The Classes

Image of Leo Coulson, Charles “Skip” Gorman, Hal Cannon, and Tom Carter on a porch

THE SWEET SOUND OF REUNION Above, left to right: Leo Coulson ’65, Charles “Skip” Gorman ’71, Hal Cannon (’72 RISD) and Tom Carter ’71 reunited last November, just 52 years after they played Spring Weekend 1969, under their student band name, the Rhode Island Mudflaps. They had all stayed in touch, and all kept playing music, so when they got together, naturally they produced an album: River Stay Away From My Door. Their string band plays old-time southern Appalachian music and used to gig on College Hill, at URI, and at dances at nearby grange halls and naval bases. Though serious about their music, Tom says, “I think we all wanted to be hillbillies, although we had no real idea what that meant.” Leo notes, “the music relieved the mental stress of studying.” Their careers, left to right: banjo maker (Leo), full-time musician (Skip), public sector folklorist (Hal), and folklore professor (Tom). Of their new album, Skip remarks: “At our age it’s not about how many CDs you can sell and how much money you can make, it’s just about the fact that we did it, we enjoyed it, and there’s a legacy there.”—Sheila Dillon


PHOTO: TRISH EMPEE

Jul, 2022
22
Pandemic Puzzles
Five minutes with Ethan Pan ’22
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Image of Ethan Pan on his bed with crosswords surrounding him
Related classes:
Class of 2022, Class of 2021
Jul, 2022
88
A Reunion with Yourself
Read More
Related classes:
Class of 1988, GS Class of 1974
Jul, 2022
65
The Sweet Sound of Reunion
Read More
Image of the "Rhode Island Mudflaps" bandmates on a porch with instruments
Jun, 2022
GS 89

Robert Mueller ’89 AM, ’95 PhD, announces the publication of his book, Hereafter Knowing in Sonnets and Their Similars, with Lexington Books, an imprint of Rowman & Littlefield. The book is a literary study with forays into philosophy and theology.

Jun, 2022
GS 19

George “Donnie” Hasseltine ’19 EMCS writes: “I was selected for the Presidential Leadership Scholars Program (along with Timothy James ’20 EMBA). To my knowledge we are the second and third Brown alums to be selected (after Nicole Issac ’00). Additionally, I was selected for the inaugural class of Veteran Fellows at Stanford’s Hoover Institution. For both PLS and Hoover, I am working on a project to address the impact of wildfires on California homeowners.”

Jun, 2022
GS 13

In April 2022, Baobab Press released Souvenirs, a collaborative work of short fiction and prose poems by Andrew Colarusso ’13 MFA and Karen An-hwei Lee ’95 ’97 MFA. A collection of visions shared across cyberspace, Souvenirs celebrates fragments from the literary afterlife. In this collection of miniature fictions and contemporary fables, objects take on shapes of their own designs, creating a composite map to a world populated with little transparent souls and ghost ships in lost bottles; a menagerie of curios; photophores of bioluminescence humming in the depths; light begetting light, deep calling to deep. Colarusso and Lee seem to write from a single mind as they strike a balance between humor and philosophy; the acute and the everlasting. The ideas they discuss—religion, faith, universality, continuance—are large, but their prose is accessible, and at times outright hilarious.

Jun, 2022
GS 10

Duke University Press announces the publication of Life-Destroying Diagrams, a new book by Eugenie Brinkema ’10 PhD (February 2022). Through readings of works of film, literature, and philosophy, Eugenie shifts understandings of the horror genre away from bodily gore and the spectator’s shudder and toward how the genre’s sequencing, order, diagrams, and treatment of bodies forces readers to confront ethical questions of the limits of thinking and being. Eugenie is an associate professor of contemporary literature and media at MIT and author of The Forms of the Affects (2014).

Jun, 2022
1

Jennifer Ruth ’95 AM, ’00 PhD published It’s Not Free Speech: Race, Democracy, and the Future of Academic Freedom with Michael Bérubé through Johns Hopkins University Press in April. It was excerpted in The New Republic in March in a feature essay entitled “When Professors’ Speech is Disqualifying.”

Jun, 2022
1

Anna Pegler-Gordon ’95 AM wrote Closing the Golden Door: Asian Migration and the Hidden History of Exclusion at Ellis Island, published in December 2021 by the University of North Carolina Press. The book discusses the immigration station at New York’s Ellis Island, which opened in 1892 and remained the largest U.S. port for immigrant entry until World War I. In popular memory, Ellis Island is typically seen as a gateway for Europeans seeking to join the “great American melting pot.” But as this fresh examination reveals, it was also a major site of immigrant detention and exclusion, especially for Chinese, Japanese, and other Asian travelers and maritime laborers who reached New York City from Europe, the Americas, and the Caribbean, and even within the United States. And from 1924 to 1954, the station functioned as a detention camp and deportation center for a range of people deemed undesirable. Anna draws on oral histories and memoirs, government archives, newspapers, and other sources to reorient the history of migration and exclusion in the United States. In chronicling the circumstances of those who passed through or were detained at Ellis Island, she shows that Asian exclusion was both larger in scope and more limited in force than has been previously recognized. Anna is a professor at James Madison College and in the Asian Pacific American Studies Program at Michigan State University.

Jun, 2022
GS 05

Do the Work: An Anti-Racist Activity Book, cowritten by Kate Schatz ’05 MFA and Emmy-winning director W. Kamau Bell (United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell) is scheduled to be published by Workman in July 2022.

Jun, 2022
FAC
Excavating Joy
Martha Sharp Joukowsky’s renowned field methods included a liberal dose of fun
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Image of Martha Joukowsky
Related classes:
FAC, Class of 2019
Jun, 2022
24
Prints for a Purpose
Raising funds for Ukraine
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Photograph of a bicyclist in front of a colorful building
Related classes:
Class of 2024, Class of 2023
Jun, 2022
24
A Star Is Born
Brown’s newest newspaper focuses on Black joy and accomplishments
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Image of Keiley Thompson and Amiri Nash
Related classes:
Class of 2024, Class of 2023
Jun, 2022
24
Beyond the Average White Guy
Experts are moving past biological sex to “precision medicine” that takes each individual patient—whatever their gender—into account.
Read More
Illustration by Melinda Beck of a human with a diagram of female body around it
Jun, 2022
22
Data-Driven Elder Care
A student startup is driving down hospitalizations in geriatric patients
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Robbie Felton, Alex Rothberg, and Evan Jackson.
Related classes:
Class of 2022, Class of 2021
Jun, 2022
22
Ready to Roar!
Quarterback E.J. Perry signs with Jaguars
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Image of EJ Perry stretching on football field
Related classes:
Class of 2022, Class of 2021
Jun, 2022
22
Classics: Dead or Alive?
A new course examines ancient Greece and Rome with a 21st-century lens.
Read More
Illustration by James Heimer of broken Roman and Grecian statues and columns
Jun, 2022
21
Beyond the Divide
A Hillel program gets Zionist and anti-Zionist students talking.
Read More
Image of Isaac Goldman Sonnenfelt speaking to a crowd at Brown
Related classes:
Class of 2021, Class of 2022
Jun, 2022
20

Pierre Lipto was included on the Forbes 30 Under 30 list. He is cofounder of 1440 Media, which releases a free, ad-supported daily email newsletter, leaning on fact-based reporting and primary research to summarize events in a way that Americans across the political spectrum can agree on.

Jun, 2022
19

Emma Matarasso is studying at Imperial College in London for a master’s of science in climate change, management, and finance. She writes: “Brown was a wonderful experience and preparation.”

Jun, 2022
18
A New Way to Support Emerging Artists
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Image of Bungalow store
Jun, 2022
18

Talia Dutton writes: “My first original graphic novel, M is for Monster, was published by Surely Books, which is an imprint of Abrams ComicArts, started by Mariko Tamaki. Here’s the link to the book’s page: tinyurl.com/4xmyxbjh.”

 

Jun, 2022
12

Max Rosero writes: “I’m the founding designer at Troupe, a travel startup based in New York City, backed by Jetblue. My team and I are currently building a collaborative group travel planning app that simplifies the process of organizing trips with family and friends. Planners can create a trip, suggest things like dates, destinations, and stays, and then invite travelers to vote and join them on the trip.”

 

Jun, 2022
10

Kelly McWilliams released her YA novel Mirror Girls. Set in a rural haunted Georgia at the height of Jim Crow, it’s about biracial twin sisters separated at birth—one is obviously Black, while the other can pass as white. It’s a brilliant examination of identity, colorism, and familial ties like The Vanishing Half, yet it’s the rare gothic horror novel that seamlessly weaves historical fiction.

Jun, 2022
09
Women Scientists Making a Difference
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Image expedition team cooking dinner in Guatemala
Jun, 2022
09

Gabby Salazar writes: “My first book came out on Feb. 01, 2022, with National Geographic Kids Books. My 160-page book is called No Boundaries: 25 Women Explorers and Scientists Share Adventures, Inspiration, and Advice and is for 9 to 12-year-olds. The book exposes kids to outstanding female scientists of diverse backgrounds, nationalities, and fields of study—many of whom are just beginning their game-changing work—by shining a light on the unique journeys and struggles that led to their modern-day achievements.”

Jun, 2022
09

Janine Kwoh published her first book, Welcome to the Grief Club, with Workman Publishing in February. Based on her own experience with grief—Janine’s partner died when both were in their late twenties—and those of other Grief Club members, the book uses brief writings, illustrations, and creative diagrams to explore the wide range of emotions and experiences that grief can encompass, with humor and empathy.

Jun, 2022
08
Goodbye, Art History
The Afterparty star Zoë Chao ’08 discovered her passion for acting in a class at Brown
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Image of Zoë Chao with her outstretch hand to the camera
Jun, 2022
07

Rachel Lubin Duvdevani and Ben Duvdevani announce the May 28, 2021, birth of their son Eric Duvdevani. They write: “Before eight months old he was already crawling, standing, and playing his toy guitar and piano, and he loves reading — does that qualify him for early admission into Brown?”


