getting to the world finals twice. He then trained shelties and made regular pet therapy visits to the VA Hospital in Manchester and volunteered as a Granite State Sheltie Rescue driver. Later in retirement he rediscovered bridge and joined and helped run the Derry Bridge Club. He was an avid runner before a severe case of food poisoning on a trip to Mexico triggered an autoimmune disease that left him with arthritis. He is survived by a daughter and son-in-law, a son and daughter-in-law, and four grandchildren.

Jan, 2022
68

Judith Ann Hofrichter ’68, of Bolton, Conn.; Aug. 23, of B-cell lymphoma. She was a Peace Corps volunteer in Turkey from 1968 to 1969 and, after various jobs in California and Connecticut, decided to become a physician. She enrolled in Wesleyan University’s graduate liberal studies program and passed all the required science courses prior to joining UConn’s medical school as the oldest person accepted to the medical school at that time. She followed with a residency at SUNY Health Science Center in Syracuse. In 1990 she married and joined the Women’s Health Group of Manchester. She assisted in the births of several babies over the course of her career in ob/gyn medicine before retiring in 2016. In retirement she was an amateur vintner, producing award-winning country wines such as dandelion, rhubarb, and blueberry. She is survived by her husband, Stewart, and two sisters.  

 

Jan, 2022
66

James A. Mann ’66, of Montoursville, Pa.; Aug. 1. He spent his career working at Alcan Cable, beginning in Jersey Shore, Pa., and moving to many locations around the U.S. before finishing his career in Atlanta, Ga. He and his wife spent some years of retirement in Phoenix before relocating back to the Montoursville area. He enjoyed reading and playing golf. He is survived by his wife, Ann; three children and their spouses; seven grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and a brother.

Jan, 2022
63

Anne Kasson Heck ’63, of Belton, Mo.; Aug. 20. She had a career in advertising beginning with selling air for several radio stations before moving into ad agencies. She was vice president for development at Wayside Waifs animal shelter and was involved as a leader in local addiction recovery groups. She is survived by her son and two stepdaughters.

 

Jan, 2022
63

George M. Bryant ’63, of Vero Beach, Fla., formerly of Ridgewood, N.J.; Aug. 23. After graduating from Columbia Law School he began a career at Cravath, Swaine & Moore in New York City. Later he was corporate counsel with New York Life Insurance Company and Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. He retired to Vero Beach in 2005 and became active in his community, the Moorings of Vero, serving for six years as president. He was also president of the Brown University Club of the Treasure Coast and presented interesting speakers to the Club from the local community. He served on the board of directors of Wheels and Keels of Vero Beach Foundation and, having spent many summers in Dorset and Manchester, Vt., he became a board member of Hildene. He enjoyed playing golf and was proud to have achieved Eagle Scout status. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; a daughter; a son; and three granddaughters. 

Jan, 2022
62

Robert C. Wachter ’62, of Grosse Pointe, Mich.; Aug. 10, following a long battle with dementia and cancer. After graduating, he joined his father’s family business, Eastern Box Company in Detroit, where he remained for 40 years. He served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, was a board member of Ascension Brighton Center for Recovery, and was a member of the Rotary Club. He enjoyed fixing things. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie; three daughters; two sons-in-law; and 14 grandchildren. 

 

Jan, 2022
62

John D. Holbrook ’62, of Bethel, Conn.; July 12. He worked for a short time at Procter & Gamble before founding Marketing Action Group and American Family Crafts, both in Danbury, Conn. Later, he pursued a lifelong passion and opened Holbrook Farm in Bethel, a premier organic farm and market. He served Bethel on the town Zoning Commission, helped to get the Francis J. Clarke Business Park established, and attempted a bid at First Selectman. He coached Bethel soccer teams to state championships and was a founding member of the Walnut Hill Community Church. He also helped the Cambodian New Life Church and Jericho Center in Danbury get established by selling them his old factory building for one dollar. He is survived by his wife, Lynn; a daughter and son-in-law; two sons; a daughter-in-law; five grandchildren; and a sister. 