Rachel Lubin Duvdevani ’07 baby
Jun, 2022
06

Jenna Grace Sciuto, an associate professor of English at the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, published her first book, Policing Intimacy: Law, Sexuality, and the Color Line in Twentieth-Century Hemispheric American Literature, in 2021 with the University Press of Mississippi. The book traces connections between the U.S. South and the Global South, analyzing literary depictions of sexual control of the color line across Mississippi, Louisiana, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic.

Jun, 2022
06

Laura Martin, professor of environmental studies at Williams College, published Wild by Design: The Rise of Ecological Restoration (Harvard University Press), which argues that wild nature is created rather than found. Find her work at ljanemartin.com.

Jun, 2022
06

Clare Frost writes: “As a producer, I’ve just completed my first feature film, The Sisters Karras. It’s my great ambition to have it screened at a film festival near you, yes YOU, this year. Many of our earliest investors were friends from Brown. Stay tuned. I founded my independent film company, SK Deli Market Productions, with writer/director/coproducer Micah Stathis in 2020. We’ve also released a short film, Zero, a contemporary homage to Chris Marker’s La Jetée, re-imagined from the perspective of a woman. A second feature is in development. As an actor, catch me as a young Agatha Christie in Netflix’s upcoming Midnight at the Pera Palace.”

Jun, 2022
05
Ancient Tracks
New Mexico footprints alter the timeline for human habitation in the Americas.
Read More
Image of ancient footprints in New Mexico
Related classes:
Class of 2005, Class of 2019
Jun, 2022
05
In the news

Essence reported that Adam Mangana ’05, current executive director of Optima Domi, is cofounder of Optima Classical Academy, the world’s first-ever virtual reality charter school.  The tuition-free school will be based in Florida and has plans to initially enroll up to 1,300 students, grades 3-8, for its inaugural classes in August 2022. Mangana says it will merge a virtual reality classroom with classical learning pillars personalized to students’ needs. Each classroom will be led by real teachers who are superimposed into the virtual classroom and can respond in real time.

Jun, 2022
04

Brent Lang was promoted to executive editor at Variety. In his new role, he will help guide the editorial operations across digital and print platforms. He will continue to oversee Variety’s film, media, and theater coverage, and he serves as leader of the New York bureau. He joined Variety in 2014 as a senior film reporter and most recently served as executive editor of Film and Media and New York bureau chief.

Jun, 2022
03
Meeting the Need
A nurse practitioner helps bring primary care to San Francisco’s mentally ill and homeless
Read More
Image of Jim Gatewood on the streets of San Francisco
Related classes:
Class of 2003, GS Class of 2008
Jun, 2022
03

Kenneth Lim writes: “In December I moved to Toronto, Canada, with my wife and two children. After a five-year stint on Wall Street and 13 years running a photography studio in Hong Kong, I am excited about being close to family again and starting new adventures in a different city.”

Jun, 2022
03

Raffi Bilek published The First Ten Letters: Secrets of the Universe Hiding in Plain Sight.

Jun, 2022
02

Sam Seidel writes: “I wanted to share a book I had come out, Hip Hop Genius 2.0. (HipHopGenius.org.) The book is timely, as the school it focuses on was at the front lines during the height of the pandemic and at ground zero of George Floyd’s murder. They navigated all this while maintaining pre-pandemic levels of attendance. In a moment of Critical Race Theory debates, this school isn’t just teaching a banned book, it is unapologetically centering Black brilliance, lived experiences, culture, and politics.”

Jun, 2022
02

The new short novel by Brian Herman, One Rainy Season in Yunnan, is the story of a young American who joins world-renowned Pu’er tea expert Robert Painter on a journey to a famous tea mountain in rural Yunnan. In their search for a tea with purported healing powers, Robert and the narrator haggle with tea gurus, feast with cigarette company executives, and experience the darker side of karaoke. After participating in a mystical celebration, and with help from their Chinese patrons, the two adventurers uncover a universal, human truth underlying all cultures. This title will appeal to tea enthusiasts, Sinophiles, wanderlust adventurers, and those interested in Jungian psychology or the collective unconscious. Print and e-book formats are now available worldwide on Amazon and/or Bookbaby, and at Bookshop Santa Cruz in Santa Cruz, Calif.

Jun, 2022
99
Fresh Ink for June–August 2022
Books by Xochitl Gonzalez ’99, Maia Weinstock ’99, Siena Cherson Siegel ’90, and Mark Siegel ’89.
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Books by Xochitl Gonzalez, Maia Weinstock, Siena Cherson Siegel, and Mark Siegel
Jun, 2022
99

Carbon Queen: The Remarkable Life of Nanoscience Pioneer Mildred Dresselhaus is a fascinating introduction to the game-changing legend of Mildred “Millie” Dresselhaus. Maia Weinstock, deputy editorial director at MIT News, highlights the many scientific contributions of this celebrated nanotechnologist (1930-2017) in this portrait of a brilliant mind.

Jun, 2022
99

Xochitl Gonzalez writes: “When I saw many of you at our last reunion, I was packing up my life to get my MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. By way of an update, with the help of my amazing literary agent, Mollie Glick ’01, I completed and sold my novel Olga Dies Dreaming to Megan Lynch ’01 (at Flatiron Books). Olga was published in January and hit the New York Times Best Sellers list. I’ve been hard at work on book two and getting the TV adaptation of Olga on the air but wanted to say thank you to all of you for cheering me on. It really does get greater, later. See you all at the 25th.” 

Jun, 2022
98

Nina Shope writes: “After publishing a book of novellas in 2005, I have finally completed my first full-length novel, titled Asylum. The novel won the Dzanc Fiction Prize and was published in May. Asylum delves into the disturbing and seductive relationship between a young hysteric named Augustine and renowned nineteenth-century French neurologist J.M. Charcot. The seeds for this book were planted at Brown, and the process ended up taking far longer than I ever expected, but I am thrilled with the final product. Please check it out at https://www.dzancbooks.org/our-books/asylum.”

Jun, 2022
97

Ugly Freedoms by Elisabeth Anker was published by Duke University Press in January. Elisabeth is associate professor of American Studies and Political Science at George Washington Univ. and author of Orgies of Feeling: Melodrama and the Politics of Freedom, also published by Duke University Press. Her new book reckons with the complex legacy of freedom offered by liberal American democracy, identifying modes of “ugly freedom” that can lead to domination or provide a source of emancipatory potential.

Jun, 2022
95

Brandon Protas writes that he continues to live on the west end of the North River in the eastern side of South Dakota. Due to social distancing, he has not been able to attend any classmates’ weddings or divorces in person, but if you look hard enough, you can find him in the background of at least three wildlife documentaries (check out the elk bugling). Brandon has received no recent awards for his sense of fashion, although he does maintain that paisley combined with stripes is a faux pas. 

 

Jun, 2022
93
Trauma and Taste Buds
An acclaimed memoir recalls how Korean food kept Grace Cho ’93 connected to her mother
Read More
Image of Grace Cho and her mother in 1971
Related classes:
Class of 1993, Class of 1991
Jun, 2022
93

Emily Steiner writes: “I’m delighted that my daughter, Sophia Decherney, is in the class of 2025. As a professor of medieval literature at the University of Pennsylvania, I owe many debts to the wonderful humanities faculty at Brown.”

Jun, 2022
93

Chris Ott writes: “I recently became deputy director of the National High Speed Rail Alliance. We’re working to bring the fast trains that so many other countries already have to the United States, and to give much better and cleaner alternatives to long drives and short flights.”

Jun, 2022
92
In the news

Dr. Marina Catallozzi ’92, MD ’96, will join Barnard College as its inaugural vice president of health and wellness and chief health officer. Dr. Catallozzi is an adolescent medicine specialist and is board certified in both pediatrics and adolescent medicine. In this inaugural role, she will lead the Francine A. LeFrak Foundation Center for Well Being, which provides support for students’ physical, mental, and financial wellness, as well as Barnard’s primary care health services and the Rosemary Furman Counseling Center. She will also coordinate the college’s response to infectious disease threats, enhance undergraduate medical research opportunities for Barnard students, and closely collaborate with human resources to expand wellness initiatives for faculty and staff.

Related classes:
Class of 1992, GS Class of 1996
Jun, 2022
92

Lisa Haley Huff writes: “My son and I relocated to my hometown of Pittsburgh. I lead Middle Market Banking for JPMorgan Chase as we continue to grow our presence in the Western Pennsylvania region. I look forward to attending Reunion this year.”

Jun, 2022
91

Amy Seiple Hebb cofounded Second Serve Resale. Second Serve sells donated clothing to support customer-selected nonprofits for community impact. Second Serve will connect buyers, donors, and nonprofits to promote resale as a tool for community transformation. “We are working towards a day when clothing is maximized as a resource, continually reused in a circular economy that is a win-win-win for the customer, the community, and the environment.” Check it out: https://www.secondserveresale.org.

 

Jun, 2022
91

Joshua Garren ’96 AM, ’97 MD, writes: “I’m back in the U.S. after several years in London and Costa Rica, celebrating 20 years of marriage with Michal Yitshary (Hebrew University ’98) with our five children; Daniel and Ariella (Columbia ’25 and ’26), Maya, Jonathan, and Shira (hopefully Brown ’29, ’33, and ’34). Ariella and Maya’s organization, ParysowProject.org, has published translations of historical accounts of the plight of turn of the century Yemenite Jewry and of Holocaust memoirs from Spanish, Yiddish, Hebrew, and German and is now expanding to help document contemporary accounts of attempted genocide. The Parysow Yizkor Book is a particularly fascinating read.”

Jun, 2022
90

Ned Sherman was named on Variety’s 2021 Dealmakers Impact Report among professionals who led major game-changing deals affecting the entertainment industry. This is the second time he was featured on this prestigious list. In his profile, Variety noted that he has established himself as the go-to advisor for companies and talent in the quickly evolving e-sports industry.

Jun, 2022
89

Mark Siegel writes: “Siena Cherson Siegel ’90 and I are alums who met at Brown as undergraduates and later married. We have released books, including a joint one, Tiny Dancer, which is a graphic novel memoir by Siena, which culminates with her time at Brown.” (See Fresh Ink, pg. 45)

Related classes:
Class of 1989, Class of 1990
Jun, 2022
89

Scott Moskol, cochair of the financial restructuring and distressed transactions group at Burns & Levinson in Boston, has been named president of the Turnaround Management Association, Northeast chapter, effective Jan. 1. Scott will lead the organization’s mission to help businesses that are navigating critical turning points and transitions get to the next level. Scott counsels clients across the country on restructurings, workouts, bankruptcies, receiverships, and other insolvency-related matters. He has deep experience in the purchase and sale of distressed assets, companies, and loan portfolios.

Jun, 2022
89

Judson Brandeis writes: “I wrote The 21st Century Man, the most comprehensive and medically accurate men’s health book, which has been recognized with five book awards. The 101 chapters and 900-plus pages include 60 physicians and men’s health experts including Ethan Basch and Michael Ingegno ’84. I practice rejuvenative urology in San Ramon, California, where I see patients and perform clinical research in regenerative medicine.”

Related classes:
Class of 1989, Class of 1984
Jun, 2022
88

Season two of Art Heals All Wounds, a podcast by Pam Uzzell, began on Feb. 9. Pam launched this podcast in 2021 to highlight artists and their work during the pandemic. Initially inspired by how artists were pivoting during the pandemic in order to continue doing creative work, the podcast has gone far beyond that. Each episode features a different artist telling their own story of how they began their creative work and what motivates them. “These artists grapple with personal, social, and political issues that we’re all working with. Hearing how they apply creative tools in their approach inspires me and helps me to see things differently,” says Pam. “I hope it inspires listeners, too.” Season one featured visual artist and illustrator Ajuan Mance and Deb Gottesman, codirector of The Theatre Lab in Washington, D.C. Season two will feature writer Ceci Najar Chandler talking about her upcoming memoir. All story ideas and suggestions for artists to be featured on the podcast are very welcome and can be sent to pam@arthealsallwoundspodcast.com. Art Heals All Wounds information and episodes can be found at arthealsallwoundspodcast.com.


Pam Uzzell ’88 & Ceci Najar Chandler ’88
Jun, 2022
88

Lisa Mullins Marchiano is a licensed clinical social worker and author of Motherhood: Facing and Finding Yourself (Sounds True, 2021). Motherhood continues to deeply and positively impact its thousands of readers and her work both as a Jungian psychoanalyst in successful private practice and as a cohost on the popular This Jungian Life podcast continues to make incredibly meaningful waves. She has a second book forthcoming from Sounds True in 2024 and a third book in the works as well.

Jun, 2022
88

Ballard Spahr intellectual property and litigation partner Robert Baron has been shortlisted for Managing IP’s 2022 Litigator of the Year award for Pennsylvania. The Managing IP Awards recognize the firms, individuals, and companies “behind the most innovative and challenging IP work of the past year, as well as those driving the international IP market.” Robert represents clients in some of their most complex, high-stakes, and strategically important disputes. He is the former vice chair of Ballard Spahr’s intellectual property department and the former head of its intellectual property litigation group. In 2021, Robert was the winner of this award and was also named as an IP Star in 2021.

Jun, 2022
87
Access to Capital
The new Dream Exchange, the first Black-owned stock market, aims for diversity and inclusion
Read More
Illustration of Bruce Trask by Andrew Colin Beck
Jun, 2022
87

Edisa Weeks headlined the 2022 Motion State Dance Festival in Providence. She performed her solo work-in-progress 3 RITES: Liberty before it tours nationally. The Motion State Dance Festival introduces Rhode Island audiences to the latest in contemporary dance. Local and national artists converge to share their boundary-pushing creative explorations with a growing Rhode Island dance audience. Edisa Weeks is a choreographer, educator, curator, and founder of DELIRIOUS Dances. She creates multimedia interactive work that explores our deepest desires, darkest fears, and sweetest dreams. Her work has been performed in a variety of venues including the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Works & Process at the Guggenheim Museum, and Mount Tremper Arts. She has performed with Annie-B Parson’s Big Dance Theater, Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Co., Dance Brazil, Homer Avila, Jane Comfort, Jon Kinzel, Muna Tseng, Reggie Wilson/ Fist & Heel Performance Group, Sally Silvers, and Spencer/Colton Dance, among others. In addition, she danced in the 2016 “Bessie” award-winning performance by the Skeleton Architecture. She is on the board of directors for Movement Research and is an associate professor of dance and acting chair of the Department of Drama, Theatre, and Dance at Queens College.

Jun, 2022
87

Jonathan Scherl received an MBA from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in December. Jonathan is an orthopedic surgeon and also has an administrative role with a company called TeamHealth overseeing several orthopedic hospitalist programs. He lives in New Jersey with his wife of 27 years.

Jun, 2022
85

Todd Wong ’85 AM, head of sustainability at JPMorgan’s Asia real estate investment team, announces that Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark ranked JPMorgan’s flagship Asia real estate fund #1 among its peers in Asia Pacific.

 

Related classes:
Class of 1985, GS Class of 1985
Jun, 2022
85

Tom Pier writes: “Former members of the campus band ‘The Worst,’ Chip Brady, Jeff Leon, John Gagliano, and myself gathered at my home in San Francisco to celebrate the nuptials of Eric Stetzler to Vans Tanega. Also in attendance were Sara Hardner Leon and Eric Pandiscio. I was thinking that after 37 years, Brady would have developed some sense of intonation. But it seems that my expectations were misplaced.”

Jun, 2022
85

Rob Cunningham moved from Carnegie Mellon University to the University of Pittsburgh, where he is now the vice chancellor for research infrastructure. He writes: “If you find yourself in Pittsburgh, please reach out.”

Jun, 2022
84

Suzanne Keen ’86 AM, formerly vice president of academic affairs and dean of faculty at Hamilton College, became the 10th president of Scripps College in Claremont, Calif.

Related classes:
Class of 1984, GS Class of 1986
Jun, 2022
83
In the news

Lake Forest College has named Dr. Jill M. Baren ’83 its first woman president, starting July 2022. A medical doctor, educator, and researcher, she brings to the role nearly 30 years of academic medicine and higher education administrative experience as well as a deep appreciation for and understanding of the liberal arts. At the time of the announcement, she was serving as provost and vice president of academic affairs at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia.

Jun, 2022
83

Anne Skomorowsky wrote The Carriers: What the Fragile X Gene Reveals About Family, Heredity, and Scientific Discovery, which was published by Columbia University Press in May.

Jun, 2022
83

Eric Dolin published Rebels At Sea: Privateering in the American Revolution on May 31 with Liveright, an imprint of W. W. Norton. The heroic story of the founding of the U.S. Navy during the Revolution has been told before, yet missing from most maritime histories of America’s first war is the ragtag fleet of private vessels that truly revealed the new nation’s character, above all its ambition and entrepreneurial ethos. Rebels at Sea corrects that significant omission and contends that privateers, though often seen as profiteers at best and pirates at worst, were in fact critical to the revolution’s outcome. Abounding with tales of daring maneuvers and deadly encounters, Rebels at Sea presents the American Revolution as we have rarely seen it before. To see where Eric will be speaking, please visit https://www.ericjaydolin.com/events.

Jun, 2022
82
Can We Refreeze the Chicken?
An acclaimed new film by Bonnie Waltch ’82 demonstrates the scary self-reinforcing mechanisms of climate change.
Read More
Image of Bonnie Waltch on the set of Earth Emergency
Jun, 2022
82

In December 2021, John Strauss hosted a show of watercolors by fellow art concentrator Morgan Spangle ’81 in the Upstairs Gallery of his design building in Canton, Ohio. Morgan’s art exhibit can be viewed online at https://tinyurl.com/53ktkfj. John writes: “It has been great to reconnect with Morgan and be able to put together a show of his work.”

Jun, 2022
80

Susan Hurwit continues to love her work as a child and adult psychologist in private practice in Newton, Mass. Her story The Space Between Human Beings, created as a response to people’s curiosity about what happens in play therapy, has moved audiences at Boston area story slams. Her article “Finding the Perch: Psychotherapy During Times of Mutual Uncertainty and Grief” was published in psychotherapy.net. Now single with two adult children, she enjoys small music
venues, attending Buddhism and psychotherapy conferences, and finding quiet in the stillness of nature.


Susan Hurwit ’80
Jun, 2022
79

On Feb. 28, Craig Waters retired after 35 years working as a lawyer and communications director at the Florida Supreme Court. Craig is best known as the public spokesperson for Florida’s highest tribunal during the tumultuous Bush v. Gore presidential election cases in 2000. He announced major court decisions in cases that helped determine the outcome of the disputed 2000 election. But his work involved much more. First Amendment groups describe his career as a groundbreaking advancement of open government and transparency that serves as a national model. He was an early pioneer for the idea of courts around the nation using high-tech means of communications like the web, live-streaming legal arguments, and social media to better inform the public. This body of work earned Waters the 2022 Pete Weitzel/Friend of the First Amendment Award from the First Amendment Foundation.


Craig Waters ’79
Jun, 2022
79

Nanette Veilleux writes: “I have been granted a Fulbright award to teach computer science at the Fulbright University in Vietnam (FUV). Fulbright is a liberal arts institution, somewhat of a novelty outside of the U.S. My students are engaging and enthusiastic. They are working on a project to implement an automatic speech recognition (ASR) system in various Vietnamese dialects. The FUV students have weekly Zoom meetings with Simmons University students (my home institution), who are implementing an ASR system for Amharic (the official language of Ethiopia). It’s great to see this international collaboration. Ho Chi Minh City is a wild, high-octane, cosmopolitan place.”