Jan, 2022
63

Cynthia Nugent Pinkston ’63, of McLean, Va.; July 21. As a diplomat’s wife, she traveled the world and was able to indulge her fascination with classical architecture and great works of art. She later would use her skills as an interior decorator, art historian, and archaeologist. Early on she was a docent and board member at the National Collection of Fine Arts and program chair at the Renwick Gallery. While living in Ecuador she worked with hearing-impaired and orphaned children and coordinated a U.S.-Ecuadorian cultural exchange program. During her time in Manila, she organized an annual Antiques & Artists Bazaar that raised donations for the local hospital, and while in Frankfurt, she was invited to join the docent group of the Stadel Art Museum. She developed an appreciation for distinct cuisines of the world and in 1978 enrolled in L’Academie de Cuisine in Bethesda. While pursuing her PhD at the University of Maryland, she lectured and led tours for the State Department, the National Gallery of Art, the National Academy of Sciences, and local universities. She established the first docent program at Dumbarton Oaks in Georgetown. During her 15 years as docent, she introduced visitors to the historic property, gardens, and collections. She also served as an officer and member of the board of directors for the American Association of Museum Volunteers. She authored many articles, academic papers, and museum publications. Later, as a laboratory director for Boston University’s La Milpa Project in Belize, she organized the processing of more than 10,000 archaeological finds while supervising college students. In 1999, she received a grant to travel to Oaxaca, Mexico, to further her research into archaeologist Louis Ayme. She led teams to explore local caves and earned the nickname “Cindy-anna Jones” from her colleagues and “DangerMom” from her children. She instilled a sense of adventure and a love for travel in each of her children. She is survived by three children and two grandchildren.

Jan, 2022
62

Margaret “Peggy” Snyder Hinman ’62, of Atherton, Calif.; July 4. She worked at New York Bell Telephone and Cornell University until her husband, whom she met at Brown, graduated law school and they moved to California. Once in California, she raised a family and was active with the Junior League of Palo Alto. She was also actively engaged in the San Francisco Colonial Dames, Atherton Garden Guild, and the Garden Conservancy, where she served on the San Francisco Board. After her children left for college, she returned to school to become a landscape architect and opened her own business, Peggy Hinman Landscape Design. Eventually she refined her watercolor skills and became a botanical artist. She enjoyed being a member of the Stitch and Bitch group, playing tennis, horseback riding, hiking, skiing, and spending time with her family in the mountains around Sun Valley and the beaches of Carmel. She is survived by her husband, Harvey ’62; three children and their spouses, including son George ’87 and daughter Sarah Whittle ’90; nine grandchildren, including Phebe Hinman ’19 and Alexandra Whittle ’21; a sister; and a brother. 

Jan, 2022
62

Joseph Golouski ’62, ’72 ScM, of Smithfield, R.I.; July 20. He was employed by General Electric and later Brown & Sharpe. He enjoyed country dancing, playing golf, and traveling. He is survived by lifelong friends. 

Related classes:
Class of 1962, GS Class of 1972
Jan, 2022
62

Norman Barstow ’62, of Hartford, Conn.; July 31, after suffering for several years with frontotemporal dementia. He sang in the Brunaires while a Navy ROTC student at Brown. Following graduation, he spent two years serving on a destroyer in the Mediterranean, then returned to Mystic, Conn., where he worked for a book importer. For the next five years he worked as a group insurance underwriter and eventually became an elementary school teacher in Simsbury, Conn., where he spent his last ten years as the science curriculum coordinator. He served as president of the Connecticut Science Teachers’ Association. Music was a big part of his life and he sang in glee clubs and church choirs, taught sea shanties to girl scouts at Mystic Seaport, and was a member of the Spare Parts a cappella group. He enjoyed travel and foreign languages, acquiring enough vocabulary to interact with anyone he encountered through the years he lived in Greece and Bulgaria. He also liked taking photographs of interesting faces and beautiful landscapes and was a tinkerer who liked to create collages and mini sculptures out of a variety of found objects. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two daughters, including Amanda Barstow ’00; two grandsons; a sister; and a brother; and he will be mourned as the King of Limericks by his fraternity brothers, as W.H. Snapper by his Navy buddies, and as Stormin’ Norman by his neighbors.