Jun, 2022
79

Bernard Langs released “Sacred and Profane Love” on SoundCloud (https://soundcloud.com/bernie-langs/sacred-and-profane-love). The piece is an 18-minute “literary” rock and experimental music operetta. “Sacred and Profane Love” was developed for a May staging at a theater “so far off Broadway you’ll be sitting in the Hudson River” and in the summer as a choreographed piece in Woodstock, N.Y. Bernie has also decided that after self-publishing more than 20 novellas on the Amazon Kindle Store, he will retire from fiction and have a go at cultural and political essays. He is always in search of collaboration with others in music, music video, and other artistic genres. His final book, The Plot, can be found at: https://tinyurl.com/pwakd5wd.

Jun, 2022
78

Erroll Southers was appointed associate senior vice president of safety and risk assurance at the University of Southern California. He is responsible for overseeing all of the administration division’s safety departments; the Department of Public Safety, Environmental Health and Safety, and Fire Safety and Emergency Planning. Previously, he served on the faculty as a professor of practice in National and Homeland Security, director of the Safe Communities Institute, and director of Homegrown Violent Extremism Studies. He is in his 19th year at the university.


Erroll Southers ’78
Jun, 2022
78

David Shields’s new book, The Very Last Interview, was reviewed by New York Review of Books on March 29; it’s also been adapted into a film: https://vimeo.com/485780248.

Jun, 2022
78

Beth Lapides was profiled by Vulture for her significance to stand-up comedy history https://tinyurl.com/ytfs77e9. She is the creator and host of Los Angeles’s groundbreaking alternative comedy show UnCabaret, where comedians tell personal stories they haven’t performed before. (No polished bits from their act.) She just released her new audiobook So You Need to Decide, which is part memoir and part recorded interviews. Like UnCabaret, it features intimate conversations with comedians, writers, and cultural icons about decisions they’ve made (and how and why) in the areas of family, work, love, moving, and spirituality.

Jun, 2022
78

David Hahn’s most recent compositions can be heard at: https://davidhahn.bandcamp.com/.

Jun, 2022
78

Michael Blumstein writes: “I guess I’m not the retiring type. After nearly nine years at Oak Hill Advisors, I started a new position as chief financial officer of OpenExchange, www.openexc.com. The company provides high-end video technology and services to the major banks and various other corporations that have permanently moved many of their conferences and meetings online. For me, it’s always fun to meet new colleagues and figure out a new business—exercise for the mind.”

Jun, 2022
77

Barbara Sunderland Manousso writes: “I am cohosting international podcasts with InstantMediations.com. My series is Manousso Musing, bringing almost 30 years of experience in mediation and arbitration and interviews with the titans of theory, especially conversations on worldwide mediation and arbitration training and practice on micro and community scales—which we now conduct on Zoom.”

 

Jun, 2022
76

Harry Haskell is the writer and host of a new three-part podcast about his step-grandmother Katharine Wright, the sister of the Wright brothers. In Her Own Wright is based in part on his novel Maiden Flight, about Katharine’s late-life marriage to his grandfather and the tragic breach it caused between her and Orville. Among other topics explored in the three-part podcast are Katharine’s prominent part in the women’s movement, her early career as a high-school Latin teacher, and her largely behind-the-scenes role with the Wright Company. In Her Own Wright was funded by Dayton Aviation Heritage National Historical Park in conjunction with the recent world premiere of Laura Kaminsky’s opera Finding Wright. You can listen to the podcast at https://www.harryhaskell.com/in_her_own_wright_.htm.

Jun, 2022
75

Jan Blacher writes: “The documentary Autism Goes to College won Gold at the inaugural Anthem Awards for Diversity Equity and Inclusion under Special Projects for our film and podcast. The Anthem Awards is the cause-focused division of the Webby Awards. This is an enormous honor and is a recognition of the authenticity the autistic college students brought in sharing their stories of navigating college.”

Jun, 2022
73

George Thurston writes: “I’m still busy teaching at NYU and doing research on the human health effects of air pollution, as well as a course on climate and health. I’m also active in my professional organizations, now serving as chair of the policy committee of the North American Chapter of the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology (ISEE), which has involved providing technical comments and testimony on EPA’s environmental policy proposals, and participating in policy webinars. In early November 2021, I traveled to Glasgow, Scotland, as a member of NYU’s delegation to the Climate Conference of the Parties (COP26), where I hosted a hybrid session on how cities can act to improve residents’ health while at the same time addressing the causes of climate change. COP26 was a bittersweet meeting: disappointing in that more definitive commitments were not made by our world’s political leaders to meet the climate crisis, but heartening to see that, more than at any past such meeting, young people came in large numbers to peacefully protest the political inaction (my first was COP5 in Bonn, Germany in 1999). It reminded me of the anti-war movement when we were at Brown. I had to stay in Edinburgh to find an available room and commute daily to Glasgow, but each day I met the most interesting people on that intercity train, from other scientists and environmental reporters to U.S. Senate staffers. I also advise nonprofit organizations on air pollution matters and traveled to rural Chatham, Virginia, to testify at a natural gas pipeline permit hearing about the human health effects of air pollution. See https://tinyurl.com/2p8ej2be. I believe that, just like everyone should have legal representation in proceedings, in today’s technical world, everyone also deserves scientific representation. As I said for the below article: “I’m just trying to give them the same level of scientific representation that the vested interests have.” See https://tinyurl.com/mcwmmvx2. Prudence is still happily working for the IT department of the Monroe-Woodbury (N.Y.) school system, where they had to revamp the school’s education system to allow remote learning online as well as cope with a cyberattack on the school system. We are renovating an old barn on our daughter’s and her husband’s property to move in next door to them (and our first granddaughter Bea) in Waccabuc, but that is another story. So lots going on right now, despite the pandemic. And I’m always happy to add more Twitter followers:
@ProfGThurston.”

Jun, 2022
72

Samuel (Skip) Halpern published Wellsprings of Work, subtitled, Surprising Sources of Meaning and Motivation in Work. Samuel writes: “Unlike the extensive literature bemoaning how work brings you down, Wellsprings explores a dozen sources of fulfillment to lift you up. It’s aimed at students and anyone early in a career, as well as Baby Boomers, wondering what their work lives really amounted to and what to do for an encore. Wellsprings uses episodes from my own career in investing and law—dealing with Warren Buffett, Bernie Madoff, the 2008 financial crisis and investing funds for professional athletes (baseball, tennis, and hockey players), Inupiat Eskimos, and hundreds of millions in China—as springboards for exploring purpose and value across a wide range of fields.”

Jun, 2022
66

Doug Gortner writes: “I am still tinkling away in Nashville. Much to my amazement, I am still considered the top party/wedding/corporate function pianist in Music City. I still can’t read music, but I can play 440 tunes by ear. To hear my music and see my ancient face and red beret, just google ‘Best Jazz Pianist in Nashville.’ I also model. I played Kryptonite man in a music video and boogied shoulder to shoulder with Billy Ray Cyrus in an episode of Still The King. Pre-COVID, I was selling photos of flowers for $350 that I took with my $200 camera. My son graduated from Skidmore and Dartmouth and my daughter from Connecticut College. My son is on medical leave from teaching engineering at Dartmouth and my daughter (with her math degree) teaches gymnastics to tots and cleans houses in the Hanover, Mass., area. Like most of my classmates, I am entering into the decrepitude stage of life, but am well-medicated and well-doctored, so I am still playing golf and passing for 60 in my modeling roles. Looking for one last wife. (Sandra Z. are you out there?) I am still in touch with my Zete brothers, but don’t hear from my pool hall buddies. Would love to hear from y’all.”

 

Jun, 2022
65

Jane Marantz Connor McMahon writes: “I received my master’s in marriage and family therapy from Capella University on Feb. 19. This fulfills for me a long-term interest in bringing connection and healing to families and communities. It follows 10 years of work as a trainer of restorative justice practices in Washington, D.C., inner-city schools, which followed 30 years as an academic psychologist at SUNY-Binghamton. I am starting a small private practice and doing pro bono coaching of some Kenyans committed to increasing the use of nonviolent communication to resolve conflicts peacefully.”

Jun, 2022
65

Patricia Cobb writes: “My career has been, to my delight, teaching in art schools. With many other well-qualified women in the ’70s I helped to break the glass ceiling. Hired at the Art Institute of Boston by Nathan Goldstein to help expand his freshman drawing program to include figure sculpture for a better understanding of form, I soon became an associate professor of drawing and sculpture. After a dozen years there, I taught at Lesley University and then at Maine College of Art. Eight years ago my husband David Campbell and I returned to Brickbottom Artist Studios, a 150 unit live-work studio complex started 30-plus years ago in Somerville, Mass. David was one of the founders. Later this year we will return to Portland, Maine, to join one of our daughters and her family and to rejoin the vibrant arts community there.”

Jun, 2022
62

Ralph Steuer writes: “I am in my 41st year on the faculty of the business school (Terry College of Business) at the University of Georgia doing what I have been doing for the past 40 years.”