Jan, 2022
60

Ronald G. Whittle ’60, of Belfast, Me.; Aug. 17. After Brown, he received a master’s in history from Clark University. He had a career teaching and coaching in private schools, beginning at the Gunnery in Washington, then at Kathleen Laycock Country Day in Greens Farms and at Choate Rosemary Hall (all in Conn.). In 1986, he and his family moved to Belfast and he began a career as an assistant dean of admissions at Colby College. He is survived by his wife, Carol; son Jonathan ’85; a daughter; a daughter-in-law; a grandson; six step-grandchildren; seven step-great grandchildren; and two step-great-great-grandchildren.

Jan, 2022
60

Charles A. Heckman ’60, of North Haven, Conn.; Aug. 2, after a short illness. After Brown and a year of graduate study in France, he attended the University of Chicago School of Law, where he was a managing editor of the Law Review. He went on to teach law, specializing in legal history and commercial law at the University of North Dakota, the University of Houston, Western New England University, and Whittier Law School. He concluded his teaching career at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut. He retired as professor emeritus and elected member of the American Law Institute. While at the University of Houston, he established a legal course in Mexico and attended meetings of theEuropean Society for Comparative Legal History. He enjoyed reading detective novels, solving crossword puzzles, and playing bridge. He is survived by his wife, Honor; a daughter and son-in-law; four sons; a daughter-in-law; and two grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
60

Clark E. Goebel ’60, of Easton, Mass.; July 8, of cancer. An outstanding athlete, he was invited to try out for the Phillies but declined and joined the Navy. He attended Brown’s ROTC program and met his wife while a student. After graduating, he served as an officer during the Bay of Pigs. He was later promoted to lieutenant and served in Vietnam. He was honorably discharged in 1978 and settled in Ossining, N.Y., where he worked as a programmer for Reader’s Digest. He and his family moved to Wilbraham, Mass., where he worked for Mass Mutual and eventually went on to work for Monarch Life Insurance Company, helping the company’s real estate portfolio grow during his tenure. Some of the developments he was involved in included Monarch Place of Springfield, the World Trade Center in Boston, and Marina Bay in Quincy. He was a fan of all sports but particularly enjoyed tennis, and golf, and the Red Sox, Bruins, Patriots, and Celtics. He is survived by his wife, Gail Cox Goebel ’61; two daughters; two sons; a daughter-in-law; a son-in-law; nine grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
60

Stuart P. Doling ’60, of Albany, N.Y.; Aug. 9, of complications from multiple illnesses. He graduated from Albany Law School and spent the majority of his professional career as an attorney for the New York State Division of Corporations. He participated in numerous marathons and bicycle rides and enjoyed scuba diving, traveling, completing the New York Times crossword puzzle, watching all types of sports, and having friendships with people from all walks of life. He is survived by three children, a sister-in-law, and two nieces. 

Jan, 2022
60

Thomas B. Caswell Jr. ’60, of Wayzata, Minn.; Aug. 20. He spent his entire business career with the Caswell-Ross Insurance Agency, also serving as president of the Independent Insurance Agents of Minnesota. In 1990 he retired from business when he and his partners sold Caswell-Ross. For many years he was involved with United Theological Seminary and served as a trustee for more than a decade. At age 54, he went back to school working toward a Master of Divinity in Religion and Theology degree. He graduated from United Theological Seminary in 1994, having received multiple academic honors, including the New Testament Academic Prize. He also served on the seminary’s presidential search committee and was the interim vice president for donor relations, and he and his wife, Nancy, endowed the Wilys Claire Nelson Scholarship. He was active in Wayzata Community Church, serving on committees, task forces, and boards. He was also an officer and board member of the Minnesota Conference of the United Church of Christ. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Seidl Caswell ’60; six children and their spouses; 10 grandchildren; a sister; a brother; and several nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
59