Jun, 2022
60

Carolyn Nygren Curan writes: “I remembered it was Josiah’s birthday today as I was in the studio making mini replicas of some of the examples of ancient pottery he used in his lectures years ago, but I was two years ahead. (I guess forgetfulness happens with octogenarians, but I sent off a small donation celebrating his life in any case.) Who knows if I’ll be around for his real leap year birthday in 2024! Josiah has always been dear to my heart, and I am always sad when fellow alums do not post on his Facebook page. Thus this note to Brown hoping that others will commemorate his birthdays, perhaps with a gift to his university. I am in two shows this year: Haverford Guild of Craftsmen spring craft show, as well as the miniature show at the Philly/Cherry Hill Hilton in November. I am hoping that I will see some acquaintances from Brown at the Philly show, and I’ll even give you one of my little brown jug minis as a memento of Josiah if you drop by to say hello. COVID-19 messed up studio time and life in general at Quadrangle Independent Living, where I moved in fall of 2019, but things have thankfully pretty much opened up again. The Quadrangle has somewhat the atmosphere of a college campus for the older set with a preponderance of liberal-thinking retired academics, artists, and movers and shakers. I heartily recommend it if you are thinking of changing your domicile. FYI, did you know that Josiah Carberry had some years at Wesleyan after his career at Brown, part of the Carberry legend according to Wikipedia? Although unfortunately not a fan of Carberry, my oldest son Andy is a Wesleyan professor of the humanities specializing in 18th century French literature and Diderot. He gave a lecture here at the Quadrangle on his forthcoming book, Who’s Black and Why? A Hidden Chapter from the Eighteenth-Century Invention of Race, edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Unfortunately, the lecture had to be on Zoom, so I was cheated out of an in person visit. C’est la vie.”

Jun, 2022
58

Sandy McFarland Taylor has been in touch with her childhood bestie, Carol Jadick Hanson, who lives in Lawrenceville, N.J. Sandy visited Carol this past February, traveling with her daughter, Sarah Taylor ’90, from Tuxedo Park.

Related classes:
Class of 1958, Class of 1990
Jun, 2022
58

John Reistrup writes that his granddaughter, Gina Reistrup, is studying for her master’s in public health at George Washington University while also being gainfully employed at a public health clinic at George Mason University. She went to Mpala Research Center in Kenya to learn research methods of vector-borne disease surveillance, i.e., tracking the spread of disease by mosquitoes, ticks, etc.

Jun, 2022
58

Kay Ulry Baker writes: “I finally organized myself (including those books, spices, and just about everything else). I sold both New York and Florida townhouses and instead am living in a Lifecare Retirement Community on Long Island. It took quite a bit of downsizing, but I think the Jefferson’s Ferry community here in South Setauket, New York, is worth all that hassle. I’ve had the opportunity to make new friends, renew some old pastimes, and develop new interests. This is a vibrant place that encourages continuing development along with the security of a community. Quite a life change, but always something new.”

Jun, 2022
58

Class Secretary Jill Hirst Scobie writes: “Once again I am urging you to frequent the Class of 1958 website (https://sites.google.com/brown.edu/brown-class-of-1958/) or simply search for ‘Brown Class of 1958.’ The class website, set up with the help of Alumni Relations, features many sources of information previously scattered. Just above a letter of greeting from our copresidents, you can learn how to update your profile. This will enable you to get in touch with other alums via info in the Brown database. You can enjoy a photo gallery immortalizing decades of our reunions and mini reunions, news, notes, and tributes to classmates, links to our Class of 1958 Newsletter, Brown Insider newsletter, and the Brown Daily Herald, as well as to the BAM. Copresidents Jim Moody ’65 ScM and Jane Bertram Miluski would like you to bear in mind that in May 2023 we will be celebrating our 65th reunion. Oh, mercy, mercy me! Who knows where the time goes!”

Related classes:
Class of 1958, GS Class of 1965
Jun, 2022
57

Dorothy Crews Herzberg writes: “My sixth book, Sharing the Journey, Unitarian Universalist Church of Berkeley, is available on Amazon and I think it’s the best one. I’ve been a Unitarian for more than 70 years, but a member of UUCB for 30 years. It’s a story of the life of the congregation for the past 30 years, and a resource book for ministerial candidates and new ministers for our congregation. I completed it just before getting a lumpectomy and radiation, which required rest. I keep up a weekly game of Scrabble and serve on a couple of boards and some committees, but this may be my last book…who knows?”

 

Jun, 2022
56

Roger Hale writes: “I was thrilled and honored to be inducted into the Minnesota Chess Hall of Fame. This wasn’t because of any great chess playing ability, but rather for resuscitating the local chess club (Chess Castle of Minnesota) from life support to what became one of the most active chess clubs in America, hosting around 150 rated tournaments each year until the pandemic shut us down. Although I had played recreational chess off and on over the years, I played in my first rated tournament game when I was 72, which may have been the record for the oldest person playing in a first US Chess Federation rated game.”

Jun, 2022
54

Frank Wezniak writes: “Wish I had some exciting news to report to the class, but all that I can report is that Nan and I are trying to avoid the COVID bugs in the air. Also trying to support the local restaurants in Boston, who are continuing to have a tough time. We had a great trip to Texas in June 2021 to attend two of our grandchildren’s graduations. Our grandson Garrett graduated from U Texas, Austin, in a monstrous 100,000 person capacity football stadium. He was a computer science major and got a wonderful software job immediately. A few days later granddaughter Cassie graduated from Colleyville High School and was off this fall to attend NYU. Her graduation was also in a football stadium, but this one was only about the size of the one at Brown. Texans take their football very seriously.”

 

55

Send your news to Class President

Jun, 2022
54

Al Gerstein writes; “I am pleased to announce the latest addition to my extended family. On Oct. 27, Andromeda (Andie) Web Lichtman came into this world weighing 7 pounds, 13 ounces, joining her sister Winifred, age 7. Her parents are Hilary Gerstein ’03 and Martin Lichtman ’01. Needless to say there will be no pressure to join the ranks of alumnae when it’s time to apply to college.”

Jun, 2022
53

Marty Cohen writes: “Following the class pattern, I am now in an adult independent living facility. My wife, unfortunately, is in memory care. I have quit golf but am into bridge and in good health in Florida. Trying to understand politics as they are, not what we studied.”

 

Jun, 2022
50

Jerry Green covered his 56th consecutive Super Bowl—SB LVI—for the Detroit News in Los Angeles on Feb. 13. He is the only print sportswriter to have covered every Super Bowl. He has become part of the story. Newsweek magazine printed a lengthy feature article about him in its Feb. 18 issue on its website. Also, the local weekly Grosse Pointe News printed a feature article about him.

 

Apr, 2022
MD 88

Bobby Chang ’88 MD (see Pamela Wiseman ’83).

Related classes:
MD Class of 1988, Class of 1983
Apr, 2022
MD 78

Gary A. Neidich ’78 MD (see ’74).

Related classes:
MD Class of 1978, Class of 1974
Apr, 2022
GS 99
Out of Darkness
Two new works from Dan O’Brien ’99 MFA on surviving trauma
Read More
Image of Dan O'Brien leaning against a tree
Apr, 2022
GS 97

Jide Aradeon ’97 ScM (see Darryl Heslop ’96).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1997, Class of 1996
Apr, 2022
GS 97

Darryl Heslop and Jide Aradeon ’97 ScM are becoming green entrepreneurs with their foray into the rapidly emerging legal cannabis industry. Subject to a licensing award, the duo plans to open three adult-use cannabis retail dispensaries in New York City branded as “The Greenwood District.” Although residing on opposite coasts—Darryl as a practicing attorney in New York and Jide as a technical program manager in California—Darryl writes: “This was a special opportunity to collaborate with a lifelong friend in a newly regulated field brimming with pathways for positive social and economic impact. We look forward to being pioneers in this space and welcome the support of the Brown community.”

Apr, 2022
GS 88

Susan Morrison ’88 AM, ’91PhD, was named a Texas State University System Regents Professor at the Nov. 18 quarterly Board of Regents meeting. This is the highest faculty honor conferred upon professors who demonstrate excellence and exemplary achievement in the areas of teaching, research and publication, and service. She was also made University Distinguished Professor of English at Texas State University.

Apr, 2022
GS 87

Bob Valentini ’87 ScM, ’93 MD, ’93 PhD (see Pamela Wiseman ’83).

Apr, 2022
GS 86
Cashing Out
Digital currencies are on the rise, says Eswar Prasad ’86 AM in his new book
Read More
Image of Eswar Prasad
Related classes:
GS Class of 1986, Class of 1987
Apr, 2022
GS 86

Suzanne Keen ’86 AM (see ’84).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1986, Class of 1984
Apr, 2022
GS 86

Suzanne Keen ’86 AM, dean of faculty and professor of literature and creative writing at Hamilton College (N.Y.), has been named the 10th president of Scripps College, the women’s college of the Claremont Colleges.

Apr, 2022
GS 80

Eric Sirota ’80 ScM (see ’80).

Related classes:
GS Class of 1980, Class of 1980
Apr, 2022
GS 80

Eric Sirota ’80 ScM writes: “My musical, Frankenstein, based on Mary Shelley’s novel, played Off-Broadway for three years prior to the pandemic and was filmed as a movie and released in January on StreamingMusicals.com. I’ve written and am now developing a new musical, A Good Day, about a widowed artist who is brought into the life of his childhood girlfriend—his first love, his muse—who spurned him 50 years before, and who now has Alzheimer’s. I’ve been married to artist Cara London for 29 years and am still doing physics research at ExxonMobil and living in Flemington, New Jersey, where
I’ve been for 36 years.”

Apr, 2022
GS 79

Joel Scheraga ’79 AM, ’81 PhD (see ’76).

Apr, 2022
GS 09
In the news

Martín Guzmán, Minister of Economy for Argentina, has been chosen by Pope Francis to join the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. His appointment is for 10 years. The academy is dedicated to “promoting the study and progress of social, economic, political, and legal sciences in the light of the social doctrine of the Church.” In addition to serving as Minister, Guzmán is a research assistant at Columbia University, where he directs the debt restructuring program and is a member of the Institute for New Economic Thinking’s Taskforce on Macroeconomic Efficiency and Stability. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Buenos Aires and at the National University of La Plata, both in Argentina, and directs the Journal of Globalization and Development.

Apr, 2022
GS 03
Fast Food Capitalism
The Pulitzer-winning Franchise by Marcia Chatelain ’03 AM, ’08 PhD, narrates the complicated history between McDonald’s and its Black outlet owners
Read More
Image of Marcia Chatelain
Apr, 2022
GS 02

Rosalind Galt ’02 PhD published Alluring Monsters. Further details about the book can be found at: cup.columbia.edu/book/alluring-monsters/9780231201339.

Apr, 2022
GS 01

Elda Stanco Downey ’01 AM, ’05 PhD (see Paul Berry ’07).

Apr, 2022
GS 01

Paul Berry and Elda Stanco Downey ’01 AM, ’05 PhD, were both honored to receive an award from Senator Tim Kaine for their community work during the pandemic. Elda is deeply involved with the Latino community in southwest Virginia, as Paul is in northern Virginia.

Apr, 2022
FAC
“That Changed Everything”
Professor Jim Barnhill founded the Theatre Arts department and helped launch Trinity Rep, Rites and Reason, and several acting careers
Read More
Image of James Barnhill
Apr, 2022
24
Stalking Mies van der Rohe
Five minutes with Professor Dietrich Neumann
Read More
Image of Professor Dietrich Neumann sitting in a Mies-designed “Barcelona” chair
Apr, 2022
22
Living Well
Brown’s newest dorm focuses on wellness
Read More
Image of the new Wellness Dorm at Brown
Apr, 2022
18

Quinn Schoen, Saria Sakka, and Abigail Tisch opened Bungalow, an art-forward concept store and platform for emerging artists. Quinn writes: “We’re a nomadic and temporary project, with this iteration in Chinatown that ran Nov. 11 to Dec. 19, and our second presentation is scheduled to come this spring at the historic artists complex Westbeth in New York. We’ve received a bit of coverage so far in Elle Decor and New York Magazine’s Curbed.”

Apr, 2022
15

A new novel by Dana Schwartz, Anatomy: A Love Story, was published on Jan. 18 (Wednesday Books). The gothic tale full of mystery and romance is set against the backdrop of 1830s Edinburgh. Dana is the author of three other books: the memoir Choose Your Own Disaster, the humor tome The White Man’s Guide to White Male Writers of the Western Canon, and the YA novel And We’re Off. She recently wrote her first comic book for Marvel, Deadpool Annual #1, and currently serves as a staff writer on the Disney+ original series She-Hulk. She is also the creator and host of the history podcast, “Noble Blood.” As a journalist, she has written for notable publications such as the New Yorker, Washington Post, Entertainment Weekly, Vanity Fair, Marie Claire, Glamour, and GQ. Dana currently lives in Los Angeles with her cat Beetlejuice and often entertains her fans through her tweets, which often go viral.

Apr, 2022
11

Kayla Ringelheim writes: “I was published in the New York Times’s Modern Love column. This is my first ever piece of published writing. My essay is a heartfelt commentary on friendship, self-discovery, and...dating in your 30s during a global pandemic. Since publishing it, I have been surprised and touched by hearing from women all over the world who see themselves in this story.”

Apr, 2022
10

Lee Taglin writes: “I’m head of operations for Knock for Democracy (knockfordemocracy.org). By building a volunteer experience that is easy, accessible, community-driven, and legitimately fun, Knock for Democracy is transforming political volunteering from an every-four-year obligation into an engaging and empowering practice, all while upending results in tightly contested races. In 2020, Knock for Democracy volunteers completed nearly 12,000 phone banking shifts and made over 2.8 million calls to key voter constituencies in swing districts and battleground states, where 11 of our 19 target candidates won their races. We’re fundraising for the 2022 midterms and are seeking committed partners to join and support our mission. If you’re interested, I’d love to chat! I can be reached at lee@knockfordemocracy.org.”

Apr, 2022
10

Alejandra Rojas and Tristan Freeman were married on Nov. 20 in a small ceremony with immediate family. They met in 2014 at a volunteer alumni event in a women’s shelter in Brooklyn, N.Y. They still live in Brooklyn with their dog Russell.

Apr, 2022
09

Gabby Salazar writes: “My first book was published on February 1 with National Geographic Kids Books. The 160-page book is called No Boundaries: 25 Women Explorers and Scientists Share Adventures, Inspiration, and Advice and is for 9- to 12-year-olds. The book exposes kids to outstanding women of diverse backgrounds, nationalities, and fields of study—many of whom are just beginning their game-changing work—by shining a light on the unique journeys and struggles that led to their incredible modern-day achievements.”

Apr, 2022
07

Christina Sanabria writes: “The children’s music duo I’m a part of, 123 Andrés, has received a Grammy nomination for Best Children’s Music Album for our most recent album, Actívate. I’m the most recent Brown alum, after Lisa Loeb ’90, to be nominated in this category. The album can be streamed here: ditto.fm/activate-123-andres.”

Related classes:
Class of 2007, Class of 1990
Apr, 2022
05
A Woman Ref Breaks the Ice Ceiling
Read More
Image of referee Katie Guay on the ice
Apr, 2022
05
Livening Up the Concert Experience
Cemeteries and crypts become the settings for classical music
Read More
Image of entrance arch at the Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, N.Y.
Apr, 2022
05

Kimberly Spector Wolf writes: “I graduated with honors in gender studies and went on to receive my master’s in human development and psychology from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. After nearly two decades working at the intersection of adolescent health and media, working as a sexual health and love educator, educational consultant, and educational media producer, I will be releasing my first book, Talk With Her: A Dad’s Essential Guide to Raising Healthy, Confident, and Capable Daughters (Penguin, May 2022). Talk With Her is a comprehensively researched, nonfiction book for fathers of teenage and soon-to-be teenage daughters, helping fathers understand their dynamic roles in raising girls, boost their daughters’ well-being, strengthen their relationships, and guide them to fulfill their potential in all areas of their lives. In its pages, I draw from my experience in the field, highlight expert perspectives from esteemed researchers and representatives from leading nonprofits, and incorporate insights from girls and fathers I have encountered through my career and in interviews for this book. Chapters on key topics including body positivity, mental health, social media, and love give fathers the foundation of knowledge they need to approach delicate and critical conversations. You can find more information about me on my website at KimberlyWolf.com and on Penguin’s website.”

Apr, 2022
05

Merrill Feather writes: “I produced an event in November called Climate Con 2021: For a Future That Doesn’t Suck. Climate Con 2021 was a free virtual gathering aimed at developing the next generation of climate-minded professionals and entrepreneurs. Attendees learned how to leverage their skills and experiences to become more climate-oriented in their everyday jobs and personal lives. My Brown education taught me to pursue my passions first and foremost and while my path has led me in various different directions, the theme of connecting people through my work has been a consistent one I can trace back to my activities and passions at Brown. Climate Con is informed by my experience running my own marketing consultancy focused on climate solutions, and it is our first big effort into making climate action more approachable, and bringing more regular folks like me into the fold.”

Apr, 2022
05

Frances Cowhig writes: “I studied playwriting, visual arts, and sociology, and I published a unique collection of plays. This collection, published by Bloomsbury/Methuen, is titled Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s China Trilogy: Three Parables of Global Capital. Some things that are unique about it: every play is set in contemporary China; every play is written for a cast of all Asian-heritage actors; and these plays have been produced on major stages in the U.S. and U.K., including the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre, Manhattan Theatre Club, and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. On a political note, when the most recent play was produced in the U.K. two years ago, shortly before the pandemic, agents of Chinese state security tried to pressure the family and friends of the Chinese public health whistleblower who was the subject of the play, in hopes of getting her to cancel the production.”

Apr, 2022
04

Nick Bayard was appointed executive director of BirdNote, a public media and environmental conservation organization dedicated to telling vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face in order to inspire listeners to care about the natural world and take steps to protect it. BirdNote stories can be heard on more than 200 radio stations across the U.S. and at www.birdnote.org and has an estimated audience of two million people. BirdNote Board President Tom Livingston shared, “We’re excited to have Nick lead us in supporting new programs and reaching new audiences, making birding an accessible and inspiring way for communities around the country to connect with conservation.”

Apr, 2022
02

In March, Timothy Kelly started as the assistant general counsel with the Hall of Fame Resort & Entertainment Company, a leading sports, entertainment, and media enterprise headquartered in Canton, Ohio.

Apr, 2022
02

Anthony DiPietro’s first poetry chapbook, And Walk Through, has been published by Seven Kitchens Press. The book contains a series of poems composed on a typewriter in the earliest days of the pandemic focusing on forms of isolation. Additionally, his poetry book kiss & release is now under contract for publication in 2024. More information is available at www.AnthonyWriter.com.

Apr, 2022
01
In the news

Saya Woolfalk has been commissioned to design a monument honoring the late U.S. Supreme Court justice and women’s equality trailblazer Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The monument, at Van Nuys Civic Center in Los Angeles, will consist of special details related to Ginsburg's journey as a law student at Harvard, including benches based on Harvard Law School desks, so it can be used as a space for reflection. It will have a stainless steel roof and mosaic tile floor based upon two of the collars that Ginsburg was known to wear with her judicial robes.

Apr, 2022
01

Terri Landon Bacow writes: “I am excited to announce the publication of my new book Goodbye, Anxiety: A Guided Journal for Overcoming Worry. I started writing this book in the summer of 2020 and the panic at that moment provided plenty of inspiration. The book is a guided journal filled with scientifically based anxiety management strategies and coping skills for tweens, teens, and young adults (and their parents). It is published by Spruce Books, an imprint of Sasquatch/A Penguin Random House company. The book will help readers identify anxiety triggers, change unhelpful thinking patterns, and develop healthy mental habits such as self-compassion. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the book or my work as a psychologist. I currently live in New York City with my husband and two children and can be reached at tbacow@gmail.com.”

Apr, 2022
00

Amit Trehan and his wife Sara announce the birth of their daughter, Mila Devi Trehan. They can be reached at trehan@gmail.com.