Francis B. Gilbert Jr. ’59, of McKinney, Tex., formerly of Hawaii, Colorado, and New York; Aug. 27. He was an investment banker with the Bank of New York and Chemical Bank. He was a member of the U.S. 6 Meter Sailing Team and competed in four world championships. As a longtime member of the Seawanhaka Yacht Club, he sailed the Bermuda-to-Spain and Newport-to-Bermuda races, among others. He was also an accomplished pilot who enjoyed flying friends and family up and down the East Coast in his Cessna 182. He is survived by a daughter, a son and daughter-in-law, and five grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
58

Robert A. Wood ’58, of Placida, Fla.; July 3. He moved to Florida after retiring from his career in the investment business. He enjoyed playing golf, chocolate chip cookies, and making people laugh. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth; three children; three grandchildren; a sister; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
58

Stuart E. Money ’58, of Jersey City, N.J.; July 24, after a brief illness. He had a career in financial management. He began working for Texas Instruments, then served as executive director of St. Luke in the Fields Church in Greenwich Village, and retired in 2007 as executive director of the Archdiocesan Investment Fund of the Episcopal Church of New York. He enjoyed history, the origins of language, classical music, and traveling. 

Jan, 2022
58

Peter Megrdichian ’58, of Cranston, R.I.; July 10. After serving in the U.S. Army during the Korean War, he attended Brown and later earned a master’s in public administration from URI. He entered state service at the Department of Personnel in 1960 and in 1968 was promoted to assistant hospital administrator at Rhode Island Hospital. In 1974, he was promoted to chief administrative officer. It was during his tenure the hospital achieved accreditation from the Joint Commission of Hospitals. He retired from state service in July 1989 and entered private business. He worked in real estate and was an administrator in a home health care company. He retired permanently in 1993. He was an active member of the Armenian Church Youth Organization of America, was past commander of the Knights of Vartan Arax Lodge and past master of the Fraternal Order of Masons, and served on the board of directors for the Cranston YMCA. He enjoyed playing softball and was a Boston Red Sox and New York Giants fan. He is survived by his wife, Lucy; two sons and daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; a sister; and brother Michael ’59.

Jan, 2022
58

Connie Engle Black ’58, of Hendersonville, N.C.; Aug. 12, from complications of a stroke. After college, she traveled to Germany as part of an exchange program, Experiment in International Living, and learned to speak the language there. When the program ended, she stayed on working as a civilian employee of the U.S. Army in Nuremberg, where she met her future husband. They lived in Indiana and she received a master’s in library science from Indiana University. They relocated to New York, where she began a family and worked at the Spring Valley Public Library and the White Plains Public Library. In 1978, the family moved to Michigan and she worked at Wayne State University Library and the Michigan Library Consortium. During that time, she obtained a second master’s in administration from Michigan State University. She retired in 1992 to North Carolina, where she and her husband built a log home on 22 acres of forested land in the mountains, though she continued to work with the Downtown Hendersonville Development Project and later at the cataloging department at Brevard College. She enjoyed traveling and is survived by her husband, Earl; two sons; and a granddaughter. 

Jan, 2022
57

Henry L. Thompson Jr. ’57, of Quogue, N.Y.; Aug. 4, from complications of Parkinson’s disease. After Brown he attended Harvard Business School and spent his entire career as an investor. He volunteered with churches and nonprofits and helped friends navigate the markets. He retired in 2001 as senior vice president of Fiduciary Trust Company. He enjoyed fishing and playing golf and bridge, achieving the rank of life master. Phi Beta Kappa. He is survived by his wife, Mary; three children and their spouses; and six grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
59