Apr, 2022
98

Carrie Nielsen’s book, Unleaded: How Changing Our Gasoline Changed Everything, was published on Sept. 17 by Rutgers University Press.

Apr, 2022
98

Amanda Kracen writes: “After studying abroad in Dublin and then living in St. Louis for five years after graduating Brown, my family and I have moved to Ireland. I am a faculty member in psychology at the National College of Ireland. I am also working to establish the Irish Psychosocial Oncology Network. My kids are playing rugby and learning to speak Irish. I welcome hearing from classmates and other Brown grads at akracen@hotmail.com.”

Apr, 2022
97

Sara Lippmann’s JERKS—a collection of short stories that Steve Almond calls “daring and fearless”—was published in March by the Mason Jar Press, an independent publisher in Baltimore.

Apr, 2022
97

Rachel Salguero Kowalsky writes: “My short story, ‘The Billboard,’ was selected as the winner of the inaugural New England Journal of Medicine fiction contest.”

Apr, 2022
96
Roy Moore in a cockpit

Roy Moore writes: “Last November, after 11 years at Southwest Airlines, I was promoted to Boeing 737 Captain, Los Angeles domicile. From time to time, I’ve seen old friends, teammates, and classmates aboard the aircraft. Stop by the flight deck.”

Apr, 2022
96

Todd Guren writes: “I recently changed jobs, which gave me an occasion to send a class note. I have been in health insurance for 15 years and mentioning that I work in health insurance still stops any conversation at parties. I switched to a start-up health insurance company as a remote worker for a Medicare Advantage plan called Alignment Healthcare and really like both the start-up and working remotely. My family (two kids ages 9 and 13) and I have been very lucky during the pandemic with our health and flexibility with school and schedules. My oldest loves his Waldorf School and completed a successful ultimate frisbee season with his team. I have been very jealous of the Waldorf curriculum—he does woodworking, music, learns how to quilt, and will even get to work in a forge in high school. If I were still at Brown, I would have tried to turn those topics into a major. We are still living in Portland, Oregon, enjoying the outdoors, and playing lots of Dungeons and Dragons. I am still knitting and finished a Big Lebowski sweater for both myself and my son. If any of my classmates are in the Pacific Northwest, I always look forward to connecting.”

Apr, 2022
95
Fresh Ink for April–May 2022
Books by Alan Maimon ’95, Jessamine Chan ’00, and Andrew Blauner ’86
Read More
Books by Alan Maimon, Jessamine Chan, and Andrew Blauner
Apr, 2022
93
Strange Brews
A beloved Delaware-based beer maker chronicles its first quarter century
Read More
Image of Mariah Draper Calagione and Sam Galagione
Apr, 2022
93
In the news

Ayanna Howard Torres, dean of the College of Engineering at Ohio State University, has been elected to the National Academy of Investors 2021 class of fellows. An accomplished roboticist, entrepreneur, and educator, she joined Ohio State on March 1, 2021, as the first woman to lead the university’s College of Engineering. Her career, which has included positions in higher education, at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and in the private sector, has also focused on inclusiveness and diversity in STEM. She has received numerous accolades and honors for her work. In 2018, Forbes named her to its America’s Top 50 Women in Tech list. In May 2020, she was named the Association for Computing Machinery’s Athena Lecturer in recognition of fundamental contributions to the development of accessible human-robotic systems and artificial intelligence.

Apr, 2022
93

Jodi Shin Yamamoto writes that Karen Hutton and Darrell Perkins were married in Captiva Island, Fla., on July 29. Joining them in celebration were Darrell’s Brown classmates Roy Carver, Kevin Newman, Katie Brainard Perkins, and Amy Weimer.

Apr, 2022
93

Christopher Ott became the deputy director for the Chicago-based High Speed Rail Alliance.

Apr, 2022
93

Mariah Draper Calagione, cofounder and communitarian at Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, coauthored The Dogfish Head Book: 26 Years of Off-Centered Adventures. Mariah writes: “It is a heavily illustrated, lovingly told page turner that provides a detailed account of Dogfish Head’s history through heartfelt stories, a timetable of the brewery’s off-centered beverage releases and a plethora of coworker-told tales. It’s written in collaboration with my husband and Dogfish Head cofounder and brewer, Sam Calagione, and longtime coworker and general manager of the Dogfish Inn, Andrew C. Greeley. The Dogfish Head Book: 26 Years of Off-Centered Adventures offers readers a chronology of the offbeat escapades that propelled Dogfish Head to exponential growth, from opening its doors as one of the smallest commercial breweries in America in 1995 to today becoming one of the largest and most well-known independent craft breweries in the nation.”

Apr, 2022
91

Daniel Levine (see William Levine ’64).

Related classes:
Class of 1991, Class of 1964
Apr, 2022
90

Cecilia Wong Kaiser writes: “Thirty-one years after graduating with a degree in visual art and creative writing, I have returned to painting. To see my work and learn what I’ve been up to since leaving College Hill, please visit ceciliakaiser.com. I am also (at my daughter’s urging) on Instagram @ceciliawongkaiser.”

Apr, 2022
89
Getting There
The CEO of Philly’s transit authority is figuring out ways to improve riders’ lives
Read More
Image of Leslie Richards in the street
Apr, 2022
88

Jane Snyder (see William Levine ’64).

Related classes:
Class of 1988, Class of 1964
Apr, 2022
88

Sally Frank writes: “I’m happy to report that my daughter, Zöe Mermelstein ’21, is working as a protection counselor at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Washington, D.C. My husband, Steven Mermelstein, and I were thrilled with Zoë’s experience at Brown, particularly the support she received from professors. We have two other kids in college: Remy is in his fifth year studying architecture at Cornell AAP and Julien is a junior studying political science, econ, and public health at Duke. Our youngest, Leo, is a senior in high school looking into contemporary music/liberal arts programs for college. We moved to the Bay Area just over a year ago and I started a new role heading up philanthropic programs at Agilent. I’m looking for partnership opportunities to promote STEM education in underrepresented groups and mentoring opportunities for our global workforce in STEM and other areas. If you have ideas, please contact me at sally.frank@agilent.com.”

Related classes:
Class of 1988, Class of 2021
Apr, 2022
87

Doug Mayer coauthored Trail Running Illustrated, an expert introduction to this rapidly growing sport. “It is the perfect partner for runners interested in turning off the tarmac and experiencing the solitude and adventure that comes with running on trails.” It is available at www.mountaineersbooks.org.

Apr, 2022
86
Healthcare Hero
Leon L. Haley Jr. ’86, a doctor and CEO who inspired a COVID vaccination rally
Read More
Image of Leon Haley in dr coat
Apr, 2022
86

Rebecca Macieira-Kaufmann published FitCEO: Be the Leader of Your Life in September. She writes: “The book is about achieving holistic health at work, home, and play. It shares lessons learned over decades of leadership, fitness, transformation, and life to enable any reader ready for ‘immediate and imperfect action’ to make small changes in habits that can manifest in lifelong change. It can serve as a powerful tool for a CEO, leader, parent, friend, or individual.”

Apr, 2022
86

Dorothy Faulstich Bowe writes: “Six months after launching our youngest, we went back to the drawing board and welcomed a one-year-old foster child into our home for eight months. In brief: It does all come back to you, older backs do not appreciate sitting on the floor, and we wanted to do something with our resources to help someone with less.”

Apr, 2022
86

Now Comes Good Sailing: Writers Reflect on Henry David Thoreau, edited by Andrew Blauner, was published on October 19. In Now Comes Good Sailing, 27 of today’s leading writers offer wide-ranging original pieces exploring how Thoreau has influenced and inspired them—and why he matters more than ever in an age of climate, racial, and technological reckoning. Andrew is a literary agent and the editor of seven previous anthologies, including Coach: 25 Writers Reflect on People Who Made a Difference, The Peanuts Papers: Writers and Cartoonists on Charlie Brown, Snoopy & the Gang, and the Meaning of Life, and In Their Lives: Great Writers on Great Beatles Songs.

Apr, 2022
85
Sex-Complaint Czar
Suzanne Goldberg ’85 now faces the challenge of her distinguished legal career—squaring Obama- and Trump-era rules.
Read More
portrait of Suzanne Goldberg in DC
Related classes:
Class of 1985, Class of 1991
Apr, 2022
85

Bradley Hertz writes: “Having learned that I carry the BRCA2 genetic mutation, and therefore have a significantly increased risk of four different kinds of cancer (prostate, pancreatic, breast, and melanoma), I have been splitting my time between practicing law and serving as a men’s health advocate. For more information, and to read some of the articles I’ve written, Google Brad Hertz and BRCA and reach out to me.”

Apr, 2022
84

Tuneen Chisolm writes: “The summer before I officially joined the legal academy, I attended a luncheon hosted on the beautiful campus of Howard University School of Law. As I was touring the halls, in awe of the rich history embodied in class murals and portraits—including the likes of the late Justice Thurgood Marshall as a law student, and the late former Dean Patricia Roberts Harris, Ambassador to Luxembourg—I declared to the then-interim dean that I had to get a visiting appointment at Howard. She chuckled, noting that I hadn’t asked, but had indeed declared what I wanted. Fast forward eight years and I am now blessed and privileged to be a newly appointed, tenured associate professor of law at Howard, teaching constitutional, entertainment, and intellectual property law. I am also entering the twelfth year of my alternative dispute resolution practice as a member of the National Roster of Arbitrators for the American Arbitration Association, which allows me to exercise my engineering brain muscle in chemical industry construction matters. I look forward to connecting with folks in the Washington, D.C., area.”

Apr, 2022
83

Pamela Wiseman writes: “I connected with Mary Griffin Perna and Chris Perna, Bobby Chang ’88 MD, Karen Sadler, and Eliane Videira, and I obtained a recipe from Bob Valentini ’87 ScM, ’93 MD, ’93 PhD. I moved to Dallas in 2017 for an executive position leading supply chain transformation of a top-ten health system. I would be happy to assist my alumni friends in their pursuit of supply chain excellence. Timing is everything!”

Apr, 2022
82

Jean Leibowitz Wiecha published Discover Her Art: Women Artists and Their Masterpieces with Chicago Review Press. Written with children’s author Lisa LaBanca Rogers, Discover Her Art explores 24 paintings, letting young artists learn about art by looking at works by women. The paintings range from formal portraits to abstract expressionism between 1590 and 1960. Brief biographies of the artists demonstrate the professionalism and persistence of important women in art history. Hands-on activities lead readers to think like an artist.

Apr, 2022
82

Bonnie Waltch writes: “I’m excited to announce that the science documentary I produced and wrote, Earth Emergency, narrated by Richard Gere, aired on PBS on Dec. 29. The broadcast version of our five short films, Climate Emergency: Feedback Loops, incorporates footage from our launch, during which we brought together His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Greta Thunberg for the first time in a virtual panel. The film screened at COP26 at the invitation of His Royal Highness Prince Charles for his Terra Carta Sustainable Markets Initiative and is being sold to television stations globally.”

Apr, 2022
82

Ruth Sessler Bernstein writes that she has published two new books: “To improve on more than 60 years of attempts to achieve fairness and performance from diversity, Performance through Diversity and Inclusion: Leveraging Organizational Practices for Equity and Results is aimed at being smarter with our efforts. Based on knowledge from large bodies of research and illustrated with successful cases, the book provides practical guidance for managers, leaders, diversity officers, educators, and students to achieve the benefits of diversity by taking advantage of opportunities to create meaningful, inclusive interactions. The second, Diversity and Inclusion in Nonprofit Governance: No More Excuses!, an ebook, is a guide for nonprofit boards desiring to be more diverse and inclusive.”

Apr, 2022
81

Jessie Goldfarb was recently accepted as a psychic reader by California Psychics. She also continues her divorce and family law practice in Boulder, Colo. She visits Louisiana on a regular basis and she is a devotee of zydeco music. She writes: “Ever true friends can reach me at jessiegoldfarb@gmail.com.”

Apr, 2022
81

Randall Drain writes: “As an alumnus and pediatrician, I would periodically receive requests to host Brown undergraduate students as interns throughout the year. Recently, I retired from pediatric medicine. Now, I volunteer part-time with a nonprofit agency entitled PSALT NK, an organization supporting North Korean refugees and their families who are living here in the United States. We have begun a program called RISE designed for teens of North Korean families to tutor them in their academic subjects.” 

Apr, 2022
80

Diana Davis Williams writes: “After many years working in South Africa in arts management, art tourism, and cultural policy, I have moved to live outside Lisbon with my husband Nick. We have semi-retired here on the Portuguese Riviera. We are enjoying life within the burgeoning art scene here, exploring the trails of the Sintra hills, and playing lots of tennis and golf. Please get in touch if you are in the area at dianawilliams736@gmail.com.”

Apr, 2022
80

Jim Sweetser writes: “I’m retiring from Sweetser Law Office PLLC on December 8, 2022, at age 65. One of my sons is taking over and kicking me to the curb. My wife Dee and I have five kids who are now adults. No grandchildren yet. We will be staying in a vacation home on the Big Island in Hawaii during the winter months and on Lake Coeur D’Alene, Idaho, the rest of the time. If Brown friends are in the area, look me up to get together. Retirement should be a good time to renew friendships and a new page in the journey for us all. Not done. Just transforming.” Contact Jim at jsweets@earthlink.net; (509) 998-0671.

Apr, 2022
80

Jonathan Schwartz launched Climate Media Exchange and just filmed the Red Rebels, a stunning street mime troupe. His series on health and safety in the motion picture industry is soon to be released by Audacious Film and Digital.

Apr, 2022
80
Image of BJ Miller holding her dog


BJ Miller writes: “Hello fellow Brunonians, what an interesting time on the planet. I spent decades on the business side of the film biz, switched to the field of health and wellness in 2014, and am truly gratified that I did. I want to be where I can serve the most. One of my passions is connecting people to 100 percent pure products from Mother Earth as a complementary modality to help them achieve both their physical and emotional health goals. I am happy to offer my Brown colleagues a free virtual wellness consultation. My other passion is being a spiritual coach (Miracle-Minded). I hold one-on-one virtual sessions with people, ‘walking with them’ to help them take responsibility for their lives and achieve their potential as expeditiously as possible. I wish all of you and yours the very best in 2022 and look forward to connecting and finding out what you’re up to!”

Apr, 2022
80

Terence Hook writes: “I am continuing to enjoy the semi-retired lifestyle here in Vermont. After some 38 years with IBM I retired in 2018 but I continue to consult on a part-time basis with IBM Research in Albany, New York. That leaves me with the flexibility to ride our horses, play golf, go skiing, sketchily maintain our 1805 farmhouse, and do other important things like serve on the board of the Yale Club of Vermont. In 2021 my wife, Andrea, and I celebrated our 37th anniversary and most importantly, the marriage of our daughter Catherine.”

Apr, 2022
80

Mark Gould and his wife, Allison, successfully completed a yearlong project of throwing a wedding for their daughter, Caroline, during the middle of the plague. Frank Fuerst ’79 also attended the outdoor affair, which was blessed with perfect late October weather. Although he is looking forward to retirement someday, Mark remains very busy as a solar energy and commercial real estate attorney in Atlanta.

Related classes:
Class of 1980, Class of 1979
Apr, 2022
80

Jeff Dennis launched www.AltHealth.Me, a social media platform and marketplace for people struggling with chronic conditions.

Apr, 2022
80

After 40 years in the music business as a multi-platinum selling singer and songwriter, Dana Calitri is loving teaching songwriting and voice at the Steinhardt School at New York University. She is happily married to musician/composer Martin Briley and stepmom to his two beautiful daughters, Vanessa and Olivia.

Apr, 2022
80

Bruce Bukiet was promoted to the rank of professor in the department of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology, where he also serves as associate dean for undergraduate studies in the College of Science and Liberal Arts.

Apr, 2022
80

Sue Schukar Berdy writes: “After nearly 30 years in practice as an allergist, I retired in December 2019 and haven’t looked back. I’m enjoying many of the things I delayed during college/medical school/residency/fellowship/raising kids and practicing medicine. Our two children, Andrew and Emily, have both married and settled in our hometown of St. Louis. We have four grandkids who live within a few miles of us. St. Louis is still our home but we purchased a second home in Bonita Springs, Florida.”

Apr, 2022
78

Benjamin Owens (see Steve Owens ’78).

Related classes:
Class of 1978, Class of 2017
Apr, 2022
78
Image of Steve Owens behind a microphone

Steve Owens writes: “On Sept. 9, I was confirmed by the U.S. Senate to be a member of the U.S. Chemical Safety & Hazard Investigation Board (CSB), having been nominated by President Biden earlier in the year. The CSB investigates accidents at facilities that produce, process, handle, and store chemicals and makes recommendations to prevent future accidents and protect human health and the environment. In addition, my wife, Karen Carter Owens, and I celebrated the wedding of our oldest son, John, to Haleigh Williams in Phoenix, Arizona, on November 13. Our son Benjamin ’17 was the best man. We were blessed to be joined at the wedding by many dear friends, including Jill Berkelhammer Zorn, Bob Keough, and Sue Goldberger ’76.”

 

Apr, 2022
77

Rebecca Fullerton Taniguchi published Hiro’s War, a work of historical fiction.

Apr, 2022
77

Karen Misler writes: “My husband, Barry Feigenbaum, and I are thrilled to announce the engagements of both our children. Jeremy Feigenbaum is engaged to Adam Amir and Stephanie Feigenbaum is engaged to Avi Arfin. Our cup runneth over!”

Apr, 2022
76

Joel Scheraga ’79 AM, ’81 PhD, led the team that produced the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s new Climate Adaptation Action Plan. The plan was released by the White House, along with others from across the federal government, on Oct. 7. It describes how EPA will work with its partners in states, tribes, territories, local governments, and businesses to promote a healthy and prosperous nation that is more resilient to a changing climate with a particular focus on advancing environmental justice.

Apr, 2022
75
In the news

Craig Cogut ’75 was presented with the Leader in Sustainability Award at the 15th Annual Global Wellness Summit, a gathering of international global wellness economy leaders. Craig is the founder, chairman, and CEO of Pegasus Capital Advisors and was honored for his focus on bringing capital and expertise to businesses that are able to compete successfully while focusing on resource efficiency and sustainability.

Apr, 2022
75

Kenneth Lury writes: “It has been two years since repatriating to the U.S. after living and working in New Zealand for three and a half years. During that time I travelled extensively in New Zealand as well as Australia, Rarotonga, Bora Bora, Tahiti, China, Japan, Thailand, Singapore, and Bali. I also went on an expedition cruise to Greenland, which was a major life highlight—250 passengers on a French ship with French chefs. Fortunately all of the physical exercise allowed us to fully enjoy the food. Unfortunately I arrived back in the U.S. shortly before COVID so my landing has been bumpy. Still, happy to be back home. I am retired and spending most of my time sailing year round. Next on my bucket list, I hope to charter a sailboat in a flotilla to cruise the Croatian coast.”

Apr, 2022
74

Gary A. Neidich ’78 MD has been named professor emeritus at the Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota. He has been with the university for 38 years and has been section chief of pediatric gastroenterology for more than 25 years. He also is on the Professional Education Committee of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition and has received several teaching and clinical awards from the university.

Related classes:
Class of 1974, MD Class of 1978
Apr, 2022
42
Unseating Freud
Aaron Beck ’42 created cognitive behavioral therapy and transformed the field of mental health
Read More
Image of smiling Aaron Beck

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