Fredric J. Fleron Jr. ’59, ’61 AM, of Westfield, Mass.; June 2. He was professor emeritus of political science at the University at Buffalo. He wrote seven books on Russian foreign and domestic policy and technology transfer and was preparing two more at the time of his death. While at Brown, he was a teaching assistant and lecturer. He took summer courses at Harvard and then entered the graduate program in political science and Russian studies at Indiana University with a Ford Foundation graduate fellowship and completed his doctorate in government. He taught at the University of Kentucky for five years and joined the University at Buffalo in 1970. At UB he served terms as acting department chairman and director of graduate studies. He developed a new general education curriculum for UB undergraduates and served for several years as associate vice provost for undergraduate education. After retiring in 2003, he became a university research scholar. He lived in the mountains of Colorado for a few years and then moved to Westfield, where he was an adjunct faculty member at Westfield State University from 2008 to 2018. He taught numerous undergraduate and graduate courses on aspects of Soviet and American politics and foreign policy. In the 1970s he was invited to serve as a member of the East-West Technology Transfer Advisory Panel for the U.S. Congress. He took part in conferences on Soviet foreign policy sponsored by Johns Hopkins University and served as a consultant to the CIA, the U.S. State Department, the White House staff, and the British Broadcasting Corp. In addition to his books, he contributed to more than 20 book chapters and articles for academic journals and was editor of the Comparative Studies of Communism newsletter. He was an associate of the Harriman Institute on Russian, Eurasian, and East European Studies at Columbia University from 1992 to 1995 and was nominated for a SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1992. He was a civil rights activist and took part in Vietnam War protests. He was a member of the board of directors of the Central Kentucky Civil Liberties Union and served on the board of the Southern Conference Education Fund. He enjoyed many types of music, sang, and played the guitar, banjo, dobro, and cello. He attended concerts and festivals and each year compiled a CD of “Fred’s Favorites” for his friends. He also enjoyed cooking. He is survived by his wife, Kimberly; a daughter; a son; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. 

Related classes:
Class of 1959, GS Class of 1961
Jan, 2022
57

Joseph S. Carnabuci ’57, of South Easton, Mass.; Aug. 8, after a long illness. After Brown, he entered the U.S. Navy operating out of Cape Canaveral during the firing of the Polaris fleet ballistic missile. He was honorably discharged as a lieutenant junior officer and received the Navy Unit Commendation. He attended Boston University Graduate School of Business and graduated from Suffolk University School of Law in 1968. He had served as assistant manager of the Brockton Chamber of Commerce and served as executive director of the North Attleboro Chamber of Commerce for four years. During his time as an attorney, he was a member of the Plymouth County Bar Association and for a time served as its president. He was also a recipient of the Alan M. Hale Award for providing outstanding legal services in Massachusetts. He enjoyed attending performances of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; three sons and daughters-in-law; four grandchildren; a brother; and two nephews. 

Jan, 2022
56

Richard E. Williams ’56, of Shavertown, Pa.; Sept. 3. He came to Brown through the NROTC training program and in his junior year was initiated into Phi Delta Theta. Prior to his death he was granted Phi Delta Theta True Blue status and received a brick in his name at Phi Delta Theta’s founding campus. He graduated with a civil engineering degree and, after military service, worked at the former Pennsylvania Gas & Water Company for 36 years in various engineering and operating positions. He enjoyed fishing trips to Quebec, a tradition started by his father, and singing in the Shavertown United Methodist Church choir and Orpheus Choral Society. He was the recipient of military commendations and the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with two bronze stars. He fired in sanctioned .22 caliber prone rifle matches until age 81 with competitive proficiency and held a lifetime master classification in four position indoor rifle shooting. He was a member of the Wilkes-Barre Rifle and Pistol Club and the Harveys Lake Rod & Gun Club. He is survived by his wife, Joanie; three sons and daughters-in-law; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; a sister-in-law; and many nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
56

David W. Reynolds ’56, of Estero, Fla.; Feb. 16, of declining health related to Parkinson’s disease. After Brown he was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy and served until 1962. He earned an MBA from Boston University and thereafter began a 26-year career with IBM Corp. He maintained a dual career with the U.S. Navy Reserve and, among other commissions, served as commander of the Naval Reserve Iceland Defense Force, for which he received a Defense Meritorious Service Medal. He retired with the rank of captain to Florida but spent summers at the family home in Chatham, Mass. He enjoyed sailing and is survived by his wife, Catherine; a son, two daughters, including Andrea Reynolds ’94 AM; five grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and his former wife, Cecily Reynolds Mermann. 

 

Jan, 2022
56

Harold Resnic ’56, of Longmeadow, Mass.; Aug. 25. He graduated with an MBA from Cornell University and a law degree from Western New England Law School. He practiced law in Springfield for more than 40 years. He enjoyed playing the saxophone, tennis, golf, and traveling the world. He is survived by his wife, Sally; two sons; a daughter-in-law; two grandchildren; a brother and sister-in-law; and nieces and nephew. 

Jan, 2022
56

Linda Kessler Fishman ’56, of Bloomfield, Conn., and Charlestown, R.I.; July 23, of pancreatic cancer. She rejoins her husband of 64 years, David Fishman ’56, who passed in January, and whom she deeply missed. They met in the Brown bookstore on the first day of their senior year. Their fate was sealed in an English class they shared when David sat down next to her on the day the professor declared that these were now assigned seats for the semester. They were married shortly after graduation. After a brief time in Buffalo, N.Y., they moved to Bloomfield and (mostly) lived there and in West Hartford, except for summers, which they spent at their beach house in Green Hill, R.I. She and David loved that house and that beach and gathered family and friends there for most of the rest of their lives. She was an excellent cook, baker, and gourmand. She was always game for lobster rolls, oysters, and dessert, especially cookies. Linda and David were inveterate world travelers and lovers of opera. She was generous, kind, and slyly funny. During her last illness she was lovingly cared for by her son Douglas, his wife Dena, and grandchildren Zoe and Lili Fishman, who loved their grandma very much (it was a mutual love-fest). She is survived by her son, Douglas Fishman ’81 and his wife; daughter Sarah Boyle ’89, ’96 MD and her partner; four grandchildren; two step-grandchildren; siblings and in-laws; and numerous nieces and nephews.

Jan, 2022
55

Kendrick Thayer ’55, of Portland, Me.; Mar. 23, 2021. Following graduation, he served in the U.S. Coast Guard and married. He worked for several years at Rockbestos Wire and Cable Co. in Connecticut before joining Fairchild Semiconductor in South Portland. He was employed by Fairchild and later by National Semiconductor for 35 years in various manufacturing, engineering, and quality assurance functions. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling with his wife, Joan Gately Thayer ’55, who survives him. He is also survived by three sons, including Matthew ’87; two daughters-in-law; and seven grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
55

Socrates H. Mihalakos ’55, of Vero Beach, Fla.; July 6. He was a retired appellate court judge. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Air Force. He received the title of first lieutenant and was honorably discharged but continued to serve in the reserves. He attended law school at the University of Connecticut and earned his JD. After practicing in Cheshire, Conn., he was appointed a Connecticut Superior Court judge in 1985, and in 2000, while serving as chief administrative judge in Danbury (Conn.), he was elevated to judge of the Appellate Court, where he served until retiring in 2019. He was active in both Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Conn.) and St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church (Fla.). He is survived by his wife, Joani; four daughters; three sons-in-law; four grandchildren; and nieces and nephews. 

Jan, 2022
55

Joseph Blumen ’55, of Newport, R.I.; July 25. After graduating from Tufts University School of Medicine, he enlisted as a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and served as chief of general surgery at the 67th Evac Hospital, Qui Nhon, Vietnam, and later on the surgical staff at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. He returned to Newport in 1967 to practice as a general surgeon and primary care physician. Active in the community, he was a member of the planning board for the City of Newport, was a trustee of the Seamen’s Church Institute and was a master Mason and member of St. Paul’s Lodge for more than 50 years. He also established the Dora and Elias Blumen Collection for the Study of Holocaust Literature at Salve Regina University. He is survived by his wife, Dale; four children and their spouses; and six grandchildren. 

Jan, 2022
55

Gene E. Bloch ’55, of Redwood City, Calif.; July 31. After Brown, he served in the U.S. Navy, studied physics at the University of Pittsburgh, then worked for many years as a software engineer. His love of language, learning, word games, and science, especially astronomy, never flagged. In mid-life, he and his wife were avid folk dancers in several Eastern European traditions. He is survived by his wife, Kristine Kimble; two brothers, including Dan ’74, ’77 MD; three sons and their spouses; six grandchildren; and a great-grandchild.

